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06 mai 2018

Icons and Idols: Hollywood - 11/2017 - Julien's Auction

Photographies diverses


Lot 129: VINTAGE PUBLICITY IMAGES
A group of 15 vintage publicity images of Hollywood celebrities including Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor, Elvis Presley, Betty Grable, Rita Hayworth (whose name has been written on the photograph), and Shirley Temple. Accompanied by an envelope of news clippings and other ephemera primarily related to Monroe.
Estimate: $200 - $400 | Winning Bid: $256
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Lot 130: MARILYN MONROE NEGATIVE, CIRCA 1947
A black and white negative of Marilyn Monroe, believed to have been taken on the Fox Studios back lot set by Joseph Jasgur, circa 1947. Accompanied by a black and white photograph recently printed from this negative.
Estimate: $500 - $1,000 | Winning Bid: $640
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Lot 141: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE SILKSCREEN PRINT
A limited edition silkscreen print of a Milton Greene photograph of Marilyn Monroe, taken during the famed "Black Sitting" photo session in New York in 1956. Printed later. Signed by the artist in pencil lower right, “AP” lower left.
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $1,280
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 Lot 142: MARILYN MONROE BERT STERN PHOTOGRAPH
A photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken in 1962 by Bert Stern during “The Last Sitting.” The black and white image was printed and signed by the artist in 1994; it is numbered on the photographer's stamp 91/5000. Stern wrote in the lower margin “Marilyn 1962 Bert Stern.”
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $1,600
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Lot 145: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY MANFRED KREINER
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner. The image shows Monroe walking onto a photo set and is marked with red pencil. Photographer’s stamp on verso (multiple times) with handwritten notation in red pencil. Accompanied by a small typed message written in German regarding Monroe and this photograph.
Estimate: $600 - $800 | Winning Bid: $448
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 Lot 146: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY MANFRED KREINER
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner. The image shows Monroe descending an airplane staircase and has been scribbled on in red ink. Photographer’s stamp on verso with handwritten notation in pencil and the words “Kill Kill” in red ink. “Kill” here refers to the fact that Monroe did not want this image published. Accompanied by a small typed message written in German by Kreiner regarding Monroe and this photograph.
Estimate: $600 - $800 | Winning Bid: $640 
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Lot 147: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
A group of three original never before seen original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 30, 1958, as she exited her apartment at 444 East 57th Street in New York City. Just three days prior, Monroe was photographed by Richard Avedon for Life magazine.
PROVENANCE Lot 755, "Marilyn Monroe Auction," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, November 17, 2016 
Estimate: $800 - $1,200 | Winning Bid: $1,024
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Lot 156: SOME LIKE IT HOT BEHIND-THE-SCENES SLIDES WITH COPYRIGHT
A group of 23 original color slides taken on the set of Some Like It Hot (United Artists, 1959) sold with copyright to the images. The slides include approximately eight images of Marilyn Monroe and five of Tony Curtis, among others on and around the set of the film, including Coronado Beach.
While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection of copyright given.
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $1280
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Lot 159: MARILYN MONROE PRINT BY RUSSELL YOUNG (BRITISH, 1959)
A screenprint on paper titled “Marilyn in Korea (Pink + Midori Blue)” by Russell Young, signed by the artist at lower right and numbered 10/50. Additionally marked in pencil on verso in an unknown hand “56105/ 12.”
Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000 | unsold
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Photographies Bruno Bernard


Lot 134: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
A black and white pin-up photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard, circa 1946. According to the book Marilyn: Intimate Exposures by Susan Bernard “Marilyn said to Mr. Bernard ‘Can you take some sexy pictures of me?’ and he replied ‘But Norma, you are the girl next door.” Estate signed at lower right and numbered 1/90.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $2,500 - $3,000 | unsold
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Lot 135: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard, circa 1946, titled “Norma Jean Sailor Girl.” This is a seldom seen outtake photograph from a shoot intended for magazine cover images. Estate signed at lower right and numbered 5/50.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $2,500 - $3,200 | unsold
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Lot 136: MARIYLN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1953. This photograph was taken of Monroe backstage at the Hollywood Bowl for an appearance benefiting St. Jude’s. Monroe wore a costume from the film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953). Estate signed at lower right and numbered 6/90.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000 | unsold
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Lot 137: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1953. This photograph was taken of Monroe backstage at the Hollywood Bowl deciding what message to describe on a guest wall at a charity event benefiting St. Jude’s. This image was never published and comes from a contact sheet of artist’s proofs. Estate signed at lower right and numbered 6/90.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000 | Winning Bid: $2,560
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Lot 138: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1954. The photograph shows Monroe on the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) having her makeup applied by Whitey Snyder. According to the book Marilyn: Intimate Exposures by Susan Bernard, Snyder stated that this is the only color photograph of himself and Monroe that he had ever seen. Estate signed at lower right and numbered 5/50.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500 | Winning Bid: $1,920

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Lot 139: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1954. The photograph shows Monroe in a screening room at the 20th Century Fox studios wearing her iconic white dress from the film The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). Estate signed at lower right and numbered 14/50.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $2,500 - $3,000 | Winning Bid: $3,437.50

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Lot 140: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
An original vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard on the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) and signed by Bernard on verso “Bernard of Hollywood.” Housed in a Bernard of Hollywood vintage photograph folder.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $10,000 - $20,000 | unsold

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Vêtements & Accessoires


 Lot 143: MARILYN MONROE WORN BLACK COLOBUS COAT
A mid-1940s black colobus coat worn by Marilyn Monroe to the 1948 film premiere of The Emperor Waltz (Paramount, 1948). The coat has broad shoulders, a cordé collar, a satin lining, and a Jerrold's Van Nuys, Calif. label. Although the black colobus is currently on the endangered species list, it was quite fashionable in the 1940s. Monroe wrote in a letter to Grace Goddard dated December 3, 1944, "I found out that its [sic] possible to buy a Gold Coast Monkey Coat. I shall write to you about it later." The coat was gifted from Monroe to Jacquita M. Rigoni (Warren), who was the great-niece to Anne Karger, mother of Monroe's voice coach, Freddie Karger. Monroe had a close relationship with the family, and the coat has remained in their possession. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Jacqui Rigoni detailing the family's relationship to Monroe and the history of the coat.
The monkey species used to make this Marilyn Monroe monkey fur coat is on the Endangered Species list. U.S. Endangered Species Act regulations required by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service impose certain regulations on the sale of this coat. Please read the following carefully:
Please read the following carefully: The Marilyn Monroe monkey fur coat may be sold to a resident of California without requiring a Federal permit. A non-California resident may bid on this coat and if he or she were the winning bidder could apply for a Federal permit to remove the coat from the state of California. Julien’s has been advised that a Federal permit would likely be REFUSED by the governing offices. It is vehemently advised that non-residents of California DO NOT bid on this Marilyn Monroe owned monkey fur coat. If you bid on this lot and are unable to obtain a permit Julien’s has no liability and will be unable to refund you for your purchase.
A California resident who purchases this coat and later moves from California to another state would not be required to obtain a permit if he or she maintained ownership of the coat when changing state of residence. However, the owner would need to make sure there are no state regulations prohibiting the transfer of the coat from one state to another.
Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000 | Winning Bid: $32,000

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Lot 144: MARILYN MONROE FAN FROM THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL
A vintage lace fan used by Marilyn Monroe in the film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). The folding hand fan is used by Monroe in the ballroom scene in the film. The frame and guard are embellished with floral motif carvings embellished with pink, blue, and gold-metallic paint. The accompanying letter from the consignor explains that the fan was gifted by Monroe to William Louis George Le Brun, known as Louis Le Brun in the film industry, who was the Chief Production Accountant for Warner Bros. in the United Kingdom. When Monroe was taken ill while filming, Le Brun, who was responsible for overseeing the distribution of all finances, which involved the insurance and wellbeing of the cast and production team, stayed by her side. As a thank-you, Monroe gave him this fan, or more specifically gave the fan to his wife as an apology for keeping Le Brun from his family. At the time the fan was received several of the fan blades were broken, presumed to be from use during filming. The fan has remained in the possession of the Le Brun family since the gift was made by Monroe.
Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000 | Winning Bid: $10,000 

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Lot 149: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MINI PINECONE TREE GIFTED FROM JOE DIMAGGIO TO MARILYN MONROE
A mini brown wire form holiday tree made of pinecones and other tree items, dusted with glitter. Wrapped in a black tulle base. The tree was purportedly a gift from Joe DiMaggio to Marilyn Monroe one Christmas when he discovered that she did not have a tree to celebrate the holidays.
Height, 23 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 246, "Marilyn Monroe: Property from The Estate of Lee Strasberg," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, November 17-19, 2016
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000 | Winning Bid: $7,500 

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Lot 150: MARILYN MONROE ROCOCO STYLE COFFEE TABLE
A carved wood coffee table with canted edges and inset parchment top.
PROVENANCE Lot 558, "Marilyn Monroe: Property from The Estate of Lee Strasberg," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, November 17-19, 2016
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $2,880

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Lot 151: MARILYN MONROE FLOWER SWAG
Gold tone wirework floral wall ornament, with enameled blue and purple flowers formed from Australian pennies dated 1942. Two leaves and one flower detached.
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 456, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27-28, 1999
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | unsold

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Lot 153: MARILYN MONROE MIRROR
A small handheld sterling silver mirror accompanied by a handwritten note reading in full on the recto: “11/1/00/ This make-up mirror was owned/ by Marilyn Monroe. It was left in/ her 57 St Apart-/ ment when she/ moved to California./ The super of/ the building/ ”liberated” it.’ Hopefully, you/ will find a good/ home for it!/ Thanks./ Terry Seymour (212) 777-0157” as well as “Mrs. S:/ will write thank you/ letter when donate it”; on the verso is “Super’s daughter used it/ a few years. T. Seymour/ in real estate, were (sic)/ selling MM apartment a few/ years ago./ Super gave it to her./ Super said/ MM bought it in/ London, used it/ a lot at home./ I thanked her and said/ you would like to/ donate it to Hollygrove.”
Approximate diameter, 7 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 224, “Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe,” Julien’s Auctions, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000 | Winning Bid: $1,920

