21 février 2017

Never-before-seen pictures of Marilyn Monroe

EXCLUSIVE: Never-before-seen pictures of secretly pregnant Marilyn Monroe, who confided to her close friend that her Let's Make Love co-star Yves Montand was the baby's father - not husband Arthur Miller
Article published on 15 february 2017
online Daily Mail

  • Marilyn Monroe's friend Frieda Hull kept the color pictures she took of Marilyn's baby bump private but were sold as part of Frieda's estate last year
  • The pictures were taken in July, 1960 in New York City; Marilyn was 34 years old
  • Marilyn and married French actor Yves Montand began working together on Let's Make Love in February of that year and their affair began soon after
  • The images were the prized possession of Hull, who worked for Pan Am and became close to the star while part of a group of fans known as the Monroe Six
  • Frieda dubbed the pictures  ‘the pregnant slides’ – a reference to a shocking secret the screen siren kept right up until her death
  • Tony Michaels, a friend and neighbor of Frieda's,  bought the images at the ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ Marilyn Memorabilia Auction held by Julien’s Auctions in LA
  • Michaels was told by Frieda that Marilyn  lost the baby. ' It was never made clear whether that was by way of a miscarriage or even an abortion'

Extraordinary photographs purporting to show a secret pregnancy of film icon Marilyn Monroe can today be revealed for the first time.
The world exclusive images of the beautiful Some Like It Hot actress and model were sold as original color slides at an auction in Hollywood in November last year from the estate of well known Monroe confidante Frieda Hull.
But the stunning photos went under the radar, selling for a mere $2,240 with wealthy collectors not aware of their true significance.

Now DailyMail.com can reveal the six unique images were the prized possession of Monroe's loyal friend Hull, which she dubbed the ‘pregnant slides’ – a reference to a shocking secret the screen siren kept right up until her death.
The shots were taken on July 8, 1960, outside Fox Studios in New York after Monroe had completed costume and hair tests for her film The Misfits, starring Clark Gable and Montgomery Clift .

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- Six photos of legendary film icon Marilyn Monroe taken by her friend Frieda Hull on July 8, 1960, outside Fox Studios in New York
- The images clearly show a prominent bump from Monroe’s belly which Hull claimed was evidence the star was in the early stages of pregnancy
- Monroe had wanted a baby more than anything in the world, but that joy was denied her. She had three miscarriages prior to losing this baby, all of which played out in the public eye

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Marilyn and sexy French actor Yves Montand didn't contain their lovemaking to onscreen

The images clearly show a prominent bump from Monroe’s belly which Hull claimed was evidence the star was in the early stages of pregnancy.
And DailyMail.com can reveal the would-be father was not Monroe's then husband, playwright Arthur Miller, it was in fact Italian-French actor Yves Montand – who she met on the set of film Let's Make Love and who she had a very public affair with.

DailyMail.com spoke to Tony Michaels, the man who bought the color slides at the ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ Marilyn Memorabilia Auction held by Julien’s Auctions in LA.
Tony, 56, was a close friend and next door neighbor of Frieda Hull before she passed.
He reveals that Hull had confided in him about Monroe’s secret pregnancy and claims the ‘pregnant slides’ are genuine evidence that she was with child.
And in an extraordinary and tragic Hollywood tale Tony says Monroe kept her pregnancy a secret from the world before 'losing' the baby during a hospital visit.

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The images were the prized possession of Hull, who died in 2014

Tony told DailyMail.com: ‘Frieda was very proud of those slides and she was very proud to keep them a secret until the day she died.
But she told me the story behind them, that Marilyn got pregnant by Yves Montand.
It wasn’t a guess or a presumption, it was something she knew for sure, she was very close to Marilyn.
As far as she was concerned Marilyn was pregnant in the summer of 1960 and the slides prove it.’

Monroe had wanted a baby more than anything in the world, but that joy was denied her.
She had three miscarriages prior to losing this baby, all of which played out in the public eye. The star suffered with a condition called endometriosis her entire life that caused severe menstrual pain and she also struggled to conceive.

‘I suggested she sell the slides and all her other memorabilia so she could afford a better place to live, but again she refused, she said she would never sell out on her friend of ten years Marilyn.

At Julien’s three day auction the Frieda Hull estate had 187 lots on sale.
Rare items from the archive included unseen color photos of Monroe as she sang ‘Happy Birthday’ for President John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden on May 19, 1962 as well as Frieda’s original ticket and program to the gala event; never-before-seen slides of Monroe on location as she filmed the now famous subway skirt-blowing scene for The Seven Year Itch and a large collection of many unpublished photos of Marilyn at the 1955 premiere of East of Eden.

