22 mai 2022

04 et 06/12/1935 - Echanges épistolaires entre Grace et l'Orphelinat

Le 04 décembre 1935, Grace Mc Kee Goddard (devenue tutrice légale de Norma Jeane cette année 1935), écrit une lettre à Mme Dewey, certainement l'interlocutrice (ou directrice) de l'orphelinat de Los Angeles où est placée Norma Jeane (âgée alors de 9 ans) depuis le 13 septembre 1935. Grace demande que l'institution refuse les visites de Ida Bolender à Norma Jeane (qui a élevé Norma Jeane avec son mari jusqu'à ses 7 ans) et cite les noms de ceux et celles autorisées à la voir.

On December 4, 1935, Grace Mc Kee Goddard (who became Norma Jeane's legal guardian this year 1935), writes a letter to Mrs. Dewey, certainly the contact person (or director) of the orphanage in Los Angeles where Norma Jeane (aged then 9 years old) is placed since September 13, 1935. Grace requests that the institution refuse visits from Ida Bolender to Norma Jeane (who raised Norma Jeane with her husband until she was 7 years old) and cite the names of those allowed to see her.

1935-12-04-Grace_letter_to_Mrs_Dewey_of_LA_Orphans-1 

Letter transcription:

December 4, 1935
3107 Barbara Court,
Hollywood, Calif.

Los Angeles Orphan's Home,
815 North El Centro
Hollywood, Calif.

Attention: Mrs Dewey

Dear Mrs. Dewey:

I am very anxious that no one sees or talks to little Norma Jean Baker, unless you have my written permission to do so.

I especially do not want Mrs. Ida Bolender to see her again, as her visits seem to upset the child.

I wish you could instruct every person who is in charge at night or on Sundays, to please see that she is not allowed to visit Norma Jean.

It is quite all right for Elsie or Harvey Giffin, Maude, George or Nell Atkinson, or her Aunt, Olive Monroe, or Mrs. Martin, Olive's Mother, to see her or take her out at any time.

If there is anyone else wishing to see her, I wish you would first get in tough with me here at the studio, Hollywood 3181, or at my home, Granite 4288.

Yours very sincerely,
GRACE MC KEE GODDARD

Traduction de la lettre:

À l'attention de : Mme Dewey

Chère Mme Dewey :

Je suis très inquiète que personne ne voie ou ne parle à la petite Norma Jean Baker, à moins que vous n'ayez ma permission écrite de le faire.

Je ne veux surtout pas que Mme Ida Bolender la revoie, car ses visites semblent bouleverser l'enfant.

Je souhaite que vous puissiez demander à chaque personne responsable la nuit ou le dimanche de veiller à ce qu'elle ne soit pas autorisée à rendre visite à Norma Jean.

Il est tout à fait correct pour Elsie ou Harvey Giffin, Maude, George ou Nell Atkinson, ou sa tante, Olive Monroe, ou Mme Martin, la mère d'Olive, de la voir ou de la sortir à tout moment.

S'il y a quelqu'un d'autre qui souhaite la voir, je souhaite que vous commenciez par entrer en contact avec moi ici au studio, Hollywood 3181, ou chez moi, Granite 4288.

Très sincèrement,
GRACE MC KEE GODDARD


Le 06 décembre 1935, Mme Dewey répond à Grace Mc Kee Goddard, expliquant qu'elle a constaté l'état de perturbation dans lequel se trouve Norma Jeane après la visite de Mme Bolender. Elle accepte la requête de Grace en refusant les visites de Ida Bolender et lui demande de faire un mot à chaque personne autorisée à venir voir Norma Jeane.

On December 6, 1935, Mrs. Dewey responds to Grace McKee Goddard, explaining that she has noticed the state of disturbance in which Norma Jeane finds herself after Mrs. Bolender's visit. She accepts Grace's request by refusing Ida Bolender's visits and asks her to write a word to each person authorized to come and see Norma Jeane.

1935-12-06-LA_Orphans_letter_to_Grace-1 

Letter transcription:

LOS ANGELES ORPHANS HOME SOCIETY
815 North El Centro Avenue
Hollywood 5311

Dec. 6, 1935

Mrs. Grace Mc Kee Goddard,
Hollywood, Calif.,

Dear Mrs. Goddard, -

When Mrs. Bolender was here I told her she should not talk to Norma about her mother.
The physicians have said Mrs. Baker would not get well - that means the child must have first consideration.
Will you please give a letter to each person you want Norma to see and go out with. That would be an extra check. If I just tell the ones who are on duty the names of the ones to see Norma there might be a slip.
Norma is not the same since Mrs. B. visited with her. She doesn't look as happy. When she is naughty she says - "Mrs. Dewey, I wouldn't ever want my Aunt Grace to know I was naughty." She loves you very much.
I'll do as you request. We want to do all we can to make Norma happy, and to please you.
Sincerely yours
(Mrs) SSDewey

Traduction de la lettre:

Chère Mme Goddard,-

Quand Mme Bolender était ici, je lui ai dit qu'elle ne devait pas parler à Norma de sa mère.
Les médecins ont dit que Mme Baker ne guérirait pas - cela signifie que l'enfant doit avoir la priorité.
Pourriez-vous, s'il vous plaît, donner une lettre à chaque personne que vous voulez que Norma voie et qu'ils la prennent avec eux. Ce serait une vérification supplémentaire. Si je dis juste à ceux qui sont de service les noms de ceux qui doivent voir Norma, il pourrait y avoir un faux pas.
Norma n'est plus la même depuis que Mme B. lui a rendu visite. Elle n'a pas l'air aussi heureuse. Quand elle est méchante, elle dit - "Mme Dewey, je ne voudrais jamais que ma tante Grace sache que j'étais méchante." Elle vous aime beaucoup.
Je ferai ce que vous demandez. Nous voulons faire tout ce qui est en notre pouvoir pour rendre Norma heureuse et vous faire plaisir.
Cordialement
(Mme) SSDewey


source Lettres vendues 2 812 $ le 14/11/2019 aux enchères de The Personal Property Of Goodman Basil Espy III


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copyright text by GinieLand.

20 août 2021

12/01/1955, The Australian Women's Weekly

The Australian Women's Weekly

country: Australia
date: 1955, January, 12
content: 4 pages article on Marilyn Monroe
part 1 of a series of articles in 4 parts - "This is my story"

1955-01-12-The_Australian_Women_s_Weekly-cover 

 pays: USA
date: 12 janvier 1955
contenu: article de 4 pages sur Marilyn Monroe
partie 1 sur une série d'articles en 4 parties - "This is my story"

1955-01-12-The_Australian_Women_s_Weekly-p16  1955-01-12-The_Australian_Women_s_Weekly-p17 
1955-01-12-The_Australian_Women_s_Weekly-p18  1955-01-12-The_Australian_Women_s_Weekly-p19 


Article: "This is my story - by Marilyn Monroe"

I thought the people I lived with were my parents. I called them Mamma and Dad. The woman said to me one day: "Don't call me Mama. You're old enough to know better, I'm not related to you in any way. You just board here. Your Mamma's coming to see you tomorrow. You can call her Mama, if you want to."
I said thank you. I didn't ask her about the man I called Dad. He was a letter-carrier. I used to sit on the edge of the bathtub in the morning and watch him shave, and ask him questions - which way was East or South or how many people there were in the world. He was the only one who had ever answered any questions I asked.
The people I had thought were my parents had children of their own. They weren't mean. They were just poor. They didn't have much to give anybody, even their own children. And there was nothing left over for me. I was seven, but I did my share of the work. I washed floors and dishes and ran errands.
My mother called me the next day. She was a pretty woman who never smiled. I'd seen her often before, but I hadn't known quite who she was.
When I said, "Hello, Mama", this time she stared at me. She had never kissed me or held me in her arms or hardly spoken to me. I didn't know anything about her then, but a few years later I learned a number of things.
When I think of her now my heart hurts me twice as much as it used to when I was a little girl. It hurts me for both of us.
My mother was married at fifteen. She had two children (before me) and orked in a movie studio as a film-cutter. Her young husband got mixed up with another woman; there was a big row, and he left home.
While my mother was crying over the collapse of her marriage he sneaked back one day and kidnapped her two babies. My mother spent all her savings trying to get her children back. She hunted them for a long time.
Finnaly she traced them to Kentucky and hitch-hiked to where they were.
She was broke and with hardly any strenght left when she saw her children again. They were living in a fine house. Their father was married again, and well off.
She met him, but didn't ask him for anything, not even to kiss the children she had been hunting for so long. But like the mother in the movie "Stella Dallas", she went away and left them to enjoy a happier life than she could give them.
She came back to Hollywood and went to work as a film-cutter again. I wasn't born yet.
The day my mother called for me at the letter-carrier's house and took me to her rooms for a visit was the first happy day in my life that I remember.
I had visited my mother before. Being sick, and unable to take care of me and keep a job, too, she paid the letter-carrier five dollars a week to give me a home. Every once in a while she brought me to her rooms for a visit.
I used to be frightened when I visited her and spent most of my time in the closet of her bedroom hiding along her clothes. She seldom spoke to me except to say, "Don't make so much noise, Norma." She would say this even when I was lying in bed at night, and turning the pages of a book. Even the sound of a page turning made her nervous.
There was one object in my mother's rooms that always fascinating me. It was a photograph on the wall. There were no other pictures on the walls, just this one framed photograph.
Whenever I visited my mother I would stand looking at this photograph and hold my breath for fear she would order me to stop looking. I had found out that people always ordered me to stop doing anything I like to do.
This time my mother caught me staring at the photograph, but didn't scold me. Instead, she lifted me up in a chair so I could see better.
"That's your father," she said.
I felt so excited I almost fell off the chair. It felt so good to have a father, to be able to look at this picture and know I belonged to him. And what a wonderful photograph it was. He wore a slouch hat a little gaily on the side. There was a lively smile in his eyes, and he had a fin moustache like Clark Gable's. I felt very warm towards the picture.
My mother said: "He was killed in an auto accident in New York city."
I believed everything people told me at that time, but I didn't believe this. I didn't believe he was run over and dead.
I asked my mother what his name was. She wouldn't answer, but went into the bedroom and locked herself in.
Years later I found out what his name was, and many other things about him. The strange thing was that everything I heard about him, even if it wasn't good, made me feel warmer towards him. The night I met his picture, I dreamed of it when I fell asleep. And I dreamed of it a thousand times afterwards.
That was my first happy time, finding my father's picture. And every time I remember how he smiled and how his hat was tipped I felt warm and not alone. When I started a sort of scrapbook a year later the firt picture I put in it was a photograph of Clark Gable because he looked like my father - especially the way he wore his hat and moustache.
And I used to make up daydreams, not about Mr. Gable, but about my father. When I'd be walking home from school in the rain and feeling bad, I'd pretend my father was waiting for me, and that he would scold me for not having worn my rubbers.
I didn't own any rubbers. Nor was the place I walked to any kind of home. It was a place where I worked as a sort of child servant, washing dishes, clothes, floors, running errands, and keeping quiet.
But in a daydream you jump over facts as easily as a cat jump over a fence. My father would be waiting for me, I daydreamed, and I would come into the house smiling from ear to ear.
Once, when I lay in a hospital after having my tonsils out, and running into complications, I had a daydream that lasted a whole week without stopping.
I kept bringing my father into the hospital ward and walking him to my bed, while the other patients looked on with disbelief and envy at so distinguished a visitor; and I kept bending him over my bed, and having him kiss my forehead, and I gave him dialogue, too.
"You're be well in a few days, Norma Jean. I'm very proud of the way you're behaving, not crying all the time like other girls."
And I would ask him to please take off his hat. But I could never get him in my largest, deepest daydream to take his hat off and sit down.
When I went back to my "home", I almost sick again. A man next door chased a dog I had loved, and who had been waiting for me to come home. The dog barked because he was happy to see me. And the man started chasing him, and ordering him to shut up. The man had a hoe in his hand. He swung the hoe. It hit my dog's back and cut him in half.
My mother found another couple to keep me. They were English people, and needed the five dollars a week that went with me. Also, I was large for my age, and could do a lot of work.
One day my mother came to call. I was in the kitchen washing dishes. She sttod looking at me without talking. When I turned around I saw there were tears in her eyes, and I was surprised.
"I'm going to build a house for you and me to live in," she said. "It's going to be painted white and have a backyard." And she went away.
It was true. My mother managed it somehow, out of savings and a loan. She built a house. The English couple and I were both taken to see it. It was small and empty, but beautiful, and was painted white.
The four of us moved in. I had a room to myself. The English couple didn't have to pay rent, just take care of me as they had done before. I worked hard, but it didn't matter. It was my first home.
My mither bought furniture, a table with a white top and brown legs, chairs, beds, and curtains. I heard her say, "It's all on time, but don't worry. I'm working double shift at the studio, and I'll soon be able to pay it off."
One day a grand piano arrived at my home. It was out of condition. My mother had bought it second-hand. It was for me. I was going to be given piano lessons on it. It was a very important piano, despite being a little banged-up. It had belonged to the movie star Fredric March.
"You'll play the piano over here, by the windows," my mother said, "and here on each side of the fireplace there'll be a love seat. And we can sit listening to you. As soon as I pay off a few other things I'll get the love seats, and we'll all sit in them at night and listen to you play the piano."
But the love seats were not to be. Mother had a nervous breakdown, fell seriously ill, and hed to be taken to the hospital. All the furniture disappeared. The white table, the chairs, the beds, and white curtains melted away, and the grand piano, too.
The English couple disappeared also. And I was taken from the newly painted house to an orphan asylum, and given a blue dress and white shirtwaist to wear, and shoes with heavy soles. And for a long time when I lay in bed at night I could no longer daydream about anything.
I never forgot the white painted house and its furniture. Years later, when I was beginning to earn some money modelling, I started looking around for the Fredric March piano. After about a year I found it in an oid auction room, and bought it.
I have it in my home now in Hollywood. It's been painted a lovely white, and it has new strings and plays as wonderfully as any piano in the world.

My mother's best friend was a woman named Grace. I called nearly everybody I knew Aunt or Uncle, but Aunt Grace was a different sort of make-believe relative. She became my best friend, too.
Aunt Grace worked as a film librarian in the same studio as my mother -Columbia Pictures. She was the first person who ever patted my head or touched my cheek. That happened when I was eight. I can still remember how thrilled I felt when her kind hand touched me.
Grace had almost as rough a time as my mother. She lost her job in the studio and had to scrape for living. Although she had no money she continued to look after my mother, who was starting to have mental spells, and to look after me.
At times she took me to live with her. When she ran out of money and had only a half-dollar left for a week's food, we lived on stale bread and milk. You could buy a sackful of old bread at the Holmes Bakery for 25 cents. Aunt Grace and I would stand in line for hours waiting to fill our sacks.
When I looked up at her she would grin at me and say: "Don't worry, Norma Jean. You're going to be a beautiful girl when you grow up. I can feel it in my bones."
Her words made me so happy that the stale bread tasted like cream puffs.

EVERYTHING seemed to go wrong for Aunt Grace. Only bad luck and death ever visited her. But there was no bitterness in my aunt. Her heart remained tender and she believed in God.
Nearly everybody I knew talked to me about God. They always warned me not to offend Him. But when Grace talked about God she touched my cheek and said that He loved me, and watched over me. Remembering what Grace had said, I lay in bed at night crying to myself. The only One who loved me and watched over me was Someone I couldn't see, or hear, or touch.
I used to draw pictures of God, whenever I had time.
In my pictures He looked a little like Aunt Grace, and a little like Clark Gable.
As I grew older I knew I was different from other children because they were no kisses or promises in my life. I often felt lonely and wanted to die. I would try to cheer myself up with daydreams. I never dreamed of anyone loving me as I saw other children loved. That was too big a stretch for my imagination. I compromised my dreaming of my attracting someone's attention (beside God), of having people look at me and say my name.
When my mother was taken to the hospital Aunt Grace become my legal guardian.
I could hear her friends arguing in her room at night when I lay in her bed pretending to be asleep. They advised her against adopting me because I was certain to become more and more of a responsability as I grew older. This was on account of my "heritage", they said.
They talked about my mother and her father and brother and grandmother all beign mental cases, and said I would certainly follow in their footsteps. I lay in bed shivering as I listened. I didn't know what a mental case was, but I knew it wasn't anything good. And I held my breath waiting to hear whether. Aunt Grace would let me become a State orphan or adopt me as her own.
After a few evenings of argument, Aunt Grace adopted me, heritage and all, and I fell asleep happy.
Grace, my new guardian, had no money, and was out looking for a job all the time, so she arranged for me to enter the Orphan Asylum - the Los Angeles Children's Home Society. I didn't mind going there because even in the orphanage I knew I had a guardian outside - Aunt Grace.
It wasn't till later that I realised how much she had done for me. It not for Grace I would have seen sent to a State or COunty institution where there are fewer privileges, such as being allowed to have a Christmas tree, or seeing a movie sometimes.
I lived in the orphanage only off and on. Most of the time I was placed with a family, who were given five dollars a week for keeping me. I was placed in nine different families before I was able to quit being a legal orphan. I did this at 16 by getting married.
The families with whom I lived had one thing in common - a need for five dollars. I was also an asset to have in the house. I was strong and healthy; and able to do almost as much work as a grown-up. And I had learned not to bother anyone by talking or crying.
I learned also that the best way to keep out of trouble was by never complaining ar asking for anything. Most of the families had children of their own, and I knew they always came first. They wore the colored dresses, and owned whatever toys there were, and they were the ones who were believed.
My own costume never varied. It consisted of a faded blue skirt and a white waist. I has two of each, byt since they were exactly alike everyone thought I wore the same outfit all the time. It was one of the things that annoyed people - my wearing the same clothes.
Every second week the home sent a woman inspector out to see how its orphans were getting along in the world. She never asked me any questions, but would pick up my foot and look at the bottom of my shoes. If my shoe bottoms weren't worn through I was reported in a thriving condition.
I never minded coming "last" in these families except on Saturday nights, when everybody took a bath. Water cost money, and changing the water in the tub was an unheard of extravagance. The whole family used the same tub of water. And I was always the last one in.
One family with whom I lived was so poor that I was often scolded for flushing the toilet at night.
"That uses up five gallons of water," my new "uncle" would say, and "five gallons each time can run into money. You can do the flushing in the morning."
No matter how careful I was there were always troubles. Once, in school, a little Mexican boy started howling that I had hit him. I hadn't. And I was often accused of stealing things... a necklace, a comb, a ring, or a nickel. I never stole anything.
When the troubles came I had only one way to meet them -by staying silent. Aunt Grace would ask me when she came to visit how things were. I would tell her alwayds they were fine, because I didn't like to see her eyes turn unhappy.
Some of my troubles were my own fault. I did hit someone occasionally, pull her hair and knock her down. But worse than that were my "character faults" A slightly overgrown child who stares and hardly ever speaks, and who expects only one thing of a home -to be thrown out- can seem like a nuisance to have around.
There was one home I hoped wouldn't throw me out. This is was a house with four children who were watched over by a great-grandmother who was over a hundred years old.
She took care of the children by telling them bloodcurling stories about Indian massacres, scalpings, and burnings at the stake, and other wild doings of her youth. She said she had been a close friend of Buffalo Bill and had fought at his side in hand-to-hand battles with the savage Redskins.
I listened to her stories with my heart in my mouth and did everything I could to make her like me. I laughed the loudest and shivered the most at her stories.
But one d y one of her own great-grandchildren came running to her with her dress torn from her neck. She said I had done it. I hadn't. But the old Indian-fighter wouldn't believe me and I was sent back to the orphanage in disgrace.
Most of my troubles were of this minor sort. In a way they were not troubles at all, because I was used to them. When I look back on those days I remember, in fact, that they were full of all sorts of fun and excitement. I played games in the sun and races. I also had draydreams, not only about my father's photograph but about many other things.
I daydreamed chiefly about beauty. I dreamed of myself becoming so beautiful that people would turn to look at me when I passed. And I dreamed of colors -scarlet, gold, green, white. I dreamed of myself walking proudly in beautiful clothes and being admired by everyone, and overhearing words of praise. I made up the praises and repeated them aloud as if someone else were saying them.
Daydreaming made my work easier. When I was waiting on the table in one of the poverty - stricken, unhappy homes where I lived,I would daydream I was a waitress in an elegant hotel, dressed in a white waitress uniform, and everybody who entered the grand dining-room where I was serving would stop to look at me and openly admire me. 
But I never daydreamed about love.

At 12 I looked like a girl of 17. My body wase developed and shapely. But no one knew this but me. I still wore the blue dress and the blouse the orphanage provided me. They made me look like an overgrown lummox.
I had no money. The other girls rode to school in a bus. I had no nickel to pay for the ride. Rain or shine, I walked the two miles from my "aunt's" home to the school.
I hated the walk. I hated the school. I had no friends.
The pupils seldom talked to me, and never wanted me in their games. Nobody ever walked home with me, or invited me to visit their homes. This was partly because I came from the poor part of the ditrict, where all the Mexicans and Japanese lived. It was also because I couldn't smile at anyone.
Once a shoemaker standing in the doorway of his shop stopped me as I was walking to school.
"What's your name ?" he asked me.
"Norma," I said.
"What's your last name ?" he asked.
I wouldn't give him the name I had - Norma Mortensen - because it wasn't the name of the man with the slouch hat and the Gable moustache. I didn't answer.
"You're a queer kid,' the shoemaker said. "I watch you pass here every day, and I've never seen  you smile. You'll never get anywhere like that."
I went on to school, hating the shoemaker.
In school the pupils often whispered about me and giggled as they stared at me.
They called me dumb and made fun of my orphan's outfit. I didn't mind beign thought dumb. I knew I wasn't.
One morning both my white blouses were torn, and I would be late for school if I stopped to fix them. I asked one of my "sisters" in the house if she could loan me something to wear. She was my age, but smaller. She loaned me a sweater.
I arrived at school just as the maths class was starting. As I walked to my seat everybody stared at me. It was a very tight sweater.
At recess a half dozen boys crowded around me. They made jokes and kept looking at my sweater as if it were a gold mine. I had known for sometime that I had shapely breasts and thought nothing of the fact. The maths class, however, was more impressed.
After school four boys walked home with me, wheeling their bicycles by hand. I was excited but acted as if I nothing unusual were happening.
The next week the shoemaker stopped me again.
"I see you've taken my advice," he said. "You'll find you get along much better if you smile at folks."
I noticed that he, also, looked at my sweater as he talked. I hadn't given it back to my "sister" yet.
The school and the day became different after that. Girls who had brothers began inviting me to their homes, and I met their folks, too. And there were always four or five boys hanging around my house. We played games in the street and stood around talking under the trees till suppertime.
I wasn't aware of anything sexual in their new liking for me and there were no sex thoughts in my mind. I didn't think of my body as having anything to do with sex. It was more like a friend who had mysteriously appeared in my life, a sort of magic friend.
A few weeks later I stood in front of the mirror one morning and put lipstick on my lips. I darkened my blonde eyebrowns. I had no money for clothes, and I had no clothes except my orphan rig and the lone sweater. The lipstick and the mascara were like clothes, however. I saw that they improved my looks as much as if I had put on a real gown.
My arrival in school with painted lips and darkened browns, and still encased in the magic sweater, started everyone buzzing. And the buzzing was not all friendly. All sorts of girls, ont only 13-year-olds, but seniors of 17 and 18, set up shops as my enemies.
They told each other and whoever would listen that I was a drunkard and spent my nights sleeping with boys on the beach.
The scandals were lies. I didn't drink, and I didn't let any boys take liberties. And i had never been on any beach in my life. Bu I couldn't feel angry with the scandal-makers. Girls being jealous of me ! Girls frightened of losing their boyfriends because I was more attractive ! These were no longer daydreams made up to hide lonely hours. They were thruths !
And by summertime I had a real beau. He was 21, and despite being very sophisticated, he thought I was 18 instead of 13. I was able to fool him by keeping my mouth shut, and walking a little fancy. Since taking the maths class by storm a few months ago I had practised walking languorously.
My sophisticated beau arrived at my home one Saturday with the news that we were going swimmings. I rushed into my "sister's" room (the one who was a little smaller than me) to borrow her bathing suit. Standing in front of the bureau mirror I spent an hour putting it on and practising walking in it.
My beau's impatient cries finally brought me out of the bedroom in an old pair of slacks and a sweater. The bathing suit was under them.
It was a sunny day and the sand was crowded with bathers and with mothers and their children. Despite being born and raised only a few miles from the ocean I had never seen it close up before. I stood and stared for a long time. It was like something in a dream, full of gold and lavender colors, blue and foaming white. And there was a holiday feeling in the air that surprised me. Everybody seemed to be smiling at the sky.
"Come on, let's get in," my beau commanded.
"In where ?" I asked.
"In the water," he laughed, thinking I had made a joke.
I thought of my tight bathing suit. The idea of hiding myself in the water while wearing it seemed to me ridiculous. But I said nothing. I sttod watching the girls and women and felt a little disappointed. I hadn't expected that half the feminine population of Los Angeles would be parading the sands with almost nothing on. I thought I'd be the only one.
My beau was getting impatient again so I removed my slacks and sweater and stood in my skimpy suit. I thought, "I'm almost naked," and I closed my eyes and stood still.
My sophisticated boyfriend had stopped nagging me. I started walking slowly across the sand. I went almost to the water's edge and then walked down the beach. The same thing happened that had happened in the maths class, but on a larger scale. It was also much noisier.
Young men whistled at me. Some jumped up from the sand and trotted up for a better view. Even the women stopped moving as I came nearer.
I paid no attention to the whistles and whoops. In fact, I didn't hear them. I was full of a strange feeling, as if I were too people. One of them was Norma Jean from the orphanage who belonged to nobody. The other was someone whose name I didn't know. But I knew where she belonged. She belonged to the ocean and the sky and the whole world.
BUT nothing happened out of the great vision that smote me on the beach. I went back to my blue dress and white blouse and returned to school. But instead of learning anything I grew more and more confused. So did the school. It had no way of coping with a thirteen year old siren.
Why I was a siren, I hadn't the faintest idea. I didn't want to be kissed and I didn't dream of having a duke or a movie star fall in love with me. The thruth was that with all my lipstick and mascara and precocious curves, I was as unsensual as a fossil. But I seemed to affect people quite otherwise.
The boys took to wooing me as if I were the only girl in the district. I used to lie awake at night wondering why they chased after me. Occasionally I let one of them kiss me to see if there was anything interesting in the performance.
There wasn't.
I decided finally that the boys came after me because I was an orphan and had no parents to look after me. This decision made me cooler than ever to my train of admirers. But neither coolness nor disdain nor "get out of here," "don't bother me," none of my frozen attitudes changed the pictures.
The boys continued to pursue me as if I were a vampire with a rose in my teeth.
The girl pupils were another problem, but one I could understand. They disliked me more and more as I grew older. Now, instead of being accused of stealing combs, nickels, or necklaces, I was accused of stealing young men.
Aunt Grace suggested a solution for my troubles.
"You ought to get married," she said.
"I'm too young," I said. I was still 15.
"I don't think you are," Aunt Grace laughed.
"But there's nobody wants to marry me," I said.
"Yes there is," she said.
"Who ?" I asked.
"Jim," said my aunt.
Jim was Mr. Dougherty. He lived near me. He was good-looking, polite, and fullgrown.
"But Jim is stuck on my 'sister'," I told her.
"It was you he took to the football game," Aunt Grace said, "not her."
"It was awful boring," I said. "I hate football games."
"How do you feel about Jim ?" she asked.
"I don't feel anything," I said, "He's like the others, except he's taller and more polite."
"That's a fine quality in a man," said Aunt Grace, "politeness".
The "aunt" and "uncle" with whom I was living - my ninth set of relatives - helped me to make up my mind. They were going to move. This meant I'd have to go back and live in the orphanage tii they unloaded me on another family.
I married Jim Dougherty.
The first effect marriage had on me was to increase my lack of interest in sex. My husband either didn't mind this or wasn't aware of it. We were both too young to discuss such an embarrassing topic openly.
Jim's folks didn't care much for me, for which I couldn't blame them. I was a peculiar wife. I disliked grown-ups. I preferred washing dishes to sitting and talking to them.
As sson as they started playing cards or having arguments I would sneak out of the house and join the kids in the street. I liked boys and girls younger than me. I played games with them until my husband came out and starting calling me.
My marriage brought me neither happiness nor pain. My husband and I hardly spoke to each other. This wasn't because we were angry. We had nothing to say. I've seen many married couples since that were just like Jim and me.
They were usually the more enduring kind if marriages, the ones that were pickled in silence.
The most important thing my marriage did for me was to end forever my status as orphan. I felt grateful to Jim for this. He was the Lochinvar who rescued me from my blue dress and white blouse.
My various advisers had been right about marriage putting an end to my popularity as a siren. The boys did not come after Mrs. Dougherty. The rose seemed to have fallen out of her teeth.
Jim joined the Merchant Marine in 1944, and I went to work in a parachut factory. The great war was on. Battles were being fought. Juke boxes were playing. People's eyes were lit up.

I WORE overalls in the factory. I was surprised that they insisted on this. Putting a girl in overalls is like having her work in tights, particularly if a girl knows how to wear them. As parachute inspector I was back in the maths class again. The men buzzed around me just as the high school boys had done.
I have noticed since that men usually leave married women alone, and are inclined to treat all wives with respect. This is no great credit to married women. Men are always ready to respect anything that bores them.
The reason most wives, even pretty ones, wear such a dull look is because they're respected so much.
Maybe it was my fault that the men in the factory tried to date me and buy me drinks. I didn't feel like a married woman. I was completely faithful to my overseas husband but that wasn't because I loved him or even because I had moral ideas. My fidelity was due to my lack of interest in sex.
Jim finally came home and we lived together again. It's hard to remember what you said, did, or felt when you were bored.
Jim was a nice husband. He never hurt me or upset me - except on one subject. He wanted a baby.
The thought of having a baby stood my hair on end. I could see it only as myself, another Norma Jean in an orphanage. Something would happen to me. Jim would wander off. And there would be this little girl in the blue dress and white blouse living in her "aunt's" home, washing dishes, being last in the bath water on Saturday night.
I couldn't explain thsi to Jim. After he fell asleep beside me at night I would lie awake crying. I didn't quite know who it was that cried, Mrs. Dougherty or the child she might have. It was neither.
It was Norma Jean, still alive, still alone, still wishing she were dead.
I feel different about having a child now. It's one of the things I dream of. She won't be any Norma Jean now. And I know how I'll bring her up - without lies. Nobody will tell her lies about anything. And I'll answer all her questions. It I don't know the answers I'll go to an encyclopedia and look them up. I'll tell her whatever she wants to know - about love, about sex, about everything !
But chiefly, no lies ! No lies about there being a Santa Claus, or about the world being full of noble and honorable people all eager to help each other and do good to each other. I'll tell her there are honor and goodness in the world, the same as there are diamonds and radium.
This is the end of my story of Norma Jean. Jim and I were divorced. And I moved into a room in Hollywood to live by myself. I was 19 and I wanted to find out who I was.
When I just wrote "This is the end of Norma Jean," I blushed as if I had been caught in a lie. Because this sad, bitter child who grew up too fast is hardley ever out of my heart. With success all around me I can still feel her frightened eyes looking out of mine.
She keeps saying: "I never lived, I was never loved," and often I get confused and think it's I who am saying it.
I had been a sort of "child bride." Now I was a sort of "child widow." Many things seemed to have happened to me. Yet, in a way, nothing had happened, except that I was 19 instead of nine, and I had to look for my own job.
The sort of instinct that leads a duck to water led me to photographer's studios. I got jobs posing for ads, and layouts. The chief trouble was that the photographers were also looking for work. Finding a photographer who wanted me as a model was easier than finding one who could pay more than promises.
But I made enough money for room rent and a meal a day, although sometimes I fell behind on my eating. It didn't matter, though. When you're young and healthy a little hunger isn't too important.
WHAT mattered more was being lonely. When you're young and healthy loneliness can seem more important than it is.
I looked at the streets with lonely eyes. I had no relatives to visit or chums to go places with.
My aunt Grace and Aunt Anna were working hard to keep food in their kitchens and the rent paid. When I called on them they felt sorry for me and wanted to help me. I knew how they neede the half-dollars in their purses, so I stayed away unless I had money and could take them to a restaurant or the movies.
I had only myself. When I walked home from the restaurant in the evening with the streets lighted up and a crowd on the sidewalks, I used to watch the people chatting to each other and hurrying some place. I wondered where they were going and how it felt to have places to go or people who knew you.
There were always men willing to help a girl be less lonely. They said "Hi! baby," when you passed. When you didn't turn to look at them they sneered, "Stuck up, eh ?"
I never answered them. Sometimes I felt sorry for them. They seemed as lonely as I was. These lonely street-corner wolves "Hi babying" me sounded like voices out of the past calling me to be Miss Nobody again.
One evening I met a man in a restaurant.
"This town has sure changed a lot in the past 40 years," he said. "Used to be Indians right where we're walking."
"Did you use to live here 40 years ago," I asked.
"Yes, ma'am," he said. "How old do you think I am ?"
"About 60," I said.
"Seventy-seven my last birthday," he corrected me. "The name is Bill Cox. You going anywhere ?"
I said I wasn't.
"Why not to drop in on me and the missus ?" he said. "Live right near here. I'm taking her home a sandwich."
I became a friend of Bill Cox and his wife. The three of us would walk together in the streets at night sometimes.
He talked chiefly about the Spanish-American War, in which he had been a soldier, and about Abraham Lincoln. These two topics were very exciting him.
I had never heard of the Spanish-American War. I must have been absent from school the week it was studied by my history class.
Walking with Bill Cox in the lighted Hollywood streets and hearing stories about the Spanish-American War and Abraham Lincoln, I didn't feel lonely and the sidewalk wolves didn't "Hi-baby" me.
One evening Bill Cox told me he was going back to Texas.
"I'm felling sick," he said, "and I'd hate to die any place except in Texas."
He sent me a few letters from texas. I answered them. Then a letter came from his wife saying Bill Cox had died in an Old Soldier's Home in Texas. I read the letter in the restaurant where I had met him, and I walked home crying. The Hollywood streets seemed lonelier than ever without Bill Cox, his favorite war, and Abraham Lincoln.