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Lot 154: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ABSTRACT PARCEL GILT FAN
A folding paper Japanese hand fan with abstract parcel gilt decoration.
15 1/2 by 24 1/2 by 2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 244, "Marilyn Monroe: Property from The Estate of Lee Strasberg," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, November 17-19, 2016
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $1,024
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Documents papiers


Lot 131: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTER FROM UNCLE ART
A double-sided two-page letter written to Marilyn Monroe from "Uncle Art," who was a relative of Monroe's foster mother, Grace Goddard. The letter reads in part "So glad you are making satisfactory progress in school. I advise that you be particularly diligent in the cultural subjects...sad is the fate of the young woman who has not the ambition to so model and mold her language and conduct as to have [illegible] herself to the point where she can mingle with cultured people inconspicuously." The letter is written on International Correspondence Schools of Scranton, Pennsylvania, stationery, undated and signed "Devotedly Yours, Uncle Art."
PROVENANCE Sotheby’s Parke-Bernet, Sale number 94, October 21, 1973
Estimate: $500 - $1,000 | Winning Bid: $640
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 Lot 133: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CHECK TO JAX
A Marilyn Monroe completed and signed Jax counter check in the amount of $63.83; address is listed as the Beverly Carlton Hotel. Monroe did not fill in the date; the check is stamped on verso May 12, 1952.
Estimate: $500 - $1,000 | Winning Bid: $640
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Lot 148: MARILYN MONROE 1954 SIGNED CHECK
A counter check fully completed and signed by Marilyn Monroe. The check is dated October 11, 1954, to The Christian Community in the amount of $50.00. On October 6, 1954, Monroe announced her separation from then-husband Joe DiMaggio.
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000 | Winning Bid: $4,480
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 Lot 152: MARILYN MONROE SKIN CARE REGIME INSTRUCTIONS
A typed instruction sheet dated June 11, 1958, for Marilyn Monroe’s skin care regime from the Erno Laszlo Institute. The instructions are for morning care of skin, evening “ ’if’ dressing” for formal occasions, and in the evening before retiring. The sheet also includes a list of foods not to eat.
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 334, "Marilyn Monroe: Property from The Estate of Lee Strasberg," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, November 17-19, 2016
Estimate: $400 - $600 | Winning Bid: $3,840
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 Lot 155: MARILYN MONROE BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S SCRIPT AND REPORT
A clean copy of the screenplay for Breakfast at Tiffany's written by George Axelrod and dated July 9, 1959. Monroe was considering the part, and she sought the opinions of her professional team including the Strasbergs, her husband, and management team. The script is accompanied by a single-page, typed "report" dated September 23, 1959, which also has the name "Parone" typed to the left of the date. Literary luminary Edward Parone was at the time running Monroe's production company and most likely is the one who wrote this single-page, scathing review of the script, leading with the simple sentence, "I think not." It goes on to criticize the screenplay, determining, "I can see Marilyn playing a part like Holly and even giving this present one all the elan it badly needs, but I don't feel she should play it: it lacks insight and warmth and reality and importance." It has been long reported that Monroe declined the part upon the advice of Lee Strasberg, but this document provides further evidence that other people in her inner circle advised her not to take the role. Together with a four-page shooting schedule for November 4, 1960, for the film.
PROVENANCE Lot 441, "Marilyn Monroe: Property from The Estate of Lee Strasberg," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, November 17-19, 2016
Estimate: $6,000 - $9,000 | Winning Bid: $12,500

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Lot 160: JOHN F. KENNEDY 1962 BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION PROGRAM
A program from President John F. Kennedy's birthday celebration at Madison Square Garden, New York, in 1962. The program, with "Happy Birthday Mr. President" and an image of Kennedy on the cover, lists the entertainers of the evening: Marilyn Monroe - who sang her now-famous rendition of "Happy Birthday" to Kennedy, Ella Fitzgerald, Maria Callas, Henry Fonda, Peggy Lee, and Danny Kaye, among others.
Estimate: $600 - $800 | Winning Bid: $1,600 

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Medical


Lot 157: MARILYN MONROE PELVIC X-RAY
A Marilyn Monroe pelvic X-ray dated November 9, 1954. Information ghost printed in the upper right of the X-ray reads "Cedars of Lebanon Hospital/ Drs. E. Freedman and S. Finck/ Name Di Maggio, Mrs. Marilyn/ No. 50612 Date 11-9-54/ Ref. By Dr. L. Krohn." Dr. Leon Krohn was Monroe’s gynecologist.
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000 | Winning Bid: $3,840
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Lot 158: MARILYN MONROE MEDICAL FILE
A medical file pertaining to cosmetic surgery performed on Marilyn Monroe. The file includes facial X-rays and doctors' notes from the office of Dr. Michael Gurdin, M.D., and the X-ray office of Drs. Conti and Steinberg. Dr. Gurdin's chart on Monroe begins on July 14, 1958, and lists the patient as Marilyn Miller with addresses in New York and Los Angeles. The chief complaint listed is "chin deformity" and goes on to give a medical history that begins in 1950 and ends in 1962. Listed are a 1956 bout of neutropenia in England; 1957 ectopic pregnancy in New York; and 1950 cartilage implant in chin that the doctor observed had slowly begun to dissolve. Those with knowledge of the implant procedure have explained that this was done in association with a tip rhinoplasty, a procedure involving the tip of Monroe's nose only, not the bones. The last entry is dated June 7, 1962, and reports a fall at between 2 and 3 a.m. resulting in swelling and tenderness of the nose. Monroe was brought to Dr. Gurdin by her psychoanalyst, Dr. Ralph Greenson. Monroe was referred to Drs. Conti and Steinberg for X-rays. For her visit to the radiologists she was given the alias "Miss Joan Newman," and that name appears on the paperwork with Monroe's Brentwood home address. Six X-rays are in the folder: a frontal facial bones X-ray; a smaller X-ray that is a composite of the right and left sides of her nasal bones; and four small dental X-rays into the roof of Monroe's mouth, looking upward toward the nasal bones. The conclusion, written by Dr. Conti and dated June 7, 1962, is that there was no damage to Monroe's nose due to her fall. A more recent evaluation of the X-rays indicates a very minute hairline fracture of this bone. Monroe had turned 36 less than a week earlier. On June 8, the following day, Monroe was fired from the film Something's Got to Give (20th Century Fox, 1962).
Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000 | unsold
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Presse


Lot 132: PLAYBOY MAGAZINE FIRST ISSUE SIGNED BY HUGH HEFNER
An original first issue of Playboy magazine (HMH Publishing, 1953) featuring Marilyn Monroe on the cover and signed by Hugh Hefner. The magazine, which launched in December 1953, sold for 50 cents a copy. Housed in a protective plastic case.
  Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000 | Winning Bid: $12,800
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Art


Lot 198: AL HIRSCHFELD ABE HIRSCHFELD PRINT
A print of Al Hirschfeld’s "Abe Hirschfeld and Friends" caricature commissioned by Abe Hirschfeld in 1988. The image shows Abe surrounded by Shirley MacLaine, Luciano Pavarotti, Michael Jackson, Jackie Mason, Anthony Quinn, Donald Trump, Barbra Streisand, Carol Channing, Jackie Onassis, Jackie Gleason, Elvis Presley, and Marilyn Monroe. With a faded inscription that reads "To Mary [illegible] With appreciation from all of us Abe Hirschfeld."
Estimate: $100 - $300 | Winning Bid: $1,600
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© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.


14 janvier 2018

TV - Cette semaine là

gif_tvmarilyn

 Dimanche 14 janvier 2018 - 15h15 - France 3
à revoir en replay pendant 7 jours

Magasine:  Cette semaine là

Présentation: Wendy Bouchard

un sujet est consacré au mariage de Marilyn Monroe et Joe DiMaggio
(date du 14 janvier 1954)

Posté par ginieland à 15:19 - - Commentaires [12] - Permalien [#]
Tags : ,

23 février 2017

Saturday Evening Post, 1956/05/19

Saturday Evening Post
- The New Marilyn Monroe - Part 3

1956-05-19-saturday_evening_post-cover 

pays magazine: USA
paru le 19 mai 1956
article: 3ème partie "The New Marilyn Monroe"
en ligne sur saturdayeveningpost.com


Blonde, Incorporated
By Pete Martin
Originally published on May 19, 1956
The story of Marilyn’s brief marriage to Joe DiMaggio, her battle with Hollywood, and her surprising new career.

SEP-3-01 
Milton Greene, vice-president of Marilyn Monroe Productions, playwright Terence
Rattigan, Sir Lawrence Olivier and Marilyn in New York. The occasion: To announce
plans for a movie version cf a Rattigan play, costarring Olivier and Monroe. (Hans Knopf, © SEPS)

I put this question to my friend and confidant, whom I call Flack Jones: “How did Joe DiMaggio happen to come into Marilyn’s life?” Jones is one of my principal sources of Marilyn Monroe information. As a skilled and articulate employee of the publicity department of the 20th Century-Fox motion-picture studio, he had worked closely with Marilyn for several years before her highly publicized departure from Hollywood to live in New York and “learn to be an actress.”

“Marilyn met him in a café one night on a blind double date,” Jones said. “DiMaggio had heard about her and wanted to meet her. They met through friends and had dinner. Everything went just fine and dandy, until ultimately their friendship ripened into a romance which led to their marriage.