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Hull (circled) , who worked for Pan Am,  became close to the star while part of a group of fans known as the Monroe Six who followed the star from place to place, here the star boarding a plane for Hollywood at Idlewild Airport in New York on February 25, 1956. One of the images in this set way signed by Marilyn: 'To Frieda Love & Kisses

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In January of 1960 when she was filming Let's Make Love with Yves Montand  Marilyn's tummy was flat. But by the beginning of July the star has a visible baby bump

In total, according to Julien’s, ‘The Frieda Hull Marilyn Monroe Photo Archive’ included over 550 color and black and white candid snapshots and photographs, over 150 color slides, nearly 750 movie stills, publicity photos and lobby cards, and personal home movies.
Even the camera Frieda had used to take the 'pregnant slides' as well as dozens of other photos of Marilyn - a Mercury II, model CX 35mm - went up for sale selling for a bid of $3,437.50.
Tony said: 'It was amazing stuff, Frieda had 14 Marilyn autographs, some went as high as $14,000.'

The provenance for all the lots – which sold for $433,000 - was simply that they came as part of the Frieda Hull estate.
Tony recalls: ‘Frieda had even gotten permission from Marilyn to get a couple of locks of hair from her hairdresser.
I’m not talking much, just small lots of hair, together the two locks of hair went for $72,700.
She also had a red scarf that Marilyn had given her in there.
But out of all the lots her prized possession was the six ‘pregnant slides’ as she called them.
'She talked about these to me all the time, they were very important to her.'

Julien's auctioneers decided not to mention the pregnancy claims when selling the slides.
As a result the slides went relatively unnoticed and Tony felt it his duty to snap them up, paying just $2,240 - a bargain given the back story now emerging.
Of course, the astonishing claims which will send Marilyn Monroe historians into a flap, cannot be proven - both Marilyn and Yves Montand are long dead.
But Tony's compelling account of what Frieda had confided in him is difficult to ignore.

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Tony Michaels (left) purchased six photos of the film icon Marilyn Monroe taken by his friend and neighbor Frieda Hull (right)

And today he wants to tell Frieda’s story and how his long time friend was infatuated with Marilyn Monroe.
Speaking from his home in Las Vegas, the high stakes casino croupier told DailyMail.com: ‘I met Frieda over the wall in my back yard around 20 years ago around 1996, she was a neighbor and I introduced myself, she introduced herself and I invited her over for a prize fight.
‘I had ordered a pay for view fight that night and she had mentioned she was a fan of boxing and she came over with a bottle of Jack Daniels and drank me under the table.
She became my drinking partner and we became pretty good friends, she came to all the kid’s Little League games, if they had events, she went to all of them.
She became my kid’s surrogate grandmother because she had no family of her own.’

Frieda was never married and had no children so she ‘adopted’ many of the neighborhood children, including Tony’s two young boys Anthony and Andrew.
She was preceded in death by her brother, Thomas Hull; and her aunt, Elizabeth Hagen, but had no obvious heir when she died.

Tony said: ‘My family became very close to her. Frieda didn’t drive so we would take her grocery shopping or to her doctor’s appointments.
She was very generous, we’d go out to eat and she’d never let us pay for it, she liked to do a little gambling and loved sports, she was a die-hard fan of the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Mets.
She was set in her ways and was never going to change her opinion about anything, She was a brutally honest person.

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Marilyn carried a coat in front of her belly after Frieda took the 'pregnant slides.;

She was very warm hearted, especially to the under dog whether it was children or animals.
She loved Bing Crosby and Judy Garland, but she had an infatuation with Marilyn Monroe.

Frieda is widely known to have been one of the ‘Monroe Six’ – a group of six friends based in New York City who followed the star all over America to take her photo.
As an employee of Pan Am Airlines Frieda was in the enviable position of being able to photograph Monroe on a regular basis.
The group learned of the screen siren's whereabouts by reading movie magazines and asking her hairdresser and would wait outside her hotel or home.

Tony said: ‘Frieda started out as a fan, almost like a stalker, her and five friends.
Then after a while Marilyn would recognize the kids and she came over and asked their names and they started a friendship.
When she would come in to town, for lack of a better word, they would kidnap her, put a scarf on her head and put sunglasses on her and they would go out and do things that Marilyn couldn’t do because she was too famous.
'They called her "Mazzi". It was a code name they had for her, so no one else would know who they were talking about.
She got to be a kid with the Monroe Six, they would go roller skating in Central Park or bike riding, just hang out.