YOU sit alone. It's night outside. Automobiles roll down Sunset Boulevard like and endless string of beetles. Their rubber tyres make a purring, highclass noise. You're hungry and you say "It's good for my waistline not to eat. There's nothing finer than a washboard belly."
And you say your speech lesson out loud:
"Ariadne arose from her couch in the snows in the Akrakaronian mountains." Followed by "Hail to thee, blithe spirit, bird thou never wert."
The lessons are a dollar apiece. For a dollar you could buy a pair of stockings and a hamburger will never make you an actress. Speech lessons may. So with bare legs and an empty stomach you hit the consonants of, "Hail to thee, blithe spirit."
I used to think as I looked out on the Hollywood night, "There must be thousands of girls sitting alone like me dreaming of becoming a movie star. But I'm not going to worry about them. I'm dreaming the hardest."
You don't have to know anything to dream hard. I knew nothing about acting. I had never read a book about it, or tried to do it, or discussed it with anyone. I was ashamed to tell the few people I knew of what I was dreaming. I said I was hoping to make a living as a model. I called on all the model agencies and found a job now and then.
But there was this secret in me -acting. It was like being in gaol and looking at a door that said "This Way Out."
Acting was something golden and beautiful. It was like the bright colors Norma Jean used to see in her daydreams. It wasn't an art. It was like a game you played that enabled you to step out of the dull world you knew into worlds so bright they made your heart leap to think of them.
When I was eight I used to look out of the orphan asylum window at night and see a big lighted-up sign that read: "R.K.O. Radio Pictures." I hated the sign. It reminded me of the smell of glue. My mother had one taken me to the studio where she worked. The smell of the wet film she cut and spliced had stuck to my nose.
That was Norma Jean's nose. Norma Dougherty, the aspiring actress, had no such fellings towards studio signs. To her they were the beacons of a Promised Land - the land of Ingrid Bergman, Claudette Colbert, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Olivia De Havilland, Gene Tierney, Jennifer Jones.
That's the way it was when I sat alone in my Hollywood room. I went to sleep hungry and woke up hungry. And I thought all actors and actresses were geniuses sitting on the front port of Paradise - the movies.

To be continued

Next week
. Marilyn Monroe writes about a Hollywood you don't see on the screen - "the Hollywood of failure... where we were the prettiest tribe of panhandlers that ever overan a town... and around us were the wolves."


Traduction
"C'est mon histoire - par Marilyn Monroe"
 
Je croyais que les gens avec qui je vivais étaient mes parents. Je les appelais maman et papa. La femme me dit un jour : "Ne m'appelle pas maman. Tu es assez grande pour savoir, je ne suis en aucun cas apparentée à toi. Tu es juste de passage ici. Ta maman vient te voir demain. Tu pourras l'appeler maman, si tu veux."
Je lui ai dit merci. Je ne lui ai pas posé de questions sur l'homme que j'appelais papa. Il était facteur. J'avais l'habitude de m'asseoir sur le bord de la baignoire le matin pour le regarder se raser et lui poser des questions - où était l'Est ou le Sud ou combien de gens il y avait dans le monde. Il était la seule et unique personne à toujours répondre à mes questions.
Les gens que je pensais être mes parents avaient eux-mêmes des enfants. Ils n'étaient pas méchants. Ils étaient juste pauvres. Ils n'avaient pas grand-chose à donner à qui que ce soit, pas même à leurs propres enfants. Et il ne restait alors rien pour moi. J'avais sept ans, mais j'ai fait ma part du travail. Je lavais par terre, faisais la vaisselle et les courses.
 
Ma mère est venue me voir le lendemain. C'était une jolie femme qui ne souriait jamais. Je l'avais souvent vue auparavant, mais je ne savais pas vraiment qui elle était.
Quand je lui ai dit cette fois là "Bonjour maman", elle m'a regardé fixement. Elle ne m'avait jamais embrassée ni tenue dans ses bras, ni à peine parlé. Je ne savais rien d'elle à l'époque, mais quelques années plus tard, j'ai appris un certain nombre de choses.
Quand je pense à elle maintenant, mon cœur me fait deux fois plus mal qu'au temps où jétais une petite fille. Ça me fait mal pour nous deux.
Ma mère s'est mariée à quinze ans. Elle a eu deux enfants (avant moi) et a travaillé dans un studio de cinéma en tant que monteuse de pellicules. Son jeune mari a fréquenté une autre femme; il y a eu une grande dispute, et il a quitté la maison. 
Alors que ma mère pleurait sur l'effondrement de son mariage, il est revenu en douce un jour et a enlevé ses deux bébés. Ma mère a dépensé toutes ses économies pour essayer de récupérer ses enfants. Elle les a cherchés pendant longtemps.
Finalement, elle a retrouvé leur trace dans le Kentucky et a fait de l'auto-stop pour y aller.
Elle était fauchée et à bout de forces quand elle a revu ses enfants. Ils vivaient dans une belle maison. Leur père s'était remarié etgagnait bien sa vie.
Elle a discuté avec lui, mais ne lui a rien demandé, pas même d'embrasser ses enfants qu'elle cherchait depuis si longtemps.
Mais comme la mère dans le film "Stella Dallas", elle est repartie et les a laissés profiter d'une vie plus heureuse qu'elle ne pouvait leur offrir. 
Elle est revenue à Hollywood et est retournée travailler comme monteuse de pellicules. Je n'étais pas encore née.
Le jour où lors de l'une de ses visites, ma mère est venue me chercher chez le facteur pour m'emmener chez elle, fut le premier jour heureux de ma vie dont je me souvienne.
J'avais déjà été chez ma mère. Étant malade et incapable de s'occuper de moi, et comme elle travaillait, elle payait le facteur cinq dollars par semaine pour que je puisse bénéficier d'un foyer. De temps en temps, elle venait me chercher.
J'avais peur quand j'allais chez elle et passais le plus clair de mon temps dans le placard de sa chambre à me cacher le long de ses vêtements. Elle me parlait rarement, sauf pour me dire : "Ne fais pas autant de bruit, Norma." Elle disait cela même quand j'étais allongée dans mon lit le soir et que je feuilletais un livre. Rien que le bruit d'une page qu'on tourne la rendait nerveuse.
Il y avait quelque chose dans sa chambre qui m'avait toujours fasciné. C'était une photographie accrochée au le mur. Il n'y avait pas d'autres photos sur les murs, juste cette photo encadrée.
Chaque fois que je rendais visite à ma mère, je restais debout à regarder cette photo et retenais mon souffle de peur qu'elle ne m'ordonne d'arrêter de regarder. Je m'étais rendu compte que les gens m'ordonnaient toujours d'arrêter de faire ce dont j'avais envie.
Ce jour là, ma mère m'a surprise en train de regarder la photo, mais ne m'a pas grondé. Au lieu de cela, elle m'a soulevé sur une chaise pour que je puisse mieux voir.
"
C'est ton père", a-t-elle dit.
Je me sentais tellement excitée que j'ai failli tomber de la chaise. C'était si bon d'avoir un père, de pouvoir regarder cette photo et savoir que je lui appartenais. Et quelle magnifique photo c'était. Il portait un chapeau mou, cavalièrement incliné sur un côté. Son regard était vif et souriant, et il avait une fine moustache comme celle de Clark Gable. Je me sentais réconfortée à voir cette image.
Ma mère a dit : "Il a été tué dans un accident de voiture à New York." D'ahbitude, je croyais toujours ce que les gens me disaient, mais cette fois-là, je n'y croyais pas. Je ne croyais pas qu'il avait été renversé et qu'il était mort.
J'ai demandé à ma mère comment il s'appelait. Elle ne répondit pas, mais alla s'enfermer dans sa chambre.
Des années plus tard, j'ai découvert son nom et bien d'autres détails à son sujet. Le plus étrange était que tout ce que j'entendais à son sujet, même si ce n'était pas glorieux, me faisait me sentir encore plus chaleureuse envers lui. La nuit où j'ai vu sa photo pour la première fois, j'en ai rêvé en m'endormant. Et par la suite, j'en ai rêvé des milliers de fois.
Ce fut le premier moment heureux de ma vie, celui de découvrir la photo de mon père. Et chaque fois que je me rappelais de son sourire et comment son chapeau était incliné, je me sentais réconfortée et plus seule. Un an après, quand j'ai commencé à faire un album photos, la première photo que j'ai mise dedans était une photo de Clark Gable parce qu'il ressemblait à mon père - surtout la façon dont il portait son chapeau et sa moustache.
Et j'avais l'habitude de rêvasser, non pas de M. Gable, mais de mon père. Quand je rentrais de l'école à pied sous la pluie et que je me sentais déprimée, je faisais comme si mon père m'attendait et qu'il me grondait de ne pas avoir porté mes bottes en caoutchouc.
Je ne possédais aucune bottes en caoutchouc. Ce n'était pas non plus l'endroit où je rentrais chez moi. C'était un endroit où je travaillais comme une sorte d'enfant domestique, lavant la vaisselle, la lessive, les sols, faisant des courses, tout en gardant le silence.
Mais dans nos rêveries, on saute par-dessus les faits aussi facilement qu'un chat saute par-dessus une clôture. Je rêvais que mon père m'attendrait et que j'entrais dans la maison avec un immense sourire d'une oreille à l'autre. Un jour que j'étais à l'hôpital après l'opération d'ablation de mes amygdales suivies de complications, je me suis laissée emportée par mes rêves qui ont duré une semaine entière sans s'arrêter.
Je ne me lassais pas d'imaginer que mon père venait me voir à l'hôpital, s'approchant de mon lit, pendant que les autres patients regardaient avec incrédulité et envie un visiteur si distingué; et il se penchait sur mon lit pour m'embrasser sur le front, tout en discutant avec lui aussi.
"Tu seras guérie dans quelques jours, Norma Jean. Je suis très fier de la façon dont tu te comportes, ne pleure pas tout le temps comme les autres petites filles."
Et je lui demandais de bien vouloir enlever son chapeau. Mais même dans mes pensées de rêveries les plus folles et des plus intenses, je n'ai jamais réussi à lui faire enlever son chapeau, ni qu'il s'asseye à côté de moi.
Quand je suis rentrée "chez moi", j'ai failli retomber malade. Un voisin s'est mis à chasser un chien que j'aimais tellement et qui attendait mon retour. Le chien aboyait parce qu'il était content de me voir. Et l'homme s'est mis à le chasser en lui hurlant de la boucler. L'homme avait une houe à la main. Il a balancé la houe qui a touché le dos de mon chien et l'a coupé en deux.
Ma mère a trouvé un autre couple pour me garder. C'était des anglais et avaient besoin des cinq dollars par semaine pour me garder. De plus, j'étais grande pour mon âge, et je pouvais faire beaucoup de travail.
Un jour, ma mère est venue me voir. J'étais dans la cuisine en train de faire la vaisselle. Elle resta debout à me regarder sans parler. Quand je me suis retournée, j'ai vu qu'elle avait les larmes aux yeux, et j'ai été surprise. "Je vais construire une maison pour que toi et moi y vivions", a-t-elle déclaré. "Elle sera peinte en blanc et aura une arrière-cour." Et elle s'en alla.
C'était vrai. Ma mère s'est débrouillée d'une manière ou d'une autre, avec ses économies et en faisant un prêt. Elle a construit une maison. Le couple anglais et moi avons tous deux été emmenés pour la voir. Elle était petite et vide, mais belle, et était peinte en blanc.
Nous y avons emménagé tous les quatre. J'avais une chambre pour moi toute seule. Le couple anglais n'avait pas à payer de loyer, il s'occupait juste de moi comme ils le faisaient avant. Je travaillais dur, mais ce n'était pas grave. C'était mon premier foyer. Ma mère a acheté des meubles, une table avec un dessus blanc et des pieds marron, des chaises, des lits et des rideaux. Je l'ai entendue dire : "Tout est à crédit, mais ne t'inquiète pas. Je travaillerai deux fois plus au studio et je pourrai bientôt tout payer."
Un jour, un piano à queue est arrivé à la maison. Il était hors d'état. Ma mère l'avait acheté d'occasion. C'était pour moi. On me donnerait des leçons de piano avec. C'était un piano très important, même s'il était un peu cabossé. Il avait appartenu à la star de cinéma Fredric March.
"Tu joueras du piano ici, près des fenêtres", dit ma mère, "et ici, de chaque côté de la cheminée, il y aura une causeuse. Et nous pourrons nous asseoir à t'écouter. Dès que j'aurai fini de payer les autres choses, j'achèterai les causeuses, et nous nous assiérons tous dessus la nuit pour t'écouter jouer du piano."
Mais il n'y eut jamais de causeuses. Maman a fait une dépression nerveuse, est tombée gravement malade et a dû être emmenée à l'hôpital. Tous les meubles ont disparu. La table blanche, les chaises, les lits et les rideaux blancs, ainsi que le piano à queue.
Le couple anglais a disparu aussi. Et j'ai quitté ma maison fraîchement repeinte pour être emmenée dans un orphelinat, où on m'a donné une robe bleue et une blouse blanche à porter, et des chaussures à grosses semelles. Et pendant longtemps, quand j'était couchée la nuit, je ne pouvais plus rêver de rien. Je n'ai jamais oublié la maison peinte en blanc et ses meubles. Des années plus tard, alors que je commençais à gagner un peu d'argent en tant que mannequin, j'ai commencé à chercher le piano Fredric March. Environ un an après, je l'ai retrouvé dans une salle des ventes aux enchères et je l'ai acheté.
Je l'ai chez moi maintenant à Hollywood. Il a été peint d'un beau blanc, et il a de nouvelles cordes et joue aussi merveilleusement que n'importe quel autre piano au monde.

La meilleure amie de ma mère s'appelait Grace. J'appelais presque toutes les personnes que je connaissais par ma 'tante' ou mon 'oncle', mais tante Grace était différente de tous mes autres pseudo-parents. Elle est aussi devenue ma meilleure amie.
Tante Grace travaillait comme documentaliste dans le même studio que ma mère, à la Columbia. Elle a été la première personne à m'avoir tapoté la tête ou caressé ma joue. C'est arrivé quand j'avais huit ans. Je me souviens encore à quel point j'ai été ravie lorsque sa main bienveillante m'a touchée.
Grace a eu des moments presque aussi difficiles que ma mère. Elle a perdu son travail au studio et a dû s'escaner pour vivre. Bien qu'elle n'ait pas d'argent, elle a continué à s'occuper de ma mère, qui commençait à avoir des troubles mentaux, et à s'occuper de moi. Parfois, elle m'emmenait chez elle. Quand elle a manqué d'argent et qu'il ne lui restait plus qu'un demi-dollar pour manger dans la semaine, nous vivions de pain rassis et de lait. On pouvait acheter un sac de pain rassis à la boulangerie Holmes pour 25 centimes. Tante Grace et moi faisions la queue pendant des heures pour remplir nos sacs.
Quand je la regardais, elle me souriait et me disait: "Ne t'inquiète pas, Norma Jean. Tu seras une belle fille quand tu seras grande. Je peux le sentir au plus profond de moi".
Ses mots me rendaient si heureuse que le pain rassis avait le goût de choux à la crème.

TOUT semblait mal tourner pour tante Grace. Seules la malchance et la mort ont fait parti de sa vie. Mais il n'y avait aucune amertume chez ma tante. Son cœur restait tendre et elle croyait en Dieu.
Quasiment toutes les personnes que je connaissais me parlaient de Dieu. On m'a toujours averti de ne pas l'offenser. Mais quand Grace me parlait  de Dieu, elle caressait ma joue et me disait qu'Il m'aimait et veillait sur moi.
Me rappelant de ce que Grace m'avait dit, je restai dans mon lit la nuit à pleurer. LE seul qui m'aimait et veillait sur moi était quelqu'un que je ne pouvais ni voir, ni entendre, ni toucher.
J'avais l'habitude de dessiner des portraits de Dieu, chaque fois que j'en avais le temps.
Dans mes dessins, il ressemblait un peu à Tante Grace et un peu à Clark Gable.
En grandissant, je savais que j'étais différente des autres enfants parce qu'il n'y avait ni baisers ni promesses dans ma vie. Je me sentais souvent seule et je voulais mourir. J'essayais de me remonter le moral avec mes rêveries. Je ne rêvait jamais que quelqu'un m'aime comme j'ai vu d'autres enfants aimés. C'était trop d'imagination pour mes rêveries. Je me contentais de rêver d'attirer l'attention de quelqu'un (Dieu mis à part), des gens qui me regarderaient et prononceraient mon nom.
Quand ma mère a été emmenée à l'hôpital, Tante Grace est devenue ma tutrice légale. Je pouvais entendre ses amis discuter dans sa chambre la nuit quand j'étais allongé dans mon lit en faisant semblant de dormir. Ils lui ont déconseillé de m'adopter car il était certain que je deviendrai une responsabilité de plus en plus lourde à gérer en grandissant. C'était à cause de mon « héritage », disaient-ils. Ils ont parlé de ma mère, de son père, de son frère et de sa grand-mère, tous atteints de troubles mentaux, et ont dit que je suivrais certainement leurs traces. J'étais allongée sur le lit, frissonnant en les écoutant. Je ne savais pas ce qu'était un trouble mental, mais je savais que ce n'était rien de bon. Et je retenais mon souffle en attendant de savoir si Tante Grace me laisserait devenir orpheline d'État ou m'adopterait comme da propre enfant. Après quelques soirées de discussions, Tante Grace m'a adoptée, héritage ou autre, et je me suis endormie heureuse. Grace, ma nouvelle tutrice, n'avait pas d'argent et passait son temps à chercher du travail, alors elle s'est arrangée pour que j'entre à l'orphelinat - celui du Los Angeles Children's Home Society. Cela ne me dérangeait pas d'y aller parce que même à l'orphelinat, je savais que j'avais une tutrice à l'extérieur - tante Grace.
Ce n'est que plus tard que j'ai réalisé tout ce qu'elle avait fait pour moi. Sans Grace, j'aurais été envoyée dans une institution d'État ou de comté où il y a moins de privilèges, comme l'arbre de Noël ou de voir un film de temps en temps.
J'ai vécu dans l'orphelinat seulement par intermittence. La plupart du temps, j'étais placée dans une famille qui recevait cinq dollars par semaine pour me garder. J'ai été placée dans neuf familles différentes avant de pouvoir mettre un terme au statut légal d'être orpheline. Je l'ai fait à 16 ans en me mariant.
Les familles avec lesquelles je vivais avaient un point commun : le besoin d'avoir les cinq dollars. J'étais aussi un atout à avoir dans une maison. J'étais forte et en bonne santé ; et capable d'abattre autant de travail qu'un adulte. Et j'avais appris à ne déranger personne en parlant ou en pleurant.
J'ai aussi appris que la meilleure façon d'éviter les ennuis était de ne jamais se plaindre, ni de demander quoi que ce soit. La plupart des familles avaient leurs propres enfants et je savais qu'ils passaient toujours en premier. Ils portaient des vêtements colorés et possédaient toutes sortes de jouets, et c'étaient toujours eux que l'on croyait.
Mon habillement n'a jamais varié. Il se composait d'une jupe bleu délavée et d'une blouse blanche. J'en avais deux exemplaires de chaque, parfaitement identiques, si bien que tout le monde pensait que je portais toujours les mêmes vêtements. C'était l'une des choses qui agaçaient les gens - le fait d'être toujours habillée pareil.
Tous les quinze jours, le foyer envoyait une inspectrice pour voir comment ses orphelins se débrouillaient dans le monde. Elle ne me posait jamais de questions, mais soulevait mon pied pour regarder la semelle de mes chaussures. Si mes semelles n'étaient pas usées, elle signalait que j'étais placée dans de bonnes conditions.
Cela ne me dérangeait pas d'être la « dernière » dans ces familles, sauf le samedi soir, quand tout le monde prenait un bain. L'eau coûtait cher, et changer l'eau de la baignoire était une extravagance inouïe. Toute la famille utilisait la même baignoire d'eau. Et je passais toujours en dernier.
Une famille avec laquelle je vivais était si pauvre que j'étais souvent réprimandée pour avoir tiré la chasse d'eau la nuit.
"Cela consomme 15 litres d'eau", pouvait dire mon nouvel "oncle", et "15 litres à chaque fois, ça coûte de l'argent. Tu peux tirer la chasse d'eau que le matin."
Peu importe que je sois prudente ou non, il y avait toujours des problèmes. Une fois, à l'école, un petit garçon mexicain s'est mis à hurler que je l'avais frappé. Je ne l'avais pas fait. Et j'ai souvent été accusée d'avoir volé des choses... un collier, un peigne, une bague ou une pièce de cinq cents. Je n'ai jamais rien volé. Lorsque les problèmes surgissaient, je n'avais qu'un seul moyen de les confronter - c'était de garder le silence. Quand elle venait me voir, Tante Grace me demandait comment ça se passait. Je lui disais toujours que tout allait bien, parce que je n'aimais pas voir son regard empli de tristesse.
Certains de mes problèmes étaient de ma faute. De temps en temps, je frappais une fille, je lui tirais les cheveux et je la jetait par terre. Mais le pire cela était mes "défauts de caractère". Une enfant un peu trop grande qui regarde fixement et ne parle presque jamais, et qui s'attend à une seule chose d'un foyer -en être mise à la porte- peut sembler être une nuisance autour de soi.
Il y avait une maison dont j'espérais ne pas être chassée. C'était une maison avec quatre enfants qui étaient gardés par une arrière-grand-mère qui avait plus de cent ans.
Elle s'occupait des enfants en leur racontant des histoires sanglantes sur les massacres indiens, les scalps et les incendies sur le bûcher, et d'autres actes sauvages de sa jeunesse. Elle a dit qu'elle avait été une amie proche de Buffalo Bill et qu'elle avait combattu à ses côtés dans des combats au corps à corps avec les sauvages Peaux-Rouges.
J'écoutais ses histoires le coeur au bord des lèvres et j'ai fait tout ce que j'ai pu pour qu'elle m'aime. C'est moi qui riait le plus fort et qui frissonnait le plus à l'écoute de ses histoires.
Mais un jour, l'une de ses arrière-petites-filles accourut vers elle avec sa robe arrachée au col. Elle a dit que c'était moi. Je n'avais rien fait. Mais la vieille ennemie des Indiens n'a pas voulu me croire et j'ai été renvoyée à l'orphelinat en disgrâce.
La plupart de mes problèmes étaient de ce genre, plutôt sans importance. D'une certaine manière, ce n'étaient pas du tout des problèmes, parce que j'y étais habituée. Quand je repense à cette période, je me souviens qu'en fait je prenais beaucoup de plaisir et d'excitation. Je jouais au soleil et je faisais la course. Je rêvassais toujours, non seulement sur la photographie de mon père, mais aussi de bien d'autres choses.
Je rêvais surtout de beauté. Je rêvais de devenir si belle que les gens se retourneraient sur mon passage. Et je rêvais de couleurs - écarlate, or, vert, blanc. Je rêvais marchant fièrement dans de beaux vêtements et admirée par tout le monde, entendant leurs éloges. J'inventais ces louanges et me les répéter à haute voix comme si quelqu'un d'autre me les disait.
Ces rêves me faciliateint le travail. Quand je servais à table dans l'une des maisons misérables et malheureuses où je vivais, je rêvais que j'étais serveuse dans un hôtel élégant, vêtue d'un uniforme blanc, et tous ceux qui entraient dans la grande salle à manger où je servais, s'arrêtaient pour me regarder et m'admiraient ouvertement.
Mais je n'ai jamais rêvé d'amour.

À 12 ans, j'en paraissais 17. Mon corps s'était développé et j'étais bien galbée. Mais personne ne le savait à part moi. Je portais toujours la robe bleue et le chemisier que l'orphelinat m'avait fourni. J'avais l'air d'une grosse nunuche.
Je n'avais pas d'argent. Les autres filles allaient à l'école en bus. Je n'avais pas un nickel pour payer le trajet. Sous la pluie ou le soleil, je faisais les trois kilomètres à pied de la maison de mes "tantes" à l'école.
Je détestais marcher. Je détestais l'école. Je n'avais pas d'amis.
Les élèves me parlaient rarement et ne voulaient jamais jouer avec moi. Personne n'a jamais fait le trajet avec moi, ni ne m'a invité à venir chez eux. C'était en partie parce que je venais du quartier pauvre du district, où vivaient les Mexicains et les Japonais. C'était aussi parce que je ne sourais à personne.
Un jour, un cordonnier qui se tenait à la porte de son magasin m'a arrêté alors que j'allais à lécole.
"Comment t'appeles-tu ?" me demanda-t--il.
"Norma," lui dis-je.
"Quel est ton nom de famille ?" me demanda-t-il.
Je ne voulais pas lui dire mon nom - Norma Mortensen - parce que ce n'était pas le nom de l'homme au chapeau mou et à la moustache de Gable. Je n'ai pas répondu.
"Tu es une gamine étrange", dit le cordonnier. "Je te regarde passer ici tous les jours et je ne t'ai jamais vu sourire. Tu n'arriveras à rien comme ça."
J'ai repris mon chemin, détestant le cordonnier.
À l'école, les élèves chuchotaient souvent à mon sujet et ricanaient en me fixant.

Il me traitaient d'idiote et se moquaient de ma tenue d'orpheline. Je me fichais qu'on me croie idiote. Je savais que je ne l'étais pas.
Un matin, mes deux chemisiers blancs étaient déchirés et j'aurais été en retard à l'école si je les aurais raccommodés. J'ai demandé à l'une de mes «sœurs» de la maison si elle pouvait me prêter quelque chose à porter. Elle avait mon âge, mais était plus petite que moi. Elle m'a prêté un pull.
Je suis arrivé à l'école au moment où le cours de maths commençait. Pendant que je me dirigeais vers ma chaise, tout le monde me regardait. C'était un pull très serré.
A la récréation, une demi-douzaine de garçons m'entouraient. Ils faisaient des blagues et continuaient à regarder mon pull comme s'il s'agissait d'une mine d'or. Je savais depuis quelque temps que j'avais des jolis seins mais je n'y pensais pas. La classe de maths, cependant, en était plus impressionnée.
Après l'école, quatre garçons ont fait le chemin avec moi, tenant leurs vélos à la main. J'étais excitée mais j'agissais comme si rien d'inhabituel ne se passait.
La semaine suivante, le cordonnier m'a de nouveau arrêté.
"Je vois que tu as suivi mon conseil," dit-il. "Tu t'endendras mieux avec les gens si tu leur souris."
J'ai remarqué qu'il regardait aussi mon pull en me parlant. Je ne l'avais pas encore rendu à ma "soeur".
L'école et les journées sont devenues différentes après cela. Des filles qui avaient des frères ont commencé à m'inviter chez elles, et j'ai aussi rencontré leurs parents. Et il y avait toujours quatre ou cinq garçons qui traînaient près de chez moi. On jouait dans la rue et on restait à discuter sous les arbres jusqu'à l'heure du souper.
Je ne me rendais pas compte de l'aspect sexuel à travers les égards qu'ils me portaient et il n'y avait aucune pensée sexuelle dans mon esprit. Je ne pensais pas que mon corps avait un rapport avec le sexe. C'était plutôt un ami qui était mystérieusement apparu dans ma vie, une sorte d'ami magique.
Quelques semaines plus tard, un matin, devant le miroir, je me suis mise du rouge à lèvres. J'ai foncé mes sourcils blonds. Je n'avais pas d'argent pour acheter des vêtements, et je n'avais pas de vêtements à part ma tenue d'orpheline et le seul et unique pull. Le rouge à lèvres et le mascara étaient cependant comme des vêtements. J'ai vu qu'ils amélioraient mon apparence autant que si j'avais porté une vraie robe.
Mon arrivée à l'école, avec les lèvres peintes et les sourcils noircis, et toujours moulée dans le pull magique, a fait vibrer tout le monde. Et les réactions n'étaient pas toutes amicales. Pleins de filles, pas seulement celles de 13 ans, mais les plus âgées de 17 et 18 ans, sont devenues mes ennemies déclarées.
Elles racontaient entre elles, et à qui voulait bien les entendre, que j'étais une ivrogne et que je passais mes nuits à coucher avec des garçons sur la plage.
Les scandales étaient des mensonges. Je ne buvais pas et je ne laissais aucun garçon prendre des libertés avec moi. Et je n'avais jamais été sur aucune plage de ma vie. Mais je ne pouvais pas me sentir en colère contre les faiseurs de scandales. Des fillesjalouses de moi ! Des filles avaient peur de perdre leurs copains parce que j'étais plus attirante ! Ce n'étaient plus là des rêveries pour tromper ma solitude. C'étaient des vérités !
Et en été, j'ai eu un vrai soupirant. Il avait 21 ans, et bien qu'il soit très intelligent, il pensait que j'avais 18 ans au lieu de mes 13 ans. Je parvins à l'abuser en parlant le moins possible et en marchant d'une manière suggestive. Depuis que j'avais fait la conquête du cours de maths quelques mois avant, je m'étais entraînée à marcher langoureusement.
Mon soupirant intelligent est arrivé chez moi un samedi pour m'annoncer que nous partons nous baigner. Je me suis précipitée dans la chambre de ma "soeur" (celle qui était un peu plus petite que moi) pour lui emprunter son maillot de bain. Debout devant le miroir du bureau, j'ai passé une heure à m'entraîner à marcher après l'avoir mis.
Les cris d'impatience de mon soupirant me firent enfin sortir de la chambre, vêtue d'un vieux pantalon et d'un pull. Le maillot de bain était en-dessous.
C'était une journée ensoleillée et le sable envahi de baigneurs et de mères avec leurs enfants. Bien que née et ayant été élevée à seulement quelques kilomètres de l'océan, je ne l'avais jamais vu de si près auparavant. Je suis restée debout et je l'ai regardé pendant un long moment. C'était comme dans un rêve, pleins de couleurs or et lavande, d'un bleu et blanc mousseux. Et il y avait un esprit de vacances dans l'air qui m'a surprise. Tout le monde semblait sourire au ciel.
"Viens, allons-y", ordonna mon cavalier.
"Où ?" je lui ai demandé.
"Dans l'eau" dit-il en riant, pensant que je plaisantais. J'ai pensé à mon maillot de bain moulant. L'idée de me cacher dans l'eau en le portant me paraissait ridicule. Mais je n'ai rien dit. J'ai regardé les filles et les femmes et je me suis sentie décue. Je ne m'attendais pas à ce que la moitié de la population féminine de Los Angeles défile sur le sable portant presque rien sur elles. Je pensais être la seule.
Mon soupirant s'impatientait enocre alors j'ai enlevé mon pantalon et mon pull et restait plantée là, dans ma tenue étriquée. J'ai pensé : "Je suis presque nue", et j'ai fermé les yeux et je suis restée immobile.
Mon petit ami intelligent avait cessé de m'embêter. J'ai commencé à marcher lentement sur le sable. Je suis presque allée jusqu'au bord de l'eau, puis j'ai longé la plage. La même chose s'est produite que ce qui qui s'était produit dans la classe de maths, mais à plus grande échelle. C'était aussi beaucoup plus bruyant.
Les jeunes hommes me sifflaient. Certains ont sauté du sable et couraient en trottinant pour mieux voir. Même les femmes s'arrêtèrent de bouger à mesure que je m'approchais.
Je ne prêtais aucune attention aux sifflets et aux cris. En fait, je ne les ai pas entendus. J'étais envahie d'un sentiment étrange, comme si j'étais deux personnes. L'une d'elles était Norma Jean de l'orphelinat qui n'appartenait à personne. L'autre était quelqu'un dont je ne connaissais pas le nom. Mais je savais où elle se trouvait. Elle appartenait à l'océan, au ciel et au monde entier.

