21 février 2017

Hiver 1955 - Marilyn à New York -2

Marilyn Monroe en pull col roulé noir et manteau camel Dior,
 New York - 1955
Marilyn Monroe in a black turtleneck sweater and Dior's camel overcoat

1955-01-new_york-mm_in_camel-turtleneck-01-1 


- de la collection de James Collins, fan des Monroe Six
-from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six'

1955-01-new_york-mm_in_camel-turtleneck-collection_james_collins-1  1955-01-new_york-mm_in_camel-turtleneck-collection_james_collins-2 
Marilyn & Milton Greene


  - de la collection de Frieda Hull, une fan des Monroe Six
-from the personal collection of Frieda Hull, one of the 'Monroe Six'

1955-01-new_york-mm_in_camel-turtleneck-collection_frieda_hull-2-1 
1955-01-new_york-mm_in_camel-turtleneck-collection_frieda_hull-2-1a 1955-01-new_york-mm_in_camel-turtleneck-collection_frieda_hull-2-1b 
1955-01-new_york-mm_in_camel-turtleneck-collection_frieda_hull-2-1c 
1955-01-new_york-mm_in_camel-turtleneck-collection_frieda_hull-2-1d 1955-01-new_york-mm_in_camel-turtleneck-collection_frieda_hull-2-1e 
1955-01-new_york-mm_in_camel-turtleneck-collection_frieda_hull-1-1  1955-01-new_york-mm_in_camel-turtleneck-collection_frieda_hull-1-1a  


- de la collection de James Haspiel, fan
-from the personal collection of James Haspiel, fan 

1955-01-new_york-mm_in_camel-turtleneck-by_haspiel-1 


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand. 

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer


28 janvier 2017

Août 1955, New York, "The Skin Of Our Teeth"

Marilyn Monroe prend un taxi à New York - août 1955
Elle assiste à la pièce "The Skin Of Our Teeth" à l'ANTA Theatre. 

Marilyn Monroe takes a taxi cab in New York - August 1955
She attends the play "The Skin Of Our Teeth" at the ANTA Theater.

1955-08-new_york-taxi-by_james_haspiel-1 1955-08-new_york-taxi-by_james_haspiel-1a 
- de la collection de James Haspiel, fan
-from the personal collection of James Haspiel, fan


1955-08-new_york-taxi-collection_frieda_hull-1  
- de la collection de Frieda Hull, une fan des Monroe Six
-from the personal collection of Frieda Hull, one of the 'Monroe Six'


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.

Enregistrer

Posté par ginieland à 19:23 - - Commentaires [2] - Permalien [#]
Tags : , , , , ,

Hiver 1955 - Marilyn à New York

Marilyn Monroe en pull col roulé noir et manteau de fourrure,
Gladstone Hotel, New York - 1955
Marilyn Monroe in a black turtleneck sweater and fur coat

1955-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-by_james_haspiel-1-1 1955-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-by_james_haspiel-1-2 1955-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-by_james_haspiel-2-1 
- de la collection de James Haspiel, fan
-from the personal collection of James Haspiel, fan


1955-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-by_james_collins-1  1955-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-by_james_collins-2 
- de la collection de James Collins, un fan des Monroe Six
-from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six'


1955-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-1a  1955-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-1b 
1955-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-1c  1955-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-1d  1955-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-1 
1955-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-2 
1955-01-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-3 

1955-01-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-4  1955-01-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-4a 
1955-01-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-4b  1955-01-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-4c 
1955-01-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-4d  1955-01-new_york-mm_in_fur-tutleneck-collection_frieda_hull-4e 
- de la collection de Frieda Hull, une fan des Monroe Six

-from the personal collection of Frieda Hull, one of the 'Monroe Six'


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

09 novembre 2016

Marilyn Monroe Auction - 11/2016 - photos 1 -snapshots


 Photographies - Instantanés en public & privé
Photographs - Public & Private Snapshots


Lot 197: MARILYN MONROE AND ELI WALLACH SNAPSHOTS
 Three vintage black and white glossy photographs of Monroe, two with Eli Wallach, at a party in the late 1950s. Two images have creases from being folded, and one has distortion in the emulsion of the photo paper.
3 1/4 by 4 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $700 - $900
245417_0 


Lot 209: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS OF JOE DIMAGGIO
 A group of 17color snapshots likely taken by Monroe while relaxing in Canada with Joe DiMaggio during filming of River of No Return in 1953. Six images feature DiMaggio on a boat and against scenic backdrops. Four images feature an elk; six feature scenic views. Two images feature Jean Negulesco, who was uncredited for his work on the film.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500 
245435_0  245436_0  


Lot 267: MARILYN MONROE OWNED PHOTOGRAPHS OF ARTHUR MILLER
 Five images of the famous American author and then husband of Monroe: a vintage candid photo of Miller as a young man, a photograph of Miller playing baseball, two smaller photographs of Miller by David Gahr with photographer's stamp on verso, and a snapshot of Monroe and Miller as they attended a ceremony to receive the American Friends of the Hebrew University award in Philadelphia September 27, 1959.
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245540_0 245541_0 245542_0 


Lot 315: MARILYN MONROE SNAPSHOTS
 Three vintage black and white glossy photographs of Monroe playing badminton with Hedda and Norman Rosten in Amagansett, New York, 1955.
3 1/2 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245632_0 


Lot 317: MARILYN MONROE PARAKEET PHOTOGRAPHS
 Four color snapshots of pet parakeets including Butch, a pet parakeet kept by Monroe and Arthur Miller. The images are stamped with a date of October 1958. Additional birds named Bobo, Clyde, and another illegibly named in the margin are visible in the photographs.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245634_0  


Lot 496: PHOTOGRAPH OF MARILYN MONROE WITH MAF
 A small trimmed color photograph of Monroe holding Maf, her poodle, with super fan and friend of Monroe James Haspiel taken in June 1961. The photograph was printed subsequently in December of the same year.
2 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245907_0  


Lot 498: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS OF MAF
 Two small color snapshots of Monroe's pet Maltese Maf, short for Mafia, a gift from Frank Sinatra.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245911_0  


Lot 572: MARILYN MONROE INCOGNITO SNAPSHOT
 A small color snapshot of Monroe wearing a brunette wig and scarf around her head in disguise. A number of stories have been told regarding Monroe dressing in a brunette wig and going out to bars to see how men responded to her when she wasn't "being" Marilyn. This image documents Monroe as she appeared in a brunette disguise.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246010_0  


Lot 587: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS OF FIFTH HELENA DRIVE PROPERTY
 A group of four vintage black and white photographs, most likely of the kitchen and laundry room of the guest house at Monroe's Fifth Helena Drive property prior to her renovations and decorating.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246061_0   


Lot 627: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1953. In the photographs, Monroe wears her costume from the thriller Niagara (20th Century, 1953). One image is marked on verso "Leaving the El Capitan Theater."
Largest, 5 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246113_0 


Lot 633: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1953, with "La Rue Restaurant" inscribed on verso of three of the images. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246121_0 


Lot 635: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1953. One photograph is marked on verso "In front of the Mocambo,” and two are marked "Mocambo Club." All are likely never before seen images of Monroe.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246123_0 


Lot 643: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on September 9, 1954, the same day she was interviewed by Ed Wallace at the St. Regis Hotel in New York City. This lot contains three color and four black and white photographs.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246133_0  247267_0 


Lot 644: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of three color slides of Marilyn Monroe from September 9, 1954, the day she was interviewed by Ed Wallace at the St. Regis Hotel in New York City.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246134_0   


Lot 645: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken with a young fan, likely in New York City, circa 1954.
5 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246135_0   


Lot 650: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe in New York City from September 12, 1954, one of which includes superfan James Haspiel. Monroe had arrived days earlier to film The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). This lot includes one color photograph and four black and white photographs, some possibly never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 7 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $400 - $600
246142_0  246143_0 


Lot 656: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on November 6, 1954, at a party thrown for Monroe at Romanoff’s restaurant in Beverly Hills to mark the end of shooting for The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955).
3 3/4 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246149_0 


Lot 658: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on various occasions, circa 1955. Most images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246153_0  247269_0  


Lot 659: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955. One photograph shows Monroe leaving the Gladstone Hotel in New York City; the other shows her with husband Joe DiMaggio in the background. Both images are possibly never before seen.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246154_0 


Lot 660: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 15 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955, taken in front of the Gladstone Hotel in New York City. Some images show her with her press agent Jay Kantor. Several images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 7 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,400 - $1,600
246155_0 247270_0 


Lot 661: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED SNAPSHOT
 A black and white snapshot of Marilyn Monroe driving a car and posing through the driver's side window taken in the mid-1950s. The image is signed in blue ballpoint pen "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246156_0   


Lot 662: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of six original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken at a party she attended with friend and Hollywood reporter Sidney Skolsky. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246157_0 


Lot 666: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original Marilyn Monroe color photographs that show Monroe seated in the backseat of a vehicle, circa January 1955.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $200 - $400
246161_0  


Lot 668: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe; one reads "1/55" on verso, believed to have been taken on January 26, 1955, at the Gladstone Hotel.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246163_0 


Lot 671: MARILYN MONROE COLOR PHOTOGRAPH
 An original color photograph of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955, from when she attended Skin of Our Teeth at the ANTA Theatre in New York City. "Skin Of Our Teeth/Anta Theatre" is written in pencil on verso. This play, written by Thornton Wilder, opened in New York on August 17, 1955, and starred Helen Hayes, George Abbott, Mary Martin, and Florence Reed. The director was Alan Schneider.
5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246169_0 


Lot 672: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe, possibly taken on September 7, 1955, when she was going to a birthday party for Elia Kazan that had been organized by the Actors Studio. This is likely a never before seen photograph of Monroe.
5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246170_0 


Lot 673: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955, showing her in the driver's seat of a convertible wearing sunglasses. It is a candid image of Monroe "caught in the moment."
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246171_0


Lot 674: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of five slides of Marilyn Monroe, from various events, circa 1955.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246172_0   


Lot 675: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine color original photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955. Monroe is shown smiling and laughing and signing autographs for fans. Several images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,000
246173_0  247274_0 


Lot 677: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 wearing a black gown, white fur and white evening gloves. The photo is signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246175_0  


Lot 678: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 wearing a black gown and white fur. The photo is signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246176_0 


Lot 679: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 wearing a black gown, white fur and black evening gloves, signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246177_0 


Lot 680: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide showing Marilyn Monroe in New York City, circa 1955, signing autographs for fans.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246178_0   


Lot 681: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of five slides of Marilyn Monroe, from various events, circa 1955.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246179_0   


Lot 682: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955, likely taken in front of the Gladstone Hotel in New York City. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,000
246180_0 247275_0   


Lot 683: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 26, 1955, when she attended Jackie Gleason's birthday party with husband Joe DiMaggio. This lot contains four black and white photographs and one color photograph. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246181_0  246182_0 


Lot 684: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 26, 1955, when she attended Jackie Gleason’s birthday party with husband Joe DiMaggio. The photo is signed in blue ink “Marilyn Monroe.” The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the “Monroe Six,” a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246183_0 


Lot 685: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955, from an unidentified event. One image shows Monroe with friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $600
246184_0 


Lot 690: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 smiling while signing an autograph for a fan. The photo is signed in ballpoint pen "To Frieda, Love & Kisses Marilyn Monroe." The image is signed to Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly. The corners of the photo are trimmed, and there is a crease on the right side of the photograph.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246190_0 


Lot 694: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four slides, three showing Marilyn Monroe and one showing Arthur Miller, at various events, circa 1955.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246195_0   


Lot 695: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four slides of Marilyn Monroe, from various events, circa 1955.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246196_0 


Lot 698: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe believed to have been taken in April 1955. A very casual Monroe is seen interacting with and signing autographs for fans.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246201_0 246202_0   


Lot 699: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 wearing a black gown, white fur and black evening gloves, signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246203_0   


Lot 700: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe from June 1955, taken when she was returning home following an acting lesson with Lee Strasberg.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246204_0 


Lot 701: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on July 27, 1955, when she was on her way to see Inherit the Wind on Broadway in New York City.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246205_0  


Lot 702: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe in New York City taken on June 7, 1955, when she was on her way to see Damn Yankees on Broadway. One photo includes Nathan Puckett, president of one of Monroe's fan clubs, in the background.
Largest, 2 3/4 by 1 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246206_0 


Lot 705: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of nine slides of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955. Monroe is shown smiling and laughing and signing autographs for fans. Several slides in this lot are likely never before seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246210_0  


Lot 707: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 10 slides of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955, from in front of the Gladstone Hotel in New York City. Some images show her with her press agent Jay Kantor and friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene. Some slides in this lot are likely never before seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246212_0 


Lot 709: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on various occasions, circa 1955. This lot contains one color and four black and white images. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246216_0 


Lot 710: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on various occasions, circa 1955. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,000
246217_0  247280_0 


Lot 715: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken circa 1955 on a New York City street. Monroe superfan James Haspiel can be partially seen in one of the photographs.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246222_0 


Lot 716: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken in New York City, circa 1955. Some images show friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246223_0  


Lot 717: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955. Monroe is shown smiling and laughing and signing autographs for fans. Several images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246224_0  247281_0  


Lot 725: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller walking their basset hound Hugo and entering their apartment located at 444 East 57th Street in New York City. These images are likely never before seen.
Larger, 2 1/2 by 2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246234_0 


Lot 733: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS COLLECTED BY FRIEDA HULL
 A collection of 23 color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe by multiple photographers (including Milton Greene and Andre de Dienes), taken at various locations and events throughout Monroe's career, including on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956) and meeting Princess Margaret in England. Many images in this lot have stamps on the reverse from various news agencies/outlets.
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246247_0 
246248_0 246249_0 247286_0  


Lot 770: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, taken as she exited the Actors Studio in New York City, circa 1960. Several images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246305_0  


Lot 771: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of six slides of Marilyn Monroe, from July 8, 1960, after she had completed costume and hair tests for The Misfits (United Artists, 1961).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246306_0   


Lot 772: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID AND CONTACT SHEET PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 12 color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on July 8, 1960, when she completed costume and hair tests for The Misfits (United Artists, 1961). Five sepia-toned photographs of Monroe show her posing for the cameras following the test, and six photographs appear to be shots of the costume and makeup tests, four having been cut from actual contact sheets, two are reproduction photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,000
246307_0  247290_0 


Lot 776: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from January 21, 1961, when she returned from Mexico, where she divorced third husband Arthur Miller. This slide is likely never before seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246318_0   


Lot 777: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original photographs and one copied color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on January 21, 1961, after returning from Mexico, where she divorced her third husband, Arthur Miller. One image is likely never before seen.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246319_0  


Lot 778: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original color photographs and one copied color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on January 20, 1961, when Monroe left New York City to travel to Mexico to divorce third husband Arthur Miller. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246320_0 


Lot 781: MARILYN MONROE JOE DIMAGGIO NEGATIVES
 A set of 16 negatives of Joe DiMaggio vacationing in Florida, most likely on March 22, 1961. Five of the negatives show DiMaggio inside the hotel, and the remaining 11 show him on the beach under a sun cover; some shots are of DiMaggio with fans. Marilyn Monroe accompanied DiMaggio on this trip and was actually on the beach with him at some point this same day, though she's not pictured in these negatives.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246323_0   


Lot 782: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A pair of color slides of Marilyn Monroe with her dog Maf, one with superfan James Haspiel, from June 15, 1961, upon Monroe's arrival in New York from Los Angeles. The slide of Monroe with Maf is likely never before seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246324_0   


Lot 783: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe with her dog Maf, one with superfan James Haspiel, taken on June 15, 1961, upon Monroe's arrival in New York from Los Angeles. The photo of Monroe with Maf is likely never before seen.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $400
246325_0 


Lot 788: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS COLLECTED BY FRIEDA HULL
 A group of 27 original color and black and white candid Marilyn Monroe related photographs. Monroe is shown in nearly all photograps, which were taken at various times and events throughout her career. One image shows her with superfan James Haspiel and members of the "Monroe Six," and another shows her with third husband Arthur Miller at an airport. Three photographs are on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Many of the candid photographs show Monroe "caught in the moment." Some images are likely never before seen. One photograph in this lot is of Miller only. One photograph shows a woman, perhaps Frieda Hull herself, standing near a cutout of Monroe from the subway grate scene in the Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). One photograph shows a theater marquee displaying titles of two Monroe films, Bus Stop and Let's Make Love, possibly being screened after Monroe's death as the photograph is dated September 1962. One photograph shows a member of the "Monroe Six" with an array of cameras and equipment.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246330_0  247291_0 


Lot 902: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED AND INSCRIBED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe leaning against a tree. Inscribed "Dear Linda, I wish you luck with your acting. Love and kisses, Marilyn Monroe Miller." This inscription was written for child star Linda Bennett.
23 by 19 inches, overall; 10 1/2 by 8 inches, sight
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246524_0 


Lot 941: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe contained in a small paper album. Accompanied by a small candid color photograph of Monroe with Lois Weber. The photographs are believed to be previously unpublished.
Album, 3 3/4 by 6 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246576_0  246577_0 246584_0 
246578_0 246579_0 246580_0 
246581_0 246582_0 246583_0  


Lot 942: MARILYN MONROE SMALL-FORMAT PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 14 small vintage black and white images of Marilyn Monroe. Many of the photographs are candid and date from different points in her career.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246585_0  


Lot 943: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe. Three were taken on the set behind the scenes of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956).
Largest, 3 1/4 by 4 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246586_0 


Bobines films & Matériel photographique
Home Movies & Photographic Equipment


Lot 76: MARILYN MONROE JOHN F. KENNEDY 1962 BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION FILM REEL
 An 8mm film reel of clips from the May 19, 1962, John F. Kennedy 45th birthday celebration held at Madison Square Garden. The eight-minute film shows clips of the venue, performers, and attendees, including John F. Kennedy; Marilyn Monroe, who appears for approximately 30 seconds; Robert Kennedy; Maria Callas; Henry Fonda; Jack Benny; Peter Lawford, who hosted the event; and Lyndon B. Johnson among others. The film was transferred from its original tin reel to a plastic reel. Accompanied by a DVD of the footage.
Reel, 5 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 41, "Entertainment Memorabilia," Christie's, New York, Sale number 1391, June 24, 2004
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

245208_0   245209_0 
245210_0 245211_0 245212_0 
245213_0 245214_0 245215_0 
245216_0 245217_0 245218_0 
245219_0 245220_0 245221_0 


Lot 248: MARILYN MONROE IN KOREA FILM
An 8mm film reel containing five minutes and 34 seconds of silent film footage, in both black and white and color, of Monroe in Korea in 1954. The first minute and a half features Monroe arriving to camp via helicopter and being escorted by various military personnel. The footage then shifts to color and shows approximately one minute of footage of some of the performers leading up to Monroe. Monroe appears for another minute of footage performing "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend" and then signing autographs for the crowd. The remaining footage features atmospheric shots of the camp and soldiers. The footage has been transferred to a DVD that is included with this lot.
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

245488_0 
245489_0 245490_0 245491_0 
245492_0 245493_0 245494_0 


Lot 696: MARILYN MONROE FRIEDA HULL'S PERSONAL SLIDE INDEX AND VIEWER
 A 1950s era Fodeco photography slide index and viewer, manufactured by Technical Devices Corporation, that originally belonged to Frieda Hull.
10 1/2 by 5 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700

246197_0 246198_0 247277_0 


Lot 697: MARILYN MONROE FRIEDA HULL 35MM CAMERA
 A Mercury II, model CX, serial no. 164404, with Universal 2.7 Tricor lens and original leather case. Together with an external flash and reflector, unrelated lens hood and telephoto lens accessory. Frieda Hull can be seen using this camera in lot 726.
Largest, 4 1/4 by 6 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300

246199_0 246200_0   


Lot 727: MARILYN MONROE HOME MOVIE REEL
 A vintage home movie reel featuring Marilyn Monroe at multiple locations. June 29, 1956, Monroe, soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, and Miller's parents are seen at a press conference at Miller's farm in Roxbury, Connecticut. Monroe and Miller were married later this day. This scene from the film is approximately 23 seconds. Note that parts of this scene are repeated at the end of the film. Various footage from 1956 shows Monroe at airports traveling to and from Los Angeles to film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). These scenes from the film are approximately 40 seconds in length. Total length: one minute, 37 seconds.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $3,000 - $4,000
246236_0 246237_0 246238_0 
246239_0 246240_0 246241_0 