Eventually Monroe came to know each member of the group very well, even inviting them to the Roxbury, Connecticut home she shared with then husband Arthur Miller for a picnic.

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'I would never, I couldn’t capitalize on Marilyn’s death she was my friend,' Frieda told Tony. Her photos and memorobilia of Marilyn was sold as part of her esate when she passed away

Tony added: ‘To show you how gruff Frieda could be at times, the story went that Marilyn came over and took a potato chip off her plate and Frieda snapped and put her in her place, “don’t you ever do that, I don’t care who you are, or who you think you are, that’s rude, don’t do that”. From then on they were pretty close friends.
Every time we would get together, especially if we were drinking, I’d get to hear all the stories from Frieda.
Marilyn gave her a red scarf at one point and she worked for Pan Am so any time Marilyn came in to town Frieda would run out on to the tarmac and start taking pictures.
I told Frieda, you know you have all this stuff why don’t you sell it, you can get a better place.
But she said, “no I would never, I couldn’t capitalize on Marilyn’s death she was my friend”.

Tony lost contact with Frieda after he divorced his wife and moved out of the marital home, but he says his ex-wife and two sons kept in close contact with her.
The best friend of Tony’s sons, a man named Chris who asked for his last name to be left out of this article, was also close to Frieda and helped her in her dying months.
Chris visited her in the hospice and took care of her house, he did a great job of helping her put and Frieda was very thankful,’ said Tony.
As a result Chris was made the executor of the estate and took up Tony on his offer to help catalogue all her Marilyn Monroe memorabilia.
My kids were in the will as was my ex-wife, I was not. Frieda and I kind of had a falling out.
But I was still fond of her and her death was terribly sad.
'I helped catalogue Frieda’s Marilyn Monroe collection because over the years she had shown me most of it, I knew what to look for in her mountain of belongings.
'The first thing on my list was "The pregnant slides".
'She always called them that, she told me the father of the unborn child was Yves Montand, she told me the story of how Arthur got called away and Yves Montand's wife got called away and they stayed together in a Beverly Hills Hotel bungalow and they had an affair.'
Indeed the affair between Monroe and Montand has been widely discussed over the years.

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The camera with which Frieda snapped her pictures of Marilyn

Monroe and playwright husband Arthur Miller were staying in a luxury bungalow at the Beverly Hills Hotel, while the golden couple of French cinema, Simone Signoret and her husband Yves Montand were next door.
Monroe and Montand were starring in the George Cukor movie, Let's Make Love at the time.
Miller and Monroe's unhappy marriage made it easy for the star to stray.
Signoret famously said of Monroe: 'If Marilyn is in love with my husband it proves she has good taste, for I am in love with him too.'

Production on Let's Make Love, a movie starring Monroe and Montand, began in February 1960.
Soon after shooting got underway, their respective partners Miller and Signoret were called away from Los Angeles, leaving Monroe and Montand alone in Miller's Beverly Hills Hotel bungalow.
On March 8, 1960 Monroe received the Golden Globe Award for Best Comedy Actress for Some Like It Hot.
Could this be the night of conception? She would have been exactly four months pregnant in Hull's July 8, 'pregnant slides'.
In May, 1960 Miller found out about the affair and was very upset - his marriage to Monroe began to crumble.

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In later years Montand admitted to the affair. 'I was crazy about my wife, but what can you do?' Montand recalled

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Tony says that Frieda believed that when Marilyn went to hospital for ten days during the filming of The Misfits, it wasn't for acute exhaustion as was claimed at the time, it was for a nervous breakdown and possibly a miscarriage

By August that year they weren't speaking and Monroe moved out of a shared room with Miller at the Mapes Hotel in Reno.
In later years Montand admitted to the affair. 'I was crazy about my wife, but what can you do?' Montand recalled with a very French shrug.
Monroe died two years after Let's Make Love, at age 36.

Tony says he has meticulously researched the time period when Frieda claimed Monroe was pregnant and claims photographs taken at the time show the development of the child between two of her movies.
'Let's Make Love, you can see towards the end that she could be pregnant and she went right in to the The Misfits, Arthur Miller's play that he wrote for her,' he says.
'Then right at the end of The Misfits there's no sign of a pregnancy.'