MAIS rien ne s'est passé en dehors de la vision grandiose qui m'avait frappée sur la plage. Je retrouvai à ma robe bleue et ma blouse blanche et je suis retournée à l'école. Mais au lieu d'apprendre quoi que ce soit, je suis devenue de plus en plus confuse. A l'école aussi. Ils ne savaient comment appréhender face à une sirène de treize ans.
Pourquoi j'étais une sirène, je n'en avais pas la moindre idée. Je ne voulais pas être embrassée et je ne rêvais pas qu'un duc ou une star de cinéma tombe amoureux de moi. La vérité était qu'avec tout mon rouge à lèvres, mon mascara et mes courbes précoces, j'étais aussi sensuelle qu'un fossile. Mais il semble que j'exerçais un effet opposé sur les gens.
Les garçons se sont mis à me courtiser comme si j'étais la seule fille du quartier. Je restais éveillée la nuit en me demandant pourquoi ils me poursuivaient. De temps en temps, je laissais l'un d'eux m'embrasser pour voir s'il y avait quelque chose d'intéressant dans la performance.
Il n'y en avait pas.
J'en ai finalement conclu que les garçons me couraient après parce que j'étais orpheline et que je n'avais pas de parents pour s'occuper de moi. Cette conclusion m'a rendu encore plus froide face à ma meute d'admirateurs. Mais ni ma froideur, ni mon dédain, ni mes « sors d'ici », « ne me dérange pas », aucune de mes attitudes figées ne changeaient les choses.
Les garçons continuaient à me poursuivre comme si j'étais un vampire avec une rose entre les dents.

Les filles de l'école étaient un autre problème, mais je pouvais le comprendre. Elles me détestaient de plus en plus à mesure que je vieillissais. Désormais, au lieu de m'accuser de voler des peignes, de la monnaie ou des colliers, j'était accusée de voler les garçons.
Tante Grace a suggéré une solution à mes problèmes.
"Tu devrais te marier", dit-elle.
"Je suis trop jeune," lui dis-je. J'avais encore 15 ans.
"Je ne pense pas que tu l'es", riait Tante Grace.
"Mais il n'y a personne qui veuille m'épouser," dis-je.
"Si, il y a quelqu'un", a-t-elle dit.
"Qui ?" ai-je demandé.
"Jim," dit ma tante.

Jim était M. Dougherty. Il habitait près de chez moi. Il était beau, poli et adulte.
"Mais Jim vise ma 'soeur'," lui dis-je.
"C'est toi qu'il a emmenée au match de football", a déclaré tante Grace, "pas elle."
"C'était terriblement ennuyeux," lui dis-je. "Je déteste les matchs de football."
"Que penses-tu de Jim ?" m'a-t-elle demandé.
"Je ne ressens rien," lui ai-je répondu, "Il est comme les autres, sauf qu'il est plus grand et plus poli."
"C'est une belle qualité chez un homme", a déclaré tante Grace, "la politesse".
La "tante" et "l'oncle" avec qui je vivais - ma neuvième famille - m'ont aidé à me décider. Ils allaient déménager. Cela signifiait que je devais retourner vivre à l'orphelinat où on m'aurait replacé dans autre famille.
J'ai épousé Jim Dougherty.
Le premier effet que le mariage a eu sur moi a été d'augmenter mon manque d'intérêt pour le sexe. Mon mari ne s'en souciait pas ou n'était pas au courant. Nous étions tous les deux trop jeunes pour discuter ouvertement d'un sujet aussi embarrassant.

Les parents de Jim ne se souciaient pas beaucoup de moi, ce dont je ne pouvais pas les blâmer. J'étais une femme particulière. Je n'aimais pas les adultes. Je préférais faire la vaisselle plutôt que de m'asseoir et leur parler.
Dès qu'ils commençaient à jouer aux cartes ou à avoir des discussions, je sortais de la maison en douce et je rejoignais les enfants dans la rue. J'aimais les garçons et les filles plus jeunes que moi. Je jouais avec eux jusqu'à ce que mon mari sorte de la maison et commence à m'appeler.

Mon mariage ne m'a apporté ni bonheur, ni douleur. Mon mari et moi ne nous parlions à peine. Ce n'était pas parce que nous étions fâchés. Nous n'avions rien à nous dire. J'ai vu beaucoup de couples mariés depuis qui étaient comme Jim et moi.
Ce sont généralement les mariages les plus durables, ceux qui sont vécus dans le silence.

La chose la plus importante que mon mariage a eu comme effet pour moi, a été de mettre fin à jamais à mon statut d'orpheline. J'étais reconnaissante envers Jim pour cela. C'est le chevalier qui m'a délivrée de ma robe bleue et de ma blouse blanche.
Mes différents conseilleurs avaient eu raison de dire que le mariage mettait fin à ma popularité de sirène. Les garçons ne venaient plus après Mme Dougherty. La rose semblait être tombée de ses dents.
Jim a rejoint la marine marchande en 1944, et je suis allée travailler dans une usine de parachutes. La grande guerre était lancée. Des batailles se livraient. Des juke-box jouaient. Les yeux des gens étaient illuminés.

JE PORTAIS des salopettes à l'usine. J'ai été surprise qu'ils ai insisté là-dessus. Mettre une fille en salopette, c'est comme la faire travailler en collants, surtout si une fille sait comment les porter. En tant qu'inspectrice de parachutes, j'étais de nouveau comme en classe de maths. Les hommes bourdonnaient autour de moi comme les lycéens l'avaient fait.
J'ai remarqué depuis que les hommes laissent généralement les femmes mariées tranquilles et ont tendance à les traiter avec respect. Ce n'est pas glorieux pour les femmes mariées. Les hommes sont toujours prêts à respecter ce qui les ennuie.
La raison pour laquelle la plupart des femmes, même les plus jolies, paraissent aussi ternes, c'est parce qu'elles sont trop respectées.
C'était peut-être de ma faute si les hommes de l'usine ont essayé de sortir avec moi et de m'offrir à boire. Je ne me sentais pas comme une femme mariée. J'étais complètement fidèle à mon mari parti en mer mais ce n'était pas parce que je l'aimais ou même parce que j'avais des idées morales. Ma fidélité était due à mon manque d'intérêt pour le sexe.
Jim est finalement rentré à la maison et nous avons de nouveau vécu ensemble. C'est difficile de se rappeler ce qu'on a dit, fait ou ressenti quand on s'ennuie.
Jim était un mari gentil. Il ne m'a jamais blessé ou contrarié - sauf sur un sujet. Il voulait un bébé.
L'idée d'avoir un bébé me dressait les cheveux sur la tête. Je ne pouvais l'imaginer que comme un double de moi-même, une autre Norma Jean dans un orphelinat. Il se passerait quelque chose. Jim s'éloignerait. Et il y aurait cette petite fille en robe bleue et chemisier blanc vivant chez une "tante", faisant la vaisselle, étant la dernière à aller dans l'eau du bain le samedi soir.
Je ne pouvais pas expliquer cela à Jim. Dès qu'il s'endormait à côté de moi le soir, je restais éveillée à pleurer. Je ne savais pas trop qui pleurait, Mme Dougherty ou l'enfant qu'elle aurait pu avoir. Ce n'était ni l'une ni l'autre.
C'était Norma Jean, toujours vivante, toujours seule, souhaitant toujours d'être morte.
Je ressens différemment les choses maitenant sur le fait d'avoir un enfant. C'est l'une des choses dont je rêve. Elle ne sera plus une Norma Jean maintenant. Et je sais comment je l'élèverai - sans mensonges. Personne ne lui dira des mensonges sur quoi que ce soit. Et je répondrai à toutes ses questions. Si je ne connais pas les réponses, j'irai les chercher dans une encyclopédie. Je lui dirai tout ce qu'elle veut savoir - sur l'amour, sur le sexe, sur tout !

Mais surtout, pas de mensonges ! Pas de mensonges sur le fait qu'il y ait un Père Noël, ou que le monde soit rempli de gens nobles et honorables tous désireux de s'entraider et de se faire du bien. Je lui dirai qu'il y a de l'honneur et de la bonté dans le monde, tout comme il y a des diamants et du radium.
C'est la fin de mon histoire de Norma Jean. Jim et moi avons divorcé. Et j'ai emménagé dans une chambre à Hollywood pour vivre seule. J'avais 19 ans et je voulais savoir qui j'étais.
Quand je viens d'écrire "C'est la fin de Norma Jean", j'ai rougi comme si j'avais été surprise dans un mensonge. Parce que cette enfant triste et amère qui a grandi trop vite n'est presque jamais sortie de mon cœur. Avec le succès qui m'entoure aujourd'hui, je peux encore ressentir ses yeux effrayés regarder au-delà des miens.
Elle n'arrête pas de dire : "Je n'ai jamais vécu, je n'ai jamais été aimée", et souvent je suis confuse et je pense que c'est moi qui dis ça. J'avais été une sorte d'«enfant épouse». J'étais maintenant devenue une sorte d'«enfant veuve». Beaucoup de choses semblaient m'être arrivées. Pourtant, d'une certaine manière, il ne s'était rien passé, sauf que j'avais 19 ans au lieu de 9 et que je devais me chercher un boulot.
L'espèce d'instinct qui conduit un canard à l'eau, m'a conduit vers les studios des photographes. J'ai obtenu des emplois posant pour des publicités et des mises en page. Le principal problème était que les photographes cherchaient eux aussi du travail. Trouver un photographe qui me voulait comme modèle était plus facile que d'en trouver un qui pouvait payer plus que des promesses.
Mais je gagnais assez d'argent pour me payer le loyer d'une chambre et un repas par jour, même si parfois je faisais l'impasse sur le repas. Cela n'avait pas d'importance, cependant. Quand vous êtes jeune et en bonne santé, avoir un peu faim n'est pas très important.

CE qui importait le plus, c'était d'être seule. Quand on est jeune et en bonne santé, la solitude peut sembler plus importante qu'elle ne l'est. Je regardais les rues avec des yeux solitaires. Je n'avais pas de parents à visiter ni de copains avec qui sortir.
Ma tante Grace et tante Anna travaillaient dur pour se nourrir et payer le loyer. Quand je les ai appelés, elles ont eu pitié de moi et ont voulu m'aider. Je savais qu'elles avaient grand besoin des demi-dollars restant dans leurs sacs à main, alors je restais à l'écart jusqu'à ce que j'ai assez d'argent pour pouvoir les emmener au restaurant ou au cinéma.
Je n'avais que moi. Quand je rentrais du restaurant à pied le soir dans les rues illuminées avec la foule sur les trottoirs, j'avais l'habitude de regarder les gens bavarder entre eux et se dépêcher de partir quelque part. Je me demandais où ils allaient et ce que ça faisait d'avoir des endroits où aller ou de connaître des gens.

Il y avait toujours des hommes prêts à aider une fille à se sentir moins seule. Ils disaient "Salut ! bébé", quand vous passiez dans la rue. Quand vous ne vous retourniez pas pour les regarder, ils ricanaient: "Coincée, hein ?"

Je ne leur ai jamais répondu. Parfois, je me sentais désolée pour eux. Ils semblaient aussi seuls que moi. Ces loups solitaires du coin de la rue à beugler "Salut bébé" me résonnait comme des voix du passé m'appelant à être à nouveau Madame Personne.
Un soir, j'ai rencontré un homme dans un restaurant. "Cette ville a certainement beaucoup changé au cours des 40 dernières années", a-t-il déclaré. "Avant, il y avait des Indiens là où nous sommes."
"Est-ce que vous habitiez ici il y a 40 ans ?", lui ai-je demandé.
"Oui, m'dame", dit-il. "Quel âge pensez-vous que j'ai ?"
"Environ 60", dis-je.

"Soixante-dix-sept ans à mon dernier anniversaire", me corrigea-t-il. "Mon nom est Bill Cox. Vous allez quelque part ?"
J'ai dit que non.

"Pourquoi ne pas venir chez moi et madame ?" dit-il. "On vit juste à côté d'ici. Je lui ramène un sandwich."
Je suis devenue amie avec Bill Cox et sa femme. Nous nous promenions tous les trois dans les rues parfois le soir.
Il parlait principalement de la guerre hispano-américaine, dans laquelle il avait été soldat, et d'Abraham Lincoln. Ces deux sujets l'excitaient beaucoup.

Je n'avais jamais entendu parler de la guerre hispano-américaine. Je devais être absente de l'école la semaine où on l'a étudié en cours d'Histoire. En marchant avec Bill Cox dans les rues éclairées d'Hollywood et en écoutant les histoires sur la guerre hispano-américaine et Abraham Lincoln, je ne me sentais pas seule et les loups des trottoirs ne m'accostaient plus par "Salut bébé".
Un soir, Bill Cox m'a dit qu'il retournait au Texas.
"Je suis malade", m'a-t-il dit, "et je détesterais l'idée de mourir ailleurs qu'au Texas."

Il m'a envoyé quelques lettres du Texas. Je lui répondais. Puis une lettre est parvenue, écrite par sa femme, disant que Bill Cox était mort dans une maison retraite pour soldats au Texas. J'ai lu la lettre dans le restaurant où je l'avais rencontré et je suis rentrée chez moi en pleurant. Les rues d'Hollywood semblaient plus vides que jamais sans Bill Cox, sa guerre préférée, et Abraham Lincoln.

VOUS êtes assise seule. Il fait nuit dehors. Les voitures roulent sur Sunset Boulevard comme un chapelet interminable de scarabées. Leurs pneus en caoutchouc émettent un ronronnement distingué. Vous avez faim et vous vous dîtes "C'est bon pour ma ligne de ne pas manger. Il n'y a rien de plus beau qu'un ventre plat." Et vous récitez votre leçon de diction à voix haute :
"Ariane s'est levée de son canapé parmi les neiges des montagnes d'Akrakaronian." Suivi de "Salut à toi, esprit joyeux, oiseau que tu n'as jamais été."
Les cours sont à un dollar. Pour un dollar, vous pourriez vous acheter une paire de bas et un hamburger, mais qui ne fera jamais de vous une actrice. Les cours de diction le peuvent. Ainsi, avec les jambes nues et l'estomac vide, vous frappez les consonnes de "Salut à toi, esprit joyeux".
J'avais l'habitude de penser en observant dehors la nuit à Hollywood: "Il doit y avoir des milliers de filles assises seules comme moi qui rêvent de devenir une star de cinéma. Mais je ne vais pas m'inquiéter pour elles. Je suis celle qui en rêve le plus fort."
Vous n'avez pas besoin de savoir quoi que ce soit pour rêver si hardemment. Je ne connaissais rien au métier d'acteur. Je n'avais jamais lu un livre à ce sujet, ni essayé de le faire, ni discuté avec qui que ce soit. J'avais honte de dire aux quelques personnes que je connaissais ce dont je rêvais. Je disais que j'espérais gagner ma vie en tant que mannequin. J'ai fait appel à toutes les agences de mannequins et je trouvais du travail ici et là.
Mais il y avait ce secret en moi: jouer la comédie. C'était comme être en prison et regarder une porte qui disait "Sortie".

Jouer était comme de l'or et c'était beau. C'était comme les vives couleurs que Norma Jean avait l'habitude de voir dans ses rêveries. Ce n'était pas un art. C'était comme un jeu qui vous permettait de sortir du monde ennuyeux que vous connaissiez pour vous projeter dans des mondes si brillants qu'ils faisaient bondir votre cœur rien que d'y penser.
Quand j'avais huit ans, je regardais par la fenêtre de l'orphelinat la nuit et je voyais un grand panneau lumineux sur lequel était écrit : "R.K.O. Radio Pictures". J'ai détesté ce panneau. Cela m'a rappelé l'odeur de la colle. Ma mère m'avait amené une fois au studio où elle travaillait. L'odeur de la pellicule mouillée qu'elle découpait et collait s'était impregnée dans mes narines.
C'était les narines de Norma Jean. Norma Dougherty, elle, l'actrice en herbe, n'avait pas un tel ressenti envers l'enseigne du studio. Pour elle, ils représentaient des projecteurs menant à une terre promise - la terre d'Ingrid Bergman, de Claudette Colbert, de Joan Crawford, de Bette Davis, d'Olivia De Havilland, de Gene Tierney, de Jennifer Jones.
C'était comme ça quand je m'asseyais seule dans ma chambre à Hollywood. Je m'endormais affamée et je me réveillais affamée. Et je pensais que tous les acteurs et actrices étaient des génies assis devant la porte de ce paradis: le cinéma.

À suivre

La semaine prochaine
. Marilyn Monroe parle d'un Hollywood qu'on ne voit pas à l'écran - "le Hollywood de l'échec... où nous étions la plus jolie tribu de mendiants qui n'ait jamais envahi une ville... et autour de nous se trouvaient les loups".


pour info

Il s'agit ici de la publication dans la presse (et du vivant de Marilyn) de ce qui restera considéré comme son "autobiographie" débutée mais jamais achevée, le fruit d'une collaboration émaillée d'entretiens avec le journaliste Ben Hecht au début de l'année 1954 et publiée dans un livre intitulé (comme cet article) "My Story" en 1974 et publié en France en 2011 sous le titre de "Confession inachevée".

This is here the publication in the press (and during Marilyn's lifetime) of what will remain considered as her "autobiography" started but never completed, the result of a collaboration punctuated by several interviews with the journalist Ben Hecht at the early of the year 1954 and published in a book entitled (like this article) "My Story" in 1974 and published in France in 2011 under the title of "Confession inachevée".


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand. 

09 novembre 2016

Marilyn Monroe Auction - 11/2016 - photos 2 -photographies


Photographies - Famille, Enfance & Adolescence
Photographs - Family, Childhood & Teens


Lot 18: MARILYN MONROE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH
 An original snapshot of Gladys Baker and Marion Otis Monroe, Marilyn Monroe's mother and uncle, with a handwritten note on the photo indicating they were aged 8 and 10 at the time the photo was taken.
3 3/4 by 2 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 81, “Fine Manuscripts,” Christie's Los Angeles, Sale 9814, September 20, 2001
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245039_0  


Lot 19: MARILYN MONROE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH
 An original snapshot of Gladys Baker, Marilyn Monroe's mother, with a handwritten note on the photo indicating Baker was 13 at the time the photo was taken.
3 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 81, “Fine Manuscripts,” Christie's Los Angeles, Sale 9814, September 20, 2001
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245040_0  


Lot 85: MARILYN MONROE BABY PICTURE
 A vintage black and white photograph of Monroe as an infant printed on heavy photo paper stock. Verso of image has note in the hand of Grace Goddard reading "Marilyn Monroe age 6 ms."
5 7/8 by 3 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245241_0 245242_0  


Lot 86: MARILYN MONROE BABY PICTURE
 A vintage black and white photograph printed as a postcard. The image features Monroe as a toddler posing with floral dress and matching bonnet. Verso has note in the hand of Grace Goddard reading "Marilyn Monroe age 2 yrs." Coffee mug ring stain to image.
5 3/8 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245243_0  245244_0  


Lot 87: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A hand tinted vintage photograph of Monroe at the age of five. The vintage photograph has writing on the back in the hand of Grace Goddard, her legal guardian, reading "Marilyn Monroe age 5yrs." Additional writing on verso in another hand has instructions for the tinting of the photograph listing that her dress should be pink with light hair and blue eyes.
5 3/4 by 3 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800
245245_0  245246_0  


Lot 88: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Monroe at the age of five with Lester Bolender. A note on verso in the hand of Grace Goddard reads "Marilyn Monroe age 5 yo." An earlier notation has been erased beneath that read "Norma Jeane and Lester."
4 1/2 by 2 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245247_0 
245248_0 


Lot 89: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPHS
 Two vintage black and white photographs featuring a young Monroe, one showing Monroe with Lester Bolender. Monroe's first foster home placement was with the Bolenders, and she and Lester became known as the twins. Each photograph has notes on verso in the hand of Grace Goddard reading "Marilyn Monroe age 4yrs." One of the images had previous writing reading "Lester Bolender and Norma Jeane Baker" that has been erased and written over.
4 1/2 by 2 7/8 inches 
245249_0 
245250_0  245251_0  


Lot 92: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A small frame with Art Deco style matte containing a vintage oval portrait of a woman circa 1900 based upon hairstyle. This image could possibly be of a young Ana Lower, whom Marilyn Monroe referred to as Aunt Ana, an important mother figure in her life. Lower was born Edith Ana Atchinson in Los Angeles in 1880. Behind this image in the same frame were found two small black and white portraits of Monroe's first husband, Jim Dougherty, in his Merchant Marine uniform.
Frame, 6 1/8 by 4 1/8 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245257_0 245258_0  


Lot 790: MARILYN MONROE HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOK
 A 1942 Chieftain yearbook that includes Marilyn Monroe. Monroe's picture is on page 48 under the name Norma Baker. Monroe attended University High School in Los Angeles as a tenth grader until February, when she dropped out to marry Jim Dougherty. This yearbook belonged to Barbara Abston, also a tenth grade student. The book has numerous inscriptions to Abston.
9 by 12 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246332_0  246333_0  


Lot 791: MARILYN MONROE 1941 SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPH
 A 1941 Ralph Waldo Emerson Junior High School class photograph. The original vintage panoramic photograph is inscribed by a number of students on verso. Some inscriptions read "To Norma." The front of the photograph is marked "Belongs to Norma Jeane Baker." Monroe can be seen in the photograph in the seventh row from the bottom, and the 15th person from the right. Housed in a frame with a reproduction of the photograph at top and the reverse of the photograph at bottom. The frame is double-sided with a glazed window in the back to show the front of the photograph.
24 3/4 by 32 3/4 inches, framed
 Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000
246334_0 246335_0 246336_0 
246337_0  


Lot 792: MARILYN MONROE HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOK
 A Chieftain 1942 yearbook from University High School in Los Angeles. Norma Jeane Baker, soon to become Marilyn Monroe, attended University High School in Los Angeles for half of the year as a 10th grade student. Her picture appears on page 48. In February 1942, at age 16, Monroe dropped out of University High School to marry Jim Dougherty.
12 by 9 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246338_0  246339_0 


Photographies & Snapshots - en public
Photographs & Snapshots - Public Appearances


Lot 77: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS SOLD WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of five color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 19, 1962, at the birthday gala for President John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Three of these images show Monroe singing "Happy Birthday" on stage and are likely the only known color photos taken of Monreo during this performance. From the collection of Frieda Hull.
This item sold with copyright but not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $5,000 - $6,000
245222_0  245223_0  245224_0 
245225_0 245226_0 245227_0 


Lot 299: MARILYN MONROE SNAPSHOT
 A single color photograph on glossy Kodak Pavelle paper of Monroe as she appeared to kick the first ball at Ebbets Field in New York, May 12, 1957, for a match between the American Soccer League and a team from Israel.
3 1/4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245614_0  


Lot 420: MARILYN MONROE FILM PREMIERE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four vintage black and white glossy photographs of Monroe and Arthur Miller at the New York City premiere of her film Some Like It Hot on March 28, 1959.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245778_0  245781_0 
245779_0  245780_0  


Lot 531: MARILYN MONROE SNAPSHOTS
 Three black and white photographs of Monroe likely taken by a fan on the streets of New York City in the late 1950s.
4 3/4 by 3 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245966_0  


Lot 607: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on October 25, 1951, when she attended the Hollywood Foreign Correspondents Association dinner at the Mocambo club in Los Angeles.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246088_0  


Lot 614: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED SNAPSHOT
 A black and white snapshot of Marilyn Monroe in front of the Sherry Netherland Hotel in New York City, 1952. The image is signed in blue ballpoint pen "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246097_0   


Lot 615: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on April 4, 1952, as she attended a publicity event held at the Owl Drug Store in Los Angeles. The event was sponsored by Life magazine, and Monroe was there to sign copies of the magazines with her on the cover. Four of the photographs have writing on the back referencing the event, likely in Frieda Hull's own hand. Some of the photographs are never before seen.
Largest, 4 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246098_0  247261_0 


Lot 616: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original photo of Monroe taken on January 26, 1952, at the Henrietta Awards ceremony held at Club Del Mar in Santa Monica, CA.  Marilyn won the "Henrietta Award for Best Young box Office Personality," given by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246099_0 


Lot 617: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on June 3, 1952, at a Look magazine awards party held at the Beverly Hills Hotel. One image from this lot is likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400 
246100_0 


Lot 618: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on August 3, 1952, at a party thrown in her honor at the home of big band leader Ray Anthony in Sherman Oaks, California. This lot contains eight black and white and two color images, some likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246101_0  247262_0  


Lot 619: MARILYN MONROE REPRODUCTION PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of two reproduction black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on June 26, 1952, as she appeared in court to testify as part of a lawsuit against an entity using her name and likeness to sell pornographic photographs.
Largest, 3 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246102_0  


Lot 620: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on October 3, 1952, at a party sponsored by Photoplay magazine.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246103_0 


Lot 629: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe original black and white photographs, circa 1953, at an unknown event. Both are likely never before seen images.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246115_0  


Lot 630: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 9, 1953, at the Photoplay magazine awards ceremony where she received the award for Fastest Rising Star of 1953. Two of the photos have "Beverly Hills Hotel" written on verso. Some images in this lot are possibly never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246116_0 247263_0 247264_0  


Lot 631: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 13, 1953, when she was at a birthday party for Walter Winchell at Ciro’s restaurant in Los Angeles. Two photographs show Monroe with Jane Russell, and two show her with Betty Grable. Reverse of one black and white image is stamped "Photo by Darlene Hammond/ 1416 Belfast Drive/ Hollywood 46, Calif./ CR. 10747." This lot contains two color and two black and white images.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246117_0 


Lot 632: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 18 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on July 10, 1953, at a gala arranged by Danny Thomas to benefit St. Jude Hospital. The fundraiser, which was held at the Hollywood Bowl, also included appearances by Jane Russell, Robert Mitchum, and Danny Kaye. Thomas, Mitchum, and Kaye are photographed with Monroe in this set of photographs. This lot includes 17 black and white images and one color image. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246118_0  246119_0 
246120_0  247265_0 


Lot 634: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe original color and black and white photographs, circa 1953, taken at an unknown event. Both are likely never before seen.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246122_0 


Lot 636: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 13 color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, some reproductions, taken on December 19, 1953, when she appeared at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles to receive the Miss Press Club Award. This lot contains five color and eight black and white photographs. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246124_0  247266_0 


Lot 638: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe from March 9, 1954, when she appeared at the Beverly Hills Hotel to receive the Photoplay magazine award for The Most Popular Actress of 1953 due to her roles in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953) and How To Marry A Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). This lot contains two color photographs and one black and white photograph.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $500
246126_0  


Lot 639: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe with Jane Russell taken on June 26, 1953, at Grauman's Chinese Theatre as Monroe and Russell memorialized their autographs, shoe prints, and handprints in wet cement. Nine photographs are stamped on verso "Photo by Darlene Hammond/ 1416 Belfast Drive/ Hollywood 46, Calif./ CR. 10747."
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246127_0  246128_0   


Lot 640: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, one together with Jane Russell, taken on June 26, 1953, in conjunction with a Grauman's Chinese Theatre event where Monroe and Russell memorialized their autographs, shoe prints, and handprints in wet cement.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246129_0  246130_0 


Lot 647: MARILYN MONROE THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS SCREENING PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe, Gracie Allen, Jack Benny, Joan Collins, and Bing Crosby, among many other stars, attending a special screening of There’s No Business Like Show Business at 20th Century Fox studios in 1954.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246137_0  246138_0  


Lot 657: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original black and white photographs taken on June 1, 1955, at the premiere of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). Seven of the photographs show Marilyn Monroe with her date for the evening, husband Joe DiMaggio. Two photographs show the theater marquee with large cutout images of Monroe in the now famous skirt- blowing scene from the film. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 7 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246150_0 
246151_0  246152_0 


Lot 667: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe alone and with guests, taken on January 7, 1955, at an event announcing the launch of Marilyn Monroe Productions, a joint venture with friend and photographer Milton Greene. This lot contains three color and seven black and white photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246162_0 247271_0 247272_0 


Lot 669: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A pair of color slides of Marilyn Monroe from March 11, 1955, at the Friars Club Testimonial Dinner.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246164_0


Lot 670: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 24 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 11, 1955, at the Friars Club Testimonial Dinner. Monroe is pictured surrounded by fans signing autographs and talking to James Haspiel. Several photographs show her with friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene. This lot contains 22 black and white photographs and two color photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246165_0  246167_0  246168_0 
246166_0  247273_0 


Lot 676: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 24, 1955, when she attended the play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof with Milton and Amy Greene. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246174_0 


Lot 686: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 19 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken at the East of Eden premiere on March 9, 1955, at the Astor Theatre in New York City. Monroe was an official usherette at the event. Some images show friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene and his wife, Amy Greene. Some images are never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246185_0 247276_0  


Lot 687: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe wearing a white brocade gown with matching jacket and white evening gloves as she attended the New York City premiere of East of Eden starring James Dean on March 9, 1955. The photograph is signed in blue ballpoint pen "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246186_0 


Lot 691: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe in costume taken on March 30, 1955, for her appearance on opening night at the Ringling Bros. Circus at Madison Square Garden, which was a benefit produced by Mike Todd for the Arthritis and Rheumatism Foundation.
Largest, 7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246191_0 246192_0 


Lot 692: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PRESS AND PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPHS
 An archive of nine vintage press and publicity photographs featuring Marilyn Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246193_0  


Lot 693: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large, glossy black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe during her famous appearance on March 31, 1955, when she rode a Barnum & Bailey elephant painted pink as part of the Mike Todd memorial event to benefit victims of arthritis.
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246194_0   


Lot 703: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 20 slides of Marilyn Monroe, from the collection of Frieda Hull. Some are never before seen images, from August 6, 1955, as she was at the airport in New York City preparing to fly to Bement, Illinois. Together with an original "Automatic Slide Changer" storage box, owned by Hull.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246207_0   


Lot 704: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 11 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on August 6, 1955, when she was at the airport in New York City preparing to fly to Bement, Illinois. One of the photographs is an original press photograph from the United Press Association. This lot contains six black and white and five color photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 9 by 6 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200
246208_0 246209_0 247279_0 
247278_0 


Lot 706: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe wearing a white brocade gown with matching jacket and white evening gloves as she attended the New York City premiere of East of Eden starring James Dean on March 9, 1955. The photograph is signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246211_0 


Lot 711: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED SNAPSHOT
 A color snapshot of Marilyn Monroe posing in the backseat of a car circa early 1950s. The image is signed in blue ink “Marilyn Monroe.” The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the “Monroe Six, a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
3 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246218_0 


Lot 712: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken the evening of December 12, 1955, when she attended the premiere of The Rose Tattoo. This lot contains two color and three black and white photographs.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246219_0  


Lot 713: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of three slides of Marilyn Monroe from evening of December 12, 1955, when she attended the premiere of The Rose Tattoo.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246220_0 


Lot 714: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on December 18, 1955, at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel following her attendance at the premiere of Baby Doll. Two of the images show Monroe with husband Arthur Miller. Research indicates that this may be the only documented occasion where Monroe parted her hair on the right. Her regular part was always on the left.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246221_0 


Lot 718: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 wearing a white gown and white fur, signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246225_0 


Lot 719: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 8, 1956, when she attended the premiere of Middle of the Night in New York City. This lot contains seven black and white photographs and one color photograph. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246226_0 246227_0 247282_0 


Lot 720: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
A pair of original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, taken on June 11, 1956. Monroe and Miller were outside her Sutton Place apartment. Miller's divorce from Mary Slattery had just been granted.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246228_0 


Lot 721: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, taken at a press conference in front of Monroe's Sutton Place apartment on June 22, 1956. Miller was in the throes of defending himself against accusations of communist activities. Monroe transitioned the focus of the press conference away from Miller toward their impending marriage, their plans to travel to England for their honeymoon, and the filming of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246229_0 


Lot 722: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 14 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, taken on June 29, 1956. Monroe and Miller were married in a civil ceremony later that day. The photographs also show Milton Greene and Miller's parents, Isidore and Augusta. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246230_0 246231_0 247283_0 


Lot 724: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original candid color photograph of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, taken on January 7, 1957, following their return from their honeymoon in Jamaica.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246233_0 