“But to complicate things, late in 1952 she decided to mix her first holdout with her romance,” Flack Jones said. Then he corrected himself, “It must have been ’53, for she had made River of No Return and How to Marry a Millionaire. Anyhow, she decided — or else her confidential advisers had persuaded her — that she was worth more money. But instead of stalking into Darryl Zanuck’s office, slapping her next script down and saying, ‘I won’t do it!’ she simply hid out. She sneaked down alleys, didn’t answer her phone and couldn’t be reached by anybody.

“This was before she ran off and married Joe DiMaggio, and the studio was taking a firm tone with her — a very firm tone. But when the romance reached full flower, the studio had to do a fast switch,” Jones said. “Here we were, issuing communiqués about this ‘silly and stubborn girl who was ill-advised enough not to come back and take this important part’ in whatever the picture was — Pink Tights, I think — when all of a sudden she ups and marries Joe, the All-American Boy. After that, if we kept on beefing about her absence, the studio would be the big bully in the plot so far as the public was concerned.

“Then, to add to the studio’s confusion, the pair went off to Korea to entertain the troops. How are you going to snap a blacksnake whip at a girl’s calves for doing a thing like that? Snow White has married Prince Charming and they’ve gone off to Korea together to entertain the servicemen. So the studio started talking sweet in a hurry.

“However, the sharp-eyed and cynical could tell that that marriage was in danger as early as their arrival in the Orient,” Flack Jones went on. “The press interviewed Marilyn in Tokyo, and a story was radioed back which said that Marilyn had talked about this and about that, and — oh yes — there was a man in the far corner of the room whose name was Joe DiMaggio. It didn’t take much of a genius to figure that situation was the beginning of the end. Then, after an interval, the lovebirds flew back to Beverly Hills.”

“Did the studio start having its troubles making her report for work before she married DiMaggio or after she married him?” I asked.

“We were having trouble before,” Flack Jones told me.

“When was the first fly in the Monroe-Fox ointment?” I asked.

“I don’t know the exact time,” he said. “But it was not peculiar to Monroe alone. It’s peculiar to life in Hollywood. It almost invariably happens when money and success make an impact on a male or female ego. We expect it to set in when the fan mail of the party in question zooms up to over two thousand a week. It’s almost as much of a sure thing as the thermostat in your house turning on the heat. Two thousand fan letters a week is when we begin to say. ‘We’ll be having troubles with this doll.”

“What form does it usually take?” I asked. “‘I want more dough,’ or ‘I don’t like my contract.’ or ‘My script stinks’?”

“A better way to answer your question is to say that when they realize they’ve got weight to throw around, they start throwing it,” Flack Jones said. “They don’t do those things you mentioned right away; they do less serious things first. They complain about wardrobe, or, if it’s a musical, they complain about the songs or the dances, or, if it’s a plain comedy or a straight drama, they gripe about how a certain scene is being directed. Whatever’s handy, that’s what they complain about. It makes no sense, but it’s a means of saying that they have some weight now, and they want you to know it.”

“What’s the next move?” I asked.

Flack Jones rubbed his fingers over his scalp thoughtfully and said, “Ordinarily it’s a preliminary test of strength, like bracing the front office for more dough for your dramatic coach.

“When she found out that she had that much weight, she decided to go out for herself, and she did. Some people think that she has always been a naive, flibbertigibbet girl moving through life. This is utter nonsense. She wasn’t that way when she first was under contract; she was a grown person then. She kept her dates, she was always on time.”

From now on,” Jones said, “what I say is merely my own opinion, but I think that it was then that she discovered that there are people in Hollywood who respect other people who kick their teeth in. That’s not just Hollywood for you. Most people do.”

“Let’s cut to the split-up between Joe and Marilyn,” I said. “As I recall it, first there were rumors of strife, then things reached an impasse.”

“Joe and Marilyn had a rented house on Palm Drive, in Beverly Hills,” Jones said. “We had a unique situation there with the embattled ex-lovebirds both cooped in the same cage. Marilyn was living on the second floor and Joe was camping on the first floor. Then a famous attorney, Jerry Giesler, was brought into the act for Marilyn, although why they had to employ such a great lawyer to handle a simple divorce case I don’t know. The public was all worked up, the press was, too, and they’re circling the house like Indians loping around a wagon tram, waiting for somebody to poke a head out. The next move was Giesler’s announcement that came Wednesday, at eleven o’clock, Marilyn would hold a press conference in his office.

“In the Fox publicity department,” Jones said, “we concluded that if you call a press conference in a lawyer’s office, it presupposes an obligation to say something, and what could Snow White say when she was breaking up with Prince Charming, or Cinderella say when she was splitting from the All-American Boy? Any press conference would only bring more characters out to chase Marilyn from her house to Giesler’s office. And once they got there, if anybody issued one of those ‘They’re just a young couple who couldn’t make a go of it’ statements, it would only irritate everybody.

“So the studio issued a statement of its own in advance. We said that Marilyn wasn’t going to hold any press conference, but she’d be leaving for work at ten o’clock from her house, to fulfill her commitment on Seven Year Itch, based on the Broadway play of the same name and costarring Tom Ewell, in Cinemascope. Once we’d got in that plug, we said that while we didn’t promise an interview, the boys would get some pictures. So forty or fifty of the press congregated. In addition, there were several hundred volunteer reporters and photographers in the trees and trampling the lawn.

“Then an unbelievable thing happened,” Flack Jones said. He grinned when he thought of it. “They were all there to get a picture of Marilyn going to work, because it would be the first picture since her announcement that she wanted a divorce, and all at once, in front of the house a great, big, beautiful automobile pulled up. In it was a friend of Joe’s from San Francisco. As I’ve said, Joe’s been in that house for three days on the first floor, with Marilyn on the second. There was a back alley, and a rejected husband could have snuck out of that back alley and disappeared if he’d wanted to. But Joe faced up to his responsibilities and took them like a man. So what do the press and newsreels get? A bonus! Out of the front door comes Joe, grim-lipped, walking the last long mile, with his pal carrying his suitcase.

“The press stopped him on the lawn, but Joe had no comment to make. They got pictures of him as he climbed into the car slowly, and one guy asked, ‘Where you going, Joe?’

“‘I’m going home,’ Joe said.

“‘We thought this was your home, Joe,’ chirped the press like a Greek chorus.

“San Francisco has always been my home,’ Joe said. He stood there waving farewell, then he drove away.”

Looking at Flack Jones, I could see that he was still marveling at a scene which no press agent would have thought of inventing in his wildest dreams. He said, “I’ve always admired Joe for that. A lot of guys would have sneaked out the back way and gone to San Francisco, avoiding that encounter in the front yard. Not old Joe.

“About ten minutes later, Marilyn came down the stairs, sobbing, on Giesler’s arm. She was all broken up. Everybody was shoving and pushing. A lady columnist kicked the crime reporter for the Los Angeles Mirror in the shins. He turned on her and asked, ‘Who do you think you’re kicking?’ and she said, ‘I’ll kick you in the pants if you don’t get out of my way.’ All in all, there was quite a hubbub. The newsreel guys were grinding away, and somebody asked, ‘How about Joe, Marilyn?’ and Marilyn said, between sobs, ‘1 can’t talk! I can’t!’ And she got in a car and drove off.”

1956-05-19-SEP-pic1  Later, when I talked to Marilyn in New York, I guided our conversation around to a story written by Aline Mosby, of the United Press. The story was about how Marilyn had told her that she had bought Joe a king-size, eight-foot bed because she didn’t approve of separate bedrooms. “People say it’s chic to have separate bedrooms,” Marilyn told me. “That way a man can have a place for his fishing equipment and guns as well as sleeping, and a woman can have a fluffy, ruffly place with rows and rows of perfume bottles. The way I feel, they ought to share the same bedroom. With a separate-bedroom deal, if you happen to think of something you want to say, it means you have to go traipsing down the hall, and you may be tired. For that matter, you may forget what you started out to say. Besides, separate bedrooms are lonely. I think that people need human warmth even when they’re asleep and unconscious.”

There were other things I wanted to ask her. “I’ve heard that in Asphalt Jungle you displayed a highly individual way of walking that called attention to you and made you stand out. I’ve heard a lot of people try to describe the way you walk, and some of those descriptions are pretty lurid. How do you describe it?”

She leaned forward, placed her elbows on a table and cupped her chin in her palms. She was very effective that way. “I’ve never deliberately done anything about the way I walk,” she said. “People say I walk all wiggly and wobbly, but I don’t know what they mean. I just walk. I’ve never wiggled deliberately in my life, but all my life I’ve had trouble with people who say I do. In high school the other girls asked me, ‘Why do you walk down the hall that way?’ I guess the boys must have been watching me and it made the other girls jealous or something, but I said, ‘I learned to walk when I was ten months old, and I’ve been walking this way ever since.’”

In California I had asked Flack Jones, “What would you say Marilyn does best? Is her walk her greatest asset?” Jones regarded the feathery top of a slender, swaying palm tree, as if searching for an answer. “She does two things beautifully,” he said. “She walks and she stands. Also, as I’ve already told you she has wit enough to buy her clothes one or two sizes too small, and with a chassis like hers, this infuriates women and intrigues guys. From a woman’s standpoint, there is no subtlety in such gowns. I remember when Marilyn came to a party. In a number which fitted her like a thin banana peel and the other women there thought it outrageous. Comments were made about that gown in a gossip column.”

“How did Marilyn react to that?” I asked.

“Marilyn asked me, ‘What should I have done?”’ Jones said. “I said, ‘Look, honey, the men loved it. Pay no attention to what the gossip-column cat said. You’re a man’s woman, so dress for men, not for other women. Any time you quit dressing for men you’re out of business.’”