Tony says that Frieda believed that when Marilyn went to hospital for ten days during the filming of The Misfits, it wasn't for acute exhaustion as was claimed at the time, it was for a nervous breakdown and possibly a miscarriage.
'She just told me Marilyn was pregnant in those photos and I believed her. I don't think she'd tell me that on a hunch, she knew.

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Speaking from his home in Las Vegas, the high stakes casino croupier told DailyMail.com: ‘I met Frieda over the wall in my back yard around 20 years ago around 1996, she was a neighbor and I introduced myself, she introduced herself and I invited her over for a prize fight

'Frieda believed that it wasn't exhaustion that landed her in hospital, she said it was a nervous breakdown and she lost her baby.
'And all she told me was that Marilyn has lost the baby, it was never made clear whether that was by way of a miscarriage or even an abortion, and I never thought to press her on it.'

Tony says he bought the photos because he knew their history as 'The pregnant slides', while no one else did.
'Now I think that the story needs to be told,' he added.
Tony says he kicks himself that he didn't quiz Frieda more on her time with Marilyn.
She would often share gems of information and fascinating stories with him, more often than not when they shared a drink together.
'Frieda worshipped Marilyn, she loved her. She wouldn't give up anything after she died,' he said.

Frieda, originally from Brooklyn, NY, and just four years younger than Monroe, died of natural causes aged 83 in 2014.
She had retired from Pan Am and came out to Las Vegas where she enjoyed the occasional flutter in the Vegas casinos, loved watching sports and lived a solitary life with her lap dog Bobby, who died before she did.
An online obituary posted locally in Las Vegas read: 'Frieda Elizabeth Hull, of Las Vegas, passed June 22, 2014... She was one of the most interesting, wonderful and kind-hearted people the world has ever known.'
The obituary mentioned her bond with her old friend: 'She was a good friend to Marilyn Monroe and loved sharing stories and private photos of the icon.'
And it ended poignantly: 'She lived a long and beautiful life, dying at 83 years old... She was an amazing woman and I could only hope to be half the person she was. "We love you and you will be greatly missed."'

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Posté par ginieland à 20:06 - - Commentaires [6] - Permalien [#]
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19 janvier 2017

FLOW 04/01/2017

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n°14
pays: France
paru le 04 janvier 2017
prix: 7,50 Euros.
article de 6 pages: "Marilyn Monroe: une vie face à l'objectif".

Posté par ginieland à 21:10 - - Commentaires [1] - Permalien [#]
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15 janvier 2017

The Lost Footage of Marilyn Monroe

 logo_thenytimes   The Lost Footage of Marilyn Monroe
That film image of Ms. Monroe’s skirt rising high in a gust of air? It’s a reshoot of a discarded and more risqué scene seldom seen until now.

published in January 13, 2017
by HELENE STAPINSKIJAN
en ligne sur nytimes.com

thenytimes-01-15MARILYN2-superJumbo 
A still of Marilyn Monroe filming “The Seven Year Itch” on the Upper East Side from the found footage of Jules Schulback, a furrier and avid taker of home movies.
 Credit Jules Schulback, via Bonnie Siegler

It happened one night in the late summer of 1954.
Jules Schulback, a New York furrier and taker of home movies, heard that Marilyn Monroe would be on the Upper East Side of Manhattan filming scenes again for her new picture, “The Seven Year Itch.” Two days earlier, Mr. Schulback had taken footage of her with his 16-millimeter Bolex movie camera around the corner from his townhouse apartment.

So he grabbed the camera — the one usually used for family picnics and parades and the stuff of everyday life — and headed over to the subway grate in front of Wright’s Food shop, just down the street from the Trans-Lux movie theater on Lexington Avenue and 52nd Street.
Though it was around 1 a.m., a large crowd had already gathered, mostly newspaper photographers and curious men waiting to see Marilyn. The movie studio and the director, Billy Wilder, had counted on this, inviting the press and the public to drum up buzz for the new movie, which starred Ms. Monroe as “the Girl Upstairs,” who entices a middle-aged executive, played by Tom Ewell, while his wife is away with the kids for the summer.