Lot 769: MARILYN MONROE JAMES HASPIEL HOME MOVIE REEL
 A vintage home movie reel in the original box addressed to James Haspiel, featuring Marilyn Monroe at multiple locations. May 30, 1958, Monroe is seen leaving her 444 East 57th Street apartment in New York City. She carries a large bouquet of flowers as she, husband Arthur Miller, and others pack luggage into a station wagon and then depart. Just three days prior, Monroe was photographed by Richard Avedon for Life magazine. This scene from the film is approximately one minute, two seconds and likely never before publicly seen. May 13, 1959, Monroe and Miller are seen arriving at the Italian Consulate on Park Avenue in New York City, where Monroe received the David di Donatello Award, the equivalent of the Academy Award, for her work in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). This film includes extensive coverage of Monroe inside the Consulate and waving to fans from an upper floor window in the building. This scene from the film is approximately one minute, 22 seconds. July 8, 1961, Monroe is seen posing after having just completed hair and costume tests for The Misfits (United Artists, 1961). Haspiel appears with Monroe in part of this footage. This scene from the film is approximately 38 seconds. Total length: three minutes, three seconds.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000 
246294_0 246295_0  246296_0 
246297_0 246298_0 246299_0 
246300_0 246301_0 246302_0 
246303_0 246304_0 

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

07 mai 2016

Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction 02/2016 -2


Photographies


Lot 89009A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, an enlarged snapshot depicting the star wearing a white evening gown and a white fur coat, signed in blue ballpoint ink in the lower right corner "To Jim / Love & Kisses / Marilyn Monroe;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs); included is a black and white photograph of Collins: an original print with a matte finish, depicting Collins as a teenager in 1955 standing at a typewriter that was set up outside of a shop on an NYC street, verso is stamped in part "Life Magazine / ...Photo by Michael Rouger / ... Apr 13 1955;" Collins remembers that this photograph of him actually ran in the magazine with a caption noting what he had just typed which was "Marilyn Monroe is a beautiful girl." (Please note the photograph of MM is heavily wrinkled on the lower margin and has a 1 1/2" tear in same area which somewhat affects her signature; the photograph of Collins is heavily wrinkled with two lower corners missing.)
10" x 8"  
More Information:
"Marilyn Monroe is a beautiful girl!" were the words I was typing when as a 17 year-old, this picture of me was shot by a photographer from LifeMagazine in 1955. The photo, which actually appeared in the magazine a couple of months later, launched my own collection of Marilyn Monroe photos taken overseveral years by me and fivefellow teenage fans who became known as "The Monroe 6." During Marilyn's time in New York, I and the others photographed herin various locations around the city. We would then run to the drugstore to get our snapshots developed in multiples so that all of us could have all the shots we had taken of her (thus the reason for the different shapes and sizes of the photos my collection). In the era before Google and GPS and TMZ and smartphones, we were alerted to Marilyn's appearancesand whereabouts by sources ranging fromVariety Magazinetoher Upper East Side hairdresser. Marilyn got to know the six of us well as we journeyed around the city with her and I remember her always being gracious and friendly. We wanted nothing from her except the opportunity to take her picture or to get her autograph - and often times she would sign on the very photographs we had just taken of her the day before. After Marilyn died, I put these photographs in a closet for many decades, though over the last few years, I have posted a few of them on the Internet for fans to see. I am now ready to let others have my original 1950s-era snapshots of the movie star I had the luck and pleasure to see many times up close and in the flesh - Miss Marilyn Monroe! And she did not disappoint - she was absolutely beautiful as all these photos clearly indicate. When you saw her in person, shewas THE movie star, no doubt about it!
James Collins
New York City, 2016  
lot89009-a  lot89009-b  lot89009-c 


Lot 89010A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, Circa 1955.
An original print with a matte finish, an enlarged snapshot showing the smiling star, signed in blue fountain pen ink on the right side "Love & Kisses / Marilyn Monroe;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs); also included with an identical photograph but not signed. (Please note the ink is slightly faded but still legible and there are a number of creases throughout which somewhat detract from the image.)
7" x 5" 
lot89010-a lot89010-b 


Lot 89011A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, 1955.
An original print with a matte finish, depicting an enlarged snapshot of the star standing next to her business partner, Milton Greene, as the two attend the New York City premiere of the James Dean film, "East of Eden," on March 9, 1955, signed in brown fountain pen ink on the lower left side "Love & / Kisses / Marilyn Monroe;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note the ink is slightly faded but still legible and there are a number of creases throughout but they don't detract from the overall image.)
9 3/4" x 7 3/4" 
lot89011-a 


Lot 89012A Marilyn Monroe Signed Color Snapshot, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star outside the Gladstone Hotel in NYC (where she briefly lived) wearing a black gown, black gloves, and a white fur coat, signed in blue fountain pen ink in the lower center "Marilyn Monroe," verso has stamp reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending Mar. 12, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note the ink is noticeably smudged from the time when it was signed.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2"  
lot89012-a  lot89012-b 


Lot 89013A Marilyn Monroe Signed Color Snapshot, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star outside the Gladstone Hotel in NYC (where she briefly lived) wearing a black gown, black gloves, and a white fur coat, signed in blue fountain pen ink in the lower center "Marilyn Monroe," verso has stamp reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending Mar. 12, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note the ink is somewhat smudged from the time when it was signed.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89013-a  lot89013-b 


Lot 89014 -  
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star outside the Gladstone Hotel in NYC (where she briefly lived) wearing a black gown, black gloves, and a white fur coat, signed in blue fountain pen ink in the lower center right "Marilyn Monroe," verso has stamp reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending Mar. 12, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note the ink is somewhat smudged from the time when it was signed.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89014-a  lot89014-b 


Lot 89015 A Marilyn Monroe Signed Color Snapshot, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star inside the Gladstone Hotel in NYC (where she briefly lived) wearing a black gown, black gloves, and a white fur coat (with two men seen in the background), signed almost illegibly in blue fountain pen ink in the upper right "Marilyn Monroe," verso has stamp reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending Mar. 12, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note much of signature is invisible as the pen MM was using evidently ran out of ink.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89015-a  lot89015-b 


Lot 89016 -  A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Twenty-one total, all original prints with a glossy finish, depicting the star wearing a gold lamé gown, a black fur coat, and black gloves as she arrives with Milton Greene at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in NYC to attend a Friar's Club dinner on March 11, 1955 (which honored Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin), MM is seen either alone or among others (including Milton Berle), some snapshots are clear, others are out of focus, in three different sizes; though these images have been seen, these are the original snapshots developed and printed in 1955; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook.)
5" x 3 1/2"; 3" x 3"; 3 1/2" x 2 1/2"  
lot89016   


Lot 89017 -  A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, Circa 1955-1956.
Twenty-seven total, all original prints with a glossy finish, three different sizes, each a candid shot depicting the star as she was out and about in NYC, sometimes in casual wear, other times in cocktail attire, many showing her surrounded by others (including business partner Milton Greene, photographer Sam Shaw, and super-fans Jimmy Collins and James Haspiel, to name a few); from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and some have slight wrinkles but overall, all are still in very good condition.)
3 1/2" x 5"; 3 1/2" x 3 1/2"; 2 1/2" x 3 1/2"  
lot89017  


Lot 89018 - A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955-1956.
Twenty-two total, all original prints with a glossy finish, four different sizes, all showing the star in evening wear on about five different occasions (judging from her different dresses), many depict others with MM such as Joe DiMaggio, business partners Milton and Amy Greene, and fans; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and some are slightly wrinkled but overall, all are in very good condition.)
5" x 3 1/2"; 3 1/2" x 4 1/2"; 3 1/2" x 3 1/2"; 2 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89018 


 Lot 89019 -  A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955-1957.
Twenty-two total, all original prints with a glossy finish (except one), four different sizes, all depicting the star at various public events she attended including seven showing her with then-husband, Arthur Miller; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and some have evident wrinkling due to age.)
10" x 8" (one only); 5" x 3 1/2"; 3 1/2" x 3 1/2"; 3 1/2" x 2 1/4" 

lot89019  


Lot 89020 -  A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Twelve total, all original prints with a glossy finish, three different sizes (with four slightly trimmed from their original size), all depicting the star next to others (including her business partners, Milton and Amy Greene) as she wears a brocade evening gown and matching cape at the March 9, 1955 NYC premiere of the James Dean film, "East of Eden" ; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook.)
5" x 3 1/2"; 3" x 3"; 3 1/2" x 2 1/2" 
lot89020 


Lot 89021A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Ten total, all original prints with a glossy finish, all sequentially shot as Marilyn goes from a NYC street into a parking garage and then takes off in a car while wearing white pedal pushers, a polka-dotted shirt, white flats, and a white summer coat, five are stamped on the right side margin "Jun 55," super-fan James Haspiel appears in one (as do a few others); all originally housed in a mint green "Photo Book" from "Berkey / Photo Service;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note one photo is severely creased across MM's face.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89021-a   lot89021-b 


Lot 89022 A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Seven total, all original prints with a glossy finish, each depicting the star wearing a lamé dress and a white fur coat as she sits in the lobby of The Hotel 14 in NYC while others surround her (including Milton Berle); from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs); Collins recalls that on this night he waited for MM and her group (which included her date, Milton Berle) to come out of the Copacabana night club which was located upstairs in the same building as The Hotel 14 at 14 East 60th Street in Manhattan -- his patience paid off when he was able to snap these great candid photos of the star as well as pose next to her in one (top row, center). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook.)
4 1/2" x 3 1/4" 
lot89022 


Lot 89023A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Eight total, two different sizes, all original prints with a glossy finish, depicting the star sitting in the lobby of the Gladstone Hotel (where she briefly lived) as she wears a black dress, black jacket, and black fishnet gloves, verso of all faintly stamped "Kodak / Velox / Paper;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" and 3 1/2" x 2 1/2" 
lot89023 


Lot 89024A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Eight total, all original prints with a glossy finish, three different sizes (two being trimmed from their original size), all depicting the star wearing a white cocktail dress and white fur as she and her date, Joe DiMaggio, attend the June 1, 1955 premiere of "The Seven Year Itch" (which was also MM's 29th birthday); most images are out of focus but still of interest as this is a now-historic event in film history; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and the largest one has a 1" tear on the center right side.)
6 1/2" x 5"; 3 1/2" x 5"; 3 1/2" x 2 1/2" 
lot89024  


Lot 89025A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Color Snapshots, Mid-1950s.
Thirty-eight total, all original prints with a glossy finish, seven different sizes, depicting the star at various times over a number of years, most are candid shots though many appear to have been taken by professional photographers due to their clarity, four have stamps on the verso reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending July 2, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and some are slightly wrinkled due to age.)
5" x 3 1/2" biggest; 2 3/4" x 1 3/4" smallest  
lot89025 


Lot 89026A Marilyn Monroe Rare Black and White Snapshot, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star wearing her famous 'white dress' with a fur coat thrown over her shoulders and a script in her hand as she leaves the St. Regis hotel in New York City, getting ready to promote a film (likely "The Seven Year Itch"); though this image has been seen, this is the original snapshot developed and printed in 1955; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when this was in a scrapbook and there are slight creases on the surface seen in raking light only.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2"  
lot89026-a  lot89026-b 


Film Footage


Lot 89027A Marilyn Monroe Never-Before-Seen Piece of Color Film Footage from Korea, 1954.
Shot on 8mm, approximately 1 minute and 21 seconds long, footage shows MM walking outside with a soldier escort (as she wears pants and a bomber jacket) while dozens of other soldiers surround her (to take her photograph), then it shows her getting into a car, then it (briefly) shows her performing on stage (as she wears the purple spaghetti-strapped sequined dress); shot by the current owner's father when he was stationed in Korea, he had close access to the star during the walking sequences, but was farther away when she was on stage; the original 1954 film was on three separate reels as the soldier shot tons of footage that didn't include MM (it's of the Korean people, the landscape, and fellow American soldiers) but it has now been spliced together and put on one modern-day plastic reel; the three 1954-era metal reels are still included as is a DVD transfer so the footage can be viewed.
Plastic Reel: 7"; Metal Reels: 5" 
lot89027-b 
lot89027-a lot89027-c lot89027-d 


16 août 2015

Jayne Mansfield

Jayne Mansfield
(1933 - 1967)

actrice et sex-symbol américaine
Surnommée "Working's Man Monroe", "Marilyn King Sized"

jayne-1957-studio-satin_and_fur-010-2 

 jayne-1940s-teenager-1-1 Jayne Mansfield naît le 19 avril 1933 sous le nom de Vera Jayne Palmer à Bryn Mawr (en Pennsylvanie) dans une famille bourgeoise. Elle est la fille unique de Herbert William Palmer (1904–1936), avocat, et de Vera (Jeffrey) Palmer (1903–2000) aux origines allemandes et anglaises et dont les parents avaient fait fortune dans l'industrie de l'ardoise. Jayne passe sa petite enfance à Phillipsburg (dans le New Jersey) où son père est l'avocat de Robert B. Meyner, futur gouverneur du New Jersey. En 1936, alors que Jayne n'a que trois ans, son père décède d'une attaque cardiaque pendant qu'il conduisait sa voiture avec sa femme et Jayne en passagères. Se retrouvant veuve, sa mère travaille comme professeur et se remarrie en 1939 avec Harry Lawrence Peers, un ingénieur commercial. La famille démènage à Dallas (au Texas) et Jayne prend le nom de Vera Jayne Peers.
Dès son plus jeune âge, Jayne rêve d'Hollywood et admire l'enfant star Shirley Temple, elle dira plus tard: «Je dévorais les magazines de cinéma. Et je voulais être une nouvelle Lana Turner.» A l'âge de 12 ans, elle prend des leçons de danse de salon; et au lycée, elle suit des cours de piano, de violon et d'alto. Elle étudie aussi l'espagnol et l'allemand et obtient d'excellentes notes à ses diplômes, particulièrement en mathématiques.
C'est à l'âge de 13 ans -en 1946- qu'elle aurait subi des attouchements d'un de ses professeurs.

jayne-1950-with_jayne_marie-2 A l'âge de 17 ans, en 1950, Jayne obtient son diplôme du lycée Highland Park HighSchool et, découvrant qu'elle est enceinte, elle s'enfuit pour se marier en secret le 28 janvier 1950 à Paul James Mansfield (un étudiant de 21 ans qu'elle a rencontré à une fête de Noël 1949; il travaillera plus tard dans les relations publiques). Ils organisent un mariage public et officiel le 10 mai 1950 à Fort Worth au Texas; leur fille, Jayne Marie Mansfield, naît le 8 novembre 1950 (cette dernière apparaîtra dans Playboy en 1976) (voir photo ci-contre). Les époux fréquentent l'université methodiste où ils étudient l'art dramatique, emmenant parfois à leur cours leur fille, manquant de finances pour faire garder l'enfant. C'est aussi l'année de sa première apparition à l'écran: elle tient un tout petit rôle dans un film de série B "Prehistoric Women" (nommé aussi "The Virgin Goddess").

jayne-1950s En 1951, ils emmènagent à Austin, au Texas, où Jayne étudie l'art dramatique à l'université d'Austin. Durant cette période, elle enchaîne divers petits boulots: elle pose comme modèle nue pour des étudiants en art, vend des livres en faisant du porte à porte et travaille comme réceptionniste le soir dans un studio de danse. Elle pose une fois nue pour un photographe de Dallas. Elle gagne aussi quelques concours de beauté et se teint les cheveux en blonde: elle est 'Miss Photoflash', 'Miss Magnesium Lamp', 'Miss Blues Bonnet of Austin', 'Miss Texas Tomato' et 'Miss de la semaine de prévention des incendies' ! Elle intègre ensuite le Curtain Club (un club théâtral populaire de l'université), rejoint le Austin Civic Theater, et apparaît dans de petites productions théâtrales locales (dans les pièces The Slaves of Demon Rum, Ten Nights in a Barroom et Anything Goes). En 1952, elle retourne à Dallas quelques mois et devient l'élève de l'acteur et professeur d'art dramatique Baruch Lumet (le père du futur réalisateur Sidney Lumet), très impressionné par le potentiel de Jayne, il lui donne gratuitement des cours et la dirige le 22 octobre 1953 dans la pièce d'Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman, avec la troupe Knox Street Theater, ce qui lui vaut de se faire remarquer par la Paramount qui lui propose une audition. Lumet va l'aider à préparer le casting.
Puis, la famille part pour un an au Camp Gordon (en Georgie) où Paul est réserviste pour la guerre de Corée; ils se produisent ensemble dans la pièce Anything Goes. Jayne étudie alors le théâtre et la psychologie à l'université de Géorgie pendant que Paul est en Corée. A la base, Jayne fait des étirements sur la pelouse et se rend à la piscine en bikini de velours rouge. Au retour de Paul, elle le supplie d'aller vivre dans la cité du cinéma: Los Angeles.

jayne mansfield-1954 En 1954, la petite famille (et leurs nombreux animaux: un grand danois, deux chihuahuas, un caniche teint en rose, trois chats et un lapin) s'installent dans un petit appartement de Los Angeles où Jayne étudie l'art théâtral à l'universite d'UCLA pendant l'été (laissant sa fille Jayne Marie chez sa mère). Quand Paul repart pour la Corée, elle devient la maîtresse de son voisin, l'acteur Steve Cochran. Elle gagne la première étape du concours de Miss California, ayant caché son statut marital, puis se retire du concours; elle obtient aussi son premier rôle au cinéma, dans le film à petit budget "Female Jungle", dont le tournage a été bouclé en une dizaine de jours et pour lequel Jayne a gagné 150 $; pour ensuite finir le reste de l'année à l'université méthodiste du Texas afin de valider son diplôme. Elle continue à enchaîner les jobs: vendeuse de pop-corn dans un théâtre, elle donne des cours de danse, travaille dans une usine à chapeaux; elle est aussi vendeuse de bonbons dans un cinéma (où elle tape dans l'oeil d'un producteur de télé), pose comme modèle dans l'agence Blue Book (où Marilyn Monroe fit ses débuts) et est même photographe dans un restaurant huppé (le "Esther Williams' Trails Restaurant") où elle gagne 6 $ plus 10% de ses ventes chaque soir, à photographier de grands patrons. Et elle continue à remporter de nombreux prix de beautés, dont certains demeurent étranges: 'Gas Station Queen', 'Cherry Blossom Queen', 'Nylon Sweater Queen', 'Hot Dog Ambassador', 'Miss Analgesin', 'Miss Third Platoon', 'Miss Direct Mail', 'Miss Electric Switch', 'Miss Fill-er-up', 'Miss Negligee', 'Miss One for the Road',' Miss Freeway', 'Hot Dog Ambassador', 'Miss Geiger Counter', 'Best Dressed Woman of Theater', 'Miss 100% Pure Maple Syrup', 'Miss Tomato', 'Miss Potato Soup', 'Miss July Fourth', 'Miss Standard Foods', 'Miss Orchid', 'Miss Lobster', 'Miss United Dairies' et 'Miss Chihuahua Show'. Le seul titre qu'elle refuse est celui de 'Miss au fromage de Roquefort', car elle dit "que ça ne sonne pas très bien".

jayne_earl_moran-1956 Paradoxalement, elle ne parvient pas à percer en tant que mannequin, à cause de son physique jugé bien trop sexy pour l'époque (ses 117 cm de tour de poitrine ne faisaient pas parti des "critères" de beauté dictés par la mode de l'époque; elle est surnommée le "sablier" en référence à ses courbes; ses mensurations sont de 102-53-91 cm pour 1,68 m -1,73 m selon l'autopsie).
Elle perd ainsi des contrats publicitaires (Emmeline Snively de l'agence Blue Book l'avait dirigée vers le photographe Gene Lester qui était chargé de la campagne General Electric qui représentait de jeunes femmes en maillot de bain se relaxant autour d'une piscine).
C'est alors qu'elle se tourne vers le cinéma et passe de nombreuses auditions pour Paramount Pictures, Columbia, Twentieth Century Fox et Warner Brothers. Elle auditionnera d'ailleurs pour un rôle dans le film "The Seven Year Itch" ("Sept ans de réflexion", dans lequel Marilyn Monroe tient le rôle principal), pour "Rebel without a cause" ("La fureur de vivre") et pour "Jeanne D'arc" (un projet de la Paramount qui n'aboutira pas). Elle obtient son premier rôle au Lux Video Theatre, une série de CBS (dans l'épisode "An Angel Went AWOL", du 21 octobre 1954), où elle gagne 300 $ pour jouer au piano et prononcer quelques lignes de dialogues. En décembre 1954 -à la veille de Noël- elle frappe à la porte du manager et publicitaire James Byron pour qu'il la prenne en charge. Le crédo de Jayne est d'abord de devenir célèbre, et d'être une actrice en second lieu. Il s'occupera de sa carrière jusqu'à la fin de l'année 1961, assisté d'une équipe: William Shiffrin (agent de presse), Greg Bautzer (avocat) et Charles Goldring (business manager).