I told Jones that I’d been trying to find a phrase which would describe her walk, but that I hadn’t been able to. “I can’t help you there,” Jones said. “I’ve heard the words ‘quivering’ and ‘trembling’ used in connection with her walk, but I don’t know a description that really does the job. But when she walks across a screen a couple or three times, she attracts attention — a whole lot. That much I know.

“The public laughed at her walk in Niagara,” Jones told me, “but Marilyn was only doing what the director wanted her to. It wasn’t up to her to cut the picture or to tell the director not to point the camera at her during a long walk across cobblestones. I challenge any girl to walkdown a cobblestoned street in high heels without wiggling at least once.”

After his analysis of Marilyn as a pedestrian, Flack Jones picked up our conversational threads where we’d broken them off with her parting from Joe DiMaggio, and tied them together again. “After that she came back and finished Seven Year Itch at Fox,” he said. “Her agent, Charlie Feldman, flung a snazzy party for her at Romanoff’s, and she went to New York. The next thing anybody knew, she announced that, with a New York photographer named Milton Greene, she had formed Marilyn Monroe, Inc. She’s the president of the corporation; Greene’s vice-president. But I have reason to think that she’d done that before she left Hollywood, for a hairdresser at the studio told me that one day when he had Marilyn in front of his mirror, she had said, ‘Gee, I feel good. I’m incorporated.’”

I put it to Jones, “When she left the studio that last time, was it a clean, sharp break or did her relations with the studio gradually become fuzzy and vague?”

“After Itch,” Flack Jones said, “she simply didn’t show up again. I don’t know whether you’d call that sharp or vague.”

I said, when I finally met Marilyn, “The way I get it, you invented a whole new system of holding out; you just disappeared.”

“I disappeared because if people won’t listen to you, there’s no point in talking to people,” Marilyn told me. “You’re just banging your head against a wall. If you can’t do what they want you to do, the thing is to leave. I never got a chance to learn anything in Hollywood. They worked me too fast. They rushed me from one picture into another.

“I know who started all of those stories which were sent out about me after I left Hollywood the last time,” she added. One paper had an editorial about me. It said: ‘Marilyn Monroe is a very stupid girl to give up all the wonderful things the movie industry has done for her and go to New York to learn how to act.’ Those weren’t the exact words, but that was the idea. That editorial was supposed to scare me, but it didn’t, and when I read it and I realized that it wasn’t frightening me, I felt strong. That’s why I know I’m stronger than I was.”

She thought for a while; then she said, “I’m for the individual as opposed to the corporation. The way it is, the individual is the underdog, and with all the things a corporation has going for them an individual comes out banged on her head. The artist is nothing. It’s tragic.”

Going back to a straight question-and-answer routine, I said, “You’re habitually late for appointments. What are the psychological reasons for your lateness?’

“I don’t know,” she said. “I’ve never come to any conclusion. If I knew, I’d get over it.”

I said that I’d heard she was so nervous before appointments that she was sometimes became nauseated. I asked if this was caused by a feeling of pressure — of people pushing and hauling and pulling at her.

“You’d throw up, too, in some situations,” she told me. “I flew into New York at eight o’clock one morning and there were photographers waiting to take pictures of me at the airport, and all that morning I had a series of interviews with newspaper people. Those interviews came twenty minutes or a half hour apart. Then I was rushed to a luncheon with a group of magazine people, and right after luncheon I tore over to the Daily News Building. I don’t think anybody can take that routine very long. Another complication is that I have a certain stupid sincerity. I don’t want to tell everybody who interviews me the same thing. I want them all to have something new, different, exclusive. When I worry about that, I start to get sick at my stomach.”

I asked her if writers had ever prepared material for her to use in an “interview” or in a “by-line story.”

“I refuse to let articles appear in movie magazines signed ‘By Marilyn Monroe,” she said. “I might never see that article and it might be O.K.’d by somebody in the studio. This is wrong, because when I was a little girl I read signed stories in fan magazines and I believed every word of them. Then I tried to model my life after the lives of the stars I read about. If I’m going to have that kind of influence, I want to be sure it’s because of something I’ve actually said or written.”

“I’ve been told that you devote hours to selecting and editing pinup pictures of yourself,” I said.

“I haven’t so far,” she told me. “But maybe it’s time I did. At least I’d like to have my pictures not look any worse than I do. I’d like them to resemble me a little bit. With some photographers, all they ask is that a picture doesn’t look blurred, as if you’ve moved while they were taking it. If it’s not blurry they print it.”

“Somewhere,” I said, “I’ve read that at least half of the photographs taken of you are killed because they are too revealing.”

“That’s the Johnston Office for you,” she sighed. “They’re very small about stuff like that, and what the Johnston Office passes, the studio ruins with retouching. After one sitting of thirty poses, twenty-eight of those poses were killed. The Johnston Office spends a lot of time worrying about whether a girl has cleavage or not. They ought to worry if she doesn’t have any. That really would make people emotionally disturbed. I don’t know what their reasoning is,” she went on with a puzzled air. “They certainly can’t expect girls to look like boys.”

“I’ve read that your measurements are 37-23-34,” I told her.

“If you’re talking about my lower hips, they’re thirty-seven inches,” she said. “If you’re talking about my upper hips, they’re thirty-four.” Eying her, I tried to decide where “upper” hip left off and “lower” began. I gave up.

“Nowadays,” she said, “there’s a vogue for women with twenty-twenty-twenty figures. Models in the high-style magazines stick out their hipbones and nothing else. But I’m a woman, and the longer I am one the more I enjoy it. And since I have to be a woman, I’m glad I’m me. I’ve been asked, ‘Do you mind living in a man’s world?’ I answer, ‘Not as long as I can be a woman in it.’”

“There’s another thing I want to ask you,” I said. “It’s about something you said to a man in the Fox Studio legal department. You said, ‘I don’t care about money. I just want to be wonderful.’ He didn’t know what you meant by that.”

“I meant that I want to be a real actress instead of a superficial one,” Marilyn herself told me. “For the first time I’m learning to use myself fully as an actress. I want to add something to what I had before. I want to be in the kind of pictures where I can develop, not just wear tights. Some people thought that they were getting their money’s worth when they saw me in The Seven Year Itch, but in future I want people to get even more for their money when they see me. Only today a taxi driver said to me, ‘Why did they ever put you in that little stinker, River of No Return?’

“I thought it was a good question,” Marilyn told me. “I’m with that taxi driver. He’s my boy. Knowing what I know now, I wouldn’t accept River of No Return today. I think that I deserve a better deal than a Z cowboy movie, in which the acting finishes third to the scenery and CinemaScope. The studio was CinemaScope-conscious then, and that meant that it pushed the scenery instead of actors and actresses.” Without missing a beat, she switched gears into another subject. “One of the things about leaving Hollywood and coming to New York and attending the Actors’ Studio was that I felt that I could be more myself,” she said. “After all, if I can’t be myself, who can I be?” I shook my head. She had me puzzled too.

Nunnally Johnson had directed How to Marry a Millionaire, costarring Betty Grable, Lauren Bacall and Marilyn. “Do her pictures make a lot of money?” I asked him in Hollywood.

“Millionaire earned a tremendous amount,” Nunnally told me.

“What about The Seven Year Itch?” I asked.

“Variety reports it as the top Fox grosser for 1955,” he said. “But speaking for myself, I can’t say that I saw the ‘new Marilyn Monroe’ in The Seven Year Itch that some others did. I thought that essentially it was the same performance, just longer. Still, this could scarcely be a cause for worry for her; God had given her that equipment and it was still magnificent. She was still a phenomenon.”

“Maybe she’ll grow into a young Mae West and make people laugh at sex,” I suggested.

Johnson agreed that it might be a good thing if she could do that. “I believe that the first time anybody genuinely liked Marilyn for herself, in a picture, was in How to Marry a Millionaire,” he said. “She herself diagnosed the reason for that very shrewdly, I think. She said that this was the only picture she’d been in in which she had a measure of modesty. Not physical modesty, but modesty about her own attractiveness. In Millionaire she was nearsighted; she didn’t think men would look at her twice, because she wore glasses; she blundered into walls and stumbled into things and she was most disarming. In the course of the plot she married an astigmatic; so there they were, a couple of astigmatic lovers. In her other pictures they’ve cast her as a somewhat arrogant sex trap, but when Millionaire was released, I heard people say, ‘Why, I really liked her!’ in surprised tones.”

These comments of Johnson’s were made before Marilyn was enlightened by exposure to the Actors’ Studio. Upon her return from New York to work at Fox in Bus Stop, Johnson did see a “new Marilyn Monroe.”

“In contrast to the old Marilyn, in her present incarnation she is a liberated soul, happy, co-operative, friendly, relaxed,” he wrote me. “Actually, it is as if she had undergone a psychoanalysis so successful that the analyst himself was flabbergasted. Now she’s different; her behavior and her manner as a member of the social order are O.K. As for her acting, that remains to be seen.”

I told Marilyn that I had read an Associated Press story which estimated that her newest contract — scheduled to run for seven years — would bring her more than $8,000,000. When I mentioned this, she said, “Eight million dollars is a lot. However, no matter what they tell you, it’s not for money alone that I’m going back to Hollywood. I am free to make as many pictures for my own company as I do for Fox, and I can do TV and stage shows.”

Among others I’d talked to about Marilyn, before discussing her with herself, was Milton H. Greene, the New York photographer who’d become vice president of Marilyn Monroe Productions.

“I don’t know where they got that figure eight million, either,” Greene had told me. “Not from me or Marilyn.” He went on, “I don’t ask you what you make, do I? Everybody wants an exclusive release or an exclusive interview with Marilyn on the subject, and I want everybody to be happy, but things like that are confidential.”