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Mr. Schulback captured Billy Wilder, the director of “The Seven Year Itch,”
with Ms. Monroe in the background in her famous dress,
accessorized by a white clutch and a red-and-white scarf.
Credit Jules Schulback, via Bonnie Siegler 

In the famous street scene, the two are leaving the movies as Ms. Monroe pauses over a grate to enjoy the breeze from the subway as it blows up her dress on a hot summer night. “Isn’t it delicious ?” she purrs. The breeze came from a large fan under the grate operated by the film’s special effects chief. The night — Sept. 15 — was actually quite chilly. But the stunt worked. It became known as “the shot seen around the world.”

But there was a dark subtext to the comedy. Gathered at that late hour were hundreds of gawkers, almost all men, who catcalled and yelled things like, “Higher! Higher !” as Ms. Monroe’s dress blew up over her head. For two hours, the men watched from surrounding buildings and from the street.

Unfortunately, one of them was her husband, Joe DiMaggio,” Mr. Wilder is quoted as saying in his biography, “Nobody’s Perfect.” “And he didn’t like what he saw, or what everyone else was seeing.
Mr. DiMaggio hadn’t planned on visiting the set that night, and was waiting for his wife at the St. Regis Hotel, where the couple were staying. But the columnist Walter Winchell had persuaded him to come along. Ms. Monroe was not happy her husband had shown up. But he was even more unhappy and angrily stormed off. Later that night the couple had a screaming fight in their room. The next morning, her hairdresser covered up Ms. Monroe’s bruises with makeup. Three weeks later, Ms. Monroe filed for divorce.

Mr. Wilder never used the Lexington Avenue footage and reshot the scene on a closed lot in Hollywood, though photographs of that night appeared everywhere. Except for some brief, grainy shots from a newsreel covering the divorce, footage from that night was never screened.
The footage immediately disappeared,” Mr. Wilder said in the biography. “But one day I’m sure some film scholar will dig it up.


A filmstrip discovered in a shopping bag filled with home movies offers a rare glimpse of
Marilyn Monroe in color in New York.
By JULES SCHULBACK, VIA BONNIE SIEGLER

The story of the night Marilyn Monroe’s white halter-top dress blew up was well known among Jules Schulback’s children, and even among his grandchildren. His granddaughter Bonnie Siegler said he bragged from time to time about his personal film shoot with Marilyn.
He was a real raconteur,” said Ms. Siegler, a graphic designer who runs her own company, Eight and a Half. “I didn’t know if the story was real.” But even though she had never seen it, she often told people that her grandfather had footage of Marilyn Monroe on the subway grate.

Ms. Siegler’s older sister, Rayna Dineen, said her grandfather, whom they called Opi (a German term of endearment), was rarely without his camera. “He would be filming everywhere, all the time.” There were reels of vacations, family picnics, birthday parties and bar mitzvahs. He had even filmed a 12-minute day in the life of his daughters, depicting them waking up, brushing their teeth and going to school.
But the Marilyn story was one of his favorite stories to tell,” Ms. Dineen said.
It was just one of dozens of amazing tales. Mr. Schulback had a long, technicolorful life, one so filled with drama that his Monroe story sometimes seemed like a footnote.

In 1938, Mr. Schulback had argued with his family in Germany that Adolf Hitler was much more dangerous than anyone thought. According to Ms. Siegler, his family believed that Hitler’s hate speech was simply rhetoric, and that he wouldn’t act on anything he was saying. Mr. Schulback, 25 at the time, urged them to pack their bags and leave Berlin with him. But they resisted, opting to wait and see how things developed, never imagining the horror that awaited them and millions of other European Jews.
Mr. Schulback was not taking any chances.

thenytimes-0315MARILYN5-blog427 Mr. Schulback was a furrier by trade. He chronicled his family and the odd serendipitous moment in his neighborhood — such as Marilyn Monroe on location — with his 16-millimeter Bolex movie camera.

In 1938, Jews immigrating to the United States needed a sponsor, someone to take financial responsibility for them. Mr. Schulback sold everything he had, bought an expensive suit, booked passage on the Queen Mary, reserved a room at the Plaza and headed to America to find a sponsor for him and his wife, Edith, and their daughter Helen, who was then a toddler.

He was like: ‘I’m your lost, rich relative. I won’t be a burden.’ But he had no money. He played it,” Ms. Siegler said. He secured a signature, then returned to collect his family, but was stopped trying to enter Nazi Germany by a suspicious border guard. Knowing the Germans were big fans of the 1934 Clark Gable hit, “It Happened One Night,” Mr. Schulback told the guard he was the distributor for Mr. Gable’s new movie. He claimed that if he couldn’t enter the country, neither would the film. “The guy was like, ‘Oh, we love Clark Gable,’ and waved him through,” Ms. Siegler said.