En janvier 1955, Jayne va capter l'attention des médias et d'Hollywood en laissant tomber le haut de son maillot de bain rouge (prêté par son ami le photographe Peter Gowland) en plongeant dans la piscine d'un banquet organisé à Silver Springs en Floride pour la sortie du film Underwater ! avec Jane Russel. Le coup publicitaire marche tellement bien (avec une publication dans le magazine Variety du 12 janvier 1955), qu'elle va réitérer l'expérience le 8 juin de la même année, en laissant tomber sa robe jusqu'à sa taille deux fois dans la même soirée (à une première de film et dans un nightclub).
jayne-1955-02-playboy-playmate-by_hal_adams-2b  En février 1955, elle est 'Miss Playboy' pour le magazine Playboy (voir photo ci-contre); les photos de Jayne en pyjama rose vont non seulement booster les ventes du magazine, mais aussi donner un coup de pouce à sa carrière. Elle sera l'une des Playmates préférées du magazine qui publiera des photos de Jayne tous les mois de février de 1955 à 1958, et en 1960.
C'est aussi en février 1955 que James Byron lui négocie un contrat de sept ans avec la Warner Bros, qui était plutôt intrigué par ses pitreries en public, et qui la paie 250 $ la semaine pour les films "Pete Kelly's Blues" ("Le Gang du Blues", 1955), "Hell on Frisco Bay" ("Colère noire", 1955), "Illegal" ("Le témoin à abattre", 1955, où elle chante "Too Marvelous for Words") et "The Burglar" ("Le Cambrioleur", qui sortira sur les écrans deux après, en 1957). Insatisfaite de son contrat avec la Warner, elle parvient à le rompre, avec l'aide de l'avocat Greg Bautzer.

LIFE-1955-11-21 Le 21 novembre 1955, elle figure, parmi d'autres actrices de Broadway (dont Susan Strasberg), en couverture du célèbre et populaire magazine américain LIFE (voir photo ci-contre) photographiées par Alfred Eisenstaedt.
En janvier 1955, Jayne et Paul Mansfield se séparent: trop de divergences dans le couple dû à l'ambition de carrière et les infidélités de Jayne (et ses nombreux animaux). En août 1956, Paul réclame la garde de leur fille, affirmant que Jayne est une mère indigne en posant nue pour Playboy. Jayne demande le divorce de Paul en Californie le 21 octobre 1956 et Paul en fait la demande au Texas le 16 mars 1957 pour cruauté mentale. Ils signeront le divorce définitif le 8 janvier 1958. Après le divorce, Jayne décide de conserver le nom de "Mansfield" comme nom d'artiste.
Elle fréquente le réalisateur Nicholas Ray, l'acteur et compositeur George Jessel et le pilote Robby Robertson.

jayne_will_success Son agent William Shiffrin parvient à lui faire décrocher le rôle principal dans une pièce de George Axelrod à Broadway, celui du rôle d'une star de ciné Rita Marlowe, une sorte de Marilyn Monroe caricaturale dans "Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter ?" avec Orson Bean et Walter Matthau (voir photo ci-contre). Il s'agit de sa première grande performance sur scène, receuillant l'attention des critiques (pas toujours positives; elle obtiendra tout de même le prix de "l'actrice la plus prometteuse" aux Theatre World Award), et la popularité auprès du public (sa tenue en serviette de bain sur scène fera sensation). Brooks Atkinson du New York Times décrit "l'abandon louable" de son interprétation légèrement vêtue de Rita Marlowe dans la pièce telle "une sirène de cinéma blonde platine aux contours ondulés à la Marilyn Monroe".
Le 3 mai 1956, Jayne fait son grand retour à Hollywood (portant un manteau de vison à 20 000 $). La Twentieth Century-Fox lui signe un contrat de six ans, espérant ainsi remplacer leur star Marilyn Monroe, qui leur pose quelques problèmes. Jayne, qui sera alors une concurrente à Marilyn, sera surnommée la "Working Man's Monroe" ("La Marilyn Monroe des ouvriers").

1956-the girl cant help it  Son premier rôle pour la Fox est celui de Jerri Jordan pour le film de Frank Tashlin "The Girl Can't Help It" ("La blonde et moi") avec Tom Ewell (l'inoubliable partenaire de Marilyn dans "Sept ans de réflexion" - voir photo ci-contre) et dans lequel elle chante deux chansons ("Ev'rytime" et "Rock Around the Rock Pile"). Le film, qui réunit un casting important de stars du rock (Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran, Fats Domino, The Platters et Little Richard) remporte un vif succés critique et auprès du public. La Fox rachète pour 100 000 $ le contrat que Jayne avait signé à Broadway (elle continuait en parallèle à se produire sur les planches) et stoppe ainsi la représentation de Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter ? après 444 représentations. 
jayne-portrait-1950s-02-13 La Fox fait savoir aux médias que Jayne est la "Marilyn Monroe king-sized", afin d'effrayer Marilyn pour qu'elle revienne honorer son contrat aux studios. Le personnage que Jayne s'est construite sera désormais sa marque de fabrique: une blonde stupide, au déhanché chaloupé, parlant d'une voix de bébé essoufflé en poussant de petits cris stridants. Sa carrière médiatique est lancée: elle sera en photos dans près de 2 500 journaux et magazines et 122 000 lignes d'articles sont écrits sur elle entre septembre 1956 et mai 1957.
  En 1956, elle participe au grand show télé de la NBC, la série "Sunday Spectacular: The Bachelor"; et est l'invité vedette du show prestigieux "The Jack Benny Show" (où elle y joue du violon).
  Le 13 mai 1956, elle rencontre Mickey Hargitay (acteur et bodybuilder d'origine hongroise qui a remporté le titre de "Monsieur Univers" en 1955) au Latin Quarter à New York; il figure parmi les accompagnateurs du show de Mae West. Jayne tombe immédiatement amoureuse, ce qui provoque une dispute avec Mae West et Mickey de se faire frapper par le bodyguard de Miss West, Chuck Krauser (Monsieur California).

jayne-1957-12-04-beverly_hills-romanoffs-with_sophia_loren-4  Le 12 avril 1957, Jayne va parvenir à lancer un grand coup médiatique qui restera dans les annales: la Fox a organisé une grande soirée au restaurant Romanoff's de Beverly Hills en l'honneur de la venue de l'italienne Sophia Loren. Jayne va faire son apparition au cours de la soirée, portant une robe au décolleté très provoquant, la poitrine quasiment à l'air. Une photographie (voir photo ci-contre) va être prise montrant Sophia Loren lançant un regard dédaigneux dans le décolleté de la blonde et souriante Jayne. La photographie va faire le tour du monde et reste encore aujourd'hui une image culte.
En mai 1957, d'anciennes photos de nues d'elle posant pour des calendriers refont surface dans la presse.

jayne-1957-the_wayward_bus  Jayne joue ensuite un rôle à contre-emploi dans l'adaptation du roman de John Steinbeck, "The Wayward Bus" ("Les naufragés de l'autocar", 1957) avec Joan Collins (voir photo ci-contre). Elle tente de s'écarter de l'image de la blonde sexy et de s'établir en actrice sérieuse. Le film rencontre un petit succés et Jayne remporte le prix du Golden Globe de la 'Nouvelle Star de l'année" en 1957 face à Carroll Baker et Natalie Wood.
Puis elle tourne à nouveau sous la réalisation de Frank Tashlin, pour l'adaptation de la pièce qui l'a révélée "Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter ?" ("La Blonde Explosive") reprenant son rôle de Rita Marlowe, avec Tony Randall et Joan Blondell; Jayne parvient même à faire obtenir un petit rôle à son chéri, Mickey Hargitay. La Fox lance leur nouvelle star en lui faisant faire un tour d'Europe de 16 pays pendant 45 jours (du 25 septembre au 6 novembre 1957) pour promouvoir le film. Elle assiste à la première du film à Londres, récite du Shakespeare (Hamlet), joue du piano et du violon à la télévision britannique et elle est même présentée à la Reine d'Angleterre. A Rome, elle succombe aux charmes du Duc italien Amoalli.

> reportage et interview de Jayne en France (1957)

jayne-1957-studio-satin_and_fur-011-2   En mai 1957, elle est l'invité vedette du "Ed Sullivan Show" où elle joue du violon accompagnée de six musiciens, elle dira après l'émission: "Maintenant, je suis vraiment nationale. Maman et tout Dallas ont vu le Ed Sullivan show !"; en août 1957, elle est invitée au grand show de la télé américaine "What's My Line ?" (elle y reparticipera en 1964 et en 1966) et en novembre 1957, elle est représentée dans un épisode de "The Perry Como Show" qui va faire des records d'audience sur NBC. Elle tourne avec Cary Grant dans "Kiss Them for Me" ("Embrasse-la pour moi", 1957) qui sera un flop au box-office.
En fin d'année 1957, c'est accompagnée de Mickey Hargitay qu'elle fait une tournée de 13 jours -le "Christmas USO Tour"- avec Bob Hope à travers tous les lieux du Pacifique où est postée l'armée américaine: Hawaii, Okinawa, Guam, Tokyo et la Corée. Elle sera l'invitée dans trois émissions du "Bob Hope Show". En novembre 1957, elle achète une grande demeure de style espagnol de 40 pièces, qu'elle nomme son "Pink Palace" à Los Angeles  et où elle y recevra de nombreux photographes pour se mettre en scène avec son mari et ses enfants. Sa maison va alors devenir aussi célèbre que ses propriétaires: la décoration est ostentatoire (moquettes et tapisseries en fourrure jusque dans la salle de bain), de couleur rose (sa couleur préférée: cadillac et chihuahas teints en rose) avec des coeurs partout (lit, baignoire, cheminée, piscine). Les travaux -bien que Mickey, ancien plombier et charpentier, s'occupe de la construction de la piscine- et l'entretien ont un coût. En 1958, Jayne hérite de ses grands-parents maternels d'une somme assez conséquente (126 000 $). D'ailleurs, dès 1958, elle monnaye ses apparitions, notamment télévisuelles, se faisant payer 20 000 $ par participation dans un show TV. Elle revend aussi l'eau de son bain pour 10 $ la bouteille.

1958-wedding_mickey  Mickey Hargitay demande Jayne en mariage le 6 novembre 1957, lui offrant une bague de diamants de 10 carats à 5 000 $; le mariage est célébré le 13 janvier 1958 (soit cinq jours après son divorce officiel d'avec Paul Mansfield - voir photo ci-contre) à la Chapelle Wayfarers à Rancho Palos Verdes en Californie: le lieu n'est pas anodin, la chapelle est en verre et permet ainsi au couple d'être vu du public et surtout, des journalistes. Jayne porte une robe en dentelle de rubans roses, une robe prêtée par la Fox. Le couple part ensuite en Floride pour leur lune de miel.
Le couple semble avoir les mêmes ambitions: ils vont se mettre en scène, construisant des coups publicitaires populaires et vont devenir des partenaires dans le business: «Il est si beau et si fort, dit Jayne. Et au lit, il est tellement bon !». Ils sont un couple à la scène (dans des shows, dans les films, à la télévision) comme à la ville (posant avec bonheur pour les photographes chez eux et se montrant publiquement partout aux soirées hollywoodiennes) et dans les affaires (ils ont monté ensemble plusieurs sociétés de holdings: 'the Hargitay Exercise Equipment Company', 'Jayne Mansfield Productions', et 'Eastland Savings and Loan').

1956-10-jayne_66 En février 1958, Jayne et Mickey Hargitay signent un contrat de quatre semaines (qui va s'étendre à huit semaines) au club Tropicana de Las Vegas où Jayne propose une revue de striptease sous le nom de Trixie Divoon dans "The Tropicana Holiday". Les bénéfices de la soirée d'ouverture (20 000 $) sont reversés à l'association caritative de March of Dimes. Jayne perçoit 25 000 $ par semaine (alors que son contrat avec la Fox ne lui verse "que" 2 500 $ la semaine), avec une assurance d'un million de dollars au cas où Mickey chuterait quand il la porte: en effet, leur numéro le plus populaire et qui fera la gloire du couple, est le porté de Jayne par Mickey (voir photo ci-contre), qui la fait tournoyer en cercle autour de sa taille, tous deux vêtus de maillots en léopards !
En mai 1958, elle participe au Festival de Cannes en France avec Mickey Hargitay; elle est interviewée par François Chalais dans l'émission "Reflets de Cannes" et où elle reproduit son petit gloussement sensuel qui a participé à la naissance de son mythe. Elle reste en Europe et passe le reste de l'été 1958 entre Londres et L'Espagne pour le tournage du western "The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw" ("La blonde et le shérif", sorti en 1959) et dans lequel Jayne chante trois chansons (l'une d'entre elles est doublée par Connie Francis). Le film sera son dernier grand succès au box-office.

jm-1 Les studios, qui veulent surtout mettre en avant sa plastique, la cantonnent à des personnages caricaturaux qui lui valent les surnoms de «Blonde explosive» ou «le Buste». Et malgré la publicité perpétuelle autour de son physique et dont participe avec bonheur Jayne, sa carrière va peu à peu décliner et après 1959, elle ne parvient plus à obtenir des rôles de qualité. Surtout, elle n'est plus assez disponible pour la Fox, à cause de ses grossesses successives (elle est par exemple contrainte de refuser un rôle dans la comédie romantique "Bell, Book and Candle" (1958) aux côtés de James Stewart et Jack Lemmon, car elle est enceinte). Et sa réputation la précède, elle est boudée par certains acteurs: quand la Fox lui offre un rôle dans "Rally 'Round the Flag, Boys !" avec Paul Newman, l'acteur s'oppose à l'engagement de Jayne, qui sera remplacée par Joan Collins. La Fox la "prête" alors à des productions étrangères (anglaises et italiennes) jusqu'à la fin de son contrat en 1962 et Jayne se retrouve alors à l'affiche de films à petits budgets sans grand intérêt.
Même certains médias se lassent de ses apparitions en bikini où Jayne ondule le ventre et finit toujours par faire tomber le haut du maillot, comme le haut de ses robes de soirée. A cause de ces "accidents" en public, même Richard Blackwell, son couturier attitré, va finir par ne plus vouloir travailler avec Jayne.

1958-12-pink_palace-jayne_mickey_miklos  Le 21 décembre 1958, Jayne donne naissance à Miklós (Jeffrey Palmer) Hargitay, le premier fils de Jayne et Mickey (voir photo ci-contre, le couple et Miklos au Pink Palace).
En février 1959, les Hargitay assistent au Carnaval de Rio puis le couple part en Italie pour tourner dans le film "The Loves of Hercules" ("Les amours d'Hercule") où ils sont en tête d'affiche (Jayne n'a accepté de tourner le film que si Mickey obtenait le premier rôle masculin). C'est aussi en 1959 que la Fox la fait tourner dans le film indépendant "The Challenge" (qui sort en 1963) en Angleterre.
En 1959, elle apparaît dans un épisode de la série "The Red Skelton Show" (elle y jouera dans deux autres épisodes en 1961 et en 1963).
Quand Jayne fait son retour à Hollywood au milieu de l'année 1960, la Fox la prête à une petite production anglaise pour le film "Too Hot to Handle" ("La blonde et les nus de Soho" qui sort en 1961, et dont une scène où Jayne apparaît seins nus sera censurée), elle y interprète le rôle d'une entraîneuse burlesque (et y chante les chansons "Too Hot To Handle", "You Were Made For Me", "Monsoon" et "Midnight" ); enfin, la Fox lui offre un rôle secondaire dans le film "It Happened in Athens" (qui sort en 1962), tourné en Grèce, avec Trax Colton, un nouveau venu que souhaitait lancer la Fox, qui fera un bide et qui marquera l'abandon de son contrat avec la Twentieth Century Fox. 
1960-08-pink_palace-jayne_mickey_jaynemarie_miklos_zoltan Le 8 février 1960, son étoile est déposée sur la célèbre avenue d'Hollywood, le 'Hollywood Walk of Fame'. En juin 1960, elle est interviewée par Edward Murrow dans son émission "Person to Person". Le 1er août 1960, le deuxième enfant de Jayne et Mickey, Zoltán (Anthony) Hargitay, voit le jour (voir photo ci-contre, le couple avec Jayne Marie, Miklos et Zoltan au Pink Palace). Et à la fête des mères de l'année 1960, le "Mildred Strauss Child Care Chapter" de l'hôpital de Mount Sinai à New York, célèbre la famille de Jayne comme "la famille de l'année". Pourtant, dans le privé, le couple connait quelques problèmes conjuguaux: Jayne se confiant même à des amis que la fin de son mariage est proche.
C'est au cours de l'année 1960 que Jayne rencontre, par l'intermédiaire de Peter Lawford, le sénateur -et futur président des USA- John F. Kennedy. Ils ont une aventure (se rencontrant à Palm Springs et à Santa Monica chez Lawford -> article The Kennedys in Hollywood ). Elle aurait aussi une liaison avec son frère, Robert F. Kennedy (vers 1964 -> cf extraits du livre "Here They Are Jayne Mansfield" par Raymond Strait, sur BooksGoogle).

1961-the_house_of_love_by_bernard_of_hollywood Puis elle retourne à Las Vegas: en décembre 1960, elle se produit dans une revue "The House of Love" (produite par Jack Cole, avec Mickey Hargitay - voir photo ci-contre) à l'hôtel et casino de Dunes et pour lequel elle perçoit un salaire de 35 000 $ la semaine: en 1962, la Fox réalisera un album intitulé "Jayne Mansfield Busts Up Las Vegas" avec les chansons de la revue.
Dès 1960, elle fait des promotions jusque dans des supermarchés et drug store, se faisant payer 10 000 $ pour chacune de ses apparitions: elle fait plus d'apparitions publiques qu'un candidat en politique. Elle reste au top dans les médias qui ne cessent de parler d'elle et est l'une des célébrités les plus photographiées au monde. Le journaliste James Bacon écrira en 1973 dans le Los Angeles Herald-Examiner: "C'était une fille avec un réel talent de comédie, une figure et un physique spectaculaires et pourtant se ridiculisant elle-même par une étrange publicité". Quand au réalisateur Frank Tashlin, il déclarera: "Jayne avait tout: la beauté, le talent, l'énergie; mais elle a fichu sa carrière à terre avec trop de publicité".

En 1961, elle joue un rôle dans un épisode de la série "Kraft Mystery Theatre", est invitée au "Jackie Gleason Show" et elle tourne pour la Warner un petit rôle dans le film biographique "The George Raft Story" ("Le dompteur de femmes"). Puis les années suivantes, elle ne tourne que dans des petites productions étrangères: allemandes "Heimweh nach St. Pauli" ("Freddy et le nouveau monde", 1963, où elle y chante "Wo Ist Der Mann" et "Snicksnack Snuckelchen"), "Einer frisst den anderen" (1964) et italiennes "L'Amore Primitivo" (1964), "Panic Button" (1964).
jayne_et_mickey_danse  A la fin de l'année 1961, elle fait une tournée spéciale pour Noël au Canada à Newfoundland, Labrador et l'île de Baffin.
En février 1962, Jayne et Mickey s'offrent une seconde lune de miel à Nassau, aux Bahamas lorsqu'un drame va surgir: leur bateau va se retourner, le couple sera découvert près de 12 heures après, frigorifiés et choqués, après s'être réfugiés sur une petite île (Rose Island). Curieusement, le couple va médiatiser l'événement, Jayne se laissant filmer en état de choc: bon nombre de personnes vont considérer ce fait comme un canular, un coup de pub de mauvais goût.

En 1962, elle participe à un épisode de la célèbre série "Alfred Hitchcock Presents", et dans la série "Follow the Sun". En juin 1962, Jayne fait parler d'elle dans la presse après s'être montrée le haut de sa robe à pois grande ouverte, avec le soutien-gorge apparent dans un nighclub de Rome. Les journalistes de télévision, radio et cinéma italien lui décernent cette année là le prix "Silver Mask".