Lot 726: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe as she boarded a plane for Hollywood at Idlewild Airport in New York on February 25, 1956. The image is signed in blue ballpoint pen over a photographer's arm, "To Frieda Love & Kisses," and below along the line of the white railing, "Marilyn Monroe." In the photograph Frieda Hull is pictured with her camera, which is lot 697 in this auction.
8 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246235_0 


Lot 728: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 20 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe that document her 1956 travels to and from Los Angeles to film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Several of the photographs show Monroe walking across the tarmac to a plane among a sea of fans and photographers, then posing for photographs at the top of the stairs leading to the plane. One photograph shows the crowd on hand at the airport to see Monroe. This lot includes eight color and 11 black and white photographs, many that have never been seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246242_0 247284_0 


Lot 729: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 18 slides of Marilyn Monroe from the collection of Frieda Hull, documenting Monroe’s travels to and from Los Angeles to film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956) in 1956. Several slides show Monroe posing for photographs at the top of the stairs leading to the plane. Together with an original "Automatic Slide Changer" storage box, owned by Frieda Hull. Many of the slides have never been seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246243_0 


Lot 730: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 19 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 25, 1956, when she held a press conference at Los Angeles Airport. Monroe had flown to Los Angeles to work on Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246244_0 247285_0


Lot 737: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large matte black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the Plaza Hotel in New York City during a 1956 press conference for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246255_0 


Lot 738: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe signing autographs for fans on February 8, 1956, when she attended the premiere of Middle of the Night in New York City.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246256_0   


Lot 739: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from July 13, 1956, as she and husband Arthur Miller departed New York City for England to film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246257_0   


Lot 740: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original candid black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on July 13, 1956, as she and husband Arthur Miller departed New York City for England to film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
3 1/2 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246258_0 


Lot 742: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 11 slides of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, from May 13, 1959, at the Italian Consulate on Park Avenue in New York City, where she attended a ceremony to receive the David di Donatello Award, the equivalent of the Academy Award, for her work in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200
246263_0  


Lot 743: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY IMAGE ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 30 vintage black and white publicity images related to Marilyn Monroe and The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). The photographs show Monroe at various press conferences, publicity events, and the premiere of the film.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246264_0  


Lot 746: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller taken on May 13, 1959, as she arrived at the Italian Consulate on Park Avenue in New York City to receive the David di Donatello Award, the equivalent of the Academy Award, for her work in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246267_0  


Lot 747: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A pair of color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from February 26, 1959, as Monroe was on her way to the French Film Institute to receive the Crystal Star Award, the French equivalent of the Academy Award, for her performance in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300

246268_0  


Lot 748: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 26, 1959, when she was on her way to the French Film Institute to receive the Crystal Star Award, the French equivalent of the Academy Award, for her performance in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Monroe is seen in the photographs with members of the "Monroe Six," including Frieda Hull, Eileen Collins, Gloria Milone, and Edith Pitts. Three photographs show Monroe with James Haspiel. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246269_0 


Lot 749: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS SOLD WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of 15 photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1957, likely taken at a New York City showing of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). These photographs show Monroe with husband Arthur Miller at what appears to be a movie theater as a poster for the film can be seen on the theater lobby wall. Monroe is shown in the back of a cab signing autographs for fans, walking to the theater, and inside the lobby of the theater. This lot contains 12 color and three black and white photographs that are believed to be never before seen images.
This item sold with copyright but is not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $8,000 - $9,000
246270_0 246271_0 247287_0 


Lot 750: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, from January 7, 1957, following their return from their honeymoon in Jamaica.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246272_0 


Lot 751: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from November 18, 1957, when she and husband Arthur Miller attended Conversation Piece, a play in which Miller's sister Joan Copeland appeared.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246273_0   


Lot 752: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on November 18, 1957, when she and husband Arthur Miller attended Conversation Piece, a play in which Miller's sister Joan Copeland appeared. James Haspiel appears in two images, "Monroe Six" member Gloria Malone in another. Some images in this lot are never before seen. This lot contains four black and white and three color photographs.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246274_0  247288_0 


Lot 755: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original never before seen original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 30, 1958, as she exited her apartment at 444 East 57th Street in New York City. Just three days prior, Monroe was photographed by Richard Avedon for Life magazine.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246277_0 


Lot 756: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four never before seen original color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from May 30, 1958, as she exited her apartment at 444 East 57th Street in New York City. Just three days prior, Monroe was photographed by Richard Avedon for Life magazine.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246278_0   


Lot 753: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original candid color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 12, 1957, at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. Monroe was on hand to make the ceremonial first kick at a soccer match between the USA and Israel. It's reported that she sprained two of her toes while kicking the ball, yet she stayed until the end of the match to award the trophy to Israel, the winning team by a score of 6-4.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246275_0 


Lot 754: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of eight color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from May 12, 1957, at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. Monroe was on hand to make the ceremonial first kick at a soccer match between the USA and Israel. It's reported that she sprained two of her toes while kicking the ball, yet she stayed until the end of the match to award the trophy to Israel, the winning team by a score of 6-4.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900

246276_0 


Lot 757: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four slides of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, from their departure from New York for Los Angeles for her to film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246279_0   


Lot 758: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller as they departed New York for Los Angeles for her to film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). This lot contains five color and three black and white photographs, some never before seen.
Largest, 5 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246280_0  


Lot 759: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 15 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 29, 1959. These images are believed to have been taken following the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) as Monroe and husband Arthur Miller traveled from the theater to the home of Lee and Paula Strasberg for a party they were throwing for Monroe. Many images are never before seen. This lot contains eight black & white and seven color photographs.
Largest, 6 3/4 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246281_0  246282_0 
246283_0  247289_0  


Lot 760: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 11 slides of Marilyn Monroe, from March 29, 1959. These images are believed to have been taken following the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) as Monroe and husband Arthur Miller traveled from the theater to the home of Lee and Paula Strasberg for a party they were throwing for Monroe. Many images are never before seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200
246284_0   


Lot 761: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from September 18, 1959, as she left her apartment at 444 East 57th Street. She was leaving to fly to Los Angeles to attend a gala in honor of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev held by Twentieth Century Fox Studios.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246285_0   


Lot 762: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller taken on September 18, 1959, when the couple left their apartment at 444 East 57th Street. Miller was escorting his wife to the airport, where she would fly to Los Angeles to attend a gala in honor of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev held by Twentieth Century Fox Studios. Because this was an event in honor of a Communist leader, Miller didn't attend the gala as it wouldn't have been appropriate considering his appearance before the House Committee on Un-American Activities about his political leanings in June 1956.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246286_0 


Lot 763: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on September 27, 1959, at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel, where Monroe and husband Arthur Miller were attending the American Friends of The Hebrew University Awards Banquet, where Miller was honored for Distinguished Achievement in the Dramatic Arts. All the photographs in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400 
246287_0 


Lot 764: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, likely reproductions, taken on September 21, 1959, at Henry Miller's Theatre on Broadway in New York City, where Monroe was attending An Evening with Yves Montand, accompanied by friend and co-star Montgomery Clift. All four photographs reference Terri Arden on the reverse.
Largest, 6 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246288_0 


Lot 765: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of three color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from November 2, 1959, when she and husband Arthur Miller departed New York City for Los Angeles to film Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960). Of note, one slide in particular shows Monroe sitting in the back of a car holding a bird in a birdcage, likely Butch, the Millers' pet parakeet.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246289_0   


Lot 766: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original candid color photograph of Marilyn Monroe, likely taken on April 16, 1960, as she attended Josephine Baker's show at the Hollywood Hartford Theatre, accompanied by Yves Montand.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246290_0


Lot 767: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original candid color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, likely taken on June 1, 1960, her 34th birthday. The cast and crew of Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960) celebrated her birthday earlier that day. That evening, Monroe attended a party in her honor held by press agent Rupert Allan at his Beverly Hills home. In these photographs, Monroe wears the same clothing worn on the set earlier in the day.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246291_0 


Lot 773: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original Marilyn Monroe black and white photographs, one of her with Clark Gable, believed to have been taken on July 24, 1960, at an event held for the cast and crew of The Misfits (United Artists, 1961) at the Mapes Hotel in Reno, Nevada. This was Monroe's final completed film.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246308_0 


Lot 779: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe surrounded by fans and security, from March 14, 1961. Monroe was attending a benefit for the Lee Strasberg Actors Studio held at the Roseland Dance Hall in New York City.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246321_0  


Lot 780: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 14, 1961. Monroe was attending a benefit for the Lee Strasberg Actors Studio held at the Roseland Dance Hall in New York City.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246322_0 


Lot 835: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original photograph of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1950, with the words "Bel Air Hotel for Red Book Awards Party" written on verso. Likely never before seen.
3 3/4 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246404_0 


Lot 838: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE TRANSPARENCY
 A vintage color transparency of Marilyn Monroe with Herman Hover, owner of Ciro’s nightclub, circa 1953.
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246410_0 


Lot 846: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL SLIDES AND PHOTOGRAPHS WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of four color transparency slides and two color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Sgt. Marvin Stamness in Korea when Monroe entertained troops there in 1954. Copyright of the images has been applied for. Once copyright is granted, it will be transferred to the winning bidder. Stamness was with the 189th Field Artillery 45th Division of the United States Army and served in the Korean War. At that time, he was from Barrett, Minnesota.
While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Photographs, 2 1/8 by 3 1/8 inches; Slides, 2 by 2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246426_0  246427_0  


Lot 861: MARILYN MONROE SEVEN YEAR ITCH PREMIERE TRANSPARENCY
 A vintage color transparency of Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio at the premiere of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955).
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246455_0  


Lot 894: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage partial contact sheet of images of Marilyn Monroe and others. The black and white contact sheet includes nine images, six of which show Monroe taken by Milton Greene at the 1955 announcement of the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc.
5 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $400 
246512_0 


Lot 895: MARILYN MONROE MMP ANNOUNCEMENT CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white partial contact sheet of images of Marilyn Monroe taken by Milton Greene at the 1955 announcement of the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. The sheet contains 10 frames, with numbering below each image.
3 1/2 by 10 inches
 Estimate:  $200 - $400
246513_0  


Lot 896: MARILYN MONROE MMP ANNOUNCEMENT CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white contact sheet of images taken at the 1955 announcement of the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. Marlene Dietrich appears in many of the photographs along with Monroe and Milton Greene, among others. The sheet has 27 frames with grease pencil markings in red.
7 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

246514_0 


Lot 901: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage Milton Greene contact sheet of 34 black and white images taken at the Sheraton Astor Hotel in December 1955. Two of the images are of Marilyn Monroe.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246523_0 
246702_0 


Lot 903: MARILYN MONROE MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three vintage Marilyn Monroe media photographs. Each is stamped by a media outlet or includes a snipe. Two images are of Monroe with husband Arthur Miller. One image is of Monroe with Jack Warner and Milton Greene from a press conference announcing the production of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Accompanied by one contemporary print of Monroe at a party for the film Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960).
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $600
246525_0 


Lot 917: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 12 black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe with husband Arthur Miller. Each photograph is dated in the margin "Jul 56" and marked "Pitts" on verso in an unknown hand.
5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,200 - $1,400
246546_0  


Lot 934: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe.
Largest, 5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246567_0  


Lot 935: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 11 vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe attending various events.
Largest, 5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246568_0 


Lot 936: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe attending various events.
5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246569_0 


Lot 937: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five candid vintage black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe at an event.
4 3/4 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246570_0 


Lot 938: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Lois Weber on the street in New York City taken by photographer Hans Knopf. PIX Incorporated stamp on verso. A New York Post snipe is attached with a paperclip dating the photograph to February 22, 1956, and stating the pair were leaving Monroe’s apartment for lunch with Elsa Maxwell.
9 1/2 by 13 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246571_0  246572_0 


Lot 939: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Lois Weber on the street in New York City taken by photographer Hans Knopf. PIX Incorporated stamp on verso. A New York Post snipe is attached with a paperclip, dating the photograph to February 22, 1956, and stating the pair were leaving the Ambassador Hotel for a cocktail party.
10 3/4 by 11 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246573_0 246574_0 


Lot 940: MARILYN MONROE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Lois Weber on the street in New York City taken by photographer Hans Knopf. PIX Incorporated stamp on verso. A New York Post snipe is attached with a paperclip dating the photograph to February 22, 1956, and stating the pair were walking to the studio of Cecil Beaton.
14 by 10 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246575_0 246703_0 


Lot 944: MARILYN MONROE CONTACT SHEET
 A contact sheet containing 10 vintage black and white candid images of Marilyn Monroe and one additional photograph from the set of an unknown production. The photographs were taken by Lois Weber.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246587_0  


Lot 945: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of vintage candid black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe beside a plane.
5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246588_0 


Lot 946: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED KREINER PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner in 1959. The photograph shows Monroe during an interview in her hotel living room at the Ambassador East Hotel in Chicago, Illinois. Monroe was in Chicago to promote the film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer's and other stamps on verso.
9 1/2 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246589_0  


Lot 947: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED KREINER PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner in 1959 while Monroe was in Chicago to promote the film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer’s stamp on verso with additional stamp that reads “Kindler Und Schiermeyer Verlag AG Archiv.”
13 1/2 by 10 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246590_0 


Lot 948: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED KREINER PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner circa 1959. Photographer's stamp and other notations on verso.
14 by 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246591_0  


Lot 949: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER PHOTOGRAPH BY MANFRED KREINER
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller at the New York City premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) taken by Manfred Kreiner. Photographer's stamp on verso along with information about the photograph in an unknown hand, written with pencil in German.
10 1/2 by 13 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246592_0 


Lot 950: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller black and white vintage original photograph. Taken by Paul Schumach at the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer's stamp on verso.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246593_0 
246594_0 


Lot 971: MARILYN MONROE MONROE, MONTAND AND CUKOR SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe, Yves Montand, and George Cukor signed black and white photograph. The image was taken at a party for the film Let’s Make Love (20th Century ,1960) in which Monroe and Montand starred and Cukor directed. The photograph is inscribed “To Herbert Stern from his first director with every good wish George Cukor,” “For Herbert Love & Kisses Marilyn Monroe,” and “Pour Herbert Stern amical souvenir Y Montand 60.”
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $8,000 - $10,000
246621_0  


Lot 976: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN GLOBE CEREMONY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the 1962 Golden Globes award ceremony taken by Gene Daniels. Monroe won the award for Female World Film Favorite. Photographer's stamp on verso with additional “Revue” stamp and notation.
9 by 13 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246628_0  


Lot 977: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN GLOBE CEREMONY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the 1962 Golden Globes award ceremony taken by Gene Daniels. Monroe won the award for Female World Film Favorite. Photographer's stamp on verso with additional “Revue” stamp and notation.
13 1/2 by 9 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246629_0 


Photographies - Joseph Jasgur
Photograph
s


 Lot 796: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 with infrared film. Gelatin silver print. Printed by the artist. Artist’s copyright sticker on mount verso.
13 1/4 by 10 inches, mounted
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246343_0  


Lot 797: MARILYN MONROE COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of six color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by photographer Joseph Jasgur. The images are of Monroe alone, and one image shows her with other models at Zuma Beach in 1946.
Each, 11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246344_0 246345_0 246346_0 
246347_0 246348_0 246349_0  


Lot 798: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 Two black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 at Zuma Beach, California. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Each with photographer’s stamp on verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246350_0 


Lot 799: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVE
 A Joseph Jasgur black and white negative of Marilyn Monroe produced in 1946. Accompanied by a photograph of the image, printed 2000–2001. Signed in ink lower right.
Negative, 2 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches; Photograph, 14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246351_0  246352_0 


Lot 800: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 Six Joseph Jasgur black and white negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced in 1946. Accompanied by a photograph of a cropping of the image, printed 2000–2001. Library of Congress number VA 308-684. The winning bidder is responsible for transfer of copyright.
One Negative, 2 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches; Five Negatives, 5 by 4 inches; Photograph, 14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246353_0  246354_0   


Lot 801: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 A sepia toned photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Toned gelatin silver print. Printed by the artist.
20 by 16 inches, mounted
 Estimate: $400 - $600 
246355_0 


Lot 802: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 Two black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. One is a cropped portrait from the full image. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the artist. Each with the artist’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246356_0  246357_0 


Lot 803: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVE AND COPYRIGHT
 A Marilyn Monroe negative of an image taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946, accompanied by copyright. The black and white negative shows Monroe on the beach with Tom Burton.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arriving as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
5 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 986, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Beverly Hills, April 11, 2014
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246358_0 


Lot 804: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Each with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246359_0 


Lot 805: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Each with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246360_0  


Lot 806: MARILYN MONROE BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by photographer Joseph Jasgur. Jasgur photographed Monroe in 1946 when she was still known as Norma Jeane Dougherty and was a model with the Blue Book Model Agency.
Largest, 11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246361_0 246363_0 246364_0 
246362_0 
246365_0 246366_0 246367_0 
246368_0 246369_0 


Lot 807: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Two with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246370_0  


Lot 808: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 Three black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 using infrared film. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Two with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246371_0 246372_0 246373_0  


Lot 809: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver print. Printed by the artist. Artist’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches, mounted
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246374_0  


Lot 810: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of three Joseph Jasgur black and white negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced in 1946. Copyright to this image will be transferred to the winning bidder.
While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
5 by 4 inches, each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246375_0 
247292_0 247293_0 


Photographies - André De Dienes
Photograph
s


Lot 795: MARILYN MONROE LIMITED EDITION ANDRE DE DIENES PRINT
A Marilyn Monroe black and white photograph taken by Andre De Dienes in 1945, printed in a limited edition, gelatin print made from the original transparency, numbered 29/50. This print is stamped, signed, and hand numbered by the estate of Andre De Dienes and stamped and hand numbered by OneWest Publishing.
19 1/2 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246342_0  


Lot 813: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white gelatin silver print montage photograph of Marilyn Monroe. Taken in 1949 by Andre de Dienes, printed circa 1960. Hand stamped on verso.
16 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Andre de Dienes
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246700_0 


Lot 814: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white gelatin silver print montage photograph of Marilyn Monroe by Andre de Dienes. Notations on the front of the photograph read "7/7 1949 A.D." in black ink.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Andre de Dienes
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246701_0  


Lot 850: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin vintage print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. The photograph is hand printed circa 1958 on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer on verso.
19 1/2 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246434_0  


Lot 851: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin vintage print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. The photograph is hand printed circa 1958 on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer on verso.
20 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246435_0  


Lot 852: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ANDRE de DIENES PHOTOGRAPH
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Silver gelatin print, printed circa 1955. Signed at lower right, photographer's stamp on verso.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 420, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Beverly Hills, March 31, 2012
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246436_0 246437_0   


Lot 853: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ANDRE de DIENES PHOTOGRAPH
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Silver gelatin print, printed circa 1955. Signed at lower right, photographer's stamp on verso.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 421, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Beverly Hills, March 31, 2012
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246438_0  246439_0   


Lot 865: MARILYN MONROE INSCRIBED MAGAZINE PAGE
 A black and white page of an unknown magazine inscribed to child star Linda Bennett. Inscription reads "To Linda, I saw you in the Seven Little Foys - Great Marilyn Monroe."
17 1/2 by 14 inches, framed; 7 1/4 by 6 3/4 inches, sight
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246461_0  


Photos Tom Kelley & Calendriers 'Golden Dreams'
Tom Kelley's Photos & Calendars 'Golden Dreams'


Lot 35: MARILYN MONROE UNCUT TIN TRAY
 A circa 1950s uncut tin tray, illustrated with two nude photographs of Marilyn Monroe, "Golden Dreams" and "A New Wrinkle" both taken during a photo session with Tom Kelley in 1949.
Framed, 26 1/2 by 36 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 110, “Film & Entertainment,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale number 9771, December 16, 2003
 Estimate: $200 - $400

245078_0  


Lot 817: MARILYN MONROE RED VELVET SESSION PHOTOGRAPHS
A group of four color Marilyn Monroe photographs from the Red Velvet session with Tom Kelley in 1949. The group of contemporary prints includes an interesting composite image of Monroe and other less often seen images from the session. Mackie was given the photographs by a fan who knew that he had worked on Monroe’s costumes and that he was a fan of Monroe's. Printed circa 2004.
15 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Bob Mackie
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000

246384_0 


Lot 818: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH FROM THE REMASTERED RED VELVET COLLECTION
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe from the 1949 Red Velvet session with Tom Kelley. The limited edition print is part of the “Remastered Red Velvet Collection” issued by the estate of Tom Kelley in 2004. The image is numbered 2/500 and is signed by Tom Kelley Jr. in the lower right corner. The image is referred to as pose number 7.
27 3/4 by 23 1/2, framed
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246385_0  247296_0  


Lot 819: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NUDE PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe “New Wrinkle” photograph from her 1949 photo session with Tom Kelley. The black and white print is affixed to foam core board. The absence of optical brighteners in the print indicates that this print was made prior to 1953.
Photograph, 10 by 8 1/4 inches; 15 1/4 by 13 1/2 inches, overall
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246386_0 

 


Lot 36: MARILYN MONROE CALENDAR
 A U.S. calendar from 1952, featuring a color print of nude Marilyn Monroe photographed by Tom Kelley.
Matted, 30 by 21 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 64, “Film & Entertainment Memorabilia,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale number 5238, December 19, 2007
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245079_0  


Lot 310: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN DREAMS CALENDAR
 A calendar from Connors Bar & Grill New York City, 1958, all months intact. Paper loss to lower edge, tape residue along top edge.
15 1/2 by 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245625_0  


Lot 626: 1955 MARILYN MONROE CALENDAR
 A four-page calendar with spiral-bound top edge featuring images of Marilyn Monroe taken by Tom Kelley in the late 1940s. The calendar features a modesty cover with added lace overprint to cover Monroe and three pin-up images of Monroe in cowboy boots, all over triple month pages. Together with original envelope advertising the calendar as "The Most Talked of Calendar in the World" for 50 cents.
12 1/4 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246112_0 


Lot 833: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN DREAMS 1952 CALENDAR
 A 1952 Marilyn Monroe “Golden Dreams” calendar. This is an early version of Monroe’s famously posed calendar and does not have her name printed on the calendar itself. A note attached to the lower portion of the calendar does identify the model as Monroe, reading in part, “This Champion Calendar was posed by Marilyn Monroe. ...Since that time she has received much publicity in the daily newspapers and national magazines and has been [sic] starred in two movies.” The calendar advertises San Fernando Valley Motor. Housed in a frame.
37 by 19 inches, framed
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246402_0 


Photographies - Bert Stern
Photographs


Lot 984: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERT STERN
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe lying in bed, signed by Bert Stern. The photograph is contained in an orange portfolio.
23 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

246640_0  


Lot 985: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERT STERN
 A color photograph of a nude Marilyn Monroe holding a striped scarf, signed by Bert Stern.
23 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000

246641_0   


Lot 986: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERT STERN
 A Marilyn Monroe color photograph taken by Bert Stern in 1962 during "The Last Sitting." Numbered 188/250 and signed by Stern in the lower right. A Martin Lawrence Galleries label attached to backing of the framed photograph is typed with the title "Last Sitting: Not Bad For 36."
27 1/2 by 26 1/4 inches, framed
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

246642_0 


Lot 1006: MARILYN MONROE BERT STERN SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white digital print photograph of Marilyn Monroe resting her chin on her hand, inscribed and dated in black marker to the upper left "For Bill/ 3-3-08" and signed and dated in red grease pen to the lower right "Bert Stern/ 2008" with Stern's copyright stamp on the verso.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246671_0 


Photographies - George Barris
Photographs


Lot 996: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe talking on the telephone signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso.
7 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $400

246654_0 246655_0 


Lot 997: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe talking on the telephone signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246656_0 246657_0 247317_0  


Lot 998: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe dressed in orange signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246658_0 246659_0 247318_0   


Lot 999: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe leaning against a cinder block wall signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246660_0 246661_0 247319_0   


Lot 1000: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe standing in the surf signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
10 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246662_0 246663_0 247320_0 


Lot 1001: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe in a bikini signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246664_0 246665_0  247321_0 


Lot 1002: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe standing in the surf signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246666_0  246667_0 


Lot 1003: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY GEORGE BARRIS
 A photographic print of Marilyn Monroe, limited edition numbered 21/50, taken in 1962 by George Barris. Silver gelatin print, printed on double-weight fiber paper under the guidance and approval of George Barris by OneWest Publishing. Signed by the photographer and stamped by OneWest Publishing.
20 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

246668_0 


Photographies - Milton H Greene
Photographs


Lot 257: MARILYN MONROE OUTTAKE PHOTOGRAPH
A black and white test print on archival paper of Monroe during the Mandolin Sitting with photographer Milton Greene. The image is stamped on verso "Reproduction Forbidden" with additional pencil notations documenting the exposure settings for the print.
7 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245520_0 


Lot 890: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white partial contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe and Milton Greene. The sheet, which consists of two partial contact sheets stapled together, contains 17 images of Monroe.
4 1/2 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246508_0  


Lot 891: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage partial black and white contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe. The Milton Greene contact sheet includes 12 images of Monroe in a black cocktail dress.
3 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246509_0 


Lot 892: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE CONTACT SHEET
A  vintage partial black and white contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe. The Milton Greene contact sheet includes 10 frames with images of Monroe and others. The images were taken by Milton Greene at the 21 Club in New York in 1954. Monroe can be seen talking to the restaurant owner, Robert Kriendler.
4 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246510_0 


Lot 893: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white partial contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe and Milton Greene. The sheet includes 10 images of Monroe. Most of the images were likely taken by Greene circa 1955.
3 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246511_0  


Lot 909: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE PRINTS
 A group of four vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe, Laurence Olivier, Arthur Miller and others taken by Milton Greene circa 1956 during the preparation for and filming of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246535_0  


Lot 910: MARILYN MONROE MONROE, OLIVIER AND RATTIGAN CONTACT SHEET IMAGES
 A group of four vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe with Laurence Olivier and Terence Rattigan taken by Milton Greene. The photographs were taken during a 1956 publicity photo session for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Two of the images show Monroe with Olivier, who co-starred with Monroe and directed the film. One image is of Monroe and Olivier with Rattigan, author of the play on which the film was based and of the screenplay for the film, and one image is of Olivier and Rattigan. Notations on verso.
Each, 2 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246536_0  


Lot 911: MARILYN MONROE MONROE, OLIVIER AND RATTIGAN CONTACT SHEET IMAGES
 A group of four vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe with Laurence Olivier and Terence Rattigan taken by Milton Greene. The photographs were taken during a 1956 publicity photo session for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Three of the images show Monroe with Olivier, who co-starred with Monroe and directed the film. One image is of Monroe and Olivier with Rattigan, author of the play on which the film was based and of the screenplay for the film. Notations on verso.
Each, 2 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246537_0 


Lot 913: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE PRINTS
 A group of six vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe, Laurence Olivier, Arthur Miller, Vivien Leigh and others taken by Milton Greene circa 1956 during the preparation for and filming of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246539_0  246540_0   


Lot 921: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY MILTON GREENE
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier taken by Milton Greene in 1956. Photographer's stamp on verso.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246553_0  


Lot 922: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY MILTON GREENE
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe, Terence Rattigan and Laurence Olivier taken by Milton Greene in 1956. Photographer's stamp on verso.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246554_0 


Lot 1010: MARILYN MONROE PRINT BY MILTON GREENE
 A large-scale silkscreen print of Marilyn Monroe removing her stockings. Marked "A/P" [Artist's Proof] to the lower left and signed to the lower right by photographer Milton H. Greene.
46 by 35 1/2 inches, framed
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Allan Rich
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246684_0 
246685_0  246686_0  


Lot 1011: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE SILKSCREEN PRINT
 A limited edition silkscreen print of a Milton Greene photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken during the "Black Sitting" photo session in New York in 1956. Numbered 218/300 and signed by Greene at lower right.
35 by 46 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246687_0 
246688_0  246689_0  


Lot 1012: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE SILKSCREEN PRINT
 A silkscreen print of a Milton Greene photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken during the "Black Sitting" photo session in New York in 1956. Numbered 44/300 and signed by Greene in pencil at lower right.
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246690_0 
246691_0 246692_0 


Photographies - Divers photographes
Photographs - Various photographers


Lot 37: MARILYN MONROE AND JOHNNY HYDE PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white gelatin silver photograph featuring Marilyn Monroe dancing with talent agent Johnny Hyde, to whom she owed much of her success, presumably taken by Bruno Bernard. Numbered 9/350 in ink to the lower left.
16 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 332, “Film and Entertainment,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale Number 6343, December 17, 1993
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245080_0 


Lot 94: MARILYN MONROE EARLY SNAPSHOT
 A circa late 1940s black and white glossy photograph of Monroe with her Chihuahua. The photograph was taken by Richard C. Miller.
4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245260_0 


Lot 100: MARILYN MONROE MODELING PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white glossy photograph of photographer Richard C. Miller posing as he takes a photo of Monroe in hunting clothing holding a rifle during a 1946 photo session. The back of the photograph has pencil notation dating the photograph, "4/5/46."
3 3/4 by 4 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245270_0  


Lot 434: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY CECIL BEATON
 A vintage copy of Monroe's favorite image of herself by Cecil Beaton. As evidenced by receipts among Monroe's documents, she ordered reprints of this photograph to sign for people. This is one of her vintage copies of the image, ordered during her lifetime.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
245806_0 


Lot 663: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 20 photographs featuring or related to Marilyn Monroe, some vintage and some reproductions, collected by Frieda Hull.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246158_0  


Lot 664: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four slides of Marilyn Monroe from various points in her career: a costume test shot from Something's Got To Give ; on the set of Something’s Got To Give ; a double exposure from the Red Velvet session by Tom Kelley; and an early photo of Monroe by Richard C. Miller.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246159_0   


Lot 665: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large, glossy black and white publicity photograph of Marilyn Monroe in white dress, heels and gloves.
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246160_0  


Lot 793: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY LASZLO WILLINGER
 A large-scale Cibachrome color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Laszlo Willinger. Stamp-signed on verso.
34 1/2 by 30 1/2 inches, framed
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246340_0 


Lot 794: MARILYN MONROE HURRELL STAMPED PHOTOGRAPH
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe with a George Hurrell attribution statement on verso signed by Hurrell-endorsed authenticator Allan Rich.
14 by 12 1/2 inches, framed
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Allan Rich
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246341_0  


Lot 811: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD
 An original vintage photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1946. The photograph is titled “Mistletoe” and is part of the Discovery Series. Signed on verso “Bernard of Hollywood.” The photograph is accompanied by a copy of Monroe’s model release signed “Norma Jeane Dougherty” on July 24, 1946. This image was among the photographs that Bernard gave to Twentieth Century Fox.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246376_0 


Lot 812: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NEGATIVE
 A vintage black and white negative of Marilyn Monroe. The image was taken by Ed Cronenweth while Monroe did her hair and makeup during the time of production for Ladies of the Chorus (Columbia, 1948). Accompanied by a contemporary print of the negative.
5 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Ted Stampfer
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246377_0  246378_0   


Lot 821: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE TRANSPARENCY
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage color transparency of an image taken in 1951. The image shows Monroe in the gown she wore to the 23rd Academy Awards ceremony, where she presented the award for Best Sound Recording. The award went to All About Eve (20th Century, 1950).
5 by 4 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246388_0  


Lot 822: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ED CLARK TRANSPARENCY
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage color transparency of an image taken in 1950 by Ed Clark, a LIFE photographer.
5 by 4 inches
Estimate: $400 - $600
246389_0  


Lot 825: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1952. In the photograph, Monroe is wearing the hot pink dress she wore in her role as Rose Loomis in Niagara (20th Century, 1953). The photograph is numbered 15/90 and signed “From the estate of Bernard of Hollywood."
16 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500
246393_0  


Lot 826: MARILYN MONROE PHILLIPPE HALSMAN PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white image of Marilyn Monroe taken by Phillippe Halsman during a 1952 photo session for LIFE magazine. Numbered 81/250.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246394_0 


Lot 827: MARILYN MONROE HAROLD LLOYD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition poster photograph print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Harold Lloyd in 1952. The color print is numbered 25/250 at lower right. The photograph was taken by silent screen star turned photographer Harold Lloyd during a photoshoot at Monroe’s Los Angeles apartment with Philippe Halsman. Later in 1952, a photograph from Halsman’s session appeared on the cover of LIFE magazine. Printed on crystal archive paper from the original 35mm Kodachrome negative in 2005. Blind stamped in the lower right corner by the Harold Lloyd Trust.
20 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 204, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246395_0 