Mr. Schulback grabbed Edith and Helen, again imploring his other relatives to leave, and escaped back to the United States with a few suitcases, claiming to the Nazi immigration officers that his family was going on vacation. The date was Nov. 8, the day before Kristallnacht.

In Berlin, he had been a furrier, and his shop was destroyed that night. His remaining family — four sisters, parents and in-laws — would all perish in the Holocaust.
The United States was good to Mr. Schulback. He and his family lived a happy, successful life in New York, much of it preserved in his home movies.

As a child, Ms. Siegler loved going to her grandfather’s Upper East Side apartment not just because of his great stories and sense of humor, but also because he lived opposite the New York Doll Hospital. From his apartment window, she could see the buckets of doll eyes and doll arms. “It was really intense,” she said.

When Edith had a stroke in the 1970s, she was given only a few weeks to live. But Mr. Schulback, always a man of action, refused to let his wife die in the hospital and took her home. The couple moved into the ground-floor apartment of a building around the corner, and Mr. Schulback became her nurse. “Half her body was paralyzed, she couldn’t speak,” Ms. Siegler said. “But he loved her and took care of her for 26 years until she finally died.

After 35 years in that same apartment, Mr. Schulback — who had been president of the 61st Street Block Association — was forced to leave. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation had bought the townhouse where he lived and the one behind it and wanted to reconfigure the property. So Ms. Siegler and her husband, Jeff Scher, helped move her 92-year-old grandfather to a new place on the other side of Central Park.

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Bonnie Siegler examines film of Ms. Monroe taken by Mr. Schulback,
who was her grandfather, over a light box in her studio.
Credit Ryan Christopher Jones for The New York Times
 

In 2004, in the arduous packing up of Mr. Schulback’s home, the couple came across a big stash of film. It was stored in a back room that the family called “Opi’s fur room,” where Mr. Schulback had once assembled garments from animal pelts for his business. “No one ever wanted to go back there,” Ms. Siegler said. “But when we went in, we found this plastic bag filled with just tons of film, home movies, bought movies and everything mixed together.

Ms. Siegler’s husband, an experimental filmmaker, couldn’t wait to screen the films. He was particularly interested in seeing whether Marilyn and the subway grate footage actually existed. “It was like this family myth,” Mr. Scher said. “So long rumored and never confirmed.”

The same was true for its source material. For decades, innuendo swirled around the Lexington Avenue shoot for “The Seven Year Itch.” Ms. Monroe and Mr. DiMaggio had married that January and had already had a bumpy ride, the Yankee Clipper enraged by her exhibitionism and by rumors of infidelity, according to Lois W. Banner, the author of the 2012 biography “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox.”
She was having an affair with her musical director at the time, and everyone knew about it in the business,” said Dr. Banner, a professor emeritus of history and gender studies at the University of Southern California. So before he even arrived on set, there was tension. “DiMaggio,” Dr. Banner said, “was not happy with Marilyn.”

There are several theories as to why the footage from that night was never used. Some believe the Manhattan shoot was done purely as a publicity stunt, which was made even more sensational when Mr. DiMaggio showed up. Some biographers say the enthusiastic crowd was just too noisy, making the film unusable.
A third theory was that the footage was too risqué and Ms. Monroe wanted to shoot a more demure version, so as not to further infuriate her husband. There was even talk at the time that she wasn’t wearing any underwear. Mr. Wilder tried to put those rumors to rest in his biography. She had put on not just one, but two sets of underwear, he said.

 thenytimes-05-15MARILYN3-master675 
Before the billowing-skirt scene, Mr. Schulback filmed Ms. Monroe in a terry robe
greeting fans and members of the press on the stoop of 164 East 61st Street.

Credit Jules Schulback, via Bonnie Siegler

Dr. Banner said all three reasons quite likely played into the final decision to reshoot. “But the photographs of that night had gone viral by the time the film was being put together,” she said, “and played a great role in her fame.” The skirt-blowing scene used in the finished film is incredibly brief and tame. The image many people have of that moment comes from the press shots and publicity stills in New York, and not from the finished movie.