1963-by_bruno_bernard Au début de l'année 1963, elle se produit dans une revue (pour la première fois hors de Las Vegas) au Plantation Supper Club à Greensboro (en Caroline du Nord), empochant 23 000 $ la semaine, puis à l'Iroquois Gardens à Louisville (dans le Kentucky). Dans ses spectacles, elle joue de la comédie en stand-up, chante, et finit sur un strip-tease. Elle obtient souvent l'ovation du public.
L'acteur et réalisateur Tommy Noonan (partenaire de Marilyn dans "Les hommes préfèrent les blondes") avec qui Jayne vit une relation passionnée, la persuade d'accepter le rôle principal de" Promises ! Promises !" avec son mari Mickey Hargitay, et dans lequel elle apparaît intégralement nue. Les photos de tournage sont publiées dans le magazine Playboy de juin 1963 (la Cour de Chicago fait un procès pour obsénité à Hugh Hefner) et le film d'être banni à Cleveland, mais rencontre un petit succés relatif au box-office.
Jayne enchaîne les aventures sentimentales (mais avant tout sexuelles). On lui prête près de 1500 amants (elle affirme que, pour se sentir bien dans son corps, il lui faut jouir au moins une fois par jour) parmi lesquels Claude Terrail (propriétaire du restaurant La Tour d'Argent à Paris), Jorge Guinle (millionaire brésilien), Oleg Cassini (couturier), Henry Miller (romancier), Porfirio Rubirosa (diplomate et playboy dominicain), Sergio Villagran (acteur), Stephen Vlabovitch (un bedeau), Raymond Strait (attaché de presse)... Certains hommes ont même payé pour passer une nuit avec elle: des hommes d'affaires et même un ministre autrichien! Quand on lui fait remarquer que cela s'apparente à de la prostitution, elle réplique: "Oui, et alors ? J'y trouve mon compte, le client aussi, ce que nous faisons ne lése personne et ne regarde que nous."
 Qu
and elle tourne pour le compte de la Fox dans le film mineur italien "Panic Button" (qui sortira sur les écrans en 1964), Jayne rencontre le producteur italien Enrico Bomba, avec qui elle vit une relation médiatisée. Mickey Hargitay, avec qui Jayne a loué une villa à Rome pendant le tournage, va accuser Bomba de saboter leur mariage. D'ailleurs, Jayne demande le divorce le 4 mai 1962, avant de se raviser en déclarant: "Je suis sûre que nous parviendrons à faire face" et retourne auprès de son mari pour les fêtes de fin d'année. Mais l'année suivante, en 1963, Jayne s'affiche avec le chanteur brésilien Nelson Sardelli et déclare vouloir l'épouser une fois divorcée d'avec Mickey. Et c'est accompagnée de Sardelli que Jayne se rend en mai 1963 au Mexique, à Juarez, pour divorcer: c'est une rupture pleine d'aigreur, où Jayne va aller jusqu'à accuser Mickey d'avoir kidnappé l'un de leurs enfants, afin d'obtenir les faveurs financières.

> Les liaisons de Jayne:
  Enrico Bomba (1962, Rome) / Nelson Sardelli (1963) / Claude Terrail (1963)

1962-Jayne-Mansfield-with-Enrico-Bomba  1963-jayne_et_nelson_sardelli  1963-09-paris-au_pied_de_cochon-jayne_mickey_claude_terrail 

1964-01-naissance_mariska  Mais après ce divorce, Jayne découvre qu'elle est enceinte (la paternité n'est pas clairement établie: Hargitay ou Sardelli). Pour sa carrière (donner naissance à un enfant en ayant divorcée quelques mois auparavant aurait été mal vu et aurait pu faire décliner son statut populaire), Jayne et Mickey annoncent qu'ils sont toujours ensemble et mariés, le divorce au Mexique n'étant pas reconnu en Californie. Leur fille Mariska (Magdolna) Hargitay naît le 23 janvier 1964 (elle deviendra une actrice populaire, grâce à la série "Law & Order" - "New York, Unité Spéciale"- voir photo ci-contre, le couple, Jayne-Marie, Miklos, Zoltan et Mariska nourrisson). Mais Jayne entreprend de faire reconnaître le divorce au Mexique comme légal; et le divorce est ainsi prononcé aux Etats-Unis le 26 août 1964. Néanmoins, le couple restera tout de même amis, continuant à se produire ensemble.
C'est alors qu'on lui propose un rôle intéressant (en remplacement de Marilyn Monroe, décédée en 1962): tourner sous la direction de Billy Wilder dans "Kiss Me, Stupid" avec Dean Martin. Mais Jayne, enceinte de Mariska, décline le rôle qui échouera à Kim Novak. 
C'est aussi le 26 août 1964 au club Whiskey A-Go-Go de Los Angeles, que Jayne rencontre le groupe les Beatles, alors en tournée aux Etats-Unis. Lorsque les journalistes leur ont demandé quelle célébrité américaine ils souhaitaient rencontrer, ils ont répondu "Jayne Mansfield". Lorsqu'elle voit John Lennon, Jayne lui demande si ses cheveux sont vraiment les siens, ce à quoi il répond: "Et vos seins, sont-ils vrais ?" On raconte qu'à la fin de la soirée, George Harrison a voulu lancer son verre de Scotch vers une Jayne en état d'ébriété, mais c'est Mamie Van Doren qui l'aurait reçu en plein visage !

1965-jayne_et_matt_cimber  En 1964, elle apparaît dans un épisode de la série "Burke's Law" ("L'homme à la Rolls"), tourne dans un petit film italien "L'Amore Primitivo" ("Primitive Love" tourné en Italie en mai 1964) avec Mickey Hargitay, puis Jayne reprend deux rôles tenus par Marilyn Monroe au cinéma dans les pièces "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" au Carousel Theater et "Bus Stop" mise en scène par Matt Cimber, au Yonker Playhouse à New York, avec Mickey Hargitay. Le couple reçoit de bonnes critiques et font la tournée des petites villes des Etats-Unis. Jayne tombe sous le charme de Matt Cimber (voir photo ci-contre, le couple en 1965) réalisateur d'origine italienne, et ils se marient le 24 septembre 1964 à Mulegé au Mexique. Cimber va devenir le manager de Jayne en gérant sa carrière; mais il va la mener à sa perte en lui faisant signer des contrats pour des projets sans envergures (tel que le film "The Las Vegas Hillbillys").
Elle co-écrit son autobiographie (avec Mickey Hargitay) "Jayne Mansfield's Wild, Wild World" sortie en 1964; un projet associant un film documentaire, du même nom, qui verra le jour en 1968, après sa mort, et où on y voit Jayne aux USA et en Europe (Rome, Paris, Cannes) lors de sorties publiques, mais aussi visitant des camps de nudistes, des bars gays et des clubs de strip-tease. Le documentaire, un peu trash, deviendra culte auprès de ses admirateurs.

> Documentaire "Jayne Mansfield's Wild, Wild, World" (narration par Jayne)

1964-jaynemansfield-shakespeareToujours en 1964, la MGM Records sort un album novateur "Jayne Mansfield: Shakespeare, Tchaikovsky & Me" (voir photo ci-contre) dans lequel Jayne récite des sonnets de Shakespeare et des poèmes de Marlowe, Browning, Wordsworth, et bien d'autres sur la musique de Tchaikovsky. L'album ne rencontre pas de bonnes critiques, tel que le mentionne un journaliste du New York Times: "Miss Mansfield est une dame aux charmes apparents, mais lire de la poésie n'en fait pas parti".
En 1965, elle joue dans les pièces "Rabbit Habit" au Latin Quarter (New York) et "Champagne Complex" au Pabst Theater, dirigées par Matt Cimber et qui reçoivent un mauvais accueil. Cette même année -1965-, Jayne enregistre deux chansons à New York, avec Jimi Hendrix à la basse: "As the Cloud Drift By" et "Suey", qui sortiront en 45 Tours en 1966 par London Records. Le motif de cette collaboration est qu'ils partagaient le même manager.

1966-04-19-birthday_jayne_with_baby_tony  Côté vie privée, son troisième mariage avec Matt Cimber est un échec: Jayne abuse trop de l'alcool, est constamment infidèle (elle ramène chez elle un étudiant, Douglas Olivares, dont elle s'est entichée lors d'une représentation en discothèque), et va juqu'à dire à son mari que le seul avec qui elle a été heureuse fut son précédent amant, Nelson Sardelli. Le couple ne tient pas et ils se séparent le 11 juillet 1965, bien que Jayne soit enceinte: leur fils, Tony (Antonio Raphael Ottaviano) Cimber, naît le 18 octobre 1965 (voir photo ci-contre, Jayne et Tony, à la fête des 33 ans de Jayne en 1966 - Tony travaillera plus tard à la télévision, comme annonceur et producteur). Et le divorce est prononcé le 20 juillet 1966. Le projet qu'ils menaient ensemble, "Single Room Furnished", réalisé par Cimber, est temporairement suspendu, avant d'être finalement repris: elle y tient un rôle dramatique où elle interprète trois personnages différents, mais le film ne sortira sur les écrans qu'en 1968, un an après sa mort. Puis elle apparaît dans un film à petit budget, "The Las Vegas Hillbillys" (1966) avec Mamie Van Doren et Ferlin Husky, où elle tient le rôle de Tawni Downs, une show girl de Las Vegas (elle y interprète la chanson "That makes it"), et pour lequel elle fait une promotion assidue avec une tournée de 29 jours à travers les grandes villes américaines en compagnie de musiciens de country. Jayne déclare qu'elle ne voulait pas "partager un moment de l'écran avec la réponse drive-in de Marilyn Monroe", faisant référence à l'actrice Mamie Van Doren (une concurrente à Marilyn dans les années 50s). Et alors que leurs personnages ne partagent qu'une seule scène, les deux actrices ont filmé chacune leur scène à part, reconstituée au montage !
Pour les fêtes de Noël 1965, elle organise une réception pour son dernier enfant Tony, mais personne ne vient. Isolée, Jayne reprend contact avec Mickey Hargitay.

Icône déchue noyée dans l'alcool, les psychotropes, et la prise de drogue (LSD), Jayne Mansfield a pris du poids (elle porte des robes amples du style de l'époque) et malgré le déclin de sa carrière, elle reste populaire et réunit toujours les foules lors de ses performances sur scène et ses frasques publicitaires, mais en est réduite à des tournées miteuses dans des shows burlesques bon marché. Elle retourne d'ailleurs à Las Vegas en 1966, pour un show joué à Fremont Street, bien loin des clubs à la mode qu'elle a connu (tels Tropicana et Dunes); puis part se produire à New York pendant six semaines au Latin Quarter pour le show "French Dressing" avec Mickey Hargitay, une version réarrangée de son ancien show du Tropicana qui connaît un succès relatif. Fin octobre 1966, elle passe une semaine au Canada, se produisant à "The Cave Nightclub".

1966-jayne_anton_lavey  En 1966, lors du Festival du Film de San Francisco (où Jayne se fait virer après s'être montrée dans une tenue très dévêtue), Jayne et Sam Brody visitent l'Eglise de Satan et elle est présentée à Anton LaVey, le fondateur de l'Église (voir photo ci-contre, Jayne et Anton LaVey), avec qui on lui prête une aventure, qui fera d'elle une grande prêtresse honoraire. L'Eglise la proclame membre à part entière et elle reçoit un certificat qu'elle fera encadrer et accrocher dans sa chambre rose. Les médias rapportent l'événement et Jayne est considérée comme une sataniste.
Dès juillet 1966, Jayne partage sa vie avec son avocat Sam Brody, avec qui elle a de fréquentes altercations quand ils sont tous deux ivres. La femme de Sam, Beverly Brody, demande le divorce après avoir déclarée que Jayne est "l'autre 41ème femme" dans la vie de Sam.

1966-jayne_zoltan  Le 23 novembre 1966, Jayne visite le parc à thème "Jungleland USA" à Thousand Oaks en Californie: son fils Zoltan se fait sévèrement attaquer par un lion qui l'a mordu au cou. Le petit garçon souffre de traumastisme crânien et subit trois opérations de chirurgies, dont une opération du cerveau qui dure six heures avant de contracter une méningite (voir photo ci-contre, Jayne et Zoltan au Community Memorial Hospital). Il parvient à en guérir mais Jayne, par le biais de son avocat Sam Brody, attaque le parc en justice réclamant des dommages à 1 600 000 $. La publicité négative amènera à la fermeture du parc.
Au début de l'année 1967, elle se rend au Vietnam pour réconforter les soldats: sa tournée sera jugée décevante, Jayne ne se produit pas sur scène et se contente de poser pour des photos et signer des autographes; elle tourne ensuite son dernier film, une apparition dans "A Guide for the Married Man" ("Petit guide pour mari volage") de Gene Kelly et participe au documentaire indépendant "Spree" (intitulé aussi "Las Vegas by Night") où elle chante "Promise Her Anything" (chanson du film "Promises! Promises!") en se déshabillant.

jayne-1966-portrait-2-1  En mars 1967, elle fait une tournée -désastreuse- en Angleterre (les beuveries et bagarres du couple Jayne/Brody ne permettent pas à une Jayne ivre et dont les jambes sont pleines d'ecchymoses de monter sur scène) et elle s'affiche aux bras du propriétaire de club Allen Welles. Et en mai 1967, sa performance au Mount Brandon Hotel à Tralee en Irelande est annulée à cause du clergé catholique qui condamne une telle représentation.
Au début du mois de juin 1967, sa fille aînée, Jayne Marie, 16 ans, porte plainte contre Sam Brody: elle l'accuse de coups et blessures, encouragés par sa mère. La jeune fille est alors placée temporairement chez l'oncle de son père Paul, William W. Pigue et son épouse Mary.
Le 19 juin 1967, Jayne fait sa dernière apparition à la télévision dans le "Joey Bishop Show".

Elle conclut un accord avec Mamie Van Doren qui se produit elle aussi en spectacle, à New York. Son show faisant salle comble, Mamie demande à Jayne si elle peut se produire dans le Mississippi où Mamie était attendue, lui permettant d'assurer à son tour le prochain show. Jayne accepte et c'est après une dernière représentation sordide dans le cabaret Gus Stevens Supper Club à Biloxi dans le Mississippi, que Jayne, qui a 34 ans, rejoint sa chambre d'hôtel au Cabana Courtyard Apartments.
1967-06-28-Gus Stevens Supper Club Après deux représentations de 30 minutes ce soir là (à 21h et à 23h - voir photo ci-contre, l'une des dernières photographies de Jayne), elle reprend la route le 28 juin 1967 un peu avant minuit à bord de la Buick Electra 225 bleue assise entre Ronnie Harrison, son chauffeur de 20 ans, et Sam Brody, âgé de 40 ans. Trois de ses enfants (Miklós, Zoltán et Mariska) sont endormis à l'arrière. Ses quatre chihuahas sont aussi du voyage. Ils se rendent à la Nouvelle-Orléans où Jayne est attendue pour une émission de télé, le "Midday Show", sur WDSU's à midi. Vers 2h30 du matin, le 29 juin 1967, leur voiture, lancée à pleine vitesse après un virage, s'encastre dans l'arrière d'un tracteur semi-remorque qui a donné un brutal coup de frein, à cause d'un camion de pulvérisation anti-moustiques. Les trois adultes, ainsi que l'un des chiens de Jayne, meurent sur le coup. Les enfants sont indemnes, s'en tirant avec quelques blessures légères (Miklos, 9 ans, a un bras cassé et Mariska, 3 ans et demie, gardera une cicatrice en zig-zag sur la tempe). Contrairement à une légende tenace, Jayne n'est pas morte décapitée mais d'un écrasement de la boîte crânienne. La rumeur provient des photos de la police prises sur le lieu de l'accident où on y découve les cheveux de Jayne sur le bitume. En fait, il s'agit d'une perruque bien bouffante; et Jayne est décédée de plusieurs traumatismes crâniens, ayant été scalpée d'un morceau de crâne et du cerveau. Après sa mort, la NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration - L'Administration nationale de la sécurité routière) demande la nécessité d'inclure une protection anti-encastrement (une forte barre en tube d'acier) à l'arrière de tous les poids lourds. Cette grande barre est désormais connue sous le nom de la "Mansfield bar".

jayne_grave  Les funérailles de Jayne ont lieu le 3 juillet 1967 à Pen Argyl en Pennsylvanie dans un cercle privé, avec néanmoins beaucoup de curieux. De ses trois maris, seul Mickey Hargitay, très affecté, est présent, ayant organisé les funérailles: il se jette sur le cercueil rose de Jayne pendant la cérémonie. Sa pierre tombale, en forme de coeur où est inscrit "We Live to Love You More Each Day" (avec une photographie de Jayne ajoutée en 2003 - voir photo ci-contre) , se trouve au cimetière de Fairview Cemetery, au sud-est de Pen Argyl. Vingt ans après, une pierre tombale en granite rose et en forme de coeur est installée. Un cénotaphe similaire a été installé dans le cimetière d'Hollywood par son fan-club. Une dernière rumeur scabreuse va courir: certains vont raconter que sa tête aurait été recousue à l'envers sur son corps (alors que l'on sait aujourd'hui que Jayne n'a pas été décapitée) !
En 1968, le 'Hollywood Publicists Guild' lance le prix "Jayne Mansfield Award" pour toutes les actrices qui reçoivent un maximum d'exposition publicitaire dans l'année. C'est l'actrice Raquel Welch qui reçoit le premier prix en 1969.

1950s-jayne-936full-jayne-mansfield Après sa mort, beaucoup de ses proches vont tenter de mettre main basse sur l'héritage: Mickey Hargitay, Matt Cimber, Vera Peers (sa mère), William Pigue (son représentant légal), Charles Goldring (son business manager), Bernard B. Cohen et Jerome Webber (ses administrateurs). Sa succession est évaluée à environ 600 000 $, dont le "Pink Palace" estimé à 100 000 $, une voiture de sport à 7 000 $, ses bijoux, et le testament de Sam Brody lui léguant 185 000 $.
Mickey Hargitay, remarié en 1968 à Ellen Siano une hôtesse de l'air, engage un procés réclamant 275 000 $ pour l'éducation des enfants (Micky, Zoltan et Mariska dont il obtient la garde intégrale en juin 1967). Il n'obtiendra pas satisfaction. Quand au petit dernier Tony, il est élevé par son père Matt Cimber et la styliste Christy Hilliard Hanak, qu'il a épousé le 2 décembre 1967.
En 1971, l'ex femme de Sam Brody, Beverly Brody (dont le divorce était en cours au moment de la mort de son mari), réclame à la succession de Jayne la somme de 325 000 $ représentant les cadeaux et bijoux achetés par Sam à Jayne et qui n'avaient pas été comptabilisés. En 1977, ce sont quatre des enfants de Jayne (Jayne Marie, Mickey, Zoltan et Mariska) qui sont face à la cour à cause des 500 000 $ de dettes contractées par Jayne, dont 11 000 $ de lingerie et 11 600 $ de frais de plomberie pour la piscine, et dont le litige avait déclaré la succession insolvable. Le Pink Palace, qui a connu divers acquéreurs, va finir par tomber en ruine et être détruit en novembre 2002. Ce qui reste de l'héritage de l'image et de la propriété intellectuelle de Jayne est désormais géré par la compagnie CMG Worldwide.

 --- Epilogue ---
1950s-jayne307Malgré ses rôles caricaturaux de blondes idiotes, son exhibitionnisme provoquant et sa nymphomanie affirmée (elle aurait dit, en se masturbant devant les photographes sur le tournage de Promises! Promises !: "La plus belle sensation dans la vie, c’est l’orgasme. Plus j’ai des orgasmes et plus je suis heureuse !"), Jayne Mansfield était une femme cultivée, polyglotte (elle parlait cinq langues: anglais, français, allemand, italien et espagnol), jouait du piano et du violon et disait avoir un QI de 163; ce qui fit d'elle "la plus intelligente des blondes stupides". Son personnage a été construit, maniant avec art la publicité, comme le montre cette citation, sur sa soit-disant couleur préférée: "On m'a identifié par le rose au cours de ma carrière, mais je ne suis pas autant folle que ça de cette couleur alors que j'ai laissé les gens le croire. Mes couleurs préférées sont en fait neutres -le noir et le blanc- mais à ce moment là, que penser d'une star de cinéma en noir et blanc ? Tout se doit d'être de couleurs vivantes." Sa fin tragique l'a fait entrer dans la légende, son image reste encore aujourd'hui, populaire et est encore beaucoup utilisée dans la culture des différents arts (écriture, BD, cinéma, séries, bon nombre font référence à Jayne, son image, sa vie, ses films, sa mort).