Lot 828: MARILYN MONROE HAROLD LLOYD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition poster photograph print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Harold Lloyd in 1952. The color print is numbered 25/250 at lower right. The full-length photograph of Monroe speaking to photographer Philippe Halsman was taken by silent screen star turned photographer, Harold Lloyd, during a photo shoot at Monroe’s Los Angeles apartment with Halsman. Later in 1952, a photograph from Halsman’s session appeared on the cover of LIFE Magazine. Printed on crystal archive paper from the original 35mm Kodachrome negative in 2005. Blind stamped in the lower right corner by the Harold Lloyd Trust.
20 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 206, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246396_0  


Lot 831: MARILYN MONROE AND JOHN FLOREA PHOTOGRAPH NEGATIVES
 A pair of vintage original negatives showing Marilyn Monroe with photographer John Florea. The first image was taken during a publicity photograph session for the film Monkey Business (20th Century, 1952). The second was taken while shooting publicity images for How To Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). The negatives were originally from the collection of John Florea.
6 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246399_0   


Lot 839: MARILYN MONROE JOHN FLOREA SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe stacking thousand-dollar bills next to photographer John Florea, likely from a series of promotional photos for the Monroe film How To Marry A Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). Signed on the verso by Florea with a copyright stamp.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246411_0 246412_0   


Lot 840: MARILYN MONROE AND OTHERS FRANK WORTH PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five black and white Frank Worth images, including two of Marilyn Monroe. All are blind stamped “Frank Worth Estate Limited Edition.” The first is an image of Monroe wearing a dress she made famous in the film How To Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). In the second image, Monroe is wearing the same dress and leaning against a car in the background, and Sammy Davis Jr. is in mid-leap, dancing in the foreground. The remaining photographs are portraits of Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor and James Dean.
Each, 12 by 17 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246416_0  246417_0 246415_0 

246413_0 246414_0 


Lot 857: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED AND INSCRIBED PORTRAIT
 A vintage print full-length black and white studio portrait shot by Bernard of Hollywood, signed and inscribed by Marilyn Monroe as she appeared in a floral corset with lace trim, fishnet stockings and high-heel shoes in a provocative pose. Inscription reads in full, “To Carole, It’s a pleasure to work with you/ Marilyn Monroe.
18 1/2 by 17 inches, overall; 9 1/2 by 7 1/2 inches, sight
PROVENANCE Lot 173, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, California, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246446_0   


Lot 866: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white matte photograph signed in green ink "Dear Inez, My love and deepest thanks, Marilyn."
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $15,000 - $20,000
246462_0  


Lot 867: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY CECIL BEATON
 A vintage black and white image of Marilyn Monroe taken by Cecil Beaton in 1956 at the Ambassador Hotel. Camera Press stamp on verso with additional typed label that reads in part, "Monroe by Beaton:/ THE ETERNAL MARILYN/ Sophisticated innocence.../ Please acknowledge: photograph by Cecil Beaton/ Camera Press London."
9 1/4 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246463_0  246464_0  


Lot 872: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe photograph and contact sheet prints circa 1956. The black and white image, which shows Monroe having her photograph taken, is stamped with Hans Knopf photographer's stamp on verso. With nine additional vintage contact sheet photographs assumed to have been taken at the same time. The contact sheet prints were all affixed to black paper at one time.
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
Estimate: $600 - $800
246472_0 246476_0 246477_0 
246475_0  246481_0 
246473_0 246478_0 246474_0 
246479_0 246480_0 


Lot 873: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage portrait publicity photograph from her personal collection.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246482_0  


Lot 874: MARILYN MONROE CECIL BEATON PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Cecil Beaton in 1956. The photograph, from Monroe's personal archive, is mounted to board and contained in a brown folder.
Photograph, 9 by 9 1/4 inches; 16 by 14 1/2 inches, overall
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246483_0  


Lot 878: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED AND INSCRIBED PHOTOGRAPH
 A framed photograph of Marilyn Monroe signed "To David, so you're still counting my money - what money? Marilyn Monroe."
20 1/2 by 17 1/2 inches, overall; 13 by 10 1/4 inches, sight
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246493_0  246494_0 


Lot 919: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe black and white publicity photograph with a notation in pencil on verso in an unknown hand "500 8x10's ordered 6/16/58 deliver and bill MM."
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246548_0 


Lot 972: MARILYN MONROE PORTRAIT IMAGES
A group of nine Marilyn Monroe portrait images from film studios for reference or publicity and from photoshoots, with photographers Eric Skipsey and Richard Avedon. Eight of the images are in black and white with one color image from the film Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960).
Most, 8 by 10 inches
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246622_0  


Lot 1009: MARILYN MONROE DOUGLAS KIRKLAND PORTFOLIO
 A limited edition portfolio of Marilyn Monroe photographs taken by Douglas Kirkland and published by the Govinda Gallery in Washington, D.C. Each of the six photographs is numbered 16/30 to the lower left and signed by Kirkland to the lower right. Housed in a blue cloth clamshell case with gilt-stamped morocco label.
19 3/4 by 16 1/2 inches, overall
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Allan Rich
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246677_0 246678_0 246679_0 
246680_0 246681_0 246682_0 
246683_0 

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21 décembre 2014

3/05/1952 Révélation de l'existence de Gladys

Alors que Marilyn Monroe a toujours déclaré être orpheline, l'existence de sa mère Gladys Baker est révélée dans la presse. Les studios demandent à Marilyn de clarifier la situation: elle donne donc une interview au chroniquer Erskine Johnson. Mais l'entretien a été répété et travaillé auparavant avec son ami Sidney Sklosky. L'article sera publié le 3 mai 1952 dans le Los Angeles Daily News:

MARILYN MONROE AVOUE:
MA MERE EST EN VIE ET VIT A HOLLYWOOD
par Erskine Johnson

Marilyn Monroe -la poupée glamour de Hollywood qui a récemment fait la une des journaux en reconnaissant qu'elle avait posé nue pour un calendrier - nous livre aujourd'hui une nouvelle confession.
Rendue célèbre par les agences publicitaires hollywoodiennes comme étant une pauvre orpheline n'ayant jamais connu ses parents, Marilyn reconnaît qu'elle est la fille d'une ancienne monteuse de la RKO, Gladys Baker et déclare: "Je l'aide et veux continuer à l'aider tant qu'elle aura besoin de moi."
En convalescence après une opération de l'appendicite au Los Angeles Hospital, Marilyn m'a donné des informations exclusives par l'intermédiaire de la Twentieth Century Fox, après l'apparition dans les studios de cinq femmes revendiquant Marilyn comme étant "leur fille perdue de longue date".

La reine du glamour hollywoodien a dit:
     "Mes amis proches savent que ma mère est en vie. A mon insu, alors que j'étais enfant, ma mère passa de nombreuses années dans un hôpital public. Par l'intermédiaire du comté de Los Angeles, ma tutrice m'a placée dans plusieurs familles d'accueil, et j'ai passé plus d'un an à l'orphelinat de Los Angeles. Je n'ai jamais connu ma mère intimement et, depuis que je suis adulte et à même de lui venir en aide, je suis entrée en contact avec elle. Je l'aide à présent, et veux continuer à l'aider tant qu'elle aura besoin de moi."

Les amis de sa mère fournirent les informations complémentaires:
     "Lorsque Marilyn était enfant, son père mourut dans un accident de voiture, à la suite de quoi sa mère souffrit de dépression nerveuse. Une amie de sa mère était sa tutrice légale. La mère de Marilyn recouvra la santé en 1945 et vécut peu de temps avec sa fille, en 1946. La même année, elle se remaria et redevint veuve pour la seconde fois, la semaine dernière, quand son mari mourut après une courte maladie."

La nouvelle que la mère de Marilyn était vivante fut une grande suprise, car les studios avaient largement tablé leur publicité sur le fait que Marilyn ne connaissait ni sa mère ni son père. Mais la nouvelle confession de la star, reconnaissant que sa mère, deux fois veuve, vit à Hollywood et qu' "elle lui vient en aide" est un grand soulagement pour le service judiciaire de la Twentieth Century Fox, très ennuyée par les revendications violentes de femmes prétendant que Marilyn était leur "fille".


 

While Marilyn Monroe has always declared to be an orphan, the existence of her mother Gladys Baker is revealed in the press. The studios ask Marilyn to clarify the situation: she thus gives an interview to reviewer Erksine Johnson. But the interview was repeated and previously worked with her friend Sidney Sklosky. The article will be published in May 3, 1952:

MARILYN MONROE CONFESSES
MOTHER ALIVE, LIVING HERE

By Erskine Johnson

Marilyn Monroe - Hollywood's confessing glamour doll who made recent headlines with the admission thatshe was a nude calendar cutie - confessed again today. Highly publicized by Hollywood press agents as an orphan waif who never knew her parents, Marilyn admitted that she's the daughter of a one-time RKO studio film cutter, Gladys Baker, and that "I am helping her and want to continue helping her when she needs me."
Recovering from an appendectomy in a Los Angeles hospital, Marilyn gave me an exclusive statement through the Twentieth Century-Fox studio following the appearance at the studio of five women claiming Marilyn as their "long-lost daughter."

Said Hollywood's new glamour queen:
"My close friends know that my mother is alive. Unbeknown to me as a child, my mother spent many years as an invalid in a state hospital. I was raised in a series of foster homes arranged by a guardian through the County of Los Angeles and I spent more than a year in the Los Angeles Orphans Home. I haven't known my mother intimately, but since I have become grown and able to help her I have contacted her. I am helping her and want to continue helping her when she needs me."

Hollywood friends of her mother supplied the rest of the story: "When Marilyn was a small child her father was killed in an automobile accident and her mother subsequently suffered a nervous breakdown. A friend of her mother was appointed her legal guardian. Marilyn's mother recovered from her illness in 1945 and lived with her daughter for a short time in 1946. In the same year her mother remarried and became a widow for the second time last week when her husband died following a short illness."

The news that Marilyn's mother is alive in Hollywood came as an eyebrow-lifting suprise because of the extensive studio publicity that Marilyn had never known her mother or her father. But the new star's confession that her twice-widowed mother is in Hollywood and that "I am helping her" came as a relief to the Twentieth Century-Fox legal department, which has been confronted with wild claims by women insisting that Marilyn is their "daughter."


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.  

20 décembre 2014

M comme Monroe, Gladys

Gladys Pearl Monroe
( 1902 - 1984 )
Mère de Marilyn Monroe

banner_gladys

Gladys Pearl Monroe (appelée aussi Gladys Baker, Gladys Mortensen, Gladys Eley) naît le 27 mai 1902 à Porfirio Diaz (aujourd'hui nommé Piedra Negra) au Mexique et est la première des deux enfants de Della Mae Hogan et Otis Elmer Monroe (les grands-parents de Marilyn). Son existence est déclarée civilement cinq jours après sa naissance (le 1er juin) à un juge civil mexicain. Son père, Otis, travaille dans les chemins de fer mexicains depuis 1901. Après la naissance de leur fille Gladys, la petite famille retourne aux Etats-Unis, menant une vie itinérante le long de la Côte Ouest, jusque dans le Nord des Etats-Unis pendant un an, puis s'installent à Los Angeles au printemps 1903 où son père décroche un emploi à la Pacific Electric Raimway. Ils vivent dans un petit bungalow d'une seule pièce dans la 37ème Rue Ouest (secteur sud du centre-ville). C'est là que naît le frère de Gladys, Marion Otis Elmer (l'oncle de Marilyn), en 1905. La famille vit dans une certaine précarité et n'a pas de foyer stable (ils vivent dans près de onze foyers différents -maisons ou appartements- entre 1903 et 1909). Gladys et Marion vivent ainsi leur enfance dans la pauvreté et l'insécurité, sans pouvoir se lier d'amitié avec des amis de leurs âges.

>> Certificats de naissance de Gladys
1900s-gladys-certificat_birth-1 1900s-gladys-certificat_birth-2 1900s-gladys-certificat_birth-3

 >> 1906 - Gladys, 4 ans
1906-gladys-4ans 

En 1907, la santé de son père Otis Elmer se dégrade. Porté sur la boisson et souffrant de troubles de la mémoire, son état s'empire rapidement: maux de tête, tremblements, instabilité émotionnelle avec des accès de rage, des crises de larmes et même des attaques cardiaques. L'été 1908, suite à une crise, Otis se retrouve à moitié paralysé. Admis à l'hôpital 'Southern California State Hospital' à Patton, en Californie, en novembre 1908, où sa mère Della espace de plus en plus ses visites car Otis ne reconnaît même plus son épouse, il y meurt, le 22 juillet 1909, à l'âge de 43 ans. Il était atteint de parésie, le stade ultime de la syphilis qu'il avait contracté au Mexique, à cause des piètres conditions d'hygiène. C'est ainsi que seulement âgée de 7 ans, Gladys se retrouve orpheline de père. Gladys souffrira beaucoup de l'absence de son père. Sans doute terrifiée par le fulgurent déclin mental de son mari, Della Mae racontera à ses enfants que leur père était devenu fou, à cause de l'alcool et de sa vie désordonnée. Pourtant, le dossier médical qu'on lui avait remis après la mort d'Otis, explique qu'il était décédé d'une maladie organique et non d'une maladie mentale.
Se retrouvant veuve à seulement 33 ans, sa mère
Della Mae vit une deuxième jeunesse en fréquentant de nombreux hommes qu'elle reçoit chez elle entre 1910 et 1911, avant de se marier le 7 mars 1912 avec Lyle Arthur Graves, un aiguilleur en chef à la Pacific Electric, où il avait travaillé avec Otis. Ils vont vivre dans la maison de Graves, au 324 bis South Hill Street dans la partie nouvelle du quartier d'affaires de Los Angeles. Lyle semble être un bon beau-père, offrant des cadeaux aux enfants de Della. Mais le couple ne tient pas, Otis étant aussi porté sur la boisson que son précédent mari, et ils divorcent le 17 janvier 1914.

>> 1912 - Gladys, 10 ans, et son frère Marion, 7 ans
245039_0    

>> 1916 - Gladys, 13 ans
 
1915-gladys-13ans 1915-gladys-13ans-2

A la fin de l'année 1916, Della Mae loue une chambre dans une pension de famille au 26 Westminster Avenue sur la toute nouvelle plage du district de Venice, en Californie, au sud de Santa Monica. Le propriétaire de la pension de famille s'appele John Baker et l'engage pour diriger sa propriété pendant qu'il s'occupe d'une salle de jeux sur la plage. Della envoie son fils Marion, âgé de 11 ans, vivre chez des cousins à San Diego car elle pense qu'un garçon doit être élevé par un homme, et seule Gladys reste vivre auprès de sa mère. Gladys est une jeune fille coquette, brillante, expansive, aux cheveux châtains clairs, parlant d'une voix limpide et haut perchée, au rire facile, et à la recherche d'attention des hommes mûrs (sans doute en lien avec son enfance, était-elle à la recherche d'une figure paternelle). Sa mère, Della, ne tarde pas à rester bien longtemps seule et elle fréquente un veuf, Charles GraingerCette nouvelle liaison rend Gladys malheureuse, qui se braque contre le nouveau compagnon de sa mère, en lui opposant un silence absolu, et se montrant de très mauvaise humeur. Gladys devient alors un boulet pour Della, qui avait peur de perdre Charles Grainger. C'est alors qu'elle décide de la marier.

1917-05-17-baker_wedding_certificat1Gladys, qui n'a alors que 14 ans, commence à avoir un certain succès auprès des hommes. Et c'est Jasper Newton "Jap" Baker (le fils de John Baker, qui est pompiste ou releveur de comptes à gaz selon les biographes) âgé de 26 ans, qui, aidé de Della Mae, certifie que Gladys était en âge de se marier, 18 ans (alors qu'elle n'en avait que 15) sous prétexte que les preuves de sa date de naissance ont disparu suite aux nombreux déménagements, et l'épouse le 17 mai 1917 (certificat de mariage ci-contre). En fait, Gladys était enceinte de deux mois au moment du mariage. Della assiste gaiement au mariage et donne sa chambre de Westminster Street aux jeunes mariés, pour, de son côté, emménager dans le bungalow de Charles Grainger. Gladys et Jasper Baker ont deux enfants: un fils Robert 'Jack' 'Kermit' Baker (le demi-frère de Marilyn) qui naît le 10 novembre 1917, et une fille Berniece Inez Gladys (la demie-soeur de Marilyn) qui naît le 30 juillet 1919.
A la naissance de Berniece, le couple donne l'adresse de Della Monroe (1410 Coral Canal Court) sur le certificat de naissance. C'est ainsi qu'à 17 ans, Gladys se retrouve épouse et mère de deux enfants. Cependant, suite à son enfance chaotique, l'exemple d'une vie mouvementée de sa mère, ayant connue de nombreux beaux-pères, et par son jeune âge (elle est encore adolescente), Gladys se montre peu maternelle avec ses enfants, dont l'envie serait plutôt de sortir pour aller s'amuser. Il lui arrive d'ailleurs de confier s
es enfants à des voisins pour sortir dans les bals et fêtes organisés sur les plages, pendant que son mari travaille de longues heures comme représentant de commerce.

>> vers 1917/1918 - Gladys, Robert Baker et une amie
1916-gladys_john_baker-2  

>> 1918 - Gladys, 16 ans
1918-gladys-1-1 1918-gladys-16ans

>> 30/07/1919 - Certificat de naissance de Berniece
1919-07-30-berniece

>> 1919 - Gladys avec ses enfants et sa mère Della Mae
1919-della_and_gladys-with_jackiehermitt_berniece-1 
1919-della_and_gladys-with_jackiehermitt_berniece-2

>> 1919 - Gladys avec Robert Baker et leurs enfants
1919-gladys_berniece_marion_jackie-1  1919-gladys_berniece_marion_jackie-1a 1919-gladys_berniece_marion_jackie-1b

  >> vers 1920 - Gladys et Robert Baker
1916-gladys_john_baker-1 

Au cours de l'année 1921, le couple part en voyage à Flat Lick, dans le Kentucky, ville d'où est originaire Jasper, pour rendre visite à la famille de celui-ci. Durant le trajet, pendant que Gladys et Robert se disputent, leur fils Jackie tombe de la voiture dans un virage et se blesse à la hanche. Robert, furieux, reproche à Gladys son manque d'attention. Pendant leur séjour à Flat Lick, Gladys part un jour en randonnée dans les bois avec Audrey, le frère cadet de Jasper. Bien que Jasper est bel homme, il est jaloux de son frère. Quand Gladys revient de la promenade, Jasper la frappe avec une bride dans le dos. Gladys s'enfuit et part en ville, où elle y montre son dos aux passants, en hurlant et pleurant qu'elle a peur de son mari. Finalement, elle revient et ils repartent ensemble avec les enfants pour retourner en Californie. Un jour, elle surprend son mari avec une autre femme dans la rue (d'après ce que rapportera plus tard Gladys à Berniece). C'en est trop pour Gladys qui finit par demander le divorce en 1921 selon les motifs suivants: "Cruauté extrême sous forme de mauvais traitements, d'insultes et de langages orduriers à son égard et en sa présence, de coups et blessures." John rétorque que sa femme a une conduite impudique et lascive.

Après avoir quitté le domicile conjugual, Gladys loue un bungalow au 46 Rose Avenue, à Venice, qu'elle partage avec sa mère Della Mae. Gladys avait signé le bail sous le nom de sa mère Della Monroe, et sous-loue deux des chambres, afin d'être payée comme gérante, ce qui lui permet de verser 100$ par mois aux propriétaires absents, Adele Weinhoff et Susie Noel.
Fin juin 1922, le dernier chèque du loyer n'avait pas été posté. Une dispute éclate entre Gladys et Della, chacune accusant l'autre de dilapider l'argent. N'ayant d'emploi ni l'une ni l'autre, l'essentiel de leurs revenus leur était versé par Charles Grainger, le compagnon de sa mère, et le reste consistant en une modeste somme qu'envoyait Jasper Baker. La courte expérience de colocataires entre mère et fille prend fin en juillet 1922, sous une menace d'expulsion. Della, avec la permission de Charles Grainger, part alors vivre dans un bungalow vide qu'il posséde à Hawthorn.

>> Gladys et sa mère Della Mae
1920s-della_mae_gladys_baby-1 1920s-della_mae_gladys_baby-2 1920s-gladys-1

1923-05-11-divorceLe divorce de Gladys et John est prononcé le 11 mai 1923 et Gladys obtient la garde des enfants (jugement de divorce ci-contre). Mais lors d'un week-end de garde, déjà bien avant que le divorce ne soit prononcé, Jasper ne ramène pas les enfants -Robert et Berniece- et les emmène dans sa ville d'origine Flat Lick dans le Kentucky, pour s'installer chez sa mère, pensant que les enfants recevront une meilleure éducation et de son côté, il espère recommencer sa vie.
Leur fils Robert, qui garde des séquelles de sa blessure à la hanche, boite. Il est hospitalisé dans un hôpital de Louisville et porte un plâtre à la jambe.
Quand à Gladys, qui souhaite récupérer ses enfants mais qui reste sans nouvelles, elle se rend à San Diego car elle pense que Jasper y a trouvé un emploi et s'y est installé. Puis elle reçoit un courrier de son ex beau-frère l'avertissant que Jasper et les enfants se trouvent à Flat Lick. Elle s'y rend donc en demandant de l'aide à sa belle-soeur Myrtle (la soeur de Jasper) qui non seulement refuse, mais va avertir Jasper. C'est alors que Jasper et sa mère cachent Berniece et avertissent les médecins de l'hôpital pour empêcher Gladys d'emmener son fils. Mais Gladys n'abandonne pas: elle s'installe à Louisville et y trouve un emploi de femme de ménage, en attendant que l'état de Robert s'améliore. Gladys va rester presqu'une année, vivant chez la famille Cohen (Margaret et John 'Jack' Cohen), où elle officie en tant que nounou de leur fille de trois ans, prénommée Norma Jeane (d'où l'origine du prénom de Marilyn Monroe et non pas Norma pour Norma Talmadge et Jean pour Jean Harlow comme bon nombre de biographes pensent). Il semblerait que Gladys aurait reporté tout son amour maternel sur la petite fille, allant jusqu'à projeter de la kidnapper pour l'emmener avec elle à Los Angeles.
De son côté, Jasper se remarie. S'avouant vaincue, ne pouvant voir ses enfants que de façon irrégulière, et réalisant qu'elle ne pourra jamais les récupérer définitivement, Gladys décide de repartir à Los Angeles et va finir par perdre de vue ses enfants.
Marilyn écrira plus tard: "Ma mère dépensa toutes ses économies pour récupérer les enfants. Finalement, elle les retrouvera dans le Kentucky où ils vivaient dans une belle maison. Leur père s'était remarié et vivait dans l'aisance. Elle le rencontra mais ne lui demanda rien, pas même d'embrasser les enfants qu'elle avait recherché pendant si longtemps."

mmfather1A Los Angeles, Gladys parvient à trouver un emploi dans la florissante industrie du cinéma: elle travaille six jours sur sept comme monteuse pour la Consolidated Film Industries, puis pour la Columbia et enfin pour la RKO. A la Consolidated Film Industries, elle se lie d'amitié avec une collègue, la surveillante Grace McKee. A la fin de l'été 1923, elles dédicent alors de partager un appartement au 1211 Hyperion Avenue (aujourd'hui le Silver Lake) à Los Angeles, à quelques kilomètres à l'Est de Hollywood. Gladys change d'apparence et teint ses cheveux en rouge cerise. Les deux femmes -Gladys et Grace- mènent une vie joyeuse de femmes célibataires, se promenant en ville et faisant beaucoup la fête. Un collègue de Gladys, Vernon S. Harbin dira que Gladys "avait la réputation d'être un pilier de bar". Mrs Leila Fields, qui travaillera avec Gladys à la RKO, dira d'elle: "C'était une belle femme, une des plus belles femmes que j'ai eu le privilège de rencontrer. Elle avait bon coeur, était une bonne copine et était toujours de bonne humeur avant sa maladie."
C'est aussi dans cette usine -la Consolidated Film Ind.- que Gladys rencontre un bel homme, Charles Stanley Gifford (le père "présumé" de Marilyn, portrait photographique ci-dessus), un véritable coureur de jupons, éléguant et distingué.

  >> Gladys au Noël de la Consolidated Film Industries
1920s-christmas_consolidated_film_industry-1 1920s-christmas_consolidated_film_industry-1b 1920s-christmas_consolidated_film_industry-1a

 

edward_mortenson Pendant l'été 1924, Gladys fréquente assidûment un homme, Edward Mortensen (photographie ci-contre) immigrant norvégien, bel homme qui est un bon parti, avec un travail stable. Ils se marient le 11 octobre 1924. Mais Gladys, sans doute trop frivole et incapable de partager une vie maritale, se lasse très vite de sa nouvelle vie; elle confie à Grace que la vie avec son mari est certes convenable, mais ennuyeuse à mourir et à peine quatre mois après son mariage, elle quitte le domicile conjugual le 26 mai 1925 pour aller revivre avec Grace. Le couple finit donc par divorcer. Et Gladys de reprendre sa vie légère faites d'aventures et d'amusement entre amis. Elle renoue quelques temps une liaison avec Charles Stanley Gifford.
En 1924, elle retourne tout de même dans le Kentucky afin de revoir ses enfants mais ces derniers sont restés trop longtemps éloignés de leur mère, et aussi probablement manipulés; pour eux, leur mère n'est qu'une étrangère. Gladys se résoud à laisser la garde définitive à leur père.

>> Certificat de mariage avec Mortensen
1924-10-11-mortensen_wedding_certificate-1  1924-10-11-mortensen_wedding_certificate-2 

>> Gladys (2ème en partant de la droite) et des amies
avec annotation de Marilyn

1920s-gladys_friends-1a 
1920s-gladys_friends-1b 

>> vers 1924 - Portraits de Gladys
 1924-gladys-1-2 1924-gladys-1-1 1924-gladys-1-3
1924-gladys-1-4 1924-gladys-1-5 1924-gladys-1-various

A la fin de l'année 1925, Gladys se retrouve enceinte. Elle donne naissance à une petite fille qu'elle prénomme Norma Jeane Mortenson (future Marilyn Monroe) le 1er juin 1926. A l'hôpital, dont le séjour est payé grâce à une collecte de ses collègues, elle affirme que ses deux premiers enfants sont décédés. Elle déclare que le "père" de l'enfant est Martin Edward Mortensen, son précédent mari, mais il semblerait que le père soit Charles Stanley Gifford, son collègue qu'elle fréquente épisodiquement depuis 1923 et qui l'aurait abandonné dès qu'il aurait su qu'elle était enceinte. Cependant, des biographes citent d'autres pères potentiels, tous des collègues de Gladys: Harold Rooney, Clayton MacNamara, ou encore Raymond Guthrie qui avait fait une cour enflammée à Gladys au cours de l'année 1925.
Plusieurs années après, Gladys sympathisera avec une jeune infirmière Rose Anne Cooper qui rapportera les propos de Gladys: "Elle disait qu'elle avait été intime avec un certain nombre d'hommes et elle parlait de son passé, disant ouvertement que lorsqu'elle était jeune, elle était 'très sauvage' comme elle disait. Cependant, pour elle, le seul genre d'intimité pouvant mener à une grossesse était celle qu'elle avait partagé avec 'Stan Gifford'. Elle avait toujours été ennuyée par le fait que personne ne semblait vouloir la croire, mais que c'était la vérité. Elle disait que même sa propre mère ne la croyait pas. 'Tout le monde pensait que je mentais ou que je ne le savais pas. Je savais. J'ai toujours su', racontait-elle".
Elle ne réclamera jamais de soutien ni moral ni financier à Charles Stanley Gifford.
Marilyn Monroe racontera plus tard: "Elle ne parlait presque jamais sauf pour dire "Ne fais pas tant de bruit, Norma." Elle me disait ça même quand j'étais au lit le soir avec un livre. Même le bruit d'une page de livre qu'on tournait l'agaçait. Il y avait un objet dans l'appartement de ma mère qui me fascinait. C'était une photographie accrochée au mur. Il n'y avait rien d'autre sur les murs que cette photographie encadrée. Chaque fois que je rendais visite à mère, je restais plantée devant en retenant mon souffle tellement j'avais peur qu'elle m'ordonne d'arrêter de la regarder. Un jour, elle m'a surprise ainsi, mais elle ne m'a pas grondée, bien au contraire. Elle m'a fait monter sur une chaise pour que je la vois mieux. Elle m'a dit :"C'est ton père." J'étais tellement bouleversée que j'ai failli tomber de la chaise. C'était si bon d'avoir un père, de pouvoir regarder sa photo et de savoir que j'étais de lui. Et quelle merveilleuse photo, en plus ! Il était coiffé d'un grand chapeau mou qu'il portait incliné sur le côté. Il avait des yeux rieurs et pleins de vie et une petite moustache à la Clark Gable. Cette photo me réconfortait... J'ai demandé à ma mère comment il s'appelait. Elle ne m'a pas répondu. Elle est allée s'enfermer dans sa chambre." 

>> 01/06/1926 - Certificats et Acte de naissance de Norma Jeane
1926-06-01-birth_certificate-1    1926-06-01-birth_certificate-3  
1926-06-01-birth_certificate-2

Après la naissance de l'enfant, Gladys rentre chez elle avec son bébé, au 5454 Wilshire Boulevard. Mais le 13 juin 1926, soit douze jours après la naissance de Norma Jeane, Gladys place le bébé dans une famille d'accueil -les Bolender- qui vivent à Hawthorn, à environ 25 km de chez elle, et non loin d'où vit Della Mae. Gladys avait echoué dans son rôle de mère avec ses deux premiers enfants, et avec son travail à plein temps et son goût pour les plaisirs et sorties, elle est incapable d'élever une enfant. C'est d'ailleurs sa mère Della Mae qui lui a conseillé de placer le bébé chez une famille d'accueil, les Bolender, un couple sérieux et dévot qu'elle connait bien, puisqu'ils sont voisins. Cependant, cette situation semble n'être que temporaire pour Gladys: elle s'installe quelques temps chez les Bolender, avant de retourner vivre chez elle et de verser 25 Dollars par mois à la famille d'accueil. Elle rend aussi visite à sa fille le week-end, comme le racontera Wayne Bolender: "Gladys venait presque tous les samedis vers midi. Il lui arrivait de passer la nuit ici, mais généralement, elle avait un rendez vous le samedi soir ou bien elle était invitée à une soirée, auquel cas elle repartait pour Hollywood au bout de quelques heures." Marilyn racontera plus tard que quand sa mère venait la voir, jamais elle ne lui montrait une marque d'affection; elle lui parlait à peine, ne l'embrassait pas et ne lui souriait pas: "C'était la belle dame qui souriait jamais. Je l'avais vue souvent auparavant mais je ne savais pas exactement qui elle était. Quand je lui ai dit:"Bonjour Maman", elle m'a regardée avec stupeur. Elle ne m'avait ni embrassée ni prise dans ses bras, elle ne m'avait jamais tellement parlé."
Sans doute les Bolender aurait peut être voulu adopter Norma Jeane, comme ils l'ont fait avec d'autres enfants dont ils s'occupaient, mais Gladys s'y est opposée, espérant reprendre un jour sa fille.
Le 18 août 1926, le divorce d'avec Mortenson est prononcé.

>> 1926 - Gladys et Norma Jeane
1926-gladys_with_nj-1-2 21604_0717_9_lg  1926-gladys_with_nj-1-3

Au début de l’année 1927, Gladys s'installe chez sa mère Della Mae qui rencontre de sérieux problèmes de santé; elle est notamment atteinte de fréquentes infections respiratoires. Malgré le surcroît de transport en trolley pour aller à son travail, Gladys s'occupe de sa mère et se retrouve ainsi aussi dans la même rue des Bolender, ce qui lui permet alors de voir plus fréquemment sa fille.
La maladie du coeur de sa mère s'aggrave rapidement, suivie d'une profonde dépression: elle souffre de délires, d'euphorie, de sautes d'humeur, de colères et d' hallucinations. Elle est hospitalisée au Norwalk State Hospital  le 4 août 1927 où on lui diagnostique une myocardite aiguë (inflammation du coeur et des tissus environnants ) et elle y décède le 23 août 1927, à l'âge de 51 ans, d'un arrêt cardiaque pendant une crise de folie. Gladys s'occupe des funérailles, faisant enterrer sa mère auprès du premier mari de celle-ci et père de Gladys, Otis Elmer Monroe, au Rose Hill Cemetery, à Whittier. Gladys sombre dans la déprime, mais parvient à faire face au deuil et reprend son activité de monteuse pour les studios de cinéma (à la Columbia et à la RKO).