Like Marilyn, Greene asked me not to use a tape-recording machine when interviewing him. “Makes me stutter,” he said. So, carefully, laboriously, and word for word, I wrote down everything he said to me. While doing it, I noticed no signs of stuttering. Evidently a notebook and pencils didn’t bother him. Greene had also asked me to put the initial “H” in his name, making it Milton H. Greene. “Would you mind very much?” he said. “There’re other Milton Greenes who are also in the photography business.”

He had met Marilyn when he had gone to California to do a series of photographs of Grace Kelly, Elizabeth Taylor, Jean Simmons and Marilyn Monroe. It hadn’t been his idea to do anything too sexy. “After all,” he said, “in a national magazine you can only expose so much of a girl, even if the girl is willing. Marilyn turned out to be different from what I thought she’d be. More sensitive.”

Greene had gone to California on a second assignment, and had begun to think of doing a book of photographs of Marilyn. “The book isn’t out yet,” he said, “but I’ll show you a few of the pictures I made for it. It will be Marilyn in different moods and settings, as if she were playing different parts.” He went to a shelf and brought back a box of aluminum squares. Each square contained a color transparency. “Here’s one where she looks as if she’s in England,” he said. “As you can see, she’s wearing an Edwardian hat. Here’s one where she looks like Bernadette in The Song of Bernadette.” I looked at that one for a long time. It was, I thought, a novel idea.

Milton H. Greene watched me write down what he’d said in my notebook; then he went off on a slight tangent. “One day I plan to do a cookbook for dogs,” he said. “It would contain dog-dish recipes. I think it would be amusing.” I brought him back from his dog cookbook project to his association with Marilyn. “In Hollywood,” he said, “we got to talking. This was after she’d made Seven Year Itch and after her divorce from Joe, and I told her that I hoped to go into television and theatrical production. I found that all Marilyn wants is to make just enough money to be able to afford to make good pictures. That’s the way I feel about it, too, so Marilyn Monroe Productions hopes to buy a good story property; then approach the right studio about making and distributing the picture.”

He stood up, walked around his office and came back to his chair. “If Marilyn had been only interested in making money,” he said, “she wouldn’t have been interested in me.”

When I asked Marilyn to tell me about her association with the Actors’ Studio, she said that she not only attended classes there, but had also had private lessons from Lee Strasberg and his wife, who are the mainsprings of the project.

Greene told me, “Marlon Brando, Jimmy Dean, Kim Stanley, Julie Harris and Montgomery Clift all studied under the Strasbergs. Marilyn observes, studies and watches. She listens to lectures. Occasionally she is allowed to take part.”

The Actors’ Studio lets interested people like Marilyn sit in on an informal, guest basis. She is not an officially enrolled student member of the Actors’ Studio, because you are not admitted there on that basis unless you have contributed something notable on the stage in a performance or have passed a series of exacting auditions. Just wanting to be in isn’t enough. This is very smart of the Strasbergs, because it eliminates all those who are without talent; otherwise the studio would be full of women all seven feet tall and all trying to be actresses.

I said to Marilyn that I’d heard she’d spent some time with Terence Rattigan, the British playwright, discussing the screenplay he was adapting for her from his London stage success, The Sleeping Prince, a vehicle in which Sir Laurence Olivier had played the prince. Sir Laurence had also agreed to play the same role opposite Marilyn and also to direct the film. “I had a bad cold the evening I spent with Mr. Rattigan, and he said I sounded like Tallulah Bankhead,” Marilyn told me proudly. Then she added thoughtfully, “Mr. Rattigan is young, but not too young.”

I asked her what she meant. She smiled and said, “I guess you want me to say over twelve and not quite ninety. I don’t know how old Mr. Rattigan is. I’d say he’s kind of ageless.”

I asked her to give me a hint of the story line followed by The Sleeping Prince. “I’m an American chorus girl in London, in it,” she said, “and the regent of a foreign country notices me and asks me to a reception at his country’s legation. I wriggle into my only formal and go, only it turns out it’s not a large gathering at all. In fact, it’s the same stale bit that’s been tried out on girls for the last three thousand years: dinner for two, candles, wine and soft music, when she’s expecting other guests. The next thing I know, I’ve had too much champagne and I’ve passed out. I won’t tell you any more. You ought to be willing to spend money to find out what happens next.

“The truth is,” she said, “the plot is about a man who’s been asleep — at least his emotional something or other has been asleep — but little by little a relationship builds up between him and this American chorus girl, and he begins to stir in his sleep, as you might say. He’s a married man, but that doesn’t complicate things because he’s sophisticated about the whole deal. Terence Rattigan describes it as ‘an occasional fairy tale or a comedy with serious overtones.’”

Weeks before, when I’d talked to Billy Wilder about Marilyn, I’d said to him, “I should think it would take a great deal of mature mental and moral strength to cope with becoming an enormous success overnight. It must be unsettling to suddenly become a sex symbol known all over the world.”

Wilder replied, “It’s my opinion that she’s basically a good girl, but what’s happened to her is enough to drive almost anybody slightly daffy, even someone who is armored with poise and calmness by his background and bringing up. You take a girl like Marilyn, who’s never really had a chance to learn, who’s never really had a chance to live, and suddenly confront her with a Frankenstein’s monster of herself built of fame and publicity and notoriety, and naturally she’s a little mixed up and made giddy by it all. However, I’d like to go on record with this: I worked with her in Seven Year Itch and I had a good time with her. She was seldom on time, but it wasn’t because she overslept. It was because she had to force herself to come to the studio. She’s emotionally upset all the time; she’s scared and unsure of herself — so much so that when I worked with her I found myself wishing that I were a psychoanalyst and she were my patient. It might be that I couldn’t have helped her, but she would have looked lovely on a couch.”

“You mean you didn’t get annoyed when she was late?” I asked.

“I understood the reasons for it,” Wilder told me. “There was no use getting annoyed. Even at the beginning, when I discovered that I had let myself in for a certain amount of trouble, I found myself liking her. At no time did I find her malicious, mean, capricious or anything but conscientious. There are certain urges and drives in her which make her different, but, as a director, I think it worth combating those things and living with them in order to work with her.”

I found myself hoping that Josh Logan, who will direct her in her next picture, the filmed version of Bus Stop, and Buddy Adler, the producer who bought that play for Fox, would feel the same way about her Wilder feels. That’s what she does to you. In spite of her spells of procrastination carried to fantastic lengths, in spite of her verbal convolutions, you wind up liking her.

By “her” I mean, of course, all of the various Marilyn Monroes — and there are several of them. There is the sexpot Marilyn Monroe; she’s the one who tries so hard to live up to the legend of her sexiness that even her own stomach sometimes can’t take it. Then there’s the frightened Marilyn Monroe, product of a broken home and a battered childhood — a girl named Mortenson who still can’t believe that she’s that girl on the screen they’re making all the fuss about. And last of all there is “The New Marilyn Monroe” — the one who is supposed to have emerged from the Actors’ Studio as a composed and studied performer, “having achieved growth” and “developed more.”

Somehow, as I neared the end of my interview, I found myself wondering if people would accept her as the new and different Marilyn Monroe she thinks she is. I had heard one man say, “Even if you hung Ethel Barrymore’s and Helen Hayes’ talent on Marilyn’s beautiful body, people wouldn’t take her acting seriously.”

To my surprise, I realized that I was dreading the possibility that when she turned on her new brand of acting, audiences might laugh at her, as they laughed at Zasu Pitts when she went in for “heavy drahma” after a lifetime as a comedienne.

“It doesn’t scare me,” Marilyn told me bravely, when I mentioned my fears. “If I have the same things I had before I started to go to the Actors’ Studio and I’ve added more — well, how can I lose?”

Whether she has really “added more” or not, I don’t know. But, as she herself points out, she does — emphatically — still have the same things she had before. My guess is that they’re still negotiable at the box office.


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by Saturday Evening Post.

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22 janvier 2017

1955, New York, Gladstone Hotel

Marilyn Monroe quitte le Gladstone Hotel de New York - vers 1955
Marilyn Monroe leaves the Gladstone Hotel, in New York City - circa 1955

 1955-ny-gladstone_hotel-snap-03-1  1955-ny-gladstone_hotel-snap-01-1  

> Marilyn et Joe DiMaggio
1955-ny-gladstone_hotel-snap-02-with_joe-1 


1955-01-ny-gladstone_hotel-snap-01-1  1955-01-ny-gladstone_hotel-snap-01-2 
1955-ny-gladstone_hotel-snap-collection_frieda_hull-1 
- de la collection de Frieda Hull, une fan des Monroe Six

-from the personal collection of Frieda Hull, one of the 'Monroe Six'


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand. 

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15 janvier 2017

The Lost Footage of Marilyn Monroe

 logo_thenytimes   The Lost Footage of Marilyn Monroe
That film image of Ms. Monroe’s skirt rising high in a gust of air? It’s a reshoot of a discarded and more risqué scene seldom seen until now.

published in January 13, 2017
by HELENE STAPINSKIJAN
en ligne sur nytimes.com

thenytimes-01-15MARILYN2-superJumbo 
A still of Marilyn Monroe filming “The Seven Year Itch” on the Upper East Side from the found footage of Jules Schulback, a furrier and avid taker of home movies.
 Credit Jules Schulback, via Bonnie Siegler

It happened one night in the late summer of 1954.
Jules Schulback, a New York furrier and taker of home movies, heard that Marilyn Monroe would be on the Upper East Side of Manhattan filming scenes again for her new picture, “The Seven Year Itch.” Two days earlier, Mr. Schulback had taken footage of her with his 16-millimeter Bolex movie camera around the corner from his townhouse apartment.