> Sur le blog: 
>> Photothèque consacrée à Jayne dans l' Album Photos


En 1980, le téléfilm biopic "The Jayne Mansfield Story" est diffusé par CBS. Réalisé par Dick Lowry, on y découvre Loni Anderson (dans le rôle de Jayne) et Arnold Schwarzenegger (dans celui de Mickey Hargitay). La fiction a été nommée pour trois Emmy Awards (des catégories coiffure, maquillage et costumes). Quelques images (extraits de films) de Marilyn Monroe sont incluses dans le film.

film-biopic-the_JM_story-1980-loni_anderson_schwarzie-4 film-biopic-the_JM_story-aff_dvd film-biopic-the_JM_story-1980-loni_anderson-2 
film-biopic-the_JM_story-1980-loni_anderson-2a  film-biopic-the_JM_story-1980-loni_anderson_schwarzie-2  film-biopic-the_JM_story-1980-loni_anderson_schwarzie-3  
film-biopic-the_JM_story-1980-loni_anderson_schwarzie-1  film-biopic-the_JM_story-1980-loni_anderson-1 
film-biopic-the_JM_story-1980-loni_anderson-3  film-biopic-the_JM_story-1980-loni_anderson-4  


> Presse: scans persos 
img923  img924 
img926 img925 img922 
img930 img931 img932 
img136  img137 

- Mariska Hargitay -
img933 img936 img935 
  img937 img938   

> Pages extraites du livre "Les séductrices du cinéma"
book-les_seductrices-jayne-1  book-les_seductrices-jayne-2 


 >> Jayne vs Marilyn <<

Prémisses d'une rencontre: Le 26 juin 1953, Marilyn Monroe laisse ses empreintes de mains et de pieds (chaussures à talons) dans le ciment frais du sol d'Hollywood, devant le Grauman's Chinese Theatre (> sur le blog: l'article 26/06/1953 Grauman's Chinese Theatre ). Deux ans plus tard, la starlette Jayne Mansfield cherche à se faire un nom à Hollywood: le 19 avril 1955 au soir, elle est photographiée accroupie devant les fameuses empreintes, apposant ses mains dans celles de Marilyn.

1953_06_26_graumans_chinese_04_12  mm_jayne-1955-04-19-LA-graumans_chinese_theatre-1 

La rencontre: Le 12 décembre 1955 se tient la grande première du film "The Rose Tattoo" à New York. Plusieurs célébrités participent à l'événement dont Marlon Brando, acteur du film, qui escorte Marilyn Monroe. Après la représentation du film, à la soirée organisée au Sheraton Astor Hotel, une autre blonde au nom de Jayne Mansfield va faire son apparition, s'incrustant au milieu des autres stars, telle en est sa spécialité, afin de se faire photographier et remarquer. Ce qui n'est pas au goût de Marilyn, qui ne va même pas lui jeter un regard (> sur le blog: l'article 12/12/1955 Première de Rose Tattoo ).

 1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_party_020_1    
1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_party_030_1  1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_party_030_1a  1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_party_040_1   

En 1957, Jayne dira: "Marilyn pense de moi que je suis une rivale. Je sais que ça l'agace." A un journaliste, elle confiera que "Marilyn n'était jamais cordiale".
Quand à Marilyn, elle dira, à propos de Jayne, à un journaliste: "Tout ce qu'elle fait, c'est de m'imiter. Mais ses imitations sont une insulte autant pour elle que pour moi. Je sais que c'est supposé être flatteur que d'être imitée, mais elle le fait si grossièrement, si vulgairement. Je voudrais avoir quelques moyens légaux pour la poursuivre envers la dégradation de l'image pour laquelle j'ai mis des années à construire."

  *  *  *  *  *

- Comparaison: mêmes poses et attitudes - partie 1 -
mmlook-1-attitude_vamp mmlook-1-car mmlook-1-bed
mmlook-1-film_bus  mmlook-1-sport-football  
mmlook-2-herbe mmlook-2-pin_up-moran mmlook-2-kiss 
mmlook-2-matelas   mmlook-2-parasol   

 *  *  *  *  *

Le parcours: Mariées et divorcées trois fois (premier mariage à 16 ans pour Marilyn, à 17 ans pour Jayne avec des hommes engagés dans l'armée), les deux blondes étaient menées par une soif de réussite à Hollywood. Elles ont étudié à l'université d'UCLA en Californie, ont été mannequins (dans la même agence: la "Blue Book" dirigée par Emmeline Snively, ce qui les as conduit à travailler avec les mêmes photographes, comme Earl Moran). Elles ont posé nues pour un calendrier et l'affaire a été révélée une fois qu'elles sont devenues célèbres (en 1952 pour Marilyn, en 1957 pour Jayne). Elles ont remporté de nombreux concours de beauté. Elles ont aussi parfois donné la réplique aux mêmes acteurs: Cary Grant, Groucho Marx, Dan Dailey, Jack Benny, Tom Ewell, Tommy Noonan, Tony Randall (qui a déclaré avoir préféré travailler avec Jayne: "Au moins, elle essaie d'être professionnelle. Elle se montre sur le plateau, répète, travaille et tourne. Elle a un grand sens de l'autodérision.") Elles ont toutes deux été présentées à la Reine d'Angleterre (en 1956 pour Marilyn, en 1957 pour Jayne) et se sont rendues en Corée pour égayer le moral des soldats (en 1954 pour Marilyn, en 1957 pour Jayne). Elles ont été utilisées par la Fox, interprétant des rôles stéréotypées de blondes idiotes mais ayant tenues un rôle dramatique marquant dans leur carrière ("Don"t Bother to Knock" pour Marilyn, "The Burglar" pour Jayne), et ont remporté le prix "Golden Globe" (en 1957 pour Jayne, en 1960 et 1962 pour Marilyn). De tradition catholique, elles se sont intéressées à d'autres religions, comme le judaïsme, pour un homme (Marilyn pour Arthur Miller, Jayne pour Sam Brody). Elles ont eu comme amant le président John F Kennedy (rencontré par l'intermédiaire de Peter Lawford) et parmi leurs relations sentimentales, leur deuxième mari leur est resté toujours fidèle, s'occupant de leurs funérailles (Joe DiMaggio pour Marilyn, Mickey Hargitay pour Jayne). Elles sont décédées tragiquement très jeunes (34 ans pour Jayne, 36 ans pour Marilyn). 

- Comparaison: les mêmes rencontres -
mm_meeting-the_queen   mm_partner-tom_ewell 
mm_partner-cary_grant  mm_partner-dan_dailey 
mm_partner-groucho_marx mm_partner-jane_russell mm_partner-JB
mm_partner-jerry_lewis  mm_partner-robert_wagner  

- les mêmes admirateurs: James Haspiel, John Reiley -
mmfan-james_haspiel   mmfan-John_Reily_fromMonroeSix 

*  *  *  *  *

Le look: Jayne comme Marilyn, avait les cheveux naturellement châtains foncés. Elle se les décolore en 1954, afin de faciliter sa carrière d'actrice. Devenue blonde platine, elle figurera parmi les nombreuses "copies de Marilyn" des années 1950s, allant jusqu'à porter parfois le même style de tenues, voire les mêmes vêtements (> sur le blog: les articles du dressing de Marilyn )

- Comparaison: les mêmes tenues
mm_clothe_blouse-jayne-1957-09-26-london_promo-mm_bus_stop-2 mm_clothe_chemise_raye
mm_clothe_robe_zebre-jayne_mm
 mm_clothe_robe_mermaid-jayne_mm mm_clothe_robe_lame-jayne_mm mm_clothe_robe_orange-jayne_mm 

*  *  *  *  *

Jayne, une doublure de Marilyn: En 1954, Marilyn Monroe claque la porte des studios de la Fox et part se réfugier à New York, où elle étudie à l'Actors Studio, et monte sa maison de production "Les MM Prod." avec un ami photographe, Milton Greene. Elle se montre désormais plus exigeante au niveau des scénarios que la Fox lui propose et impose un droit de regard sur les films qu'elle tourne, refusant bon nombre de navets où les rôles proposés sont toujours identiques: ceux de la blonde idiote, un brin sexy. La Fox cherche alors d'autres actrices blondes, pour leur refourguer leurs nanars: Mamie Van Doren, Cleo Moore, Diana Dors, Sheeree North... des blondes décolorées et jolies, il y en a des tonnes ! Et puis arrive Jayne Mansfield, qui signe son contrat avec la Fox en 1956. Les studios sont ravis, ils ont enfin trouvé une rivale à Marilyn; et Jayne est vite surnommée la "Marilyn Monroe Workings' Man" (autrement dit, la version 'cheap' de Marilyn), ou encore la "Marilyn Monroe King Sized" (en référence à son généreux tour de poitrine). Et Jayne va vite se prendre au jeu de la "doublure" de Marilyn, la parodiant à de nombreuses reprises:

> Dans la pièce de théâtre "Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter ?" jouée en 1956 à Broadway, Jayne interprète le rôle de Rita Marlowe, une caricature outrageuse de Marilyn. La pièce a été écrite par George Axelrod, celui-là même à qui l'on doit la pièce "The Seven Year Itch" où Marilyn joua le rôle de la voisine blonde dans l'adaptation cinéma et pour lequel Jayne avait auditionné. Rien que le nom Rita Marlowe est une combinaison des stars Rita Hayworth, Marilyn Monroe et Jean Harlow. Le personnage est celui, à première vue, d'une blonde idiote au déhanché terriblement sexy, poussant de petits cris accentuant sa naïveté, mais qui est en fait une femme intelligente car use de son image auprès des médias pour parvenir à ses fins. Quand la Fox souhaite adapter la pièce en version cinéma, le rôle est proposé à Mamie Van Doren, qui décline l'offre. Alors la Fox engage Jayne Mansfield, qui avait déjà brillé dans la peau du personnage sur les planches New-Yorkaises. En offrant ce rôle à Jayne, la Fox semblait comme se moquer de Marilyn, qui souhaitait être prise au sérieux, à travers ce rôle qui caricaturait sa carrière.

> Dans la série télévisée "Sunday Spectacular: The Bachelor" du 12 juin 1956, Jayne parodie Marilyn. D'abord, en lisant le livre "Les frères Karamazov", alors que Marilyn venait à peine d'annoncer qu'elle souhaitait jouer dans l'adaptation du roman de Dostoievski. Puis, en chanson, chantant le titre "Heat Wave" interprété par Marilyn dans le film "There's no business like show business".

> Dans l'émission de télévision "Jack Benny Show", épisode "Jack takes a boat from Hawai" du 26 novembre 1963, Jayne rejoue à l'identique le sketch joué en 1953 par Marilyn "The Honolulu Trip" avec Jack Benny dans la même émission (> sur le blog: l'article 13/09/1953 The Jack Benny Show ) -excepté pour la chanson, où le "Bye Bye Baby" de Marilyn est remplacé par "Too Marvelous for Words" par Jayne:


> En 1964, Jayne reprend les rôles tenus par Marilyn au cinéma en jouant sur scène dans les pièces "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" (au Carousel Theater) et "Bus Stop" (au Yonker Playhouse) à New York.

> Quand elle se produisait dans les clubs (et notamment dans ses shows de Las Vegas), il arrivait parfois que Jayne reprenne la chanson incontournable de Marilyn: "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend".

*  *  *  *  *

- Comparaison: mêmes poses et attitudes - partie 2 -
mmlook-3-attitude_blue_jean_rondin  mmlook-3-attitude-serviette  mmlook-3-attitude_vamp-porte 
mmlook-3-pose-bus_stop  mmlook-3-pose-swimsuit_colonne  mmlook-3-pose-swimsuit_yellow 
mmlook-3-attitude-premiere  mmlook-3-attitude-finger  mmlook-3-robe_strass 
mmlook-3-pose-pin_up  mmlook-3-attitude-swimsuit_white  mmlook-3-pose_assise 
mmlook-3-chair  mmlook-3-chair-nuisette  mmlook-3-chair-robe_blanche 
mmlook-3-columbia-2  mmlook-3-columbia-1  mmlook-3-graumans 
  mmlook-3-robe_noire  mmlook-3-pose-fourreau  mmlook-3-style 
mmlook-3-sport  mmlook-3-sport-baseball  mmlook-3-attitude-pose 
 mmlook-3-attitude-fur  mmlook-3-water_beach-jayne_mickey-mm_arthur  mmlook-3-water_pool  


> Sources: 
>> articles et photos (scans) personnels
>> photographies collectées sur le web via googleimages
>> Le site officiel jaynemansfield.com / Fan Club Jayne Mansfield Online FanClub 

>> biographie sur wikipedia in english / wikipedia en français
 
>> le blog français de Jéjé La vie en rose de Jayne Mansfield
>> les pages consultées pour la biographie -sites en anglais Bombshells  (petit site avec bio, films, photos), Frank's Reel Reviews
(
petite bio), Glamour Girls of the Silver Screen (dates et faits), find a death (article bio),  The Thought Experiment (article blog),  Jayne Mansfield in Popular Culture
(article de wikipedia) / -sites en français: lenaweb (petite bio),  Les chroniques de Loulou (bio illustrée), AcidPop (divers articles).

20 décembre 2014

M comme Monroe, Gladys

Gladys Pearl Monroe
( 1902 - 1984 )
Mère de Marilyn Monroe

banner_gladys

Gladys Pearl Monroe (appelée aussi Gladys Baker, Gladys Mortensen, Gladys Eley) naît le 27 mai 1902 à Porfirio Diaz (aujourd'hui nommé Piedra Negra) au Mexique et est la première des deux enfants de Della Mae Hogan et Otis Elmer Monroe (les grands-parents de Marilyn). Son existence est déclarée civilement cinq jours après sa naissance (le 1er juin) à un juge civil mexicain. Son père, Otis, travaille dans les chemins de fer mexicains depuis 1901. Après la naissance de leur fille Gladys, la petite famille retourne aux Etats-Unis, menant une vie itinérante le long de la Côte Ouest, jusque dans le Nord des Etats-Unis pendant un an, puis s'installent à Los Angeles au printemps 1903 où son père décroche un emploi à la Pacific Electric Raimway. Ils vivent dans un petit bungalow d'une seule pièce dans la 37ème Rue Ouest (secteur sud du centre-ville). C'est là que naît le frère de Gladys, Marion Otis Elmer (l'oncle de Marilyn), en 1905. La famille vit dans une certaine précarité et n'a pas de foyer stable (ils vivent dans près de onze foyers différents -maisons ou appartements- entre 1903 et 1909). Gladys et Marion vivent ainsi leur enfance dans la pauvreté et l'insécurité, sans pouvoir se lier d'amitié avec des amis de leurs âges.

>> Certificats de naissance de Gladys
1900s-gladys-certificat_birth-1 1900s-gladys-certificat_birth-2 1900s-gladys-certificat_birth-3

 >> 1906 - Gladys, 4 ans
1906-gladys-4ans 

En 1907, la santé de son père Otis Elmer se dégrade. Porté sur la boisson et souffrant de troubles de la mémoire, son état s'empire rapidement: maux de tête, tremblements, instabilité émotionnelle avec des accès de rage, des crises de larmes et même des attaques cardiaques. L'été 1908, suite à une crise, Otis se retrouve à moitié paralysé. Admis à l'hôpital 'Southern California State Hospital' à Patton, en Californie, en novembre 1908, où sa mère Della espace de plus en plus ses visites car Otis ne reconnaît même plus son épouse, il y meurt, le 22 juillet 1909, à l'âge de 43 ans. Il était atteint de parésie, le stade ultime de la syphilis qu'il avait contracté au Mexique, à cause des piètres conditions d'hygiène. C'est ainsi que seulement âgée de 7 ans, Gladys se retrouve orpheline de père. Gladys souffrira beaucoup de l'absence de son père. Sans doute terrifiée par le fulgurent déclin mental de son mari, Della Mae racontera à ses enfants que leur père était devenu fou, à cause de l'alcool et de sa vie désordonnée. Pourtant, le dossier médical qu'on lui avait remis après la mort d'Otis, explique qu'il était décédé d'une maladie organique et non d'une maladie mentale.
Se retrouvant veuve à seulement 33 ans, sa mère
Della Mae vit une deuxième jeunesse en fréquentant de nombreux hommes qu'elle reçoit chez elle entre 1910 et 1911, avant de se marier le 7 mars 1912 avec Lyle Arthur Graves, un aiguilleur en chef à la Pacific Electric, où il avait travaillé avec Otis. Ils vont vivre dans la maison de Graves, au 324 bis South Hill Street dans la partie nouvelle du quartier d'affaires de Los Angeles. Lyle semble être un bon beau-père, offrant des cadeaux aux enfants de Della. Mais le couple ne tient pas, Otis étant aussi porté sur la boisson que son précédent mari, et ils divorcent le 17 janvier 1914.

>> 1912 - Gladys, 10 ans, et son frère Marion, 7 ans
245039_0    

>> 1916 - Gladys, 13 ans
 
1915-gladys-13ans 1915-gladys-13ans-2

A la fin de l'année 1916, Della Mae loue une chambre dans une pension de famille au 26 Westminster Avenue sur la toute nouvelle plage du district de Venice, en Californie, au sud de Santa Monica. Le propriétaire de la pension de famille s'appele John Baker et l'engage pour diriger sa propriété pendant qu'il s'occupe d'une salle de jeux sur la plage. Della envoie son fils Marion, âgé de 11 ans, vivre chez des cousins à San Diego car elle pense qu'un garçon doit être élevé par un homme, et seule Gladys reste vivre auprès de sa mère. Gladys est une jeune fille coquette, brillante, expansive, aux cheveux châtains clairs, parlant d'une voix limpide et haut perchée, au rire facile, et à la recherche d'attention des hommes mûrs (sans doute en lien avec son enfance, était-elle à la recherche d'une figure paternelle). Sa mère, Della, ne tarde pas à rester bien longtemps seule et elle fréquente un veuf, Charles GraingerCette nouvelle liaison rend Gladys malheureuse, qui se braque contre le nouveau compagnon de sa mère, en lui opposant un silence absolu, et se montrant de très mauvaise humeur. Gladys devient alors un boulet pour Della, qui avait peur de perdre Charles Grainger. C'est alors qu'elle décide de la marier.

1917-05-17-baker_wedding_certificat1Gladys, qui n'a alors que 14 ans, commence à avoir un certain succès auprès des hommes. Et c'est Jasper Newton "Jap" Baker (le fils de John Baker, qui est pompiste ou releveur de comptes à gaz selon les biographes) âgé de 26 ans, qui, aidé de Della Mae, certifie que Gladys était en âge de se marier, 18 ans (alors qu'elle n'en avait que 15) sous prétexte que les preuves de sa date de naissance ont disparu suite aux nombreux déménagements, et l'épouse le 17 mai 1917 (certificat de mariage ci-contre). En fait, Gladys était enceinte de deux mois au moment du mariage. Della assiste gaiement au mariage et donne sa chambre de Westminster Street aux jeunes mariés, pour, de son côté, emménager dans le bungalow de Charles Grainger. Gladys et Jasper Baker ont deux enfants: un fils Robert 'Jack' 'Kermit' Baker (le demi-frère de Marilyn) qui naît le 10 novembre 1917, et une fille Berniece Inez Gladys (la demie-soeur de Marilyn) qui naît le 30 juillet 1919.
A la naissance de Berniece, le couple donne l'adresse de Della Monroe (1410 Coral Canal Court) sur le certificat de naissance. C'est ainsi qu'à 17 ans, Gladys se retrouve épouse et mère de deux enfants. Cependant, suite à son enfance chaotique, l'exemple d'une vie mouvementée de sa mère, ayant connue de nombreux beaux-pères, et par son jeune âge (elle est encore adolescente), Gladys se montre peu maternelle avec ses enfants, dont l'envie serait plutôt de sortir pour aller s'amuser. Il lui arrive d'ailleurs de confier s
es enfants à des voisins pour sortir dans les bals et fêtes organisés sur les plages, pendant que son mari travaille de longues heures comme représentant de commerce.