>> 1928, Santa Monica - Gladys et sa fille Norma Jeane,
son frère Marion avec sa femme Olive et leur fille Ida May
 21604_0717_6_lg  1900s_NJFamily_Gladys00100  21604_0717_8_lg
1928-santa_monica-2-olive_gladys-2  1928_nj_beach_01_1 
1928_nj_beach_02_7 1928_onbeach2 
1928_nj_beach_02_2 1928_onbeach 1928_nj_beach_02_3a
1928_nj_beach_03_1 
1928-santa_monica-3-gladys_olive-1  

Pendant sept ans, Norma Jeane va rester chez les Bolender, recevant la visite de sa mère qui de temps en temps, la prenait pour un week-end. En 1933, lorsque Norma Jeane est atteinte de la coqueluche, Gladys va rester quelques jours chez les Bolender, puis quelques temps après, elle retire sa fille de chez les Bolender car la petite restait inconsolable après la mort de son chien Tippy, tué par un voisin. Marilyn se souviendra: "Un jour, ma mère est venue me voir. J'étais en train de faire la vaisselle. Elle me regardait sans dire un mot. Quand je me suis retournée, j'ai été surprise de voir ses yeux pleins de larmes. Elle m'a dit: "Je vais faire construire une maison et nous y vivrons toutes les deux. Elle sera peinte en blanc et il y aura un petit jardin derrière."
Elles vivent ensemble dans l'appartement de Gladys au 6021 Afton Place, situé près des studios de Hollywood où elle travaille comme monteuse en free-lance avec son amie Grace. Gladys et Grace emmènent parfois Norma Jeane visiter les studios d'Hollywood, mais aussi au cinéma pour aller voir les derniers films sortis. La même année, en 1933, Gladys obtient un prêt de 5000 Dollars de la Mortgage Guarantee Company de Californie pour acheter une maison meublée de six pièces, dont trois chambres, au 6812 Arbol Street, près de Hollywood Bowl. Dans la maison, il y a aussi un piano demie-queue blanc de la marque Franklin (ayant appartenu à l'acteur Fredric March) qui a séduit Gladys. Pour faire face aux charges, Gladys loue une chambre de la maison à un couple d'anglais, George Atkinson, sa femme et leur fille. Pour Norma Jeane, c'est un nouveau mode de vie, elle expliquera plus tard: "La vie devint désinvolte et tumultueuse, c'était un changement radical après ma première famille. Quand ils travaillaient, ils travaillaient dur, et le reste du temps, ils s'amusaient. Ils aimaient danser et chanter, ils buvaient et jouaient aux cartes et avaient un tas d'amis. A cause de mon éducation religieuse, j'étais affreusement choquée -j'étais persuadée qu'ils finiraient tous en enfer. Je passais des heures à prier pour eux."
A cette époque, Norma Jeane ressent les premiers attraits vers le cinéma. Pendant les vacances scolaires, elle reste des heures dans les salles de cinéma, comme elle le racontera plus tard: "J'étais assise, toute la journée, quelques fois une partie de la nuit -face à l'écran tellement grand pour une petite fille comme moi, toute seule, et j'adorais ça. Rien ne m'échappait de ce qui se passait - et il n'y avait pas de pop-corn à l'époque."
Le 17 août 1933, le fils de Gladys, Robert 'Jackie Kermit' Baker qui vit dans le Kentucky avec son père, décède à l'âge de 16 ans des suites d'une infection rénale. Le garçon était atteint d'une tuberculose osseuse déclarée après son accident à la hanche quand il était petit. Gladys n'avait plus aucun contact avec ses enfants de son premier mariage. Robert 'Jackie' n'a donc jamais revu sa mère et n'a jamais su l'existence de sa demie-soeur Norma Jeane.

>> 1933, Californie - Gladys
1933-california-gladys-1 
1933 - Gladys et sa fille Norma Jeane
1933_NJ_01_1_with_gladys 

Le 29 mai 1933, le grand-père de Gladys qu'elle n'a jamais connu, Tilford Hogan, s'est pendu. Gladys prend peur: son père et sa mère sont morts dans des hôpitaux psychiatriques, après des phases de démence; elle reste donc persuadée que ces problèmes sont héréditaires et que sa santé mentale est en jeu. Peu à peu, elle entre en dépression et est soignée par médicaments. En janvier 1934, Gladys fait une crise d'hystérie, tremblante et recroquevillée sous l'escalier. Les Atkinson se voient obligés d'appeler une ambulance qui emmène de force Gladys à l'hôpital Los Angeles General Hospital. Cet événement va marquer Norma Jeane à jamais; Marilyn se souviendra plus tard: "Soudain, il y eu un bruit épouvantable dans l'escalier, à côté de la cuisine. Je n'avais jamais rien entendu d'aussi effrayant. Des coups et des bruits sourds qui semblaient ne jamais devoir s'arrêter. J'ai dit :"Il y a quelque chose qui tombe dans l'escalier." L'anglaise m'a empêcher d'aller voir. Son mari est sorti et il est revenu dans la cuisine au bout d'un certain temps en disant: "J'ai fait appeler la police et une ambulance." J'ai demandé si c'était ma mère et il m'a répondu :"Oui, mais tu ne peux pas la voir." Je suis restée dans la cuisine et j'ai entendu des gens arriver et essayer d'emmener ma mère. Personne ne voulait que je la voie. Tout le monde me disait: "Sois mignonne, petite, reste dans la cuisine. Elle va bien. Ce n'est rien de grave!" Mais je suis sortie quand même et j'ai jeté un coup d'oeil dans l'entrée. Ma mère était là, debout. Elle hurlait et elle riait en même temps. Ils l'ont emmenée à l'hopital spychiatrique de Norwalk. Celui où on avait emmené le père de ma mère et ma grand mère quand ils avaient commencé à hurler et à rire ( ..) J'ai longtemps continué à entendre le bruit épouvantable dans les escaliers, avec ma mère qui hurlait et riait pendant qu'ils l'entrainaient hors du havre familial qu'elle avait tenté de construire pour moi". En février 1934, Gladys est autorisée à rentrer chez elle, mais elle est à nouveau hospitalisée pendant plusieurs mois dans un asile de Santa Monica, puis transférée au Los Angeles General Hospital et en décembre, elle rejoint le Norwalk State Hospital. Gladys va passer les quarante années suivantes entre diverses institutions. Il semble qu'elle souffrait de troubles mentaux et ne pouvait mener une vie normale hors d'un encadrement spécialisé. Cependant, les soins apportés à cette époque étaient quelques peu rudimentaires et il est possible qu'un traitement non adapté n'ait fait qu'empirer son état.
Durant cette période difficile, les Atkinson et Grace McKee s'occupent alternativement de Norma Jeane, qui parvient à voir sa mère lors de rares week-end où Gladys est autorisée à sortir; lorsque c'est le cas, Gladys, Grace et Norma Jeane vont déjeuner à l'Ambassador Hotel. Marilyn confiera: "Je veux tout simplement oublier tout le malheur, toute la misère qu'elle a eus dans sa vie, et tous ceux que j'ai eus dans la mienne. Je ne peux pas oublier, mais j'aimerais essayer. Quand je suis Marilyn Monroe et que je ne pense pas à Norma Jeane, cela marche quelquefois."
Le 15 janvier 1935, Gladys est déclarée aliénée, souffrant de schizophrénie paranoïde, par les médecins du Norwalk State Hospital. Le rapport du médecin chef déclare : "Sa maladie se caractérise par des préoccupations religieuses et par une dépression profonde et une certaine agitation. Cet état semble chronique".

Le 25 mars 1935, Grace McKee devient la représentante légale de Gladys, par décision de la Cour Supérieure de Justice de Californie. Le bilan de la situation financière de Gladys est dressé: elle dispose de 60$ sur son compte en banque, de 90$ en chèques non endossés sur une assurance, d'un meuble de radio (d'une valeur de 25$ dont 15 n'ont pas été payés et sont dus au magasin); ses dettes s'élèvent à 350$ sur une Plymouth et de 200$ d'arriérés sur le piano blanc.
Pour combler les dettes, Grace revend la voiture à son précédent propriétaire, vend le piano pour 235$, et revend le crédit de la maison.

>> 25/03/1935 - Décision de la Cour: Grace tutrice des biens de Gladys
et situation financière de Gladys:
1935-03-25-grace_guardian-1 1935-03-25-grace_guardian-2 1935-03-25-grace_guardian-bilan 

>> Etat des finances de Gladys - 28/09/1936
1936-09-28-report_account-1 1936-09-28-report_account-2 1936-09-28-report_account-3
1936-09-28-report_account-4 1936-09-28-report_account-5 1936-09-28-report_account-6
1936-09-28-report_account-7 1936-09-28-report_account-8 

En 1938, Gladys tente de s'enfuir du Norwalk State Hospital. Elle racontera avoir reçu des appels téléphoniques de Martin Edward Mortensen, son précédent époux, ce qui est impossible car celui-ci est décédé dans un accident de moto neuf ans auparavant. Cependant, il existe un homonyme, un homme se nommant aussi Martin Edward Mortensen, vivant à Riverside Country en Californie, qui revendiquera bien longtemps après la paternité de Marilyn et pour lequel on retrouvera dans ses affaires après sa mort, le 10 février 1981, des documents le liant à Gladys (les papiers de mariage et divorce, mais aussi le certificat de naissance de Norma Jeane).
Après cette tentative d'évasion qui a échouée, Gladys est transférée au Agnew State Asylum, un établissement adapté pour les personnes souffrant d'hallucinations schizophrénique, situé à San José, près de San Francisco. C'est à partir de ce moment que Norma Jeane verra que très peu sa mère. Un jour, Grace emmène Norma Jeane à la pension de la clinique où vit Gladys: cette dernière ne lui adresse pas la parole jusqu'au moment de partir, où elle dit à sa fille: "Tu avais de si jolis petits pieds".

Durant l'Hiver 1938, Gladys écrit une lettre à sa fille Berniece, l'envoyant à Flat Lick chez les parents de Jasper. Mais ces derniers étant décédés, le facteur a transmis la lettre au frère de Jasper qui vit aussi à Flat Lick, qui la renvoie à son tour à Jasper qui vit désormais à Pineville, en Louisianne. Dans cette lettre, Gladys explique à Berniece qu'elle a une demi-soeur, Norma Jeane, âgée de douze ans, qui vit chez les Goddard (Grace McKee s'est mariée à Ervin Goddard en 1935). Gladys supplie aussi Berniece de la sortir de l'Agnew State Hospital, et lui donne l'adresse de sa tante (la soeur de Della Monroe), Dora Hogan Graham, qui vit à Portland, dans l'Oregon. Berniece répond à sa mère en lui informant qu'elle a contacté diverses personnes (dont Dora) et qu'elle va tout tenter pour la faire sortir.

>> Etat des finances de Gladys - 07/02/1940
1940-02-07-report_account-1 1940-02-07-report_account-2 1940-02-07-report_account-3
1940-02-07-report_account-4 1940-02-07-report_account-5 

>> 1940s - Gladys et Grace (McKee) Goddard
1940s-gladys_grace-1 

>> 1940s, Reno - Gladys
1940s-gladys-reno-1

En 1945, Dora Hogan Graham, qui vit à Portland, intervient auprès des autorités pour qu'on laisse sortir Gladys, qui en retour, accepte de vivre avec sa tante pendant un an. L'été 1945, l'hôpital 'Agnew State Hospital' la laisse alors sortir avec 200$ et deux robes, déclarant que Gladys ne représente plus un danger ni pour elle, ni pour les autres. Gladys part vivre chez sa tante Dora et trouve du travail en faisant le ménage et effectuant des soins non-médicaux à des patients en convalescence et invalides. Elle s'habille de blanc, comme une infirmière. Dora écrit une lettre à Berniece en lui racontant que Gladys s'intéresse beaucoup à la Science Chrétienne, et qu'elle souhaite soigner des gens malades sans l'apport de la médecine.
En novembre et décembre 1945, Norma Jeane voyage dans l'Ouest des Etats-Unis avec le photographe André DeDienes pour un reportage photographique: ils vont jusque dans le désert de Mojave et dans le Nevada. Lors de leur passage dans l'Oregon, ils font une halte à Portland pour rendre visite à Gladys où ils arrivent les bras chargés de cadeaux. Mais après des années passées dans des institutions, Gladys est devenue totalement asociale, fermée sur elle-même et très amaigrie. Ces retrouvailles vont marquer profondément Norma Jeane: e
lle embrasse sa mère et lui montre les photos prises par Dedienes. Gladys reste murée dans son silence, vissée dans son fauteuil. DeDienes racontera plus tard: "La rencontre entre la mère et la fille manquait de chaleur. Elles n'avaient rien à se dire. Mrs Baker était une femme d'un âge incertain, émaciée et apatique, ne faisant aucun effort pour nous mettre à l'aise. Norma Jeane faisait bonne figure. Elle avait déballé nos cadeaux: une écharpe, du parfum, des chocolats. Ils restèrent où nous les avions posés, sur la table. Il y eut un silence. Puis Mrs Baker cacha son visage dans ses mains et sembla nous oublier complètement. C'était très pénible. Apparement, ils l'avaient laissée sortir trop tôt de l'hopital." Déboussollée, Norma Jeane s'agenouille auprès de sa mère qui finit par lui murmurer: "J’aimerais tellement vivre avec toi Norma Jeane." Retenant ses larmes, Norma Jeane embrasse sa mère et lui laisse son adresse et son numéro de téléphone avant de partir. En reprenant la route avec Dedienes, elle restera inconsolable, ne cessant de pleurer. En effet, Gladys reste plus ou moins une étrangère pour Norma Jeane qui ne l'a, finalement, que très peu connue. De plus, Norma Jeane vient de signer un contrat de modèle et aspire à faire carrière. Elle se sent donc incapable de prendre soin de Gladys qui souffre de problèmes mentaux.

Gladys insiste et ne cesse d'implorer sa fille Norma Jeane lui réclamant de l'aide. En avril 1946, Norma Jeane cède et envoie de l'argent à sa mère pour qu'elle la rejoigne à Los Angeles. Elles partagent deux petites chambres louées par Norma Jeane, en dessous de chez "tante" Ana Lower, sur Nebraska Avenue. Gladys n'est pas en forme; elle est obsédée par la Science Chrétienne et découvre, par le biais des pouvoirs guérisseurs d'Ana Lower, les possibilités de l'esprit sur la maladie et étudie ainsi dévotement de nombreux livres sur ce thème. Elle assiste aussi aux services de l'Eglise tous les dimanches. Eleanor 'Bebe' Goddard (la fille de Doc Goddard, le mari de Grace McKee) racontera: "Elle errait et était imprévisible. Elle était docile mais absente."
Un jour, Gladys, toute de blanc vêtue, se rend à l'agence de modèle de sa fille (BlueBook) et déclare à la directrice Emmeline Snively, en lui saisissant la main: "Je suis simplement venue vous remercier personnellement pour tout ce que vous avez fait pour Norma Jeane. Vous lui avez offert une nouvelle vie."
En août 1946, Berniece se rend à Los Angeles avec sa fille Mona Rae pour rendre visite à sa famille. A leur arrivée à l'aéroport de Burbank, Norma Jeane, Grace McKee, Ana Lower et Gladys sont venues les accueillir.

>> Août 1946, Santa Monica - Gladys et ses filles
(Berniece et Norma Jeane) et sa petite fille Mona Rae
 1946_NJ_with_family_santamonicabeach_020_1 1946_NJ_with_family_santamonicabeach_030_1  

1946-08-berniece_gladys_nj-1  1946-08-berniece_gladys-1

>> Août 1946, Los Angeles, dans un restaurant chinois:
Berniece, Mona Rae, Grace, Norma Jean, Ana Lower et Gladys.
1946-08-LA-berniece_monarae_grace_friend_nj_ana_gladys

Après plusieurs semaines, Gladys rechute et doit à nouveau rejoindre l'hôpital Norwalk State Asylum. Grâce à ses salaires gagnés en tant que modèle, Norma Jeane envoie de l'argent pour améliorer la prise en charge de sa mère.
Gladys entretient une correspondance épistolaire avec Margaret Cohen (la mère de la petite Norma Jeane qu'elle gardait à Louisville en 1923); elle lui confie, dans une de ses lettres envoyée l'été 1946: "Mes propres filles ne me comprennent pas, elles n'essayent même pas". Gladys lui demande aussi des nouvelles de Norma Jeane Cohen, âgée désormais de 26 ans, souhaitant reprendre contact avec elle.
En février 1948, Gladys sort de l'hôpital et emmènage chez Ana Lower; elle trouve un emploi de femme de ménage.
Le 30 mai 1948, Gladys écrit une lettre à Berniece, lui reprochant notamment le fait qu'elle ne lui ait pas annoncée la mort de Tante Ana Lower, décédée le 14 mars, mais aussi car Berniece n'a pas répondu à sa dernière lettre:

>> Juin 1948 - Lettre de Gladys à Grace
1948-06-gladys_letter_to_grace  

>> Lettre non datée de Gladys à Norma Jeane
(merci à Eduardo)

gladys_letter-1 

Le 20 avril 1949, Gladys épouse John Stewart Eley, un électricien originaire de Boise, dans l'Idaho. Norma Jeane apprend la nouvelle par une lettre que lui a envoyée Grace. Mais John est déjà marié et son épouse vit à Boise.
En 1951, Marilyn demande à Inez Melson, l'administratrice de ses affaires, de faire des visites régulières à Gladys, pour s'assurer de son bien être tandis qu'elle continue à fréquenter diverses institutions. En 1952, Inez Melson persuade Marilyn qu'elle la désigne comme tutrice légale de Gladys. Gladys travaille dans une clinique privée à Homestead Lodge, près de Pasadena.
Le 23 avril 1952, John Stewart Eley meurt d'une affection cardiaque à l'âge de 62 ans et Gladys se retrouve veuve. La semaine suivante, l'existence de la mère de Marilyn est révélée par le journaliste Erskine Johnson: Marilyn a toujours dit qu'elle était orpheline; mais avec le scandale du calendrier où elle a posé nue en 1949 et qui fait surface cette année là, des journalistes curieux enquêtent et découvrent que sa mère n'est pas morte, contrairement à ce qu'a encore déclaré Marilyn la semaine précédente dans une interview pour Redbook, et que celle-ci a fréquenté des institutions psychiatriques. Marilyn accorde alors une interview, publiée le 3 mai 1952, qu'elle a préparée avec Sidney Skolsky, et y déclare notamment: "Je n'ai jamais connu ma mère intimement et, depuis que je suis adulte, je suis entrée en contact avec elle. A présent, je l'aide et veux continuer à l'aider tant qu'elle aura besoin de moi." Puis Marilyn reçoit alors une lettre implorante de sa mère: "Chère Marilyn, Je t'en prie, ma chère fille, j'aimerais avoir de tes nouvelles. Je n'ai que des soucis ici, et j'aimerais bien partir le plus vite possible. Je préfèrerais avoir l'amour de mon enfant que sa haine. Tendrement, ta mère." Gladys continue à entretenir aussi des relations avec sa fille Berniece: elle lui rend visite en Floride au cours de l'année 1952.

>> 1952, Floride - Berniece, Gladys et Mona Rae
1952-florida-berniece_gladys_monarae-1 

Le 9 février 1953, d'après les conseils de Grace McKee, Marilyn fait transférer Gladys dans un établissement plus confortable, l'institution privée Rockhaven Sanatorium, à Verduga City, afin de protéger sa mère contre les journalistes trop curieux; Marilyn paie alors 300$ par mois pour les frais d'hospitalisation.
Marilyn racontera: "Longtemps, j'ai eu peur de m'apercevoir que je ressemblais à ma mère et que je finirais comme elle dans un asile de fous. Quand je déprime, je me demande si je vais craquer, comme elle. Mais j'éspère devenir plus forte."

>> 22/03/1956 - chèque de 600 Dollars de Marilyn
adressé à Inez Melson pour l'hospitalisation de Gladys
(merci à Eduardo)

1956-03-22-check 

En 1959, Marilyn assure définitivement l'avenir financier de sa mère par un fonds de fidéicommis (qui désigne une disposition juridique -souvent testamentaire- par laquelle un bien est versé à une personne via un tiers). Pour Noël 1959, Gladys envoie ses souhaits à Marilyn, signant toujours du nom de son dernier époux décédé: "Loving Good Wishes, Gladys Pearl Eley":

>> Noël 1959 - Carte de voeux de Gladys pour Marilyn:
1959-12-gladys_letter_to_mm

Au cours du premier trimestre 1960, pendant que Marilyn tourne le film "Le Milliardaire" ("Let's Make Love"), elle donne une interview au journaliste George Belmont, à qui elle évoque notamment son enfance et sa mère. Elle déclare alors que sa mère est "morte".
Le 5 août 1962, le monde entier apprend le décès de Marilyn Monroe. Gladys en est très affectée; elle ne se rend pas à l'enterrement et fera plusieurs tentatives de suicide. Le 22 août 1962, elle écrit une lettre à Inez Melson, la remerciant de son soutien et rappelant qu'elle avait enseigné la science chrétienne à Norma Jeane: "I am very greatefull for your kind and gracious help toward Berniece and myself and to dear Norma Jeane. She is at peace and at rest now and may our God bless her and help her always. I wish you to know that I gave her (Norma) Christian Science treatment for approximately a year."

>> 22/08/1962 - Lettre de Gladys à Inez Melson:
1962-08-22-gladys_letter_to_inez

Un jour, en 1963, elle s'enfuit de Rockhaven Sanatorium; elle est retrouvée le lendemain, dans une église de San Fernando Valley, serrant dans ses mains une bible et un livre de prières de la Science chrétienne.
Inez Melson déclarera: "La mère de Marilyn se consacrait toute entière à sa religion, la Science chrétienne, et était principalement préoccupée par le mal. C'est là que se situait ses dysfonctionnements. Elle pensait avoir fait quelque chose de mal dans sa vie, et qu'elle serait punie pour cela."

>> 1963 - Gladys
1963-gladys-1-1 1963-gladys-1-2  

Le 27 avril 1966, elle est transférée au Camarillo State Hospital où elle y reste un an. Elle reçoit régulièrement la visite de Inez Melson:

>> 1966 - Gladys et Inez Melson
-photographies-

1966-gladys_with_berniece-1 1966-gladys_with_berniece-3 1966-gladys_with_berniece-2
-captures-
1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap01 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap02 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap03

1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap04 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap05 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap06
1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap07 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap08 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap09
1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap10 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap11 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap12
-video-

En 1967, elle part vivre chez sa fille Berniece en Floride.
En 1970, c'est sous le nom de Gladys Eley qu'elle intègre la maison de retraite Collins Court Home, à Gainesville en Floride. Aux journalistes curieux qui tentent de l'approcher pour qu'elle leur évoque sa célèbre fille Marilyn, elle leur répond: "Ne me parlez pas de cette femme !". En 1972, elle déclare à James Haspiel, un fan de Marilyn qui l'a connu et suivi pendant de nombreuses années: "Je n'ai jamais voulu qu'elle fasse ce métier !"
En 1980, c'est Lawrence Cusak qui devient son tuteur légal.
Le 11 mars 1984, c'est à l'âge de 81 ans que Gladys meurt d'une crise cardiaque; elle est incinérée.

>> Années 1980s - Gladys
1980s-gladys-1-1  1980s-gladys-1-2
1980s-gladys-1-1a  1983-gladys-1-1


> sources pour l'article:
Livres:
Marilyn Monroe, L'encyclopédie, de Adam Victor The secret life of Marilyn Monroe, de J. Randy Taraborelli / Marilyn Monroe de Roger Baker
Sur le blog:
enfance de Marilyn évoquée dans l' Interview de Georges Belmont
Sur le web: biographie d'Yria sur le forum mmonline /
article "family" sur marilynmonroesplace / fiche Gladys sur findagrave , sur geni , sur imdb


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.

Enregistrer

14 novembre 2014

Property from the life and career of MM - 12/2014 - Docs


 Documents papiers


Lot 708: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTER REGARDING BOND
 A Marilyn Monroe received letter. The envelope is addressed to Marilyn Monroe at 1215 Lodi Place in Los Angeles from Opal M. Clark and postmarked July 22, 1948. A note to Monroe reads in full, “Here is your bond Norma – please sign the enclosed receipt + return to me. Hope all is well with you. With love – Opal.” At the time, Monroe was living at the Hollywood Studio Club, a residence for women in the film industry.
4 1/4 by 9 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $384 - Estimate: $150 - $300
juliens-mmauction2014-lot708


Lot 709: MARILYN MONROE EMPLOYMENT RECORDS
 A group of seven Marilyn Monroe employment documents from Twentieth Century-Fox Studios. The documents date from 1947 to 1949 and include two employment opening and four employment closing notices as well as one change of rate card. These cards represent Monroe’s first forays into film work. Notable are the cards filled out during her work on The Dangerous Years (20th Century, 1947), indicated on the opening and closing cards as being for a “Sol Wurtzel Prod.,” and a starting card dated August 27, 1949, for her role as Clara in the film A Ticket to Tomahawk (20th Century, 1950), indicating that Monroe flew to the filming location with a closing card from this film dated October 21, 1949, stating that filming was finished. One closing card indicates her first firing from Fox. Dated August 25, 1947, the card explains “Option Not Exercised” after only a year; the studio opted not to take Monroe under contract again at that time. Monroe changed her name from Norma Jeane to Marilyn Monroe when she got her contract with Fox in August 1946. Monroe’s salary during this period ranged from $125 to $200 per week.
4 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$2,560 - Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot709


 

Lot 718: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CHECK
 A Marilyn Monroe signed check dated September 15, 1957, check number 35, in the amount of $12.12 paid to the New York Telephone Company from a Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. account with Colonial Trust Company. The check information is typed and signed by Monroe in blue ink. Below her signature is her title with Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc., President.
3 by 8 1/4 inches
 Winning bid:$7,040 - Estimate: $2,500 - $3,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot718 


 Lot 720: MARILYN MONROE FILM SYNOPSIS FROM ARCHIVE
 A five-page screenplay synopsis for the unproduced film "Miss Nobody" written by Garson Kanin. The typed document heading reads “ Original Screenplay – 140pp.” and “Henry F. Greenberg/ May 5, 1950.” It is presumed Monroe was approached to participate in the production.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$192 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot720


 Lot 722: MARILYN MONROE TELEPHONE COMPANY DOCUMENTS
 A Marilyn Monroe telephone bill and other telephone company related documents. Items include an April 1951 telephone bill for $180.41 (when adjusting for inflation that is almost $1600 in the 2013 economy); a bill pay reminder; an itemized list of long-distance calls from the phone company (undated); a rate information card addressed to "M. Monroe," postmarked May 1961; and other telephone company related items.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$448 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot722 


 Lot 725: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM CARY GRANT
 A Cary Grant typed, signed letter to Marilyn Monroe. The undated letter, written on Grant's personal stationery, followed a recent trip by Grant and his wife to visit troops in Japan and Korea. The letter was accompanied by a gift Grant was asked by a soldier to take to Monroe. Grant also offers his assistance if Monroe should also go visit the troops in Asia. The pair worked together on the film Monkey Business (20th Century, 1952). A notation on verso is written in pencil in an unknown hand.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$3,840 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot725 


Lot 728: MARILYN MONROE EMPLOYMENT RECORDS
 A 22-piece collection of Marilyn Monroe’s earning records from 20th Century Fox. The quarterly records span from 1946 to 1953 beginning after Monroe’s first contract with Fox in August 1946. The weekly accounting of Monroe’s salary illustrates the actress’ rise in star power throughout her career at Fox. In 1953, 20th Century Fox released three Monroe films: How to Marry A Millionaire, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Niagra. The records reflect two different employee numbers for Monroe, 63015 and 661616, most likely due to the break in her contract with Fox.
Each, 5 1/2 by 11 inches
 Winning bid:$6,250 - Estimate: $5,000 - $7,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot728


Lot 739: JANE RUSSELL HANDWRITTEN LETTER TO MARILYN MONROE
 A Jane Russell handwritten letter to Marilyn Monroe. The 10-page letter is written on onionskin paper. Russell starts the letter "Dear Little One" and signs it "Old Jane." In the letter, Russell addresses rumors of Monroe's divorce from Joe DiMaggio and encourages Monroe to rely on religion to help her through this rough period. She discusses Hollywood marriages, including her own, and gives her opinion on fellow actresses' marriages. In part, Russell writes, "I've never written such a letter - But I love you very dearly + I don't want you to be unhappy ever... ."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid: $3,200 - Estimate: $500 - $700
juliens-mmauction2014-lot739a juliens-mmauction2014-lot739b


 

Lot 747: MARILYN MONROE LETTER RECEIVED WHILE IN KOREA
 A typed letter sent to Marilyn Monroe by Major General Lionel McGarr. Dated February 16, 1954, McGarr thanked Monroe for her appearance, stating that she provided relaxation and a boost for morale. Monroe entertained troops in Korea February 16-19, 1954, while on her honeymoon with Joe DiMaggio. Accompanied by the original hand-delivered transmittal envelope typed “Miss Marilyn Monroe/ ‘Marilyn Monroe VIP Show'/ Korea.”
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $768 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot747 


Lot 748: MARILYN MONROE ENCLOSURE CARDS AND MESSAGES
 A group of Marilyn Monroe received floral enclosure cards and other personal cards from friends and family members, including Freddie Fields, “all the boys at M.C.A.," Patsy & Rose D’Amore, “Judy & Jay,” “Aunt Allis,” “Sydney,” Arthur O’Connell, Vernon Scott and others, with personal messages to Monroe. Accompanied by a note written in an unknown hand on Beverly Hills Hotel stationery regarding “M. McCarthy” and a typed message dated November 8, 1954, for Mrs. DiMaggio regarding a cousin. This note has a handwritten notation that reads “he is ??”.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 6 3/4 by 5 1/4 inches
Winning bid: $576 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot748 


Lot 749: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM SID ROSS
 A two-page handwritten letter from Sid Ross to Marilyn Monroe. Written on American Airlines stationery, postscript on a third page. The letter expresses Ross’ regret that Monroe couldn’t meet with him and goes on to offer her advice, including “Don’t be the baseball; be the bat.” Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope postmarked May 17, 1953. Ross wrote an article about Monroe in 1952, and his brother, photographer Ben Ross, had three sittings with Monroe in the early 1950s.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 1/4 by 7 1/4 inches
 Winning bid: $640 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot749 


Lot 750: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS FROM LOTTE GOSLAR
 A pair of letters received by Marilyn Monroe from her teacher and friend, mime Lotte Goslar. Both letters are from January 1954. One is a single-sided handwritten note. The other is handwritten on two-pages, double sided, in which Goslar congratulates Monroe on her marriage to Joe DiMaggio.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
Winning bid: $448 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot750 


 

Lot 752: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM JOE DiMAGGIO
 A Joe DiMaggio three-page handwritten letter to Marilyn Monroe postmarked October 9, 1954. DiMaggio dates the letter as "Saturday - a.m." and greets Marilyn "Dear Baby." The letter came to Marilyn on the heels of her October 6th announcement to the press that she and DiMaggio were divorcing. In the letter DiMaggio discusses watching the announcement. The letter reads in part, "Don't know what you're thoughts are about me, - but I can tell you I love you sincerely, - way deep in my heart, irregardless of anything." Accompanied by original transmittal envelope addressed to the house the couple shared in Beverly Hills, California.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$78,125 - Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot752


Lot 753: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM TOM NEAL
 A five-page handwritten letter to Marilyn Monroe from actor Tom Neal. Neal reminds Monroe where they had met previously and offers her support and encouragement during her divorce from Joe DiMaggio. Citing his time in the media spotlight due to his love triangle with Barbara Payton and Franchot Tone, Neal writes in part “Marriage is rough enough without taking on an added burden of marrying someone who doesn’t understand the film industry.” Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope postmarked October 1954.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$512 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot753


Lot 754: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM SAM SHAW
 A 16-page letter from Sam Shaw to Marilyn Monroe. Handwritten on small notebook paper. Shaw has labeled two pages “7.” He discusses an art opening that he went to and Monroe’s marriage to and divorce from Joe DiMaggio. Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope postmarked December 3, 1954.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
7 1/4 by 4 1/4 inches
 Winning bid:$1,562.50 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot754


Lot 755: MARILYN MONROE SEVEN YEAR ITCH TELEGRAM
 A Western Union telegram sent to Marilyn Monroe by Twentieth Century-Fox Studios dated December 23, 1954. The telegram summons Monroe to meet with Lew Schreiber regarding The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) on December 28, 1954.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$ 1,280 - Estimate: $400 - $600 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot755