So he grabbed the camera — the one usually used for family picnics and parades and the stuff of everyday life — and headed over to the subway grate in front of Wright’s Food shop, just down the street from the Trans-Lux movie theater on Lexington Avenue and 52nd Street.
Though it was around 1 a.m., a large crowd had already gathered, mostly newspaper photographers and curious men waiting to see Marilyn. The movie studio and the director, Billy Wilder, had counted on this, inviting the press and the public to drum up buzz for the new movie, which starred Ms. Monroe as “the Girl Upstairs,” who entices a middle-aged executive, played by Tom Ewell, while his wife is away with the kids for the summer.

thenytimes-02-15MARILYN1-master675 
Mr. Schulback captured Billy Wilder, the director of “The Seven Year Itch,”
with Ms. Monroe in the background in her famous dress,
accessorized by a white clutch and a red-and-white scarf.
Credit Jules Schulback, via Bonnie Siegler 

In the famous street scene, the two are leaving the movies as Ms. Monroe pauses over a grate to enjoy the breeze from the subway as it blows up her dress on a hot summer night. “Isn’t it delicious ?” she purrs. The breeze came from a large fan under the grate operated by the film’s special effects chief. The night — Sept. 15 — was actually quite chilly. But the stunt worked. It became known as “the shot seen around the world.”

But there was a dark subtext to the comedy. Gathered at that late hour were hundreds of gawkers, almost all men, who catcalled and yelled things like, “Higher! Higher !” as Ms. Monroe’s dress blew up over her head. For two hours, the men watched from surrounding buildings and from the street.

Unfortunately, one of them was her husband, Joe DiMaggio,” Mr. Wilder is quoted as saying in his biography, “Nobody’s Perfect.” “And he didn’t like what he saw, or what everyone else was seeing.
Mr. DiMaggio hadn’t planned on visiting the set that night, and was waiting for his wife at the St. Regis Hotel, where the couple were staying. But the columnist Walter Winchell had persuaded him to come along. Ms. Monroe was not happy her husband had shown up. But he was even more unhappy and angrily stormed off. Later that night the couple had a screaming fight in their room. The next morning, her hairdresser covered up Ms. Monroe’s bruises with makeup. Three weeks later, Ms. Monroe filed for divorce.

Mr. Wilder never used the Lexington Avenue footage and reshot the scene on a closed lot in Hollywood, though photographs of that night appeared everywhere. Except for some brief, grainy shots from a newsreel covering the divorce, footage from that night was never screened.
The footage immediately disappeared,” Mr. Wilder said in the biography. “But one day I’m sure some film scholar will dig it up.


A filmstrip discovered in a shopping bag filled with home movies offers a rare glimpse of
Marilyn Monroe in color in New York.
By JULES SCHULBACK, VIA BONNIE SIEGLER

The story of the night Marilyn Monroe’s white halter-top dress blew up was well known among Jules Schulback’s children, and even among his grandchildren. His granddaughter Bonnie Siegler said he bragged from time to time about his personal film shoot with Marilyn.
He was a real raconteur,” said Ms. Siegler, a graphic designer who runs her own company, Eight and a Half. “I didn’t know if the story was real.” But even though she had never seen it, she often told people that her grandfather had footage of Marilyn Monroe on the subway grate.

Ms. Siegler’s older sister, Rayna Dineen, said her grandfather, whom they called Opi (a German term of endearment), was rarely without his camera. “He would be filming everywhere, all the time.” There were reels of vacations, family picnics, birthday parties and bar mitzvahs. He had even filmed a 12-minute day in the life of his daughters, depicting them waking up, brushing their teeth and going to school.
But the Marilyn story was one of his favorite stories to tell,” Ms. Dineen said.
It was just one of dozens of amazing tales. Mr. Schulback had a long, technicolorful life, one so filled with drama that his Monroe story sometimes seemed like a footnote.

In 1938, Mr. Schulback had argued with his family in Germany that Adolf Hitler was much more dangerous than anyone thought. According to Ms. Siegler, his family believed that Hitler’s hate speech was simply rhetoric, and that he wouldn’t act on anything he was saying. Mr. Schulback, 25 at the time, urged them to pack their bags and leave Berlin with him. But they resisted, opting to wait and see how things developed, never imagining the horror that awaited them and millions of other European Jews.
Mr. Schulback was not taking any chances.

thenytimes-0315MARILYN5-blog427 Mr. Schulback was a furrier by trade. He chronicled his family and the odd serendipitous moment in his neighborhood — such as Marilyn Monroe on location — with his 16-millimeter Bolex movie camera.

In 1938, Jews immigrating to the United States needed a sponsor, someone to take financial responsibility for them. Mr. Schulback sold everything he had, bought an expensive suit, booked passage on the Queen Mary, reserved a room at the Plaza and headed to America to find a sponsor for him and his wife, Edith, and their daughter Helen, who was then a toddler.

He was like: ‘I’m your lost, rich relative. I won’t be a burden.’ But he had no money. He played it,” Ms. Siegler said. He secured a signature, then returned to collect his family, but was stopped trying to enter Nazi Germany by a suspicious border guard. Knowing the Germans were big fans of the 1934 Clark Gable hit, “It Happened One Night,” Mr. Schulback told the guard he was the distributor for Mr. Gable’s new movie. He claimed that if he couldn’t enter the country, neither would the film. “The guy was like, ‘Oh, we love Clark Gable,’ and waved him through,” Ms. Siegler said.

Mr. Schulback grabbed Edith and Helen, again imploring his other relatives to leave, and escaped back to the United States with a few suitcases, claiming to the Nazi immigration officers that his family was going on vacation. The date was Nov. 8, the day before Kristallnacht.

In Berlin, he had been a furrier, and his shop was destroyed that night. His remaining family — four sisters, parents and in-laws — would all perish in the Holocaust.
The United States was good to Mr. Schulback. He and his family lived a happy, successful life in New York, much of it preserved in his home movies.

As a child, Ms. Siegler loved going to her grandfather’s Upper East Side apartment not just because of his great stories and sense of humor, but also because he lived opposite the New York Doll Hospital. From his apartment window, she could see the buckets of doll eyes and doll arms. “It was really intense,” she said.

When Edith had a stroke in the 1970s, she was given only a few weeks to live. But Mr. Schulback, always a man of action, refused to let his wife die in the hospital and took her home. The couple moved into the ground-floor apartment of a building around the corner, and Mr. Schulback became her nurse. “Half her body was paralyzed, she couldn’t speak,” Ms. Siegler said. “But he loved her and took care of her for 26 years until she finally died.

After 35 years in that same apartment, Mr. Schulback — who had been president of the 61st Street Block Association — was forced to leave. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation had bought the townhouse where he lived and the one behind it and wanted to reconfigure the property. So Ms. Siegler and her husband, Jeff Scher, helped move her 92-year-old grandfather to a new place on the other side of Central Park.

thenytime-04-15MARILYN6-superJumbo 
Bonnie Siegler examines film of Ms. Monroe taken by Mr. Schulback,
who was her grandfather, over a light box in her studio.
Credit Ryan Christopher Jones for The New York Times
 

In 2004, in the arduous packing up of Mr. Schulback’s home, the couple came across a big stash of film. It was stored in a back room that the family called “Opi’s fur room,” where Mr. Schulback had once assembled garments from animal pelts for his business. “No one ever wanted to go back there,” Ms. Siegler said. “But when we went in, we found this plastic bag filled with just tons of film, home movies, bought movies and everything mixed together.

Ms. Siegler’s husband, an experimental filmmaker, couldn’t wait to screen the films. He was particularly interested in seeing whether Marilyn and the subway grate footage actually existed. “It was like this family myth,” Mr. Scher said. “So long rumored and never confirmed.”

The same was true for its source material. For decades, innuendo swirled around the Lexington Avenue shoot for “The Seven Year Itch.” Ms. Monroe and Mr. DiMaggio had married that January and had already had a bumpy ride, the Yankee Clipper enraged by her exhibitionism and by rumors of infidelity, according to Lois W. Banner, the author of the 2012 biography “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox.”
She was having an affair with her musical director at the time, and everyone knew about it in the business,” said Dr. Banner, a professor emeritus of history and gender studies at the University of Southern California. So before he even arrived on set, there was tension. “DiMaggio,” Dr. Banner said, “was not happy with Marilyn.”

There are several theories as to why the footage from that night was never used. Some believe the Manhattan shoot was done purely as a publicity stunt, which was made even more sensational when Mr. DiMaggio showed up. Some biographers say the enthusiastic crowd was just too noisy, making the film unusable.
A third theory was that the footage was too risqué and Ms. Monroe wanted to shoot a more demure version, so as not to further infuriate her husband. There was even talk at the time that she wasn’t wearing any underwear. Mr. Wilder tried to put those rumors to rest in his biography. She had put on not just one, but two sets of underwear, he said.

 thenytimes-05-15MARILYN3-master675 
Before the billowing-skirt scene, Mr. Schulback filmed Ms. Monroe in a terry robe
greeting fans and members of the press on the stoop of 164 East 61st Street.

Credit Jules Schulback, via Bonnie Siegler

Dr. Banner said all three reasons quite likely played into the final decision to reshoot. “But the photographs of that night had gone viral by the time the film was being put together,” she said, “and played a great role in her fame.” The skirt-blowing scene used in the finished film is incredibly brief and tame. The image many people have of that moment comes from the press shots and publicity stills in New York, and not from the finished movie.