>> vers 1917/1918 - Gladys, Robert Baker et une amie
1916-gladys_john_baker-2  

>> 1918 - Gladys, 16 ans
1918-gladys-1-1 1918-gladys-16ans

>> 30/07/1919 - Certificat de naissance de Berniece
1919-07-30-berniece

>> 1919 - Gladys avec ses enfants et sa mère Della Mae
1919-della_and_gladys-with_jackiehermitt_berniece-1 
1919-della_and_gladys-with_jackiehermitt_berniece-2

>> 1919 - Gladys avec Robert Baker et leurs enfants
1919-gladys_berniece_marion_jackie-1  1919-gladys_berniece_marion_jackie-1a 1919-gladys_berniece_marion_jackie-1b

  >> vers 1920 - Gladys et Robert Baker
1916-gladys_john_baker-1 

Au cours de l'année 1921, le couple part en voyage à Flat Lick, dans le Kentucky, ville d'où est originaire Jasper, pour rendre visite à la famille de celui-ci. Durant le trajet, pendant que Gladys et Robert se disputent, leur fils Jackie tombe de la voiture dans un virage et se blesse à la hanche. Robert, furieux, reproche à Gladys son manque d'attention. Pendant leur séjour à Flat Lick, Gladys part un jour en randonnée dans les bois avec Audrey, le frère cadet de Jasper. Bien que Jasper est bel homme, il est jaloux de son frère. Quand Gladys revient de la promenade, Jasper la frappe avec une bride dans le dos. Gladys s'enfuit et part en ville, où elle y montre son dos aux passants, en hurlant et pleurant qu'elle a peur de son mari. Finalement, elle revient et ils repartent ensemble avec les enfants pour retourner en Californie. Un jour, elle surprend son mari avec une autre femme dans la rue (d'après ce que rapportera plus tard Gladys à Berniece). C'en est trop pour Gladys qui finit par demander le divorce en 1921 selon les motifs suivants: "Cruauté extrême sous forme de mauvais traitements, d'insultes et de langages orduriers à son égard et en sa présence, de coups et blessures." John rétorque que sa femme a une conduite impudique et lascive.

Après avoir quitté le domicile conjugual, Gladys loue un bungalow au 46 Rose Avenue, à Venice, qu'elle partage avec sa mère Della Mae. Gladys avait signé le bail sous le nom de sa mère Della Monroe, et sous-loue deux des chambres, afin d'être payée comme gérante, ce qui lui permet de verser 100$ par mois aux propriétaires absents, Adele Weinhoff et Susie Noel.
Fin juin 1922, le dernier chèque du loyer n'avait pas été posté. Une dispute éclate entre Gladys et Della, chacune accusant l'autre de dilapider l'argent. N'ayant d'emploi ni l'une ni l'autre, l'essentiel de leurs revenus leur était versé par Charles Grainger, le compagnon de sa mère, et le reste consistant en une modeste somme qu'envoyait Jasper Baker. La courte expérience de colocataires entre mère et fille prend fin en juillet 1922, sous une menace d'expulsion. Della, avec la permission de Charles Grainger, part alors vivre dans un bungalow vide qu'il posséde à Hawthorn.

>> Gladys et sa mère Della Mae
1920s-della_mae_gladys_baby-1 1920s-della_mae_gladys_baby-2 1920s-gladys-1

1923-05-11-divorceLe divorce de Gladys et John est prononcé le 11 mai 1923 et Gladys obtient la garde des enfants (jugement de divorce ci-contre). Mais lors d'un week-end de garde, déjà bien avant que le divorce ne soit prononcé, Jasper ne ramène pas les enfants -Robert et Berniece- et les emmène dans sa ville d'origine Flat Lick dans le Kentucky, pour s'installer chez sa mère, pensant que les enfants recevront une meilleure éducation et de son côté, il espère recommencer sa vie.
Leur fils Robert, qui garde des séquelles de sa blessure à la hanche, boite. Il est hospitalisé dans un hôpital de Louisville et porte un plâtre à la jambe.
Quand à Gladys, qui souhaite récupérer ses enfants mais qui reste sans nouvelles, elle se rend à San Diego car elle pense que Jasper y a trouvé un emploi et s'y est installé. Puis elle reçoit un courrier de son ex beau-frère l'avertissant que Jasper et les enfants se trouvent à Flat Lick. Elle s'y rend donc en demandant de l'aide à sa belle-soeur Myrtle (la soeur de Jasper) qui non seulement refuse, mais va avertir Jasper. C'est alors que Jasper et sa mère cachent Berniece et avertissent les médecins de l'hôpital pour empêcher Gladys d'emmener son fils. Mais Gladys n'abandonne pas: elle s'installe à Louisville et y trouve un emploi de femme de ménage, en attendant que l'état de Robert s'améliore. Gladys va rester presqu'une année, vivant chez la famille Cohen (Margaret et John 'Jack' Cohen), où elle officie en tant que nounou de leur fille de trois ans, prénommée Norma Jeane (d'où l'origine du prénom de Marilyn Monroe et non pas Norma pour Norma Talmadge et Jean pour Jean Harlow comme bon nombre de biographes pensent). Il semblerait que Gladys aurait reporté tout son amour maternel sur la petite fille, allant jusqu'à projeter de la kidnapper pour l'emmener avec elle à Los Angeles.
De son côté, Jasper se remarie. S'avouant vaincue, ne pouvant voir ses enfants que de façon irrégulière, et réalisant qu'elle ne pourra jamais les récupérer définitivement, Gladys décide de repartir à Los Angeles et va finir par perdre de vue ses enfants.
Marilyn écrira plus tard: "Ma mère dépensa toutes ses économies pour récupérer les enfants. Finalement, elle les retrouvera dans le Kentucky où ils vivaient dans une belle maison. Leur père s'était remarié et vivait dans l'aisance. Elle le rencontra mais ne lui demanda rien, pas même d'embrasser les enfants qu'elle avait recherché pendant si longtemps."

mmfather1A Los Angeles, Gladys parvient à trouver un emploi dans la florissante industrie du cinéma: elle travaille six jours sur sept comme monteuse pour la Consolidated Film Industries, puis pour la Columbia et enfin pour la RKO. A la Consolidated Film Industries, elle se lie d'amitié avec une collègue, la surveillante Grace McKee. A la fin de l'été 1923, elles dédicent alors de partager un appartement au 1211 Hyperion Avenue (aujourd'hui le Silver Lake) à Los Angeles, à quelques kilomètres à l'Est de Hollywood. Gladys change d'apparence et teint ses cheveux en rouge cerise. Les deux femmes -Gladys et Grace- mènent une vie joyeuse de femmes célibataires, se promenant en ville et faisant beaucoup la fête. Un collègue de Gladys, Vernon S. Harbin dira que Gladys "avait la réputation d'être un pilier de bar". Mrs Leila Fields, qui travaillera avec Gladys à la RKO, dira d'elle: "C'était une belle femme, une des plus belles femmes que j'ai eu le privilège de rencontrer. Elle avait bon coeur, était une bonne copine et était toujours de bonne humeur avant sa maladie."
C'est aussi dans cette usine -la Consolidated Film Ind.- que Gladys rencontre un bel homme, Charles Stanley Gifford (le père "présumé" de Marilyn, portrait photographique ci-dessus), un véritable coureur de jupons, éléguant et distingué.

  >> Gladys au Noël de la Consolidated Film Industries
1920s-christmas_consolidated_film_industry-1 1920s-christmas_consolidated_film_industry-1b 1920s-christmas_consolidated_film_industry-1a

 

edward_mortenson Pendant l'été 1924, Gladys fréquente assidûment un homme, Edward Mortensen (photographie ci-contre) immigrant norvégien, bel homme qui est un bon parti, avec un travail stable. Ils se marient le 11 octobre 1924. Mais Gladys, sans doute trop frivole et incapable de partager une vie maritale, se lasse très vite de sa nouvelle vie; elle confie à Grace que la vie avec son mari est certes convenable, mais ennuyeuse à mourir et à peine quatre mois après son mariage, elle quitte le domicile conjugual le 26 mai 1925 pour aller revivre avec Grace. Le couple finit donc par divorcer. Et Gladys de reprendre sa vie légère faites d'aventures et d'amusement entre amis. Elle renoue quelques temps une liaison avec Charles Stanley Gifford.
En 1924, elle retourne tout de même dans le Kentucky afin de revoir ses enfants mais ces derniers sont restés trop longtemps éloignés de leur mère, et aussi probablement manipulés; pour eux, leur mère n'est qu'une étrangère. Gladys se résoud à laisser la garde définitive à leur père.

>> Certificat de mariage avec Mortensen
1924-10-11-mortensen_wedding_certificate-1  1924-10-11-mortensen_wedding_certificate-2 

>> Gladys (2ème en partant de la droite) et des amies
avec annotation de Marilyn

1920s-gladys_friends-1a 
1920s-gladys_friends-1b 

>> vers 1924 - Portraits de Gladys
 1924-gladys-1-2 1924-gladys-1-1 1924-gladys-1-3
1924-gladys-1-4 1924-gladys-1-5 1924-gladys-1-various

A la fin de l'année 1925, Gladys se retrouve enceinte. Elle donne naissance à une petite fille qu'elle prénomme Norma Jeane Mortenson (future Marilyn Monroe) le 1er juin 1926. A l'hôpital, dont le séjour est payé grâce à une collecte de ses collègues, elle affirme que ses deux premiers enfants sont décédés. Elle déclare que le "père" de l'enfant est Martin Edward Mortensen, son précédent mari, mais il semblerait que le père soit Charles Stanley Gifford, son collègue qu'elle fréquente épisodiquement depuis 1923 et qui l'aurait abandonné dès qu'il aurait su qu'elle était enceinte. Cependant, des biographes citent d'autres pères potentiels, tous des collègues de Gladys: Harold Rooney, Clayton MacNamara, ou encore Raymond Guthrie qui avait fait une cour enflammée à Gladys au cours de l'année 1925.
Plusieurs années après, Gladys sympathisera avec une jeune infirmière Rose Anne Cooper qui rapportera les propos de Gladys: "Elle disait qu'elle avait été intime avec un certain nombre d'hommes et elle parlait de son passé, disant ouvertement que lorsqu'elle était jeune, elle était 'très sauvage' comme elle disait. Cependant, pour elle, le seul genre d'intimité pouvant mener à une grossesse était celle qu'elle avait partagé avec 'Stan Gifford'. Elle avait toujours été ennuyée par le fait que personne ne semblait vouloir la croire, mais que c'était la vérité. Elle disait que même sa propre mère ne la croyait pas. 'Tout le monde pensait que je mentais ou que je ne le savais pas. Je savais. J'ai toujours su', racontait-elle".
Elle ne réclamera jamais de soutien ni moral ni financier à Charles Stanley Gifford.
Marilyn Monroe racontera plus tard: "Elle ne parlait presque jamais sauf pour dire "Ne fais pas tant de bruit, Norma." Elle me disait ça même quand j'étais au lit le soir avec un livre. Même le bruit d'une page de livre qu'on tournait l'agaçait. Il y avait un objet dans l'appartement de ma mère qui me fascinait. C'était une photographie accrochée au mur. Il n'y avait rien d'autre sur les murs que cette photographie encadrée. Chaque fois que je rendais visite à mère, je restais plantée devant en retenant mon souffle tellement j'avais peur qu'elle m'ordonne d'arrêter de la regarder. Un jour, elle m'a surprise ainsi, mais elle ne m'a pas grondée, bien au contraire. Elle m'a fait monter sur une chaise pour que je la vois mieux. Elle m'a dit :"C'est ton père." J'étais tellement bouleversée que j'ai failli tomber de la chaise. C'était si bon d'avoir un père, de pouvoir regarder sa photo et de savoir que j'étais de lui. Et quelle merveilleuse photo, en plus ! Il était coiffé d'un grand chapeau mou qu'il portait incliné sur le côté. Il avait des yeux rieurs et pleins de vie et une petite moustache à la Clark Gable. Cette photo me réconfortait... J'ai demandé à ma mère comment il s'appelait. Elle ne m'a pas répondu. Elle est allée s'enfermer dans sa chambre." 

>> 01/06/1926 - Certificats et Acte de naissance de Norma Jeane
1926-06-01-birth_certificate-1    1926-06-01-birth_certificate-3  
1926-06-01-birth_certificate-2

Après la naissance de l'enfant, Gladys rentre chez elle avec son bébé, au 5454 Wilshire Boulevard. Mais le 13 juin 1926, soit douze jours après la naissance de Norma Jeane, Gladys place le bébé dans une famille d'accueil -les Bolender- qui vivent à Hawthorn, à environ 25 km de chez elle, et non loin d'où vit Della Mae. Gladys avait echoué dans son rôle de mère avec ses deux premiers enfants, et avec son travail à plein temps et son goût pour les plaisirs et sorties, elle est incapable d'élever une enfant. C'est d'ailleurs sa mère Della Mae qui lui a conseillé de placer le bébé chez une famille d'accueil, les Bolender, un couple sérieux et dévot qu'elle connait bien, puisqu'ils sont voisins. Cependant, cette situation semble n'être que temporaire pour Gladys: elle s'installe quelques temps chez les Bolender, avant de retourner vivre chez elle et de verser 25 Dollars par mois à la famille d'accueil. Elle rend aussi visite à sa fille le week-end, comme le racontera Wayne Bolender: "Gladys venait presque tous les samedis vers midi. Il lui arrivait de passer la nuit ici, mais généralement, elle avait un rendez vous le samedi soir ou bien elle était invitée à une soirée, auquel cas elle repartait pour Hollywood au bout de quelques heures." Marilyn racontera plus tard que quand sa mère venait la voir, jamais elle ne lui montrait une marque d'affection; elle lui parlait à peine, ne l'embrassait pas et ne lui souriait pas: "C'était la belle dame qui souriait jamais. Je l'avais vue souvent auparavant mais je ne savais pas exactement qui elle était. Quand je lui ai dit:"Bonjour Maman", elle m'a regardée avec stupeur. Elle ne m'avait ni embrassée ni prise dans ses bras, elle ne m'avait jamais tellement parlé."
Sans doute les Bolender aurait peut être voulu adopter Norma Jeane, comme ils l'ont fait avec d'autres enfants dont ils s'occupaient, mais Gladys s'y est opposée, espérant reprendre un jour sa fille.
Le 18 août 1926, le divorce d'avec Mortenson est prononcé.

>> 1926 - Gladys et Norma Jeane
1926-gladys_with_nj-1-2 21604_0717_9_lg  1926-gladys_with_nj-1-3

Au début de l’année 1927, Gladys s'installe chez sa mère Della Mae qui rencontre de sérieux problèmes de santé; elle est notamment atteinte de fréquentes infections respiratoires. Malgré le surcroît de transport en trolley pour aller à son travail, Gladys s'occupe de sa mère et se retrouve ainsi aussi dans la même rue des Bolender, ce qui lui permet alors de voir plus fréquemment sa fille.
La maladie du coeur de sa mère s'aggrave rapidement, suivie d'une profonde dépression: elle souffre de délires, d'euphorie, de sautes d'humeur, de colères et d' hallucinations. Elle est hospitalisée au Norwalk State Hospital  le 4 août 1927 où on lui diagnostique une myocardite aiguë (inflammation du coeur et des tissus environnants ) et elle y décède le 23 août 1927, à l'âge de 51 ans, d'un arrêt cardiaque pendant une crise de folie. Gladys s'occupe des funérailles, faisant enterrer sa mère auprès du premier mari de celle-ci et père de Gladys, Otis Elmer Monroe, au Rose Hill Cemetery, à Whittier. Gladys sombre dans la déprime, mais parvient à faire face au deuil et reprend son activité de monteuse pour les studios de cinéma (à la Columbia et à la RKO).

>> 1928, Santa Monica - Gladys et sa fille Norma Jeane,
son frère Marion avec sa femme Olive et leur fille Ida May
 21604_0717_6_lg  1900s_NJFamily_Gladys00100  21604_0717_8_lg
1928-santa_monica-2-olive_gladys-2  1928_nj_beach_01_1 
1928_nj_beach_02_7 1928_onbeach2 
1928_nj_beach_02_2 1928_onbeach 1928_nj_beach_02_3a
1928_nj_beach_03_1 
1928-santa_monica-3-gladys_olive-1  

Pendant sept ans, Norma Jeane va rester chez les Bolender, recevant la visite de sa mère qui de temps en temps, la prenait pour un week-end. En 1933, lorsque Norma Jeane est atteinte de la coqueluche, Gladys va rester quelques jours chez les Bolender, puis quelques temps après, elle retire sa fille de chez les Bolender car la petite restait inconsolable après la mort de son chien Tippy, tué par un voisin. Marilyn se souviendra: "Un jour, ma mère est venue me voir. J'étais en train de faire la vaisselle. Elle me regardait sans dire un mot. Quand je me suis retournée, j'ai été surprise de voir ses yeux pleins de larmes. Elle m'a dit: "Je vais faire construire une maison et nous y vivrons toutes les deux. Elle sera peinte en blanc et il y aura un petit jardin derrière."
Elles vivent ensemble dans l'appartement de Gladys au 6021 Afton Place, situé près des studios de Hollywood où elle travaille comme monteuse en free-lance avec son amie Grace. Gladys et Grace emmènent parfois Norma Jeane visiter les studios d'Hollywood, mais aussi au cinéma pour aller voir les derniers films sortis. La même année, en 1933, Gladys obtient un prêt de 5000 Dollars de la Mortgage Guarantee Company de Californie pour acheter une maison meublée de six pièces, dont trois chambres, au 6812 Arbol Street, près de Hollywood Bowl. Dans la maison, il y a aussi un piano demie-queue blanc de la marque Franklin (ayant appartenu à l'acteur Fredric March) qui a séduit Gladys. Pour faire face aux charges, Gladys loue une chambre de la maison à un couple d'anglais, George Atkinson, sa femme et leur fille. Pour Norma Jeane, c'est un nouveau mode de vie, elle expliquera plus tard: "La vie devint désinvolte et tumultueuse, c'était un changement radical après ma première famille. Quand ils travaillaient, ils travaillaient dur, et le reste du temps, ils s'amusaient. Ils aimaient danser et chanter, ils buvaient et jouaient aux cartes et avaient un tas d'amis. A cause de mon éducation religieuse, j'étais affreusement choquée -j'étais persuadée qu'ils finiraient tous en enfer. Je passais des heures à prier pour eux."
A cette époque, Norma Jeane ressent les premiers attraits vers le cinéma. Pendant les vacances scolaires, elle reste des heures dans les salles de cinéma, comme elle le racontera plus tard: "J'étais assise, toute la journée, quelques fois une partie de la nuit -face à l'écran tellement grand pour une petite fille comme moi, toute seule, et j'adorais ça. Rien ne m'échappait de ce qui se passait - et il n'y avait pas de pop-corn à l'époque."
Le 17 août 1933, le fils de Gladys, Robert 'Jackie Kermit' Baker qui vit dans le Kentucky avec son père, décède à l'âge de 16 ans des suites d'une infection rénale. Le garçon était atteint d'une tuberculose osseuse déclarée après son accident à la hanche quand il était petit. Gladys n'avait plus aucun contact avec ses enfants de son premier mariage. Robert 'Jackie' n'a donc jamais revu sa mère et n'a jamais su l'existence de sa demie-soeur Norma Jeane.