Lot 758: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM SAM SHAW
 A three-page handwritten letter from Sam Shaw to Marilyn Monroe. The letter discusses a film Shaw has just seen and a postscript that continues on to the back of the third page discussing Monroe’s interest in collecting art. Below the postscript Shaw has drawn a caricature of Monroe with paintings in frames. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope postmarked December 8, 1954.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
12 1/2 by 8 inches
Winning bid: $1,125 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot758a juliens-mmauction2014-lot758b


Lot 759: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM SAM SHAW
 A 12-page handwritten letter from Sam Shaw to Marilyn Monroe. In the letter, Shaw offers his advice for dealing with the press and Monroe’s public image. On the back of the last page Shaw has drawn a caricature of his family with the text “We all love Marilyn/ the Shaws.” Reads in part “I found a shot of you that we both liked...I think this photo puts me in Milton’s class.” Shaw has included a newspaper clipping of Monroe dancing with Clark Gable. Accompanied by two envelopes, the first is stamped without postmark, the second is postmarked December 9, 1954.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
9 by 6 inches
Winning bid: $1,125 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot759a juliens-mmauction2014-lot759b
juliens-mmauction2014-lot759c 


Lot 760: MARILYN MONROE 1954 LETTER FROM SAM SHAW
 A one-page handwritten letter from photographer, artist and producer Sam Shaw to Marilyn Monroe. Shaw chastises Monroe for sending neither a hello nor a goodbye note to him and references Shaw giving Monroe’s address to Dame Edith Sitwell. With a drawing on reverse of a grave with a shovel and a tombstone that reads “Here lies his [drawing of a heart] and luve [sic] gone but no [sic] forgotten.” Accompanied by original transmittal envelope postmarked December 10, 1954.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
9 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$ 2,187.50 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot760a juliens-mmauction2014-lot760b


Lot 761: MARILYN MONROE 1954 LETTER FROM HER LAWYER
 A letter written to Marilyn Monroe from her lawyer, Lloyd Wright Jr. The two-page typed, signed letter, dated October 26, 1954, discusses contracts, endorsements, with references to ghostwriter Ben Hecht and a payment due to Alfred Hayes. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $500 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot761 


Lot 763: MARILYN MONROE CARD FROM MARLON BRANDO
 An enclosure card handwritten to Marilyn Monroe from Marlon Brando. The small card has an image of Asian-inspired scene of a boat in a body of water. Reads in full, “Happy birthday Marylin [sic] from Marlon.”
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 by 4 inches
 Winning bid: $1,920 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot763 


Lot 764: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS FROM HENRY ROSENFELD
A group of three letters from Henry Rosenfeld to Marilyn Monroe, undated, written on lined notepaper. One note addressed “darling” informs Monroe of a present that Rosenfeld purchased for her on the occasion of her birthday. He closes the note, “I want you to be happy above everything else in the world. Always and always, Henry.” Rosenfeld, a wealthy New York dress manufacturer, met Monroe in 1955. They became close, and at some point he proposed to Monroe. The proposal came to nothing, but the pair remained friends.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
and Lot 756, "Julien's Summer Sale," Julien's Auctions, Las Vegas, June 26, 2009
12 by 8 inches
Winning bid: $384 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot764a juliens-mmauction2014-lot764b 


Lot 767: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM CHERYL CRAWFORD
 A letter written to Marilyn Monroe by producer/director Cheryl Crawford. The letter is typed, signed and contains a handwritten postscript. In the letter, Crawford expresses a desire to work with Monroe on future productions. Typed on Crawford’s personal stationery and dated June 8, 1955. Earlier in the year, Crawford introduced Monroe to Lee Strasberg.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 1/2 by 7 1/2 inches
 Winning bid: $320 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot767


Lot 768: MARILYN MONROE 20TH CENTURY FOX CONTRACT DISPUTE LETTER
 A letter from Twentieth Century-Fox Executive Manager Lew Schreiber to Marilyn Monroe. The single-page typed, signed letter, dated December 16, 1954, is in regard to the disagreement between Monroe and the studio over her contract. In January 1955, Monroe formally announced the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid: $1,250 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot768 


Lot 769: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM HENRY GRUNWALD
A typed and signed letter to Marilyn Monroe from Henry Grunwald hand dated "Dec. 30., 1956." The letter reads in part, "It's not the story I had wanted to do on you, of course, but I think it did you justice... ." The letter was written when Grunwald was a senior editor at TIME magazine.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid: $896 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot769 


Lot 770: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED CORRESPONDENCE
 A group of three notes sent to Marilyn Monroe. The first is a handwritten note regarding a shooting schedule, In an unknown hand signed simply with a heart.The note reads in part, "RELAX - rest and go over the scenes we worked on last Saturday." Written on the back of a TIME magazine memo sheet. The second is a handwritten note believed to have been written by photographer Zinn Arthur to Milton Greene and Monroe. Reads in full, "Milt Thanks for Tryin'. Marilyn - You're a damn good actress and my hat goes off to you - Zinn (Sin)." The third appears to be a typed telegram inviting Monroe to an event at the Ambassador Hotel.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
4 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $320 - Estimate: $400 - $600 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot770


Lot 771: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM PAT NEWCOMB
 A two-page typed memo to Marilyn Monroe from Pat Newcomb. Typed on Arthur P. Jacobs Public Relations stationery and dated May 21, 1956. Newcomb wrote regarding the importance of personally reaching out to journalists who had written about Monroe. Handwritten note and sign-off from Newcomb.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $384 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot771a juliens-mmauction2014-lot771b 


Lot 773: MARILYN MONROE RIPPED CARD FROM AMY GREENE
 A handwritten card from Amy Greene to Marilyn Monroe that has been ripped in half. On the front of the card is printed “Mrs. Milton Greene.” Dated November 10, 1954, the card gives Greene’s good wishes for Monroe's recovery and an invitation to recuperate from her surgery with the Greenes. Accompanied by a note to “Sidney” on the front of the envelope, also ripped in half, with instructions to deliver the note to Marilyn.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Original size, 3 by 4 inches
Winning bid: $125 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot773a juliens-mmauction2014-lot773b 


Lot 774: MARILYN MONROE LETTER AND CARD FROM JAMES HASPIEL
 A Marilyn Monroe received letter from superfan James Haspiel. The handwritten letter is dated June 9, 1956, and reads in part, “I hope you didn’t mind that wild ride back from the airport – it was wonderful seeing you again, + I guess we all got carried away… .” Accompanied by a “Good-Bye” card from “The Monroe Six” and original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $384 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot774a juliens-mmauction2014-lot774b


Lot 775: MARILYN MONROE BIRTHDAY AND GET WELL CARDS
 A group of seven greeting cards sent to Marilyn Monroe. The cards have birthday and get well messages. Birthday greetings: belated birthday card signed “Delosky” (undated); a belated birthday greeting from Dan Hanrahan, who has included his business card and a lengthy handwritten message (June 1961); and a birthday greeting from Betty Doktor (June 1961). Get well wishes from The Monroe Six (April 1956); Anne McDowell (April 1956); Mr. & Mrs. Henry Peterson (May 1961); and Frank Young (May 1961). Most accompanied by the original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 8 3/4 by 7 3/4 inches
Winning bid:$ 2,187.50 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot775


Lot 776: MARILYN MONROE LETTER AND CARD FROM DELOS SMITH JR.
 A double sided typed letter from Delos Smith Jr. to Marilyn Monroe. Smith wrote in reaction to a TIME magazine article and Delos own discussions with a TIME editor. Smith goes on to gossip about other Hollywood stars and praising Monroe’s appearance at The Actors Studio. Smith signed the letter “Happy Mothers Day, Delos.” Accompanied by a greeting card with a handwritten note from Smith. He signed the card “Bring that old Bus to a Stop and hurry home. Love Delos.” With original transmittal envelope postmarked May 6, 1956.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Larger, 9 by 6 inches
Winning bid: $256 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot776a juliens-mmauction2014-lot776b juliens-mmauction2014-lot776c


Lot 777: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM PAT NEWCOMB
 A typed, signed letter from Pat Newcomb to Marilyn Monroe; Milton Greene was cc’d. Dated April 24, 1956, the letter is in regard to an event for Nunnally Johnson. Typed on Arthur P. Jacobs Public Relations stationery, Newcomb references recent doctor’s orders have clamped down on Monroe’s social life in order to “complete the picture in good health.” The film Newcomb refers to was Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956), Monroe’s first film under new contract with 20th Century Fox and her newly formed company, Marilyn Monroe Productions.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $320 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot777


Lot 778: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTERS
 A group of three letters received by Marilyn Monroe. The first is a handwritten letter dated January 6, 1956, that reads in part, “I think it’s wonderful that you stood your ground and got your way.” Signed indistinctly. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope with a New York return address from “Rella.” The second is a greeting card from June Alpino with an invitation for Monroe to join her at the circus and a gift to give Monroe from a third party. Alpino has included a small black and white photograph of herself. The third is a five-page letter from “Jeanie” handwritten on Disneyland Hotel stationery. The letter mentions Jeanie and her husband Frank going to spring training and laments the fact that she hasn’t seen Monroe in more than a year. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope postmarked March 26, 1956.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $375 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot778a juliens-mmauction2014-lot778b
juliens-mmauction2014-lot778c juliens-mmauction2014-lot778d juliens-mmauction2014-lot778e 


 

Lot 779: MARILYN MONROE WESTERN COSTUME SHIPPING RECEIPTS
 A pair of shipping inventory receipts from Western Costume Company. Both are dated May 28, 1956, regarding the leasing of costume items to Marilyn Monroe Productions. Each notes that the statement should be sent to “Milton Green” [sic]. These items were most likely used in Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956), which began shooting in May.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $320 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot779 

 


Lot 783: MARILYN MONROE "THAT OLD BLACK MAGIC" DOCUMENTS
 A pair of papers with the typed lyrics of the song "That Old Black Magic," one on Chateau Marmont stationery with handwritten corrections and two smaller half sheets with the typed lyrics stapled together. Marilyn Monroe sang "That Old Black Magic" in the film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The documents are presumed to have been used to rehearse or during filming of the scene.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
Winning bid: $768 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot783 


Lot 784: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM PARADE PUBLICATIONS
 A typed, signed letter to Marilyn Monroe from Bob Jennings, a staff writer at Parade Publications Inc. Dated March 6, 1956, Jennings' letter refers to an article Jennings was writing about Korea that included Monroe. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope with numerous markings on the outside, including one that reads “important take care this afternoon!”
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$ 1,152 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot784 


Lot 785:  MARILYN MONROE PRESCRIPTION FROM LEE SEIGEL
 A Marilyn Monroe slip of paper with two prescriptions written by Fox studio physician Lee Seigel dated April 6, 1956. The prescriptions are for Diamox and Achenalin. Both appear to be prescribed for an eye issue.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$375 - Estimate: $200 - $300
juliens-mmauction2014-lot785 

 


Lot 786: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM HER ANALYST
  A handwritten letter from psychotherapist Margaret Herz Hohenberg to Marilyn Monroe on Hohenberg’s stationery and dated May 10, 1956. The letter concerns the accompanying account statement and a recent telephone session. Also present is the original transmittal envelope addressed to Monroe at Chateau Marmont. Monroe began to see Hohenberg in 1955 at the recommendation of Milton Greene.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot786


 

Lot 790: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN NOTES
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe handwritten notes. The first is pencil on lined legal paper that appears to be a Lee Strasberg quote; the page is titled “Lee S.” The second is written in pencil on a blank sheet of paper and reads “My Darling, my darling, my poppy.”
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 12 1/2 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$ 4,687.50 - Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot790 


Lot 791: MARILYN MONROE 1956 BIRTHDAY CARD FROM PETER LEONARDI
 A belated birthday card sent to Marilyn Monroe from Peter Leonardi. The card appears to be postmarked June 2, 1956. This would make it after Monroe’s break from Leonardi at a time when it was proposed Monroe had written in her journals that she was afraid of him and thought “… Peter wants to be a woman – and would like to be me – I think…” (see Fragments p. 96 and Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox by Lois Banner (p. 289-290).
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
5 by 5 inches
Winning bid: $128 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot791 


Lot 793: MARILYN MONROE SAHARA HOTEL DOCUMENTS
 A group of Marilyn Monroe Sahara Hotel documents. Dated 1956, the documents relate to Monroe’s stay at the Sahara Hotel in Phoenix, Arizona. Items include two telegrams sent to Monroe at the hotel, three hotel message slips, and a letter to Monroe written on Sahara Hotel stationery from Dr. S. Purple, with original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Sizes vary
 Winning bid: $896 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot793a juliens-mmauction2014-lot793b juliens-mmauction2014-lot793c  


Lot 794: MARILYN MONROE ARCHIVE DOCUMENTS
 A group of correspondence received by or regarding Marilyn Monroe, including a 1956, letter from Inez Melson to Florence Thomas; a March 10, 1956 letter from “Olive” to “Jean”; eight hotel telephone message slips from March and May 1956; several phone messages on scraps of paper; a handwritten note left for Monroe by Ted Harper; an invitation to The Original Wine House with handwritten note on verso from proprietor Bob Purvis; empty transmittal envelopes addressed to Monroe; and two newspaper clippings about Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 4 by 10 inches
Winning bid:$1,152 - Estimate: $300 - $500 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot794 

 


Lot 795: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED AND KEPT LETTERS
 A pair of letters received by Marilyn Monroe. The first is from Fred Libby written on Pan American World Airways stationery, addressed to Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Miller, dated July 6, 1956. Libby congratulates the pair on their recent wedding, and he says he hopes to meet Mr. Miller someday. The second letter is addressed to Monroe from a chiropractor named Jacob Kaufman. Kaufman had never met Monroe, but after hearing of her frequent illnesses, he felt compelled to write her with his advice. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope postmarked March 7, 1960.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
 Winning bid:$256 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot795a juliens-mmauction2014-lot795b 


Lot 796: MARILYN MONROE LOVE NOTE FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 A small note handwritten by Arthur Miller to Marilyn Monroe dated "Wed., April 4 - 1:12 p.m." The note reads in part, "I am deeply happy. And agonized that you're not in reach." Signed simply "A."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 by 5 inches
 Winning bid:$2,560 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot796 


Lot 798: MARILYN MONROE CARD FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller handwritten card to Marilyn Monroe dated "Christmas 1955." The front of the card is a cartoon of two despondent characters. Printed text reads, "No, I'm more depressed than you are." Under the text Miller has handwritten "You're not either." The salutation on the card reads "For Marilyn." It goes on to discuss the present that accompanied the card. Also present is the original envelope that reads simply "For Noodle."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$1,280 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot798a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot798b 


Lot 799: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller typed and handwritten love letter to Marilyn Monroe. In the letter Miller addresses Monroe as "Dearest Wife" although their wedding was a month away and his divorce not yet final. Miller has signed the letter "Art," and below his signature he has written, "Please - if I have ever made you cry, or made you one ounce sadder even for a second - forgive me. My perfect girl." Accompanied by original transmittal envelope dated April 30, 1956.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$6,875 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot799 


Lot 800: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 A typed, signed love letter from Arthur Miller to Marilyn Monroe dated April 26, 1956. The letter reads in part, "The publicity is beginning to break evidently. Winchell this morning says I call you long distance all the time...I just worry that Bob and Jane won't be getting any kind of shock out of all this that will make it harder when they meet you." The letter discusses other details of Miller's life at that time. Signed, "kiss you, Art." Miller enclosed a letter from friend Norman Rosten that reads in part, "What are your plans? We won't tell, but we're curious. Even Mary is curious. What's his rush for a divorce, she asked me last week? (As though this was brand new)." Rosten's letter also discusses the press and appears to refer to the pressure on Miller by the House Un-American Activities Committee. Also present is a London review of The Crucible and the original transmittal envelope to Monroe.  Please note that this lot comes with a single transmittal envelope.  Two were shown in the printed catalog.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$3,520 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot800 


Lot 801: ARTHUR MILLER LETTERS FROM HIS CHILDREN
 A pair of letters from Arthur Miller's children mailed by Miller to Marilyn Monroe. The first letter is a single page typed from Robert Miller and dated April 23, 1956. The second is a double-sided handwritten letter from Miller's daughter Jane. Both state they miss their father, thank him for gifts he recently gave them, and share the events of their recent days. Both also state they are sending him their footprint (not present). Jane and Robert are Miller's children with his first wife, Mary Grace Slattery. Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$100 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot801a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot801b 


Lot 802: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller two-page typed signed love letter to Marilyn Monroe dated May 9, 1956. The letter begins "Dearest, Best Person" and reads in part, "It is your suffering in the past that I respect and even bow down to. I see i often as a kind of trial to which you were cruelly put...You were placed in the jaws of this society without the protection of a family, a name, an identity; it is quite as though you were the pure victim...I do know how desperately you want to shake loose from all the dragging horrors of the past." Miller discusses his initial attraction to Monroe, his divorce, and his love for her. Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$5,312.50 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot802 


Lot 803: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller four-page typed and handwritten love letter to Marilyn Monroe dated April 29, 1956. The letter provides insight into Miller's feelings about Monroe just before their wedding. Reads in part" "But what can I do? I love you. When I love somebody I love them, I want them to be near me, to bear my children, to be my wife. You think I am so clean, so faultless, so incapable of untruth that in comparison you are defiled? I have sinned, Marilyn; I am no better than you in any way. I can hate every man you were ever with but I can't hate you." On the third page Miller has affixed a piece of petrified wood and signed the letter "Your lover, slave, friend, father, son, and Pest, Art." The fourth page, written later that same day, is additionally signed "Art." Accompanied by original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$7,040 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot803


Lot 804: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller two-page typed and handwritten love letter to Marilyn Monroe dated May 9, 1956. Miller begins the letter relaying frustration with his soon to be ex-wife Mary Grace Slattery and goes on to tell Monroe that he has disclosed their relationship to his parents and his concerns about his family and children. Miller also references the film "Viva Zapata" (20th Century, 1952), a film that Monroe wanted to work on but was denied by the studio. Miller enclosed sage in the letter and writes below his signature "A little sage brush for your pillow." He additionally asks, "And where is your footprint!!!" Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$4,160 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot804


Lot 806: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller three-page typed, signed love letter to Marilyn Monroe dated May 7, 1956. Miller discusses his upcoming divorce, tension between Monroe and Milton Greene, plans for Monroe to visit him in Reno, and their plan to introduce Monroe to Miller's children. Miller also discusses a recent argument the pair had: "I was separated from you, leaving you in a world of men lusting for you. I wanted you to be reminded that I am desirable...Nevertheless, it was still more alarming to you than it should have been -- your reaction was out of proportion... ." Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope addressed to Monroe at Hotel Chateau Marmont in Hollywood.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$4,160 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot806


Lot 807: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller handwritten love letter dated May 11, 1956. Written on two lined pages. Salutation is to "Dearest Wife." Reads in part, "I am walking around in a daze of love...I wanted to buy a wedding ring but they don't have really nice ones here - I looked... ." Miller goes on to discuss an apartment he would like to rent, recent negative articles, and his love for her. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$12,160 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
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Lot 808: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER TO ARTHUR MILLER
 A Marilyn Monroe single-page handwritten letter to Arthur Miller, presumably unsent. In the undated letter Monroe is responding to an earlier letter she received from Miller. The letter reads in part, "...there was no choice to make - the same road was always before me. So when you speak of my nobility it really wasn't so noble... ." Accompanied by two sheets of blank paper found with this letter.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$43,750 - Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot808 


Lot 810: MARILYN MONROE PUBLICITY DOCUMENTS FOR THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL
 Marilyn Monroe’s copies of publicity reports for the film “The Sleeping Prince,” which was the working title of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). One document is titled “Projected Logistical Report/ Publicity” and contains 45 pages of information. The second is a 14-page document titled “Publicity and Promotion Budget for U.K.” Both cover pages list the people cc’d on the documents. Next to Monroe’s name is a check mark, indicating that these were her personal copies.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot810a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot810b 


Lot 811: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM PAT NEWCOMB
 A typed letter to Marilyn Monroe from Pat Newcomb. The letter is cc’d to Milton Greene, undated, typed on Newcomb’s stationery. Newcomb asks if Monroe can meet with a journalist who has flown in from London. She also mentions mailing Monroe her swimsuit and asks if she can bring her anything else.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
8 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$384 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot811 


Lot 813: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN NOTE TO VERA
 A Marilyn Monroe handwritten note to "Vera." Written in pencil on a tablet of unlined white paper. The note was presumably never sent. The note reads in part, "...I never had a friend before this - I mean one that was a girl..."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$3,520 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot813 


Lot 817: ARTHUR MILLER LETTERS FROM HIS CHILDREN
 A group of four letters, two drawings, and one postcard from two of Arthur Miller’s children, Bobby and Jane, to their father and Marilyn Monroe and one letter from Jane to their pets. Most addressed “To Daddy,” one to “MMM” from Bobby Miller. Those letters that are dated are from 1958 and 1959.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
and Partial Lot 816, "Julien's Summer Sale," Julien's Auctions, Las Vegas, June 26, 2009
Largest, 9 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$ 128  -  Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot817 


Lot 818: MARILYN MONROE SENT ARTHUR MILLER MANUSCRIPT
 An Arthur Miller typed manuscript sent to Marilyn Monroe. The seven-page draft of an article that Miller wrote for LIFE magazine is about his then wife and the series of photographs she took with Richard Avedon posing as five different actresses: Lillian Russell, Marlene Dietrich, Clara Bow, Jean Harlow and Theda Bara. The manuscript contains a number of handwritten corrections. The final article was rewritten and ultimately titled "My Wife Marilyn" and appeared alongside Avedon's photographs in the December 22, 1958, issue of LIFE magazine. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$ 6,250  -  Estimate: $5,000 - $7,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot818 


Lot 819: MARILYN MONROE STATEMENT AND WARNER BROTHERS TELEGRAM
 A telegram received by Marilyn Monroe from Warner Brothers, dated May 24, 1957. The two-page telegram is in regard to Monroe’s former business partner, Milton Greene, receiving a credit on the film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Accompanied by an undated typed statement by Monroe regarding the situation with Greene, condemning his leadership of Marilyn Monroe Productions and his attempt to receive an Executive Producer credit for this film.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
Winning bid: $384 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot819a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot819b 


Lot 820: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTERS
 A pair of letters sent to Marilyn Monroe. The first is from Alex North, a neighbor in Connecticut; accompanied by transmittal envelope. The second is from Herb Martin and is written on the back of a copy of a newspaper article that mentions Martin. Both letters express a desire to see Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
Winning bid: $75 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot820a juliens-mmauction2014-lot820b juliens-mmauction2014-lot820c

 


Lot 825: LETTERS BY AND REGARDING MARILYN MONROE'S MOTHER
 A group of letters written by and regarding Marilyn Monroe's troubled mother, Gladys Eley (previously Monroe, Baker, and Mortenson). Group includes letters written by Eley while institutionalized at Rockhaven Sanitarium in Verdugo City (Montrose), California, circa late 1950s to early 1960s. Several of the letters are stamped but not postmarked, believed to have been saved from the mail by Inez Melson, who was appointed guardian of Eley. The letters reveal insight into Eley's schizophrenia. The handwritten letters are addressed to The President of the United States, Mother Church – The First Church of Christ Scientist, and a letter that was mailed to Melson from Eley. Also present is a letter from Bernice Miracle, Marilyn's sister, to Melson. Those that are dated are from the early 1960s.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
and Lot 131, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
Sizes vary
Winning bid:$6,400 - Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot825 


Lot 826: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED POSTCARDS
 Three Marilyn Monroe received postcards. The first, with an image of the Golden Gate Bridge, was sent to Monroe in Idaho in May 1956. Possibly sent by Peter Lawford, initialed indistinctly as “PL” or “RL.” The second, sent from “G,” is a postcard of La Promenade des Anglais in Nice. Sent to Monroe in May 1961. The card reads in part, “Hope your ‘Killer Kut’ is still in good shape," indicating that "G" stands for hairstylist George Masters. The third is a card sent in 1956 from Suzanne, who writes, “I hadn’t heard from you in 2 weeks so I played hookey.”
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 4 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$500 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot826a juliens-mmauction2014-lot826b


Lot 827: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM MAY REIS
 A handwritten letter from May Reis to Marilyn Monroe. The letter is written on Renvyle House Hotel stationery, dated May 10, 1961. Reis writes about her stay in Ireland and travels; signed simply “May.” Reis was Monroe’s personal secretary and friend. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 1/2 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$1,000 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot827 


Lot 828: MARILYN MONROE MEDICAL INVOICES
 A group of Marilyn Monroe medical invoices that includes invoices from Dr. D. Russell Anderson, Dr. Margaret Herz Hohenberg, dentist Paul Kniss, Dr. Edward J. Simons, and one from the offices of Dr. Myron Prinzmetal and Dr. Rexford Kennamer, among others; seven items total.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$ 437.50 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot828 


Lot 829: MARILYN MONROE FAN MAIL
 A group of more than 75 letters, photographs, religious tracts and postcards sent to Marilyn Monroe by her fans. The letters span from 1956 to 1961. The letters, mailed by Monroe's fans from around the world, offer advice, matchmaking, and get well wishes and make requests.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$4,062.50 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot829 juliens-mmauction2014-lot832b 


Lot 830: MARILYN MONROE SCRAPBOOK FROM FAN
 A scrapbook given to Marilyn Monroe by a dying fan. The 30-page book contains inspirational images and text, both handwritten and pasted in. Most of the entries are religious in nature. Accompanied by a letter from the fan.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
9 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$192 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot830 


Lot 831: MARILYN MONROE FAN MAIL
 A group of more than 100 letters, cards and postcards sent to Marilyn Monroe by her fans. The letters, which span from 1954 to 1962, were mailed from fans around the world, including a card in a mailing tube from Lyle & Scott LTD in Scotland that was signed by approximately 900 employees of the clothing manufacturer.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Sizes vary
 Winning bid:$3,200 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot831a juliens-mmauction2014-lot832b 


Lot 832: MARILYN MONROE FAN MAIL
 A group of approximately 90 letters sent to Marilyn Monroe by her fans. The majority of the letters were sent to Monroe posthumously in the second half of 1962. The letters were mailed from fans around the world.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest envelope, 7 by 4 inches
 Winning bid:$4,375 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot832a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot832b 


Lot 833: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED NOTE
 A Marilyn Monroe received typed note signed “Norm,” believed to be from Norman Rosten. The humorous undated note reads in part, “Thanks for your sweet darlin’ wire: it all helped carry me through the valley of the shadow...Did you ever think that some people just gotta stay alive?” Rosten goes on to mention recent reviews.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
4 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$ 512 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot833 


Lot 834: MARILYN MONROE POSTCARD FROM NORMAN ROSTEN
 A postcard to “Marilyn Miller” from Norman Rosten sent from Alaska. The image on the front of the card is of a nude Inuit woman in the snow. Signed simply “N,” postmarked January 26, 1959. Stamp has been cut away. Rosten wrote Marilyn: An Untold Story in 1973.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
5 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$256 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot834a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot834b 


Lot 835: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CHECK TO HEDDA ROSTEN
 A Marilyn Monroe signed check from a Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. account with Colonial Trust Company in New York City. Numbered 240, dated February 5, 1960, and written to Hedda Rosten in the amount of $65.85. The typed check also details in the upper right corner taxes removed from the gross amount due Rosten of $75.00. Rosten and her husband, Norman, were friends of Monroe’s, and Hedda was also employed by Monroe as a private secretary. Endorsed by Hedda Rosten on verso.
3 1/8 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $5,120 - Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot835 


Lot 941: MARILYN MONROE NEW YORK POST RELATED DOCUMENTS
 A Marilyn Monroe received letter from the New York Post and a typescript copy of a New York Post article. The typed signed letter is from New York Post columnist Max Lerner, dated May 10, 1961, and written on New York Post stationery. The typescript is of an article written by New York Post gossip columnist Earl Wilson circa 1961. Titled “Marilyn’s not A-Marryin’ ” and is typed on three pages.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$192 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot941a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot941b


Lot 950: MARILYN MONROE POSTCARDS FROM PAT NEWCOMB
 A pair of postcards handwritten to Marilyn Monroe by Pat Newcomb and sent to Monroe’s address, 882 North Doheny Drive in Los Angeles. Both cards were mailed in 1961, one sent from New Delhi with an image of the Taj Mahal, the other from Hong Kong with an image of the city. The addressee on both cards is “Marge Stengel.”
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$320 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot950a juliens-mmauction2014-lot950b
juliens-mmauction2014-lot950c juliens-mmauction2014-lot950d


Lot 951: MARILYN MONROE TELEGRAM FROM PRODUCER ANN MARLOWE
 A telegram to Marilyn Monroe from producer Ann Marlowe again offering Monroe a part in the teleplay Rain . Monroe appears to have dictated a response to her secretary, who wrote in pencil, “I would only consider it if Lee Strasberg directed it.” Dated June 21, 1960.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
4 1/2 by 6 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$512 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot951


Lot 952: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS FROM MCA MANAGEMENT
 A group of three letters received by Marilyn Monroe from MCA Management Ltd. The first is dated May 17, 1955, and was sent to Monroe in New York. The second is dated May 3, 1961 and is accompanied by a confidential letter typed on 20th Century Fox stationery addressed to George Chasin regarding a role for Monroe in a film adaptation of the book Zuleika Dobson by Max Beerbohm. The third is from Chasin, dated May 2, 1961, regarding two screenplays delivered via messenger to Monroe’s bungalow at the Beverly Hills Hotel, where she was recovering from sinus trouble.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
9 by 6 1/4 inches
Winning bid:$192 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot952a juliens-mmauction2014-lot952b juliens-mmauction2014-lot952c
juliens-mmauction2014-lot952d 


Lot 953: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM 20TH CENTURY FOX
 A typed, signed letter from 20th Century Fox to Marilyn Monroe Productions. Dated March 4, 1959, the letter directs Monroe to appear at the studio on April 14, 1959, to begin work on "Time and Tide," later re-titled Wild River (20th Century, 1960). Monroe was ultimately replaced by Lee Remick.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$875 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot953


Lot 954: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS REGARDING FILM ROLES
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe received letters regarding potential film projects. The first is a three-page typed, signed letter from director Melvin Frank regarding Monroe starring in The Road to Hong Kong (UA, 1962). The undated letter, typed on Beverly Hills Hotel stationery, reads in part, “I wanted to thank you again for reading our script and tell you how curiously frustrated and bumbling I felt on the phone last night… .” Signed “Mel.” The second is a two-page handwritten letter from producer Harold Hecht. The letter is in regard to an unproduced film, "Lucy Crown" that Hecht would like Monroe to star in. Accompanied by original envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
Winning bid: $512 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot954a juliens-mmauction2014-lot954b 


Lot 955: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS FROM INDUSTRY INSIDERS
 A group of four letters sent to Marilyn Monroe by members of the entertainment industry. The first is a typed, signed letter from agent Freddie Fields dated May 20, 1961. It references a script that is no longer present. The second is a typed, signed letter from agent Johnny Maschio typed on Showcase Enterprises, Inc stationery and dated April 28, 1961. Maschio asks Monroe to contact him, emphasizing "It is very important." The third letter is a typed signed solicitation from casting director Owen McLean on Twentieth Century-Fox stationery. The fourth is a typed letter, written on Twentieth Century Fox stationery, is dated May 29, 1956 that appears to be signed "Harry." It reads "Marilyn: The post art turned out fine. Thanks for your gracious help."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot955a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot955b  juliens-mmauction2014-lot955c
juliens-mmauction2014-lot955d  juliens-mmauction2014-lot955e


Lot 956: MARILYN MONROE DOCTOR'S NOTES
 A pair of handwritten doctor’s notes left for Marilyn Monroe. The first is a single double-sided sheet signed indistinctly by a doctor. The message states that the doctor left two prescriptions for Monroe with Dr. Hohenberg and gives directions on how to use the medication. The second is a small single-sided note written in an unknown hand, also about medication and notes about a doctor.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
9 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$384 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot956


Lot 957: MARILYN MONROE NOTE WRITTEN ON L.A. INSTITUTE FOR PSYCHOANALYSIS NOTE PAPER
 A Marilyn Monroe retained note written on a small piece of paper from the Los Angeles Institute for Psychoanalysis. The note refers to a Dr. Walter Greenson. Written in an unknown hand.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
5 1/4 by 4 1/4 inches
Winning bid:$437.50 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot957 


Lot 958: MARILYN MONROE PRESCRIPTION CENTER RECEIPTS AND INVOICE
 Marilyn Monroe carbon copy receipts from The Prescription Center in Beverly Hills, California. Both are dated April 22, 1961, but with separate amounts. The second receipt bears Monroe’s signature on the carbon. One receipt is primarily for prescriptions, the other for makeup and personal care items. Accompanied by an invoice from The Prescription Center.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
6 by 4 inches
Winning bid:$2,240 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot958a juliens-mmauction2014-lot958b juliens-mmauction2014-lot958c