Back in the pelt room of Mr. Schulback’s apartment, Mr. Scher excitedly gathered up the old metal film canisters. None were labeled, Mr. Scher recalled. Some of the film was off the reel and sitting there like big balls of spaghetti, as if there had been a projector mishap years ago.
Later that night in his studio in the couple’s apartment on West 16th Street, Mr. Scher slowly and carefully wound the film, since some of it was very brittle and in danger of breaking. He did a few repairs and then began looking at it using a light box, spooling it from reel to reel by hand. There were about 50 rolls of 16-millimeter film and around 75 rolls of 8 millimeter.
There were the family outings and parades. The birthdays and bar mitzvahs.
And there, amid the mundane scenes of precious everyday life, was Marilyn Monroe, in crisp, colorful Kodachrome. “This stuff just popped out,” Mr. Scher said. “It was real! Preserved like the home movies are, too. Just these moments in time.”
Mr. Scher could clearly see the actress’s dress billowing up. “Like a parachute with a pair of legs attached,” he said. “It was startling. Like seeing a myth materialize.”
It was a shadow version of lost footage amid home movies of a family that almost certainly wouldn’t have existed had the Schulbacks stayed in Germany.

thenytimes-06-15MARILYN4-superJumbo-v2  
Ms. Siegler zeroing in to Ms. Monroe by using a photographer’s loupe.
The Schulback footage has been seldom seen since it was taken in 1954.
Credit Ryan Christopher Jones for The New York Times

Mr. Scher called out to his wife: “It’s really here!” They watched all 3 minutes 17 seconds in amazement.
There was something so magical about it,” Ms. Siegler said. “For years I didn’t know if it was real. I certainly didn’t believe it wholeheartedly. And there it was. It was like the end of the story.
The film starts with a spliced-in intertitle that reads “World Premiere,” Mr. Schulback’s little inside joke.

And then there is Marilyn Monroe, in a white terry robe, coming down the stoop of a white-shuttered building at 164 East 61st Street, between Lexington and Third Avenues. It was the earlier scene — before the subway grate footage — that Mr. Schulback had shot. Cameramen and press photographers are gathered outside as the actress smiles and waves.

Cut to Ms. Monroe in a second-floor window wearing a slip and blow-drying her hair. Mr. Ewell walks down the street and into the building. The film cuts inexplicably to 30 seconds of what must be a Shriners parade in Manhattan, then jumps to another intertitle, which reads “Our Baby.”

And suddenly, there is Ms. Monroe again, this time on the subway grate in that famously fluttering white dress, holding a matching white clutch in her right hand and a red-and-white-striped scarf in her left.

Mr. Schulback was incredibly close, filming right behind Mr. Wilder’s shoulder, stopping to wind his hand-held camera every 25 seconds. Now and then, a silhouette of the director’s arm intrudes into Mr. Schulback’s crystal-clear shot. At one point Mr. Wilder, in a fedora, passes across the frame. Ms. Monroe gets into position and yawns, while the cinematographer sets up the camera. Through a gap in the film crew, Mr. Schulback captures just her face, looking off to the left, serious and unsmiling.

thenytimes-07-15MONROE1-master675-v2 
 Another skirt-goes-wild still from the Schulback footage.
Credit Jules Schulback, via Bonnie Siegler

Then Mr. Ewell is there, chatting with Ms. Monroe, who pushes him into position. The dress flutters again, Ms. Monroe holds it down, bending slightly, smiling and talking to Mr. Ewell, but it flutters up some more and she laughs, her head thrown back. It blows up again, but she doesn’t push it down this time, and it flies up over her head, clearly revealing two pairs of underwear that, because of the bright lights, do not protect Ms. Monroe’s modesty quite as much as she might have liked.

Then, as suddenly as she appeared, Marilyn is gone, and the film reverts to home-movie mode: Edith Schulback walking on the grass at a family outing in the country. It’s like being shaken from some crazy dream, back to reality.
Interest in that moment in film history from more than 50 years ago endures. The new movie musical starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, “La La Land,” makes brief filmic reference to it in the opening number, with a young dancer’s yellow dress blowing up. And a Snickers commercial from the Super Bowl last year stars Willem Dafoe, Eugene Levy and a computer-generated Monroe on the famous set. “It’s that iconic image,” said Dr. Banner, the Monroe biographer. “People are still fascinated by the context in which it all happened.”

After screening the film with her husband, Ms. Siegler immediately told her grandfather that she had found the footage. “I was so excited about it — more for the reason that his story was true.” She shrugged. “But he never had any doubts.” Mr. Schulback moved in 2005 and died six months later.
Ms. Siegler and Mr. Scher made a print and screened it for about 100 people in 2004 at the upstate home of their friends Kurt Andersen and his wife, Anne Kreamer. The two couples had started a small film festival for neighbors and friends, hanging a sheet on the side of a barn and serving popcorn, ice pops and beer.

The people in the audience that summer night had no idea what they were in for.
That scene is one of the most iconic scenes in American cinema,” said Mr. Andersen, an author, radio host and a founder of Spy magazine. “So to have film of it actually being shot, it’s like watching the Zapruder film. It’s just extraordinary.
The crowd that evening sat in silence as Marilyn Monroe’s dress blew up on the side of the barn. “People were gob-smacked,” Mr. Andersen said. “They were like, ‘What did I just see ?’”

That was the only time anyone outside the family had seen the film. Until now.

Correction: January 13, 2017 
 An earlier version of this article misspelled the surname of the writer who screened the Marilyn Monroe home movie in his backyard. He is Kurt Andersen, not Anderson


 > video 1

> video 2 (plans en rapproché)

captures
1954-09-13-ny-tsyi-set-cap_by_jules_schulback-02-4 1954-09-13-ny-tsyi-set-cap_by_jules_schulback-01-3 1954-09-15-ny-tsyi-set-cap_by_jules_schulback-01-3 
> captures dans les articles du blog:
screen caps on the articles in the blog:
13/09/1954 Sur le tournage de The Seven Year Itch 15 - partie 2
13/09/1954 Sur le tournage de The Seven Year Itch 15 - partie 1
15/09/1954 NYC - Sur le tournage de The Seven Year Itch scène 11


09 novembre 2016

Marilyn Monroe Auction - 11/2016 - photos 1 -snapshots


 Photographies - Instantanés en public & privé
Photographs - Public & Private Snapshots


Lot 197: MARILYN MONROE AND ELI WALLACH SNAPSHOTS
 Three vintage black and white glossy photographs of Monroe, two with Eli Wallach, at a party in the late 1950s. Two images have creases from being folded, and one has distortion in the emulsion of the photo paper.
3 1/4 by 4 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $700 - $900
245417_0 


Lot 209: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS OF JOE DIMAGGIO
 A group of 17color snapshots likely taken by Monroe while relaxing in Canada with Joe DiMaggio during filming of River of No Return in 1953. Six images feature DiMaggio on a boat and against scenic backdrops. Four images feature an elk; six feature scenic views. Two images feature Jean Negulesco, who was uncredited for his work on the film.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500 
245435_0  245436_0  


Lot 267: MARILYN MONROE OWNED PHOTOGRAPHS OF ARTHUR MILLER
 Five images of the famous American author and then husband of Monroe: a vintage candid photo of Miller as a young man, a photograph of Miller playing baseball, two smaller photographs of Miller by David Gahr with photographer's stamp on verso, and a snapshot of Monroe and Miller as they attended a ceremony to receive the American Friends of the Hebrew University award in Philadelphia September 27, 1959.
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245540_0 245541_0 245542_0 


Lot 315: MARILYN MONROE SNAPSHOTS
 Three vintage black and white glossy photographs of Monroe playing badminton with Hedda and Norman Rosten in Amagansett, New York, 1955.
3 1/2 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245632_0 


Lot 317: MARILYN MONROE PARAKEET PHOTOGRAPHS
 Four color snapshots of pet parakeets including Butch, a pet parakeet kept by Monroe and Arthur Miller. The images are stamped with a date of October 1958. Additional birds named Bobo, Clyde, and another illegibly named in the margin are visible in the photographs.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245634_0  


Lot 496: PHOTOGRAPH OF MARILYN MONROE WITH MAF
 A small trimmed color photograph of Monroe holding Maf, her poodle, with super fan and friend of Monroe James Haspiel taken in June 1961. The photograph was printed subsequently in December of the same year.
2 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245907_0  


Lot 498: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS OF MAF
 Two small color snapshots of Monroe's pet Maltese Maf, short for Mafia, a gift from Frank Sinatra.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245911_0  


Lot 572: MARILYN MONROE INCOGNITO SNAPSHOT
 A small color snapshot of Monroe wearing a brunette wig and scarf around her head in disguise. A number of stories have been told regarding Monroe dressing in a brunette wig and going out to bars to see how men responded to her when she wasn't "being" Marilyn. This image documents Monroe as she appeared in a brunette disguise.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246010_0  


Lot 587: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS OF FIFTH HELENA DRIVE PROPERTY
 A group of four vintage black and white photographs, most likely of the kitchen and laundry room of the guest house at Monroe's Fifth Helena Drive property prior to her renovations and decorating.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246061_0   


Lot 627: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1953. In the photographs, Monroe wears her costume from the thriller Niagara (20th Century, 1953). One image is marked on verso "Leaving the El Capitan Theater."
Largest, 5 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246113_0 


Lot 633: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1953, with "La Rue Restaurant" inscribed on verso of three of the images. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246121_0 


Lot 635: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1953. One photograph is marked on verso "In front of the Mocambo,” and two are marked "Mocambo Club." All are likely never before seen images of Monroe.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246123_0 


Lot 643: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on September 9, 1954, the same day she was interviewed by Ed Wallace at the St. Regis Hotel in New York City. This lot contains three color and four black and white photographs.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246133_0  247267_0 


Lot 644: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of three color slides of Marilyn Monroe from September 9, 1954, the day she was interviewed by Ed Wallace at the St. Regis Hotel in New York City.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246134_0   


Lot 645: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken with a young fan, likely in New York City, circa 1954.
5 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246135_0   


Lot 650: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe in New York City from September 12, 1954, one of which includes superfan James Haspiel. Monroe had arrived days earlier to film The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). This lot includes one color photograph and four black and white photographs, some possibly never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 7 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $400 - $600
246142_0  246143_0 


Lot 656: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on November 6, 1954, at a party thrown for Monroe at Romanoff’s restaurant in Beverly Hills to mark the end of shooting for The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955).
3 3/4 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246149_0 


Lot 658: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on various occasions, circa 1955. Most images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246153_0  247269_0  


Lot 659: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955. One photograph shows Monroe leaving the Gladstone Hotel in New York City; the other shows her with husband Joe DiMaggio in the background. Both images are possibly never before seen.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246154_0 


Lot 660: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 15 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955, taken in front of the Gladstone Hotel in New York City. Some images show her with her press agent Jay Kantor. Several images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 7 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,400 - $1,600
246155_0 247270_0 


Lot 661: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED SNAPSHOT
 A black and white snapshot of Marilyn Monroe driving a car and posing through the driver's side window taken in the mid-1950s. The image is signed in blue ballpoint pen "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246156_0   


Lot 662: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of six original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken at a party she attended with friend and Hollywood reporter Sidney Skolsky. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246157_0 


Lot 666: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original Marilyn Monroe color photographs that show Monroe seated in the backseat of a vehicle, circa January 1955.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $200 - $400
246161_0  


Lot 668: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe; one reads "1/55" on verso, believed to have been taken on January 26, 1955, at the Gladstone Hotel.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246163_0 


Lot 671: MARILYN MONROE COLOR PHOTOGRAPH
 An original color photograph of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955, from when she attended Skin of Our Teeth at the ANTA Theatre in New York City. "Skin Of Our Teeth/Anta Theatre" is written in pencil on verso. This play, written by Thornton Wilder, opened in New York on August 17, 1955, and starred Helen Hayes, George Abbott, Mary Martin, and Florence Reed. The director was Alan Schneider.
5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246169_0 


Lot 672: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe, possibly taken on September 7, 1955, when she was going to a birthday party for Elia Kazan that had been organized by the Actors Studio. This is likely a never before seen photograph of Monroe.
5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246170_0 


Lot 673: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955, showing her in the driver's seat of a convertible wearing sunglasses. It is a candid image of Monroe "caught in the moment."
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246171_0


Lot 674: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of five slides of Marilyn Monroe, from various events, circa 1955.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246172_0   


Lot 675: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine color original photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955. Monroe is shown smiling and laughing and signing autographs for fans. Several images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,000
246173_0  247274_0 


Lot 677: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 wearing a black gown, white fur and white evening gloves. The photo is signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246175_0  


Lot 678: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 wearing a black gown and white fur. The photo is signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246176_0 


Lot 679: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 wearing a black gown, white fur and black evening gloves, signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246177_0 


Lot 680: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide showing Marilyn Monroe in New York City, circa 1955, signing autographs for fans.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246178_0   


Lot 681: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of five slides of Marilyn Monroe, from various events, circa 1955.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246179_0   


Lot 682: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955, likely taken in front of the Gladstone Hotel in New York City. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,000
246180_0 247275_0   


Lot 683: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 26, 1955, when she attended Jackie Gleason's birthday party with husband Joe DiMaggio. This lot contains four black and white photographs and one color photograph. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246181_0  246182_0 


Lot 684: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 26, 1955, when she attended Jackie Gleason’s birthday party with husband Joe DiMaggio. The photo is signed in blue ink “Marilyn Monroe.” The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the “Monroe Six,” a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246183_0 


Lot 685: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955, from an unidentified event. One image shows Monroe with friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $600
246184_0 


Lot 690: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 smiling while signing an autograph for a fan. The photo is signed in ballpoint pen "To Frieda, Love & Kisses Marilyn Monroe." The image is signed to Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly. The corners of the photo are trimmed, and there is a crease on the right side of the photograph.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246190_0 


Lot 694: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four slides, three showing Marilyn Monroe and one showing Arthur Miller, at various events, circa 1955.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246195_0   


Lot 695: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four slides of Marilyn Monroe, from various events, circa 1955.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246196_0 


Lot 698: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe believed to have been taken in April 1955. A very casual Monroe is seen interacting with and signing autographs for fans.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246201_0 246202_0   


Lot 699: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 wearing a black gown, white fur and black evening gloves, signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246203_0   


Lot 700: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe from June 1955, taken when she was returning home following an acting lesson with Lee Strasberg.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246204_0 


Lot 701: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on July 27, 1955, when she was on her way to see Inherit the Wind on Broadway in New York City.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246205_0  


Lot 702: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe in New York City taken on June 7, 1955, when she was on her way to see Damn Yankees on Broadway. One photo includes Nathan Puckett, president of one of Monroe's fan clubs, in the background.
Largest, 2 3/4 by 1 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246206_0 


Lot 705: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of nine slides of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955. Monroe is shown smiling and laughing and signing autographs for fans. Several slides in this lot are likely never before seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246210_0  


Lot 707: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 10 slides of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955, from in front of the Gladstone Hotel in New York City. Some images show her with her press agent Jay Kantor and friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene. Some slides in this lot are likely never before seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246212_0 


Lot 709: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on various occasions, circa 1955. This lot contains one color and four black and white images. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246216_0 


Lot 710: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on various occasions, circa 1955. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,000
246217_0  247280_0 


Lot 715: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken circa 1955 on a New York City street. Monroe superfan James Haspiel can be partially seen in one of the photographs.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246222_0 


Lot 716: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken in New York City, circa 1955. Some images show friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246223_0  


Lot 717: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1955. Monroe is shown smiling and laughing and signing autographs for fans. Several images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246224_0  247281_0  


Lot 725: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller walking their basset hound Hugo and entering their apartment located at 444 East 57th Street in New York City. These images are likely never before seen.
Larger, 2 1/2 by 2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246234_0 


Lot 733: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS COLLECTED BY FRIEDA HULL
 A collection of 23 color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe by multiple photographers (including Milton Greene and Andre de Dienes), taken at various locations and events throughout Monroe's career, including on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956) and meeting Princess Margaret in England. Many images in this lot have stamps on the reverse from various news agencies/outlets.
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246247_0 
246248_0 246249_0 247286_0  


Lot 770: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, taken as she exited the Actors Studio in New York City, circa 1960. Several images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246305_0  


Lot 771: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of six slides of Marilyn Monroe, from July 8, 1960, after she had completed costume and hair tests for The Misfits (United Artists, 1961).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246306_0   


Lot 772: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID AND CONTACT SHEET PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 12 color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on July 8, 1960, when she completed costume and hair tests for The Misfits (United Artists, 1961). Five sepia-toned photographs of Monroe show her posing for the cameras following the test, and six photographs appear to be shots of the costume and makeup tests, four having been cut from actual contact sheets, two are reproduction photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,000
246307_0  247290_0 


Lot 776: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from January 21, 1961, when she returned from Mexico, where she divorced third husband Arthur Miller. This slide is likely never before seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246318_0   


Lot 777: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original photographs and one copied color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on January 21, 1961, after returning from Mexico, where she divorced her third husband, Arthur Miller. One image is likely never before seen.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246319_0  


Lot 778: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original color photographs and one copied color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on January 20, 1961, when Monroe left New York City to travel to Mexico to divorce third husband Arthur Miller. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246320_0 


Lot 781: MARILYN MONROE JOE DIMAGGIO NEGATIVES
 A set of 16 negatives of Joe DiMaggio vacationing in Florida, most likely on March 22, 1961. Five of the negatives show DiMaggio inside the hotel, and the remaining 11 show him on the beach under a sun cover; some shots are of DiMaggio with fans. Marilyn Monroe accompanied DiMaggio on this trip and was actually on the beach with him at some point this same day, though she's not pictured in these negatives.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246323_0   


Lot 782: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A pair of color slides of Marilyn Monroe with her dog Maf, one with superfan James Haspiel, from June 15, 1961, upon Monroe's arrival in New York from Los Angeles. The slide of Monroe with Maf is likely never before seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246324_0   


Lot 783: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe with her dog Maf, one with superfan James Haspiel, taken on June 15, 1961, upon Monroe's arrival in New York from Los Angeles. The photo of Monroe with Maf is likely never before seen.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $400
246325_0 


Lot 788: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS COLLECTED BY FRIEDA HULL
 A group of 27 original color and black and white candid Marilyn Monroe related photographs. Monroe is shown in nearly all photograps, which were taken at various times and events throughout her career. One image shows her with superfan James Haspiel and members of the "Monroe Six," and another shows her with third husband Arthur Miller at an airport. Three photographs are on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Many of the candid photographs show Monroe "caught in the moment." Some images are likely never before seen. One photograph in this lot is of Miller only. One photograph shows a woman, perhaps Frieda Hull herself, standing near a cutout of Monroe from the subway grate scene in the Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). One photograph shows a theater marquee displaying titles of two Monroe films, Bus Stop and Let's Make Love, possibly being screened after Monroe's death as the photograph is dated September 1962. One photograph shows a member of the "Monroe Six" with an array of cameras and equipment.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246330_0  247291_0 


Lot 902: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED AND INSCRIBED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe leaning against a tree. Inscribed "Dear Linda, I wish you luck with your acting. Love and kisses, Marilyn Monroe Miller." This inscription was written for child star Linda Bennett.
23 by 19 inches, overall; 10 1/2 by 8 inches, sight
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246524_0 


Lot 941: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe contained in a small paper album. Accompanied by a small candid color photograph of Monroe with Lois Weber. The photographs are believed to be previously unpublished.
Album, 3 3/4 by 6 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246576_0  246577_0 246584_0 
246578_0 246579_0 246580_0 
246581_0 246582_0 246583_0  


Lot 942: MARILYN MONROE SMALL-FORMAT PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 14 small vintage black and white images of Marilyn Monroe. Many of the photographs are candid and date from different points in her career.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246585_0  


Lot 943: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe. Three were taken on the set behind the scenes of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956).
Largest, 3 