>> 1933, Californie - Gladys
1933-california-gladys-1 
1933 - Gladys et sa fille Norma Jeane
1933_NJ_01_1_with_gladys 

Le 29 mai 1933, le grand-père de Gladys qu'elle n'a jamais connu, Tilford Hogan, s'est pendu. Gladys prend peur: son père et sa mère sont morts dans des hôpitaux psychiatriques, après des phases de démence; elle reste donc persuadée que ces problèmes sont héréditaires et que sa santé mentale est en jeu. Peu à peu, elle entre en dépression et est soignée par médicaments. En janvier 1934, Gladys fait une crise d'hystérie, tremblante et recroquevillée sous l'escalier. Les Atkinson se voient obligés d'appeler une ambulance qui emmène de force Gladys à l'hôpital Los Angeles General Hospital. Cet événement va marquer Norma Jeane à jamais; Marilyn se souviendra plus tard: "Soudain, il y eu un bruit épouvantable dans l'escalier, à côté de la cuisine. Je n'avais jamais rien entendu d'aussi effrayant. Des coups et des bruits sourds qui semblaient ne jamais devoir s'arrêter. J'ai dit :"Il y a quelque chose qui tombe dans l'escalier." L'anglaise m'a empêcher d'aller voir. Son mari est sorti et il est revenu dans la cuisine au bout d'un certain temps en disant: "J'ai fait appeler la police et une ambulance." J'ai demandé si c'était ma mère et il m'a répondu :"Oui, mais tu ne peux pas la voir." Je suis restée dans la cuisine et j'ai entendu des gens arriver et essayer d'emmener ma mère. Personne ne voulait que je la voie. Tout le monde me disait: "Sois mignonne, petite, reste dans la cuisine. Elle va bien. Ce n'est rien de grave!" Mais je suis sortie quand même et j'ai jeté un coup d'oeil dans l'entrée. Ma mère était là, debout. Elle hurlait et elle riait en même temps. Ils l'ont emmenée à l'hopital spychiatrique de Norwalk. Celui où on avait emmené le père de ma mère et ma grand mère quand ils avaient commencé à hurler et à rire ( ..) J'ai longtemps continué à entendre le bruit épouvantable dans les escaliers, avec ma mère qui hurlait et riait pendant qu'ils l'entrainaient hors du havre familial qu'elle avait tenté de construire pour moi". En février 1934, Gladys est autorisée à rentrer chez elle, mais elle est à nouveau hospitalisée pendant plusieurs mois dans un asile de Santa Monica, puis transférée au Los Angeles General Hospital et en décembre, elle rejoint le Norwalk State Hospital. Gladys va passer les quarante années suivantes entre diverses institutions. Il semble qu'elle souffrait de troubles mentaux et ne pouvait mener une vie normale hors d'un encadrement spécialisé. Cependant, les soins apportés à cette époque étaient quelques peu rudimentaires et il est possible qu'un traitement non adapté n'ait fait qu'empirer son état.
Durant cette période difficile, les Atkinson et Grace McKee s'occupent alternativement de Norma Jeane, qui parvient à voir sa mère lors de rares week-end où Gladys est autorisée à sortir; lorsque c'est le cas, Gladys, Grace et Norma Jeane vont déjeuner à l'Ambassador Hotel. Marilyn confiera: "Je veux tout simplement oublier tout le malheur, toute la misère qu'elle a eus dans sa vie, et tous ceux que j'ai eus dans la mienne. Je ne peux pas oublier, mais j'aimerais essayer. Quand je suis Marilyn Monroe et que je ne pense pas à Norma Jeane, cela marche quelquefois."
Le 15 janvier 1935, Gladys est déclarée aliénée, souffrant de schizophrénie paranoïde, par les médecins du Norwalk State Hospital. Le rapport du médecin chef déclare : "Sa maladie se caractérise par des préoccupations religieuses et par une dépression profonde et une certaine agitation. Cet état semble chronique".

Le 25 mars 1935, Grace McKee devient la représentante légale de Gladys, par décision de la Cour Supérieure de Justice de Californie. Le bilan de la situation financière de Gladys est dressé: elle dispose de 60$ sur son compte en banque, de 90$ en chèques non endossés sur une assurance, d'un meuble de radio (d'une valeur de 25$ dont 15 n'ont pas été payés et sont dus au magasin); ses dettes s'élèvent à 350$ sur une Plymouth et de 200$ d'arriérés sur le piano blanc.
Pour combler les dettes, Grace revend la voiture à son précédent propriétaire, vend le piano pour 235$, et revend le crédit de la maison.

>> 25/03/1935 - Décision de la Cour: Grace tutrice des biens de Gladys
et situation financière de Gladys:
1935-03-25-grace_guardian-1 1935-03-25-grace_guardian-2 1935-03-25-grace_guardian-bilan 

>> Etat des finances de Gladys - 28/09/1936
1936-09-28-report_account-1 1936-09-28-report_account-2 1936-09-28-report_account-3
1936-09-28-report_account-4 1936-09-28-report_account-5 1936-09-28-report_account-6
1936-09-28-report_account-7 1936-09-28-report_account-8 

En 1938, Gladys tente de s'enfuir du Norwalk State Hospital. Elle racontera avoir reçu des appels téléphoniques de Martin Edward Mortensen, son précédent époux, ce qui est impossible car celui-ci est décédé dans un accident de moto neuf ans auparavant. Cependant, il existe un homonyme, un homme se nommant aussi Martin Edward Mortensen, vivant à Riverside Country en Californie, qui revendiquera bien longtemps après la paternité de Marilyn et pour lequel on retrouvera dans ses affaires après sa mort, le 10 février 1981, des documents le liant à Gladys (les papiers de mariage et divorce, mais aussi le certificat de naissance de Norma Jeane).
Après cette tentative d'évasion qui a échouée, Gladys est transférée au Agnew State Asylum, un établissement adapté pour les personnes souffrant d'hallucinations schizophrénique, situé à San José, près de San Francisco. C'est à partir de ce moment que Norma Jeane verra que très peu sa mère. Un jour, Grace emmène Norma Jeane à la pension de la clinique où vit Gladys: cette dernière ne lui adresse pas la parole jusqu'au moment de partir, où elle dit à sa fille: "Tu avais de si jolis petits pieds".

Durant l'Hiver 1938, Gladys écrit une lettre à sa fille Berniece, l'envoyant à Flat Lick chez les parents de Jasper. Mais ces derniers étant décédés, le facteur a transmis la lettre au frère de Jasper qui vit aussi à Flat Lick, qui la renvoie à son tour à Jasper qui vit désormais à Pineville, en Louisianne. Dans cette lettre, Gladys explique à Berniece qu'elle a une demi-soeur, Norma Jeane, âgée de douze ans, qui vit chez les Goddard (Grace McKee s'est mariée à Ervin Goddard en 1935). Gladys supplie aussi Berniece de la sortir de l'Agnew State Hospital, et lui donne l'adresse de sa tante (la soeur de Della Monroe), Dora Hogan Graham, qui vit à Portland, dans l'Oregon. Berniece répond à sa mère en lui informant qu'elle a contacté diverses personnes (dont Dora) et qu'elle va tout tenter pour la faire sortir.

>> Etat des finances de Gladys - 07/02/1940
1940-02-07-report_account-1 1940-02-07-report_account-2 1940-02-07-report_account-3
1940-02-07-report_account-4 1940-02-07-report_account-5 

>> 1940s - Gladys et Grace (McKee) Goddard
1940s-gladys_grace-1 

>> 1940s, Reno - Gladys
1940s-gladys-reno-1

En 1945, Dora Hogan Graham, qui vit à Portland, intervient auprès des autorités pour qu'on laisse sortir Gladys, qui en retour, accepte de vivre avec sa tante pendant un an. L'été 1945, l'hôpital 'Agnew State Hospital' la laisse alors sortir avec 200$ et deux robes, déclarant que Gladys ne représente plus un danger ni pour elle, ni pour les autres. Gladys part vivre chez sa tante Dora et trouve du travail en faisant le ménage et effectuant des soins non-médicaux à des patients en convalescence et invalides. Elle s'habille de blanc, comme une infirmière. Dora écrit une lettre à Berniece en lui racontant que Gladys s'intéresse beaucoup à la Science Chrétienne, et qu'elle souhaite soigner des gens malades sans l'apport de la médecine.
En novembre et décembre 1945, Norma Jeane voyage dans l'Ouest des Etats-Unis avec le photographe André DeDienes pour un reportage photographique: ils vont jusque dans le désert de Mojave et dans le Nevada. Lors de leur passage dans l'Oregon, ils font une halte à Portland pour rendre visite à Gladys où ils arrivent les bras chargés de cadeaux. Mais après des années passées dans des institutions, Gladys est devenue totalement asociale, fermée sur elle-même et très amaigrie. Ces retrouvailles vont marquer profondément Norma Jeane: e
lle embrasse sa mère et lui montre les photos prises par Dedienes. Gladys reste murée dans son silence, vissée dans son fauteuil. DeDienes racontera plus tard: "La rencontre entre la mère et la fille manquait de chaleur. Elles n'avaient rien à se dire. Mrs Baker était une femme d'un âge incertain, émaciée et apatique, ne faisant aucun effort pour nous mettre à l'aise. Norma Jeane faisait bonne figure. Elle avait déballé nos cadeaux: une écharpe, du parfum, des chocolats. Ils restèrent où nous les avions posés, sur la table. Il y eut un silence. Puis Mrs Baker cacha son visage dans ses mains et sembla nous oublier complètement. C'était très pénible. Apparement, ils l'avaient laissée sortir trop tôt de l'hopital." Déboussollée, Norma Jeane s'agenouille auprès de sa mère qui finit par lui murmurer: "J’aimerais tellement vivre avec toi Norma Jeane." Retenant ses larmes, Norma Jeane embrasse sa mère et lui laisse son adresse et son numéro de téléphone avant de partir. En reprenant la route avec Dedienes, elle restera inconsolable, ne cessant de pleurer. En effet, Gladys reste plus ou moins une étrangère pour Norma Jeane qui ne l'a, finalement, que très peu connue. De plus, Norma Jeane vient de signer un contrat de modèle et aspire à faire carrière. Elle se sent donc incapable de prendre soin de Gladys qui souffre de problèmes mentaux.

Gladys insiste et ne cesse d'implorer sa fille Norma Jeane lui réclamant de l'aide. En avril 1946, Norma Jeane cède et envoie de l'argent à sa mère pour qu'elle la rejoigne à Los Angeles. Elles partagent deux petites chambres louées par Norma Jeane, en dessous de chez "tante" Ana Lower, sur Nebraska Avenue. Gladys n'est pas en forme; elle est obsédée par la Science Chrétienne et découvre, par le biais des pouvoirs guérisseurs d'Ana Lower, les possibilités de l'esprit sur la maladie et étudie ainsi dévotement de nombreux livres sur ce thème. Elle assiste aussi aux services de l'Eglise tous les dimanches. Eleanor 'Bebe' Goddard (la fille de Doc Goddard, le mari de Grace McKee) racontera: "Elle errait et était imprévisible. Elle était docile mais absente."
Un jour, Gladys, toute de blanc vêtue, se rend à l'agence de modèle de sa fille (BlueBook) et déclare à la directrice Emmeline Snively, en lui saisissant la main: "Je suis simplement venue vous remercier personnellement pour tout ce que vous avez fait pour Norma Jeane. Vous lui avez offert une nouvelle vie."
En août 1946, Berniece se rend à Los Angeles avec sa fille Mona Rae pour rendre visite à sa famille. A leur arrivée à l'aéroport de Burbank, Norma Jeane, Grace McKee, Ana Lower et Gladys sont venues les accueillir.

>> Août 1946, Santa Monica - Gladys et ses filles
(Berniece et Norma Jeane) et sa petite fille Mona Rae
 1946_NJ_with_family_santamonicabeach_020_1 1946_NJ_with_family_santamonicabeach_030_1  

1946-08-berniece_gladys_nj-1  1946-08-berniece_gladys-1

>> Août 1946, Los Angeles, dans un restaurant chinois:
Berniece, Mona Rae, Grace, Norma Jean, Ana Lower et Gladys.
1946-08-LA-berniece_monarae_grace_friend_nj_ana_gladys

Après plusieurs semaines, Gladys rechute et doit à nouveau rejoindre l'hôpital Norwalk State Asylum. Grâce à ses salaires gagnés en tant que modèle, Norma Jeane envoie de l'argent pour améliorer la prise en charge de sa mère.
Gladys entretient une correspondance épistolaire avec Margaret Cohen (la mère de la petite Norma Jeane qu'elle gardait à Louisville en 1923); elle lui confie, dans une de ses lettres envoyée l'été 1946: "Mes propres filles ne me comprennent pas, elles n'essayent même pas". Gladys lui demande aussi des nouvelles de Norma Jeane Cohen, âgée désormais de 26 ans, souhaitant reprendre contact avec elle.
En février 1948, Gladys sort de l'hôpital et emmènage chez Ana Lower; elle trouve un emploi de femme de ménage.
Le 30 mai 1948, Gladys écrit une lettre à Berniece, lui reprochant notamment le fait qu'elle ne lui ait pas annoncée la mort de Tante Ana Lower, décédée le 14 mars, mais aussi car Berniece n'a pas répondu à sa dernière lettre:

>> Juin 1948 - Lettre de Gladys à Grace
1948-06-gladys_letter_to_grace  

>> Lettre non datée de Gladys à Norma Jeane
(merci à Eduardo)

gladys_letter-1 

Le 20 avril 1949, Gladys épouse John Stewart Eley, un électricien originaire de Boise, dans l'Idaho. Norma Jeane apprend la nouvelle par une lettre que lui a envoyée Grace. Mais John est déjà marié et son épouse vit à Boise.
En 1951, Marilyn demande à Inez Melson, l'administratrice de ses affaires, de faire des visites régulières à Gladys, pour s'assurer de son bien être tandis qu'elle continue à fréquenter diverses institutions. En 1952, Inez Melson persuade Marilyn qu'elle la désigne comme tutrice légale de Gladys. Gladys travaille dans une clinique privée à Homestead Lodge, près de Pasadena.
Le 23 avril 1952, John Stewart Eley meurt d'une affection cardiaque à l'âge de 62 ans et Gladys se retrouve veuve. La semaine suivante, l'existence de la mère de Marilyn est révélée par le journaliste Erskine Johnson: Marilyn a toujours dit qu'elle était orpheline; mais avec le scandale du calendrier où elle a posé nue en 1949 et qui fait surface cette année là, des journalistes curieux enquêtent et découvrent que sa mère n'est pas morte, contrairement à ce qu'a encore déclaré Marilyn la semaine précédente dans une interview pour Redbook, et que celle-ci a fréquenté des institutions psychiatriques. Marilyn accorde alors une interview, publiée le 3 mai 1952, qu'elle a préparée avec Sidney Skolsky, et y déclare notamment: "Je n'ai jamais connu ma mère intimement et, depuis que je suis adulte, je suis entrée en contact avec elle. A présent, je l'aide et veux continuer à l'aider tant qu'elle aura besoin de moi." Puis Marilyn reçoit alors une lettre implorante de sa mère: "Chère Marilyn, Je t'en prie, ma chère fille, j'aimerais avoir de tes nouvelles. Je n'ai que des soucis ici, et j'aimerais bien partir le plus vite possible. Je préfèrerais avoir l'amour de mon enfant que sa haine. Tendrement, ta mère." Gladys continue à entretenir aussi des relations avec sa fille Berniece: elle lui rend visite en Floride au cours de l'année 1952.

>> 1952, Floride - Berniece, Gladys et Mona Rae
1952-florida-berniece_gladys_monarae-1 

Le 9 février 1953, d'après les conseils de Grace McKee, Marilyn fait transférer Gladys dans un établissement plus confortable, l'institution privée Rockhaven Sanatorium, à Verduga City, afin de protéger sa mère contre les journalistes trop curieux; Marilyn paie alors 300$ par mois pour les frais d'hospitalisation.
Marilyn racontera: "Longtemps, j'ai eu peur de m'apercevoir que je ressemblais à ma mère et que je finirais comme elle dans un asile de fous. Quand je déprime, je me demande si je vais craquer, comme elle. Mais j'éspère devenir plus forte."

>> 22/03/1956 - chèque de 600 Dollars de Marilyn
adressé à Inez Melson pour l'hospitalisation de Gladys
(merci à Eduardo)

1956-03-22-check 

En 1959, Marilyn assure définitivement l'avenir financier de sa mère par un fonds de fidéicommis (qui désigne une disposition juridique -souvent testamentaire- par laquelle un bien est versé à une personne via un tiers). Pour Noël 1959, Gladys envoie ses souhaits à Marilyn, signant toujours du nom de son dernier époux décédé: "Loving Good Wishes, Gladys Pearl Eley":

>> Noël 1959 - Carte de voeux de Gladys pour Marilyn:
1959-12-gladys_letter_to_mm

Au cours du premier trimestre 1960, pendant que Marilyn tourne le film "Le Milliardaire" ("Let's Make Love"), elle donne une interview au journaliste George Belmont, à qui elle évoque notamment son enfance et sa mère. Elle déclare alors que sa mère est "morte".
Le 5 août 1962, le monde entier apprend le décès de Marilyn Monroe. Gladys en est très affectée; elle ne se rend pas à l'enterrement et fera plusieurs tentatives de suicide. Le 22 août 1962, elle écrit une lettre à Inez Melson, la remerciant de son soutien et rappelant qu'elle avait enseigné la science chrétienne à Norma Jeane: "I am very greatefull for your kind and gracious help toward Berniece and myself and to dear Norma Jeane. She is at peace and at rest now and may our God bless her and help her always. I wish you to know that I gave her (Norma) Christian Science treatment for approximately a year."

>> 22/08/1962 - Lettre de Gladys à Inez Melson:
1962-08-22-gladys_letter_to_inez

Un jour, en 1963, elle s'enfuit de Rockhaven Sanatorium; elle est retrouvée le lendemain, dans une église de San Fernando Valley, serrant dans ses mains une bible et un livre de prières de la Science chrétienne.
Inez Melson déclarera: "La mère de Marilyn se consacrait toute entière à sa religion, la Science chrétienne, et était principalement préoccupée par le mal. C'est là que se situait ses dysfonctionnements. Elle pensait avoir fait quelque chose de mal dans sa vie, et qu'elle serait punie pour cela."

>> 1963 - Gladys
1963-gladys-1-1 1963-gladys-1-2  

Le 27 avril 1966, elle est transférée au Camarillo State Hospital où elle y reste un an. Elle reçoit régulièrement la visite de Inez Melson:

>> 1966 - Gladys et Inez Melson
-photographies-

1966-gladys_with_berniece-1 1966-gladys_with_berniece-3 1966-gladys_with_berniece-2
-captures-
1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap01 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap02 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap03

1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap04 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap05 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap06
1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap07 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap08 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap09
1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap10 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap11 1966-gladys_inez_melson-cap12
-video-

En 1967, elle part vivre chez sa fille Berniece en Floride.
En 1970, c'est sous le nom de Gladys Eley qu'elle intègre la maison de retraite Collins Court Home, à Gainesville en Floride. Aux journalistes curieux qui tentent de l'approcher pour qu'elle leur évoque sa célèbre fille Marilyn, elle leur répond: "Ne me parlez pas de cette femme !". En 1972, elle déclare à James Haspiel, un fan de Marilyn qui l'a connu et suivi pendant de nombreuses années: "Je n'ai jamais voulu qu'elle fasse ce métier !"
En 1980, c'est Lawrence Cusak qui devient son tuteur légal.
Le 11 mars 1984, c'est à l'âge de 81 ans que Gladys meurt d'une crise cardiaque; elle est incinérée.

>> Années 1980s - Gladys
1980s-gladys-1-1  1980s-gladys-1-2
1980s-gladys-1-1a  1983-gladys-1-1


> sources pour l'article:
Livres:
Marilyn Monroe, L'encyclopédie, de Adam Victor The secret life of Marilyn Monroe, de J. Randy Taraborelli / Marilyn Monroe de Roger Baker
Sur le blog:
enfance de Marilyn évoquée dans l' Interview de Georges Belmont
Sur le web: biographie d'Yria sur le forum mmonline /
article "family" sur marilynmonroesplace / fiche Gladys sur findagrave , sur geni , sur imdb


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.

Enregistrer

Kelli Garner films Marilyn Monroe Lifetime mini series

logo_mol

 That's one lucky bird! Bombshell Kelli Garner saves pigeon from captivity as she films Marilyn Monroe Lifetime mini series
By Mailonline Reporter
Published: 18 December 2014
online on 
dailymail.co.uk/

Her new Lifetime TV mini series shows a more personal side of the icon and legend that is Marilyn Monroe.
And on Wednesday Kelli Garner showcased Marilyn's soft spot for little creatures as she filmed a touching scene in Toronto, Canada.

Kelli, 30, was spotted reenacting a real life anecdote from the biography The Secret Life Of Marilyn Monroe, where the Hollywood actress saved some pigeons from captivity in New York's Central Park. Kelli appeared demure during the outdoorsy scene, bundled up in a thick tan trench coat and blue head scarf.
She donned an all-black ensemble beneath her coat consisting of a blouse, loose-fitted trousers, and pumps.
Finishing off her look, The Aviator star sported dark brown leather gloves and black sunglasses, and of course wasn't without Marilyn's signature platinum locks and beauty mark.

kelli_garner_as_mm-1 kelli_garner_as_mm-3 kelli_garner_as_mm-2 

The four-hour project is based on J. Randy Taraborrelli's bestseller, The Secret Life Of Marilyn Monroe, and explores the late star's family life and how she succeeded in hiding from an all-too-invasive world.
And Wednesday's scene appeared to be based off a snippet of the book in which the author retells an anecdote by James Haspiel - taking place on a night Marilyn went for an evening walk while living on East 57th street in New York City. The buxom blonde stopped to watch a couple teenage boys use long netted poles to catch pigeons and put them in a cage. The young lads had said they planned on bringing the birds to the market, where they were worth 25 cents a piece.
'Well, if I sit on this bench and wait until you're done, and I pay you for the pigeons, will you then free them ?' Marilyn offered.
The boys obliged and the iconic star did indeed pay them, as promised, for each freed pigeon.

kelli_garner_as_mm-4  kelli_garner_as_mm-5 

Kelli joins Susan Sarandon, who has been cast as Marilyn's mentally ill mother, Gladys.
The Hollywood icon was just 36 when she was found dead in the bedroom of her home in the upscale Los Angeles neighbourhood of Brentwood on August 5, 1962. The Some Like It Hot star's death was ruled as suicide due to barbiturate poisoning at the time.
But it has become one of the most hotly debated conspiracy theories with many believing Marilyn was murdered because of her links to President John F. Kennedy and his brother Robert. 

kelli_garner_as_mm-6  kelli_garner_as_mm-7 

In October, Lifetime said of the series: 'Marilyn is both the personification of sex, whose first marriage ironically collapses because of her frigidity, and a fragile artist who seeks the approval and protection of men. 'But after tumultuous marriages with (baseball star) Joe DiMaggio and (playwright) Arthur Miller, she realizes she has the strength to stand on her own. She becomes the face and voice of an era, yet wants most of all to be someone's mother and someone's little girl. She's the Marilyn you haven't seen before, the artist who, by masking the truth with an image, gives her greatest performance.'