Lot 960: MARILYN MONROE LIST OF MEDICATIONS
 A typed sheet of instructions for Marilyn Monroe’s medications. The sheet is titled “Marilyn is to take Pills as follows.” It is undated and does not name, only describes the size of the medications.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $500 - $700
juliens-mmauction2014-lot960 


Lot 961: MARILYN MONROE TELEGRAMS FROM DOCTOR AND MILTON GREENE
 A pair of telegrams received by Marilyn Monroe. The first is an urgent message from Monroe’s doctor to call, May 19, dated 1956. The second is from one-time business partner Milton Greene delivered to Monroe while she was a patient at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital, dated November 12, 1954. Greene writes that he cannot wait to be with Monroe and that he has great news. Accompanied by two Western Union transmittal envelopes.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
5 3/4 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$1,024 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot961


Lot 962: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED TELEGRAMS
 A group of three telegrams sent by friends and colleagues to Marilyn Monroe. The first is from “May,” presumed to be May Reis, that offers Monroe get well wishes. The second is from Harold Mirisch. It reads “As long as we cannot talk to each other on the telephone how about you and I having dinner Monday night love = Harold Mirisch.” The third is from Nedda Logan sent to Monroe at the Chateau Marmont on May 17, 1956. Logan raves about Monroe’s performance in Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956) which her husband directed.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 5 3/4 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot962


Lot 963: MARILYN MONROE MEDIA TELEGRAMS
 A pair of telegrams regarding Marilyn Monroe. The first was sent to Monroe on November 23, 1954 from the Showmen’s Trade Review regarding Monroe being named Female Money Making Star for 1954. The second is a two page telegram from The Daily Mirror in London sent to Pat Newcomb with interview questions for Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 5 3/4 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$448 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot963


Lot 965: MARILYN MONROE FINANCIAL DOCUMENTS
 Marilyn Monroe financial documents relating to loans. A William Morris interoffice memo cover sheet on the first document is dated “2/13/51” with details of expenditures in 1949 and 1950. The second document concerns a $74,000 loan dated May 29, 1962, only three months before Monroe’s death. Five pages total.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
Largest, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$256 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot965a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot965e
juliens-mmauction2014-lot965b juliens-mmauction2014-lot965c juliens-mmauction2014-lot965d


Lot 966: MARILYN MONROE STATEMENT REGARDING GÉRARD PHILIPE
 A Marilyn Monroe statement regarding the death of actor Gérard Philipe. Handwritten in an unknown hand on the back of a Beverly Hills Hotel notecard in blue ink. Monroe laments that she never had the opportunity to work with the French actor. Marked in pencil “Statement, Radio 1 – Europe.” Philipe died in 1959 just shy of his 37th birthday.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$437.50 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot966a juliens-mmauction2014-lot966b


Lot 967: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED INVITATIONS
 A group of three invitations sent to Marilyn Monroe. The first is a card believed to have accompanied flowers sent to Monroe at the Beverly Hills Hotel. The card invites Monroe and Pat (presumably Pat Newcomb) for a quiet evening free of "shop talk." Signed "Minerva (Nelli)." The second, written on Beverly Hills Hotel stationery, reads in part, "I just traveled 6000 miles to see you and find out how you are." It is signed "Henry." The third is written on a Beverly Hills Hotel card inviting Monroe to dine. Signed "Jack Halperin." All are accompanied by unpostmarked transmittal envelopes.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$192 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot967 


Lot 968: MARILYN MONROE CHECKS, INVOICES, BILLS AND RECEIPTS
 A group of Marilyn Monroe invoices, bills and two checks. The group includes a pair of checks from the Colonial Trust Company of New York, the first is blank except for the check number “21,” the other is dated April 14, 1956, and has been made out to Dr. C. Russell Anderson but is unsigned, written in an unknown hand; a Jurgensen’s Grocery Company invoice from April 1961 and promotional flyer, return envelope and original transmittal envelope; an invoice from Beverly Hills Music Company dated May 1961 for 28 LPs purchased by Monroe, with itemized slip, return envelopes and original transmittal envelope; an invoice from Au Petit Jean restaurant from April 1961, with original transmittal envelope; and insured postage receipts from the United States Post Office from 1956.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 5 3/4 by 11 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot968a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot968e 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot968b juliens-mmauction2014-lot968c juliens-mmauction2014-lot968d


Lot 969: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL TELEPHONE MESSAGES
 A group of 20 hotel telephone message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from May 1 to May 6, 1961, and include messages from George Chasin, Norman Brokaw, José Ferrer, Frank Rosenberg, Henry Rosenfeld, and George Masters, among others. Accompanied by four Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot969 


Lot 970: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL TELEPHONE MESSAGES
 A group of 20 hotel telephone message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from May 8 to May 15, 1961, and include messages from George Chasin, Jay Kanter, Mr. Gillerof (presumed to be Sydney Guilaroff), Henry Rosenfeld, Sidney Skolsky, and Julie [sic] Styne, among others. Accompanied by four Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$896 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot970 


Lot 971: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL TELEPHONE MESSAGES
 A group of 20 hotel telephone message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from May 8 to May 15, 1961, and include messages from George Chasin, Jay Kanter, Mr. Gillerof (presumed to be Sydney Guilaroff), Henry Rosenfeld, Sidney Skolsky, and Julie [sic] Styne, among others. Accompanied by four Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$896 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot971


Lot 972: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL TELEPHONE MESSAGES 
A group of 20 hotel telephone message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from May 15 to May 20, 1961, and include messages from George Chasin, Harold Mirisch, Sidney Cassipell, Melvin Frank,and Rupert Allan among others. Accompanied by three Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$1,024 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot972 


Lot 973: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL TELEPHONE MESSAGES
 A group of 20 hotel telephone message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from May 21 to June 1, 1961, and include messages from Agnes Flanagan, Donald Barry, Ben Gary, Minna Wallis, Ernie Kovak [sic], Ben Platt Jr. and Clifton Webb, among others. Accompanied by three Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot973 


Lot 974: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL TELEPHONE MESSAGES
 A group of 20 hotel telephone message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from June 1 to June 12, 1961, and include messages from Ted Jordan, Dr. Krohn, Harrison Carroll, George Chasin, Clifton Webb and Mr. Guilaroff (presumed to be Sydney Guilaroff), among others. Accompanied by three Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot974 


Lot 975: MARILYN MONROE GROUP OF HOTEL MESSAGES
 A group of 17 hotel telephone and package delivery message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from May to June 1961 and include messages from Norman Brokaw, Richard Conte, George Chasin, Bill Penzer, Miss Wallace (believed to refer to Minna Wallis), Ted Jordan and Harold Mirisch, among others. Thirteen of the messages are accompanied by or still affixed to Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid: $640 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot975


 Lot 976: MARILYN MONROE GROUP OF NOTES, MESSAGES AND HANDWRITTEN PROSE
 A Beverly Hills Hotel note pad with a notation on the top page together with more than 30 loose pages from a similar note pad. The pages contain phone messages, including ones from George Chasin, Glenn Ford, Frank Sinatra, Josh Logan and Sandy Meisner; telephone numbers; notations; appointment reminders; and a single sheet with handwritten prose that has been crossed out but appears to be in Monroe’s hand. It reads, “All day long he stayed/ with me; and one sailed in perfect calmness… .”
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
5 1/2 by 4 inches
Winning bid:$14,080 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot976 


 Lot 977: MARILYN MONROE FINANCIAL DOCUMENTS
 A folder of Marilyn Monroe's financial documents relating to loans from City National Bank in Beverly Hills, California. The documents date from 1961 to 1962 and include file copies of typed letters from Monroe's lawyer Milton Rudin and of letters sent from Monroe's secretary as well as deposit receipts. Correspondence discusses transfers, deposits and financial arrangements made on behalf of Monroe. Folder has a typed label that reads “MARILYN MONROE 1961-1962/ CITY NATIONAL BANK OF BEVERLY HILLS.”
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
Largest, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$1,152 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot977 


 Lot 978: MARILYN MONROE CHASEN'S RESTAURANT DOCUMENTS
 A group of Marilyn Monroe documents relating to Chasen’s restaurant. The first is an invitation dated May 3, 1961, with a handwritten note that reads “Chasin,” which could refer to Monroe’s agent or that it came from him. Found with: Chasen's restaurant invoice and credit form from May 1962; a Chasen's card with Monroe’s typed name; and a telegram invitation for an event with French director Christian–Jacque.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 8 1/2 by 4 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$448 - Estimate: $100 - $200

juliens-mmauction2014-lot978a 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot978b juliens-mmauction2014-lot978c juliens-mmauction2014-lot978d 


 Lot 979: MARILYN MONROE CARD FROM DELOS SMITH JR.
 A handwritten card from Delos V. Smith Jr. to Marilyn Monroe. The card, with an image of a Native American man in front of a tipi, reads in full, “New Teepee?/ Enjoy Heapee!/ Little Peepee,” with original transmittal envelope postmarked April 1961. Envelope has additional writing and post office notations. Together with two envelopes addressed to Monroe from Smith.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 by 5 inches
Winning bid:$256 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot979 


 Lot 984: MARILYN MONROE REAL ESTATE DOCUMENT
 A Marilyn Monroe signed, typed purchase offer for Monroe's Los Angeles home on Helena Drive. This is the only home Monroe ever purchased. The document dated January 9, 1962, and contains a purchase price of $52,500. Monroe would die just eight months later.
15 by 9 1/4 inches
Winning bid:$ 17,500 - Estimate: $7,000 - $9,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot984a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot984b


 Lot 986: MARILYN MONROE RECEIPTS
 A pair of receipts from the Mart on Santa Monica Boulevard. One is dated July 31, 1962, for the purchase of a tapestry; the second, undated, is for the purchase of a table. Both are marked paid on August 1, 1962. Accompanied by a business card from the Mart. Monroe seems to have been actively decorating the house she had purchased only a few months earlier. Five days after visiting the Mart, Monroe passed away.
Each, 6 by 3 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$1,625 - Estimate: $1,300 - $1,600

juliens-mmauction2014-lot986 


 Lot 987: MARILYN MONROE AUTO INSURANCE DOCUMENT
A Marilyn Monroe automobile insurance document with effective date March 23, 1962, issued by Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company through Ebenstein and Company. The endorsement portion of the document states that Monroe is excluded as a driver under this policy. Five pages total.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
12 1/2 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $1,600  - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot987 juliens-mmauction2014-lot987a


Lot 989: MARILYN MONROE FUNERAL CARD
 An original card from the funeral of Marilyn Monroe on Wednesday, August 8, 1962, at the Westwood Village Mortuary in Los Angeles. The front of the card bears an image of the Bok Singing Tower. The inside reads in part, "In Memory of/ Marilyn Monroe/ Born June 1st, 1926/ Passed Away/ August 5th, 1962,” with the details of her funeral service. Facing page is printed with Psalm 23. Accompanied by a photocopy of an information packet about the services for Monroe that includes the eulogy given by Lee Strasberg, a list of invited guests, and a letter to those not invited to the service.
5 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
Winning bid: $2,560 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot989 juliens-mmauction2014-lot989a

01 novembre 2012

H comme Hogan, Della Mae

Della Mae Hogan
( 1876 - 1927 )
Grand-Mère ~Maternelle~ de Marilyn Monroe
 

1926_02_24_Della_M_Grainger_United_States_Passport_2a

1900s_charlotty_virginia_jennie_nance_with_della_with_tilford_marion_hoganDella Mae Hogan (appelée aussi Della Mae Monroe, Della Mae Graves et Della Mae Grainger) naît le 1er juillet 1876 dans le Comté de Brunswick (Missouri) et est la seconde de quatre enfants. Ses parents, Tilford Marion Hogan et Jennie Nance (Charlotty Virginia Jennie Nance) (photo ci-contre), sont ouvriers agricoles.
Della est une enfant sans beauté particulière, mais gaie et espiègle, précoce et pleine d'énergie. Peu influencée par les penchants académiques de son père, elle pratique, au contraire, l'école buissonnière. La dure vie paysanne amène les Hogan de l'Est vers l'Ouest, en Californie, dans les années 1890. 
Ses parents se séparent lorsqu'elle a 13 ans. Elle passera les années suivantes à vivre alternativement avec un parent puis avec l'autre.

>> Della Mae (à droite) et sa soeur Myrtle dans les années 1890
1890_della_and_sister 


Son père, Tilford Marion Hogan, est né le 24 février 1851. Il était un journalier, fils de fermiers de l'Illinois, George Hogan et Sara Owen qui ont eu 8 enfants (Mary, John, William Jasper, Newton, Tilford Marion, Amanda, Stephen et Rosa).
Tilford épouse Jennie Nance à Barry Country, dans le Missouri et ils ont ensemble quatre enfants (Dora née en 1875, Della Mae née le 1/07/1876, William Marion né le 4/04/1878 et Myrtle née en 1882). Le couple restera marié pendant 20 ans.
Tilford se remarie en 1928, à l'âge de 77 ans avec une veuve du nom d'Emma Wyatt. Il se suicide le 29 mai 1933. Comme un grand nombre de paysans, il avait dû abandonner ses terres pendant la Dépression. Cette situation avait été trop pénible à vivre pour lui, et il se pend à une poutre de sa grange. Ce n'est que quelques mois après son suicide, que sa petite fille, Gladys Baker, sombrera dans la maladie mentale. 

 > Certificat de décès du 29 mai 1933
Article de presse de l'avis de décès

1933_05_29_Tilford_M_Hogan_Death_Certificate 1933_Tilford_M_Hogan_Obiturary_Newspaper_Article


En 1898, Della Mae, alors âgée de 22 ans, rencontre Otis Elmer Monroe (le grand-père de Marilyn), un peintre en bâtiment de dix ans son aîné et fraîchement débarqué de l'Etat d'Indiana. Ils se marient l'année suivante, à la fin de l'année 1899. En 1901, ils partent s'installer au Mexique, où Otis avait trouvé un emploi dans les chemins de fer mexicains. Au début, Della Mae est triste d'avoir quitté les Etats-Unis et a du mal à s'adapter. Elle sort souvent sur son porche pour mieux contempler le pont qui, par dessus le Rio Grande, mène au Texas. Puis elle parvient à s'adapter et se sent par la suite très à l'aise dans la tâche qu'elle s'est attribuée: elle donne des cours aux Indiennes et aux Mexicaines à qui elle sert occasionnellement de sage-femme.
A l’automne 1901, Della tombe enceinte et donne naissance à une petite fille, Gladys Pearl Monroe (qui sera la mère de Marilyn), le 27 mai 1902 à Mexico. L'enfant sera déclarée cinq jours après sa naissance à un juge civil mexicain. 

La famille retourne ensuite aux Etats-Unis: ils mènent une existence itinérante le long de la Côte Ouest, jusque dans le Nord des Etats-Unis, puis s'installent dans la région de Los Angeles, qui était prospère et offrait de meilleures perspectives d'emploi. C'est ainsi qu'au printemps 1903, Otis Elmer trouve un emploi mieux rémunéré à Los Angeles, à la Pacific Electric Raimway. La famille s'installe à L.A. et loue un petit bungalow d'une seule pièce dans la 37ème Rue Ouest (secteur sud du centre-ville). C'est là que naît leur deuxième enfant, en 1905, un garçon prénommé Marion Otis Elmer (l'oncle de Marilyn).
Mais la famille vit dans la pauvreté et n'a pas de foyer stable (ils vivent dans près de onze foyers différents -maisons ou appartements- entre 1903 et 1909). Leurs enfants Gladys et Marion vivent donc leur enfance dans l'insécurité, sans pouvoir se lier d'amitié avec des amis de leurs âges.

A partir de 1907, la santé d'Otis Elmer commence à se dégrader. Il boit beaucoup et souffre de troubles de la mémoire. Son état s'empire rapidement: il souffre de violents maux de tête, est pris de tremblements importants, et devient émotionnellement fragile et instable avec des accès de rage, des crises de larmes et même des attaques cardiaques. Admis à l'hôpital 'Southern California State Hospital' à Patton, Californie, en novembre 1908, où Della espace de plus en plus ses visites, il y meurt, le 22 juillet 1909, à l'âge de 43 ans. Il était atteint de parésie, le stade ultime de la syphilis qu'il avait contracté au Mexique, à cause des piètres conditions d'hygiène.

>> Portraits de Della Mae
1900s_della_1 1900s_della_2

Pendant qu'Otis est à l'hôpital, Della adopte une attitude très digne, devenant une femme fort dévote, avec une mélancolie mêlée de stoïcisme. Elle fréquente, avec ses enfants, une des églises protestantes les plus proches, «pour qu'ils prient pour la santé de leur propre esprit». Mais malgré cet excès de piété transitoire, elle garde tout de même l'exubérance et l'impétuosité de sa jeunesse. Lorsqu'elle se retrouve veuve, à l'âge de 33 ans, Della Mae retourne ainsi à la vie désinvolte de sa jeunesse. Et en 1910, elle reçoit des hommes célibataires et des veufs chez elle, dans sa maison du 2440 Boulder Street. Et elle se fiançe même plusieurs fois entre 1910 et 1911.

>> Della Mae et l'un de ses amants
1900s_della_mae_monroe_grandmother

1912_03_07_wedding_della_lyle_arthur_gravesPuis elle rencontre Lyle Arthur Graves, originaire de Green Bay, dans le Winsconsin, de six ans son cadet, un homme timide et appliqué. Originaire de Green Bay (Wisconsin), il avait d'ailleurs travaillé à la Pacific Electric avec Otis. Il était devenu depuis aiguilleur en chef. Le 7 mars 1912, Della Mae et Lyle Graves se marient (certificat de mariage ci-contre). La famille s'installe chez Lyle, dans sa maison au 324 bis South Hill Street qui se trouve dans le récent quatier d'affaires de Los Angeles. Mais le mariage est un échec. Della découvre que Lyle est aussi alcoolique que son précédent mari et il se montre même violent. C'est alors que seulement huit mois après leur mariage, en novembre 1912, Della Mae quitte le domicile conjugal avec ses deux enfants et part s'installer dans un meublé. Mais elle rencontre des difficultés financières et continue à garder contact avec son mari. Sans plus aucune ressources, elle se résout à retourner vivre chez Lyle pendant le Noël 1912. Mais malgré toutes les bonnes attentions de Lyle, notamment en offrant des cadeaux aux enfants, Della finit par le quitter définitivement en mai 1913, bien que celui-ci avait laissé à Della la gestion de son propre salaire.
Le divorce est prononcé le 17 janvier 1914. Della y accuse Lyle Graves notamment de « ne pas lui avoir assuré le soutien matériel, de débauche et d'intempérance chronique ».

Deux ans plus tard, à la fin de l'année 1916, Della Mae loue une chambre dans une pension de famille au 26 Westminster Avenue sur la toute nouvelle plage du district de Venice, en Californie, au sud de Santa Monica. Le propriétaire de la pension de famille s'appele John Baker et l'engage pour diriger sa propriété pendant qu'il s'occupe d'une salle de jeux sur la plage.
Elle envoit son fils Marion, âgé de 11 ans, vivre chez des cousins à San Diego car Della pense qu'un garçon doit être élevé par un homme.  

charles_graingerLe 1er janvier 1917, au cours d'une soirée du Nouvel An, Della rencontre un charmant veuf d'1 mètre 85, Charles Grainger (né en 1875, mort en 1953 - photo ci-contre) , qui avait parcouru le monde en travaillant pour des compagnies pétrolières. Il avait deux fils, qui vivaient avec leur mère au Nord de la Californie. Il habitait d'ailleurs près de chez elle, au 1410 Coral Canal Court, dans un modeste bungalow de deux pièces qui donnait sur un des nombreux canaux de Venice. L'endroit était très charmant et Della succombe à son charme. A cette époque, vivre ensemble sans être mariés n'était pas très bien vu, tout comme le fait d'être divorcé. Della Mae se fait appeler Mrs. Grainger, bien qu'elle n'était pas mariée. Ils restent liés pendant plusieurs années, sans pour autant vivre ensemble.
Mais cette nouvelle liaison rendait Gladys malheureuse. Elle se braquait contre le nouveau compagnon de sa mère, en lui opposant un silence absolu, et se montrant de très mauvaise humeur. Gladys devenait alors un boulet pour Della, qui avait peur de perdre Charles Grainger. C'est alors qu'elle décide de la marier. Gladys, qui n'avait alors que 14 ans, commence à avoir un certain succès auprès des hommes. Et c'est Jasper Newton "Jap" Baker (le fils de John Baker) âgé de 26 ans, qui, aidé de Della Mae, certifie que Gladys était en âge de se marier, et l'épouse le 17 mai 1917. Della assiste au mariage et donne sa chambre de Westminster Street aux jeunes mariés, pour emménager dans le bungalow de Charles Grainger. Gladys et Jasper Baker ont deux enfants: une fille Berniece et un garçon Robert Baker.

En 1918, Charles Grainger trouve un emploi non pas dans le pétrole, mais comme directeur du Pickering Pleasure Pier de Santa Monica, où il avait un salaire régulier. Della était alors souvent séparée de Charles Grainger, pendant des jours, voire des semaines.
Le couple se quitte puis se remet à nouveau ensemble à plusieurs reprises.

En 1921, sa fille Gladys retourne vivre chez elle, après la faillite de son mariage. Elles vivent dans un bungalow que Gladys loue au 46 Rose Avenue, à Venice. Gladys avait signé le bail sous le nom de Della Monroe, et sous-loue deux des chambres, afin d'être payée comme gérante, ce qui lui permet de verser 100$ par mois aux propriétaires absents, Adele Weinhoff et Susie Noel.
Fin juin 1922, le dernier chèque du loyer n'avait pas été posté. Une dispute éclate entre Gladys et Della, chacune accusant l'autre de dilapider l'argent. N'ayant d'emploi ni l'une ni l'autre, l'essentiel de leurs revenus leur était versé par Charles Grainger, le reste consistant en une modeste somme qu'envoyait Jasper Baker. Leur courte expérience de colocataires pris fin en juillet 1922, sous une menace d'expulsion. Della, avec la permission de Charles Grainger, part alors vivre dans un bungalow vide qu'il posséde à Hawthorn.

>> Della Mae avec Gladys et ses petits-enfants
1900s_della_gladys_1 1900s_della_gladys_2 1919_della_and_gladys_with_jackiehermitt_berniece_2 
1919_della_and_gladys_with_jackiehermitt_berniece_1 
1900s_NJFamily_della_baby_1

En 1924, son fils Marion se marie avec une de ses camarades de classe, Olyve Brunnings.
L'année suivante, le 11 octobre 1925, sa fille Gladys se remarie, avec Martin Mortensen, pour le quitter quelques mois après. A la fin de l'année, Gladys est enceinte. Se retrouvant seule, elle cherche un soutien auprès de sa mère, qui réagit mal. Et la situation tombe d'ailleurs très mal car Della part en voyage en Asie du Sud-Est, un voyage prévu de longues dates avec Charles Grainger, qui y avait été envoyé sur un site de forage par la Shell, pour son travail. Certains biographes affirment qu'ils sont aussi partis en Inde. Le 24 février 1926, Della fait une demande de passeport pour son voyage à Bornéo prévu pour le 30 mars 1926. Sur cette demande, la date de mariage de Della et Charles Grainger était stipulée comme ayant eu lieu le 25 novembre 1920.

 > Lettre de recommandation Shell pour Charles Grainger du 23 avril 1925:
1925_04_23_charles_grainger_Passport_Request_Letter

> Demande de Passeport du 24 février 1926
Photographie du passeport
1926_02_24_Della_M_Grainger_United_States_Passport_1 1926_02_24_Della_M_Grainger_United_States_Passport_2 

1926_05_27_carte_postaleLe 27 mai 1926, Della envoit une carte postale de Bornéo, une île du sud-est asiatique, (carte postale ci-contre) à ses petits enfants Berniece et Robert Baker, qui vivent avec leur père dans le Kentucky. Elle ne semble pas savoir que les enfants n'avaient pas de nouvelles de leur mère Gladys:
« Dear Little Berniece,
This is kind of big snakes they have here. They are big enough they could swallow you and Jackie and so could the alligators. They have lots of fun here hunting them. This is your mother's birthday. Do you and Jackie ever write to her, write to me.
Your grand mother Mrs Chas. Grainger
».

> Photographies de son voyage exotique en Asie
1926_asie_2  
1926_asie_1  

1926_della_home_hawthornDella Mae revient en juin 1926. Quand elle découvre sa petite fille Norma Jeane (Marilyn Monroe), deux semaines après sa naissance, elle incite sa fille Gladys à placer l'enfant chez un couple sérieux et dévot qu'elle connait bien, les Bolender, une famille d'accueil qui vit à Hawthorn (une banlieue ouvrière de Los Angeles, actuellement l'aéroport international), dans la même rue qu'elle (photo ci-contre). Ida et Wayne Bolender s’occuperont de la petite fille pendant 7 ans.
Della est devenue une adepte fervente et dévouée de Soeur Aimee Semple Mc Pherson et fait baptiser Norma Jeane le 6 décembre 1926 au Sister Aimee's Angelus Temple, à la Hawthorn Foursquare Church (4503 puis 4511 West Broadway à Hawthorn):

> Photographie de Della Mae et Norma Jeane
Photographie de l'Eglise 'Hawthorn Foursquare Church'
1926_della_et_normajeane 1926_church 

Au début de l’année 1927, le coeur de Della Mae commence à faiblir et elle est atteinte de fréquentes infections respiratoires. Elle dépend alors totalement de sa fille Gladys, qui, en dépit du surcroît de transport en trolley pour aller à son travail, est venue s'installer chez elle. A la fin du printemps, Della est au plus mal; ses problèmes respiratoires se sont aggravés par l'évolution de sa maladie du coeur, ce qui la plonge dans une dépression des plus sombres. Comme bon nombre de malades atteints de troubles cardio-pulmonaires, elle dérive dans de plaisantes rêveries, des délires et des moments de franche euphorie. Sans compter des imprévisibles sautes d'humeur et colères. En juillet, Della est perduadée que sa mort est proche. Elle avait de plus en plus des hallucinations; elle raconte notamment à sa fille Gladys que ses parents, Tilford et Jennie Hogan, s'étaient réconciliés et qu'ils viendraient la secourir.
Durant cette période, Ida Bolender raconta dans une interview donnée en 1966 (et diffusée dans le documentaire The Legend of Marilyn Monroe) que Della Mae venait souvent voir sa petite fille à travers les vitres de leur maison: elle frappait sans cesse à la porte mais un jour, n'obtenant pas de réponse, elle cassa la vitre avec son coude et les Bolender ont dû appelé la police.
De plus, Marilyn racontera plus tard que sa grand-mère Della Mae fut responsable de l'incident le plus épouvantable de sa vie: en juillet 1927, Della Mae aurait tenter d'étouffer sa petite fille avec un oreiller. Mais il est possible que Marilyn inventa cette histoire. 

1927_08_23_Della_M_Monroe_Death_CertificateLe 4 août 1927, Della Mae est hospitalisée au Norwalk State Hospital où on lui diagnostique une myocardite aiguë (inflammation du coeur et des tissus environnants). Elle meurt le 23 août 1927, à l'âge de 51 ans, d'un arrêt cardiaque pendant une crise de folie, victime de ce que Gladys puis Marilyn elle même considéreront comme une malédiction familiale. Son certificat de décès (voir ci-contre) mentionne comme cause du décès une myocardite ainsi qu'une "psychose maniaco-dépressive", ce terme ayant été ajouté car Gladys n'avait cessé de répéter aux médecins que l'humeur de sa mère avait été changeante et imprévisible pendant ses dernières semaines.
C'est Gladys qui s'occupe des funérailles, et fait enterrer Della auprès de son premier mari, Otis Elmer Monroe, au Rose Hill Cemetery, à Whittier.

  Selon le biographe Donald Spoto, le comportement violent de Della Mae n'était pas provoqué par une maladie mentale, mais par une maladie cardiaque dégénérative entraînant une dépression aigüe. Son état de santé avait été aggravé par une attaque avant l'été 1927. Sa mort a donc été provoquée par une grave maladie du coeur qui fut mal soignée, avec, pour facteur aggravant, une psychose maniaco-dépressive.

> La tombe de Della Mae au Rosedale Cemetery 
(Washington Boulevard, Los Angeles)  
monroedellam


sources pour l'article:
Livres:
Marilyn Monroe, L'encyclopédie, de Adam VictorLes vies secrètes de Marilyn Monroe, de Anthony Summers
Sites Internets:
frise chrono sur geni.com  / généalogie sur genforum.genealogy.com / documents sur le forum Everlasting Star  /  sa tombe sur findagrave.com


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.

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28 novembre 2011

Icons of Hollywood 12/2011 - Photos rares de Norma Jeane

lot n°716: Marilyn Monroe (Norma Jeane) original family photograph
age 2, with her later notation on verso

From the personal effects of a relative of Marilyn Monroe (nee Norma Jeane Mortensen/ Baker) to the owner of the image archive “Silver Screen” (now deceased), to the current owner, an original gelatin-silver 3¾” x 4¾” family snapshot of toddler Norma Jeane at the beach. She is playing with another toddler she calls “Donna” in the pencil notation attributed to Norma Jeane herself, “gidy up horsy” at the beach, Donna & me I’m the horse”; comparisons were carefully made to other writing from her teen years, and this is a confident match, so she could have made this notation anytime before leaving home at age 16.

Estimate: $800 - $1 200
  21604_0718_1_lg


lot n°717: Marilyn Monroe unique collection
of 16+ personally owned family photographs and negatives
of Marilyn Monroe and her Mother.

A unique archive of 16+ original 2 ½ x 4 ¼ in. to 3 ½ in. x 4 ½ in. personal family photographs and negatives of Marilyn Monroe with her mother Gladys Pearl Baker (née Monroe) and presumably grandmother, as well as other family members and friends spanning toddler age through to adolescence. Her mother Gladys is pictured in several with a woman who is likely her best friend, Grace McKee, the woman that went on to become her guardian and ward of state. Marilyn is pictured in several as a toddler, as a teenager holding a baby on a bench, standing with Chico Marx on stage, as a young swimsuit model etc. Includes additional copy prints and negatives made from original photographs (originals not present). Approx. 30 items total. An incredible glimpse into Marilyn’s early family life and unique opportunity to acquire a rich trove of original material.

Estimate: $2 000 - $3 000
21604_0717_1_lg 21604_0717_2_lg
21604_0717_3_lg 21604_0717_4_lg 21604_0717_5_lg 21604_0717_9_lg
21604_0717_6_lg 21604_0717_7_lg 21604_0717_8_lg
21604_0717_10_lg 21604_0717_11_lg


lot n°718: Marilyn Monroe (Norma Jeane) original photobooth
snapshot self-portrait, Ca. 1940

From the personal effects of a relative of Marilyn Monroe (nee Norma Jeane Mortensen/ Baker) to the owner of the image archive “Silver Screen” (now deceased), to the current owner, a 1 ½” x 1 ¼“ self-generated “photobooth” self-portrait, cut out of the original multi-shot strip by a teenage Norma Jeane and given to a family member. We have not heard of the survival of other such photos generated by[Marilyn] herself, though of course at least a few must have been generated at the time, so it is conceivable for this to be a unique artifact in the pantheon of Marilyn Monroe’s history. In any case, it is unique for this particular shot, as the photobooth technology only creates a single print of each exposure. Side margins are intact, and this particular image was trimmed out of the middle of a multi-shot strip, so no upper or lower margin is present; else, surprisingly Fine for such a small ephemeral object.

Estimate: $800 - $1 200
21604_0716_1_lg  

Posté par ginieland à 11:48 - - Commentaires [3] - Permalien [#]
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10 juillet 2011

Paris Match 31/12/1966

mag_paris_match_1966_12_31_cover_num925Le magazine Paris Match n°925, du 31 décembre 1966, consacrait un article de six pages sur des débuts de la vie de Marilyn Monroe: Quand Marilyn n'était que Norma Jeane

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Posté par ginieland à 11:37 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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02 mars 2011

LIFE 4/11/1966

mag_LIFE_1966_11_04_coverLe magazine américain Life du 4 novembre 1966 consacrait un article intérieur de 6 pages à Marilyn Monroe, intitulé "Behind the Myth, the Face of Norma Jean" en publiant des photographies de la jeune Marilyn, enfant, adolescente, lors de son premier mariage, et de sa mère; accompagné d'un texte de Richard Meryman.

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Posté par ginieland à 14:03 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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