Back in the pelt room of Mr. Schulback’s apartment, Mr. Scher excitedly gathered up the old metal film canisters. None were labeled, Mr. Scher recalled. Some of the film was off the reel and sitting there like big balls of spaghetti, as if there had been a projector mishap years ago.
Later that night in his studio in the couple’s apartment on West 16th Street, Mr. Scher slowly and carefully wound the film, since some of it was very brittle and in danger of breaking. He did a few repairs and then began looking at it using a light box, spooling it from reel to reel by hand. There were about 50 rolls of 16-millimeter film and around 75 rolls of 8 millimeter.
There were the family outings and parades. The birthdays and bar mitzvahs.
And there, amid the mundane scenes of precious everyday life, was Marilyn Monroe, in crisp, colorful Kodachrome. “This stuff just popped out,” Mr. Scher said. “It was real! Preserved like the home movies are, too. Just these moments in time.”
Mr. Scher could clearly see the actress’s dress billowing up. “Like a parachute with a pair of legs attached,” he said. “It was startling. Like seeing a myth materialize.”
It was a shadow version of lost footage amid home movies of a family that almost certainly wouldn’t have existed had the Schulbacks stayed in Germany.

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Ms. Siegler zeroing in to Ms. Monroe by using a photographer’s loupe.
The Schulback footage has been seldom seen since it was taken in 1954.
Credit Ryan Christopher Jones for The New York Times

Mr. Scher called out to his wife: “It’s really here!” They watched all 3 minutes 17 seconds in amazement.
There was something so magical about it,” Ms. Siegler said. “For years I didn’t know if it was real. I certainly didn’t believe it wholeheartedly. And there it was. It was like the end of the story.
The film starts with a spliced-in intertitle that reads “World Premiere,” Mr. Schulback’s little inside joke.

And then there is Marilyn Monroe, in a white terry robe, coming down the stoop of a white-shuttered building at 164 East 61st Street, between Lexington and Third Avenues. It was the earlier scene — before the subway grate footage — that Mr. Schulback had shot. Cameramen and press photographers are gathered outside as the actress smiles and waves.

Cut to Ms. Monroe in a second-floor window wearing a slip and blow-drying her hair. Mr. Ewell walks down the street and into the building. The film cuts inexplicably to 30 seconds of what must be a Shriners parade in Manhattan, then jumps to another intertitle, which reads “Our Baby.”

And suddenly, there is Ms. Monroe again, this time on the subway grate in that famously fluttering white dress, holding a matching white clutch in her right hand and a red-and-white-striped scarf in her left.

Mr. Schulback was incredibly close, filming right behind Mr. Wilder’s shoulder, stopping to wind his hand-held camera every 25 seconds. Now and then, a silhouette of the director’s arm intrudes into Mr. Schulback’s crystal-clear shot. At one point Mr. Wilder, in a fedora, passes across the frame. Ms. Monroe gets into position and yawns, while the cinematographer sets up the camera. Through a gap in the film crew, Mr. Schulback captures just her face, looking off to the left, serious and unsmiling.

thenytimes-07-15MONROE1-master675-v2 
 Another skirt-goes-wild still from the Schulback footage.
Credit Jules Schulback, via Bonnie Siegler

Then Mr. Ewell is there, chatting with Ms. Monroe, who pushes him into position. The dress flutters again, Ms. Monroe holds it down, bending slightly, smiling and talking to Mr. Ewell, but it flutters up some more and she laughs, her head thrown back. It blows up again, but she doesn’t push it down this time, and it flies up over her head, clearly revealing two pairs of underwear that, because of the bright lights, do not protect Ms. Monroe’s modesty quite as much as she might have liked.

Then, as suddenly as she appeared, Marilyn is gone, and the film reverts to home-movie mode: Edith Schulback walking on the grass at a family outing in the country. It’s like being shaken from some crazy dream, back to reality.
Interest in that moment in film history from more than 50 years ago endures. The new movie musical starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, “La La Land,” makes brief filmic reference to it in the opening number, with a young dancer’s yellow dress blowing up. And a Snickers commercial from the Super Bowl last year stars Willem Dafoe, Eugene Levy and a computer-generated Monroe on the famous set. “It’s that iconic image,” said Dr. Banner, the Monroe biographer. “People are still fascinated by the context in which it all happened.”

After screening the film with her husband, Ms. Siegler immediately told her grandfather that she had found the footage. “I was so excited about it — more for the reason that his story was true.” She shrugged. “But he never had any doubts.” Mr. Schulback moved in 2005 and died six months later.
Ms. Siegler and Mr. Scher made a print and screened it for about 100 people in 2004 at the upstate home of their friends Kurt Andersen and his wife, Anne Kreamer. The two couples had started a small film festival for neighbors and friends, hanging a sheet on the side of a barn and serving popcorn, ice pops and beer.