Kelli, who broke up with her Big Bang Theory boyfriend Johnny Galecki in August (they had been together for two years) joins a long list of actresses who have played the tragic film star on TV. These include Megan Hilty, Uma Thurman, Katharine McPhee, Charlotte Sullivan, Suzie Kennedy and Constance Forslund.

22 avril 2014

22/06/1956 Conférence de presse Sutton Place

Le matin du vendredi 22 juin 1956, Marilyn Monroe parvient à se faufiler par une sortie de service de son appartement de Sutton Place à New York, et ainsi échapper aux journalistes, pour se rendre à son rendez-vous avec son psychanalyste le Dr. Hohenberg. Ceux qui l'apercoivent ce matin là, découvrent une Marilyn défaite, portant des lunettes de soleil masquant à peine son visage bouffi, non maquillée, les cheveux emmêlés et non lavés; certains disent qu'elle ne s'est même pas lavée alors qu'il fait déjà chaud à New York ce matin là. Il semble qu'elle ait passé une mauvaise nuit. Quand les photographes l'accostent, elle leur répond: "Laissez-moi tranquille les gars. Je ne suis pas très bien." D'ordinaire, les photographes l'auraient laissée tranquille, surtout avec une star habituellement aussi coopérative que Marilyn, mais pas ce jour là. Ils la photographient, elle se cache le visage avec sa main, s'énerve et se précipite à l'intérieur jusqu'à l'ascenceur.
On the morning of Friday, June 22, 1956 , Marilyn Monroe managed to sneak out in a service entrance of her apartment in Sutton Place in New York, and thus avoids journalists, in order to go at her appointment with her psychoanalyst Dr. Hohenberg. People who see her that morning, discover a bedraggled Marilyn, wearing sunglasses not conceal her puffy face, with no makeup, hair tangled and unwashed; some people say she hasn't bathed while the day is already hot in New York this morning. It seems she has passed a bad night. When photographers accost her, she answers "Leave me alone, boys, I'm a mess". Usually , photographers would have left her alone, especially with a star usually as cooperative as Marilyn, but not that day. They photograph her, she hides her face with her hand, gets upset and rushes inside to the service elevator.

> Marilyn photographiée le matin du 22 juin
1956-06-21_am-sutton_place-011-1a 
1956-06-21_am-sutton_place-010-1  1956-06-21_am-sutton_place-020-1  1956-06-21_am-sutton_place-011-1

> photos de presse 
1956-06-21_am-sutton_place-press1a  1956-06-21_am-sutton_place-press1b 
1956-06-21_am-sutton_place-press2  1956-06-22-ny-leaving_sutton_place-1

Arthur Miller, arrivé depuis la veille au soir de Washington, découvre les gros titres de la presse: le New York Times écrit "Arthur Miller admet aider des groupes communistes dans les années 1940s", le New York Daily News: "Miller admet aider les Rouges, au mépris des risques" et le Chicago Tribune de titrer "Le fiancé de Marilyn admet aider les Rouges". Ni la presse, ni l'opinion publique ne semble apprécier Miller, qui, par ses déclarations, se montre suffisant, présomptueux et égocentrique: "Je vous mentirai si je dis que je ne pense pas qu'un artiste appartient, dans un certain degré, à une catégorie de classe spéciale".
Entre-temps, Francis Walter, président de l'HUAC (Commission des Activités Anti-Américaines), change d'avis sur Miller: "Je suis certain que le comité va discuter sur l'opportunité de le faire comparaître pour outrage très prochainement (...) cet homme sera traité comme tout à chacun qui apparaît devant le comité". "Je ne pense pas qu'il y ait beaucoup d'endroits dans ce pays où il ne pourrait pas profiter d'une lune de miel de miel avec Marilyn Monroe. Et sans son passeport".
Arthur
Miller, who arrived the night before from Washington, discovers the headlines in the press: The New York Times wrote "Arthur Miller Admits Helping Communist-Front Groups in '40s", the New York Daily News: "Miller Admits Aiding Reds, Risks Contempt", and the Chicago Tribune's headline "Marilyn's Fiancé Admits Aiding Reds." Neither the press nor the public seems to appreciate Miller, who, by his statements, proves he's sufficient, arrogant and self-centered: "I would be lying to you if I said that I didn't think the artist was, to a certain degree, in a special class."
Meanwhile, Francis Walter, president of HUAC
(House Un-American Activities Committee) changes his mind about Miller: "I am quite certain the committee will discuss the advisability of citing him for contempt very shortly. (...) this man will dealt with just as everybody else who appears before this committee." "I don't suppose there are too many places in this country where he wouldn't enjoy a honeymoon with Marilyn Monroe. Without passport."


Des rumeurs courent sur un imminent mariage de Miller et Monroe, planifié avant le 13 juillet et la journaliste à potins Hedda Hooper de réveler que la cérémonie aura lieu à la maison de Spyros Skouras. Après cette matinée difficile autant pour Marilyn que pour Arthur, le couple décide d'organiser une conférence de presse dans l'après-midi, à 16h30, devant l'immeuble de Sutton Place où vit Marilyn, leur permettant ainsi de donner une meilleure image d'eux dans la presse qui paraîtra le lendemain. C'est Marilyn qui, en fin de matinée, a fait contacter toutes les salles de rédaction.
There are rumors of an upcoming marriage of Miller and Monroe, planned before July 13, and gossip columnist Hedda Hopper reveals that the ceremony will take place at the home of Spyros Skouras. After a difficult morning for the both -Marilyn and Arthur- the couple decides to hold a press conference in the afternoon at 4:30 p.m., before the building of Sutton Place where Marilyn lives, allowing to give a better vision of them in the press to be published the next day. This is Marilyn, who, in the late morning, makes contact all the newsrooms.

En début d'après-midi, des reporters, photographes, journalistes de la presse et de la télévision, des caméramen, et de nombreux passants, dont une cinquantaine d'enfants, et des fans forment une foule devant l'immeuble de Sutton Place. Les locataires de Sutton Place, furieux, empêchent les reporters d'accéder à l'immeuble. Il y a tellement de monde, que les forces de l'ordre envoient douze policiers pour mantenir l'ordre et régler la circulation. La chaleur est oppressante. Un marchand de glaces ambulant vient s'installer au coin de la 57ème Rue et fait ainsi de bonnes affaires. Les habitants des immeubles voisins sont pendus à leur fenêtre. Tout le monde attend Marilyn. Plus d'une heure et quinze minutes après, la police envoie un émissaire la chercher car la circulation de la rue est bloquée, et les locataires se plaignent du tumulte. A 18 heures, Marilyn arrive enfin, au bras d' Arthur Miller. Elle ôte une paire de gants, la même qu'elle portait lors de son annonce de divorce d'avec Joe DiMaggio. Marilyn se montre très affectueuse envers Miller, le serrant fort dans ses bras, levant la tête et lui portant un regard d'admiration et d'amoureuse transit. En fait, elle le protège, et montre au monde entier un Miller que personne n'a jamais vu. Elle l'embrasse si fort qu'il lui demande d'arrêter sous peine de s'évanouir.
En réponse aux déclarations de Francis Walter sur la lune de miel, Arthur Miller répond: "Ce sera plutôt compliqué d'être en lune de miel ici, puisque Miss Monroe part en Angleterre". Et Marilyn d'ajouter: "Je ne serais pas aux Etats-Unis. Je dois y aller qu'il puisse venir ou non. J'éspère qu'il viendra avec moi." Marilyn est en effet attendue en Angleterre pour le tournage du "Prince et la Danseuse". Ils concluent la conférence de presse par un baiser.

Quelques déclarations de Marilyn:
> "Je n'ai jamais été autant heureuse de ma vie".
> "Nous avons tellement de choses en commun. C'est la première fois que j'aime vraiment. Arthur est un homme sérieux mais il a aussi un merveilleux sens de l'humour. Nous rions et plaisantons beaucoup. Je suis folle de lui."
Quelques déclarations de Miller:
> " C'est une bonne chose que nous allons nous marier qu'une fois. C'est tout ce que je peux vous dire".

In early afternoon, reporters, photographers, journalists of press and television, cameramen, and many people, including fifty children and fans, form a crowd in front of the building of Sutton Place. The tenants of Sutton Place, furious, prevent reporters to access the building. There are so many people that the police send twelve policemen to mantain order and regulating the flow. The heat is oppressive. An ice-cream wagon just sit at the corner of Est 57th Street and thus does brisk business. The neighbors are hanging out of windows. Everybody wait Marilyn. Over an hour and fifteen minutes later, the police sends an emissary to search her because the traffic on the street is blocked and tenants complain about the uproar. At 6 p.m., Marilyn finally arrives, on the arms of Arthur Miller. She takes off her pair of gloves, the same she wore the day she announced her divorce with Joe DiMaggio. Marilyn is very loving towards Miller, shaking strongly him in her arms, lifting her head and wearing him with a look of admiration and love transit. In fact, she protects him and shows to the world a Miller that nobody has never seen before. She embraces him so much that he asked her to stop or he is going to fall over. Answering to Francis Walter's statement about the honeymoon, Arthur Miller answers: "It would be rather difficult to honeymoon here, since Miss Monroe is going to England" and Marilyn adds: "I won't be in the U.S. I've got to go whether he can or not. I hope he'll go with me". Marilyn is indeed expected in England for the filming of "The Prince and the Showgirl". They conclude the press conference by a kiss.

Some Marilyn's statements:
> "I've never been happier in my life".
> "
We have so much in common. This is the first time that I really love. Arthur is a serious man, but he also has a wonderful sense of humor. We laugh and joke a lot. I'm crazy about him."
Some Miller's statements:
> "It's a good thing that we'll only be getting married once. That's all I can tell you."

 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-010-2 
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-010-1 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-011-1 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-011-2
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-011-3 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-011-3a
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-1 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-1a 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-2a
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-2b 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-2c 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-2d
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-3 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-4a 
3244155 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-4 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-6
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-5 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-6a
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-7 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-8 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-012-8a
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-013-2  1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-013-3-by_paul_slade-1  1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-013-3-by_paul_slade-1a
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-013-1 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-014-2 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-014-1-by_sam_schulman
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-014-3 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-014-3a 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-014-3b
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-015-1  1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-015-2 
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-015-1a  1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-015-2-by_paul_slade-1 
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-015-3 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-015-4-by_paul_slade 
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-016-1 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-016-1a
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-016-2  1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-016-3-by_herb_scharfman-1 
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-016-4  1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-016-5a  1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-016-5
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-017-1 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-017-2
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-017-1a 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-017-3 
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-018-1-by_sam_schulman-1  1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-018-1-by_sam_schulman-1a 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-019-1-by_paul_slade-1 
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-019-2-by_paul_slade-1 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-019-3-by_paul_slade-1


> snapshots de James Haspiel
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-snap-by_haspiel-1

> photographies de Paul Slade 
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-013-3-by_paul_slade-1   1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-019-2-by_paul_slade-1a  1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-019-3-by_paul_slade-1a
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-015-2 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-015-3 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-015-4-by_paul_slade
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-019-1-by_paul_slade-1  

> photographies de Herb Scharfman 
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-016-3-by_herb_scharfman-1 

> photographies de Sam Schulman
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-018-1-by_sam_schulman-1 


> photos de presse  
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-press-1 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-press-2 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-press-3
1956-06-22-mag-pm 1956-06-22-mag-vie 1956-07-10-billed_bladet-danemark

 

> captures 
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap1-01 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap1-02 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap1-03
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap1-04 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap1-05 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap1-06
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap1-07 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap1-08 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap1-09
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-01 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-02 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-03
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-04 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-05 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-06
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-07 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-08 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-09
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-10 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-11 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-12
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-13 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-14 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap2-15
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap3-01 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap3-02 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap3-03
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap3-04 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap3-05 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap3-06
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap3-07 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap3-08 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap3-09
1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap3-10 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap3-11 1956-06-22-conf_press_sutton-cap3-12


> video 1

> video 2

> video 3


>> sources:
Marilyn Monroe, Les inédits, de Marie Clayton. 
Marilyn Monroe, biographie de Barbara Leaming
Marilyn Monroe et les caméras, Georges Belmont 
Paris Match, n°378, du 7 juillet 1956


 © All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.
 

28 février 2014

24/06/1956 de New York à Roxbury

Le 24 juin 1956, Marilyn Monroe quitte son appartement de Sutton Place, à New York, en taxi, afin d'éviter les reporters. Arthur Miller l'attend à trois blocks de là, dans son break où sont assis, sur les sièges arrières, la mère de Miller (Augusta Miller), ses deux enfants (Jane et Robert) et le chien Hugo; et Marilyn monte dans la voiture, pour se rendre à Roxbury, dans la propriété de Miller.
In 1956, June, 24 Marilyn Monroe leaves from her apartment in Sutton Place, New York, takes a taxi to avoid reporters. Arthur Miller waits her three blocks away, in his station wagon where wait the Miller's mother (Augusta), his children (Jane and Robert), and his basset dog Hugo; Marilyn gets into the station wagon and they all go to Roxbury, in the Miller's home.

> Marilyn Monroe en taxi
1956-06-24-taxi-2  1956-06-24-taxi-2a  1956-06-24-taxi-1 
1956-06-24-taxi-3  1956-06-24-taxi-5 1956-06-24-car-mag-point_de_vue-1956-07-p1

 > Marilyn Monroe et Arthur Miller
1956-car-miller2  1956-mm_arthur
1956-06-26-mm_miller-1a  1956-car-mm_et_miller105 

> articles de presse
1956_JUNE_24_SUTTON_PLACE_APT336  
1956-06-26-press 


extrait de "Marilyn- The Ultimate Look At The Legend" de James Haspiel:

Le 24 juin 1956 , s'est avéré être une soirée incroyable. La presse traquait Monroe et Arthur Miller, car maintenant le mot était qu'il y allait y avoir un mariage. Cette nuit là Miller essayait de faire sortir Monroe de la ville pour la quiétude de la campagne du Connecticut. Miller était au volant d'un break , maintenant garé devant le 2 Sutton Place South; chargé des bagages de Monroe, et la presse de regarder avec vivacité le break tels des faucons. Soudain, Miller est sorti du bâtiment seul, monta dans le véhicule et pris rapidement la fuite. Les journalistes et les photographes n'étaient pas vraiment intéressé par lui tout seul, ils étaient intéressés par elle, par eux ! Ainsi, le break disparu au-dessus de la zone de l'avenue York et la 61e rue , à rester là à attendre Monroe . Un taxi a été appelé à l'alcôve de stationnement du 2 Sutton Place South, la portière du passager maintenant ouverte et en attendant son prochain tarif. Un peu dans le flou, Marilyn est soudainement apparue à travers la porte d'entrée et a boulonné dans le taxi avec les flashs d'éclairage sur son chemin, et le taxi a démarré.

Le groupe des Monroe Six n'étaient pas là ce soir, et je traînais avec Nathan Puckett , qui était venu à New York du Michigan pour voir Marily , et a été le président de l'un des nombreux clubs de fans de Monroe. Nate a proposer de payer un taxi pour suivre celui de Marilyn, nous en avons donc pris un après elle, et l'un des photographes de presse a également suivi. Je me souviens très bien que le taxi de Marilyn remontait sur le côté ouest de l'avenue York, à la 61e rue; le break était garé sur le côté Est de l'avenue, et l'avenue était alors (et probablement encore) pavée. Elle sortit du taxi, et elle courait à travers les pavés dans ses très hauts talons, courant à travers le trafic dense venant en sens inverse pour atteindre le break, avec le photographe de presse solitaire à sa poursuite, et Nate et moi assis en émoi dans notre taxi, à une cinquantaine de mètres. Monroe a couru vers le côté passager de la voiture familiale, Miller avait déjà mis le moteur en route, et comme elle a atteint la porte, le photographe parvint jusqu'à elle, posa sa main sur son épaule et, avec tous ses muscle , se balançait autour de Monroe et la jeta durement contre le côté du break ! Elle est presque tombée par terre alors qu'il soulevait son appareil photo pour prendre une photo d'elle. Miller est sorti de la voiture et, sans faire attention que ce soit un photographe de presse, il aida simplement Marilyn à monter dans le break, se tenant  lui-même derrière la roue, et ils ont démarré, accélérant sur l'avenue York . Et nous avons redémarré aussi.

Nous avons grillé cinq feux rouges pour suivre le véhicule de Miller, et enfin, à un certain point de uptown, je pense aux alentours de la 110ème rue, la voiture est entrée dans la East River Drive, pour aller dans le Connecticut! Notre taxi s'est rangé près du trottoir et (rappelez-vous , c'était encore en 1956) le compteur affichait 95 cents. Rappelez-vous, aussi, que ce chauffeur avait traversé cinq feux rouges pour nous, et maintenant, le jeune garçon du Michigan, sans le bon sens du citadin, lui a remis un billet unique d'un dollar, accordant: "Vous pouvez garder la monnaie !"  Un pourboire nickel ! Si je me souviens bien, je sors du taxi et paris vite à toute hâte.


June 24th 1956, turned out to be an incredible evening. The press was hounding Monroe and Arthur Miller, because by now the word was out that there was going to be a marriage. That night Miller was trying to get Monroe out of the city and up to the quietude of the Connecticut countryside. Miller was driving a station wagon, now parked in front of 2 Sutton Place South; it was packed with Monroe's luggage, and the Press were keenly watching the station wagon like hawks. Suddenly, Miller came out of the building alone, got into the vehicle and quickly sped away. The reporters and photographers really weren't interested in him solo, they were interested in her, in them! So, the station wagon disappeared over to the area at York Avenue and 61st Street, to sit there and wait for Monroe. A taxicab was summoned to the parking alcove at 2 Sutton Place South, the passenger door now open and awaiting its next fare. Not unlike a blur, Marilyn suddenly appeared through the front door and bolted into the taxicab with flashbulbs lighting her way, and the cab took off.

The Monroe Six were not around that evening, and I was hanging out with Nathan Puckett, who had come to New York City from Michigan to see Marilyn, and was the president of one of Monroe's many fan clubs. Nate offered to pay for a taxicab to follow Marilyn's cab, so we took off after her, and one of the press photographers also followed. I vividly recall that Marilyn's taxicab pulled up to the west side of York Avenue at 61st Street; the station wagon was parked on the east side of the avenue, and the avenue was then (and probably still is) paved with cobblestones. She got out of the cab, and she was running across the cobblestones in her very high heels, running through the oncoming traffic to reach the station wagon, with the lone press photographer in hot pursuit, and Nate and I sitting agog in our taxicab, some fifty feet away. Monroe raced around to the passenger side of the station wagon, Miller already gunning the motor, and as she reached for the door, the photographer got right up to her, put his hand on her shoulder and, with all his muscle, swung Monroe around and threw her hard up against the side of the station wagon! She almost fell to the ground as he raised his camera to take a picture of her. Miller got out of the car and, paying no attention whatsoever to the press photographer, he simply assisted Marilyn into the station wagon, got himself back behind the wheel, and they took off, speeding up York Avenue. And we took off too.

We drove through five red lights following the Miller vehicle, and finally at some point uptown, I think around 110th Street, the car entered into the East River Drive, to go on up to Connecticut! Our cab pulled over the curb and (remember, it was still 1956) the meter read 95 cents. Remember, too, that this driver had gone through five red lights for us, and now the young lad from Michigan, with no sign of city-savvy, handed him a single dollar bill, allowing, 'You can keep the change!' A nickel tip! As I recall, I hustled myself out and away from the taxicab in a hurry.


source:
forum everlasting-star


 © All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.