The people in the audience that summer night had no idea what they were in for.
That scene is one of the most iconic scenes in American cinema,” said Mr. Andersen, an author, radio host and a founder of Spy magazine. “So to have film of it actually being shot, it’s like watching the Zapruder film. It’s just extraordinary.
The crowd that evening sat in silence as Marilyn Monroe’s dress blew up on the side of the barn. “People were gob-smacked,” Mr. Andersen said. “They were like, ‘What did I just see ?’”

That was the only time anyone outside the family had seen the film. Until now.

Correction: January 13, 2017 
 An earlier version of this article misspelled the surname of the writer who screened the Marilyn Monroe home movie in his backyard. He is Kurt Andersen, not Anderson


 > video 1

> video 2 (plans en rapproché)

captures
1954-09-13-ny-tsyi-set-cap_by_jules_schulback-02-4 1954-09-13-ny-tsyi-set-cap_by_jules_schulback-01-3 1954-09-15-ny-tsyi-set-cap_by_jules_schulback-01-3 
> captures dans les articles du blog:
screen caps on the articles in the blog:
13/09/1954 Sur le tournage de The Seven Year Itch 15 - partie 2
13/09/1954 Sur le tournage de The Seven Year Itch 15 - partie 1
15/09/1954 NYC - Sur le tournage de The Seven Year Itch scène 11

02 janvier 2017

Bonne Année 2017

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* * * * * 
Meilleurs Voeux
pour 2017
Bonheur et Santé

* * * * *

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* * * * *
Best Wishes
for 2017
Happiness and Good Health

* * * * *

 bonne_annee_mm_gif_new_year-2 

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11 décembre 2016

Calendriers & Agendas Marilyn Monroe 2017

Petit florilège des Calendriers 2017 dédiés à Marilyn Monroe:

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1/ Marilyn Monroe 2017 Calendar - Milton H Greene - Ed. Browntrout Pub.
18 mois - Prix: 8,80 euros

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2/ Marilyn Monroe 2017 Calendar - Milton H Greene - Ed. Int Browntrout Pub.
18 mois - Prix: 16,15 euros

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3/ Marilyn Monroe 2017 Calendar - Milton Greene - Ed. Day Dream
16 mois - Prix: ? euros

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4/ Marilyn Monroe 2017 Calendar - Milton H Greene - Ed. ACCO Brand
16 mois - Prix: 8,55 euros

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5/ Marilyn Monroe 2017 Calendar - Sam Shaw - Ed. Trends International LLC
16 mois - Prix: 17,15 euros

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6/ Marilyn Monroe 2017 Calendar - Sam Shaw - Ed. Trends International LLC
16 mois - Prix: 16 euros

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7/ Marilyn Monroe - Sam Shaw - Ed. Mead
16 mois - Prix: 10,59 euros

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8/ Marilyn Monroe 2017 Calendar - Ed. Graphique de France
16 mois - Prix: 16 euros

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9/ Marilyn Monroe 2017 Calendar - Ed. Graphique de France
16 mois - Prix: 8,55 euros

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10/ Hollywood Actresses 2017 - Ed. Radio Days
16 mois - Prix: 9,99 euros

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11/ Fox: Filmsof Marilyn Monroe 2017 - Ed. Browntrout Pub.
18 mois - Prix: 18,99 euros

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12/ Marilyn Monroe Calendrier éternel sex-symbol - Ed. Hugo & Images
25 mois - Prix: 19,99 euros

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13/ Marilyn Monroe Calendar 2017 + aimant frigo - Ed. Dream
12 mois - Prix: 19,99 euros

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14/ Marilyn Monroe 2017 - Ed. ML Publishing
11 mois - Prix: 11,50 euros

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15/ Marilyn Monroe 2017 Slim Calendar - Milton Greene - Ed. Browntrout Pub.
12 mois - Prix: 7,95 euros

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16/ Marilyn Monroe 2017-2018 Pocket Planner - Ed. Trends International LLC
12 mois - Prix: 5,34 euros

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Les agendas 2017 :

1/ Marilyn Monroe 2 year monthly planner 2016-2017 - Ed. Acco Brands
2 ans années 2016-2017 - Prix: ? euros

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2/ Marilyn Monroe 2017 Weekly/Monthly Planner - Ed. Day Dream
mois + jours  - Prix: 20,99 euros

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planner02c  planner02d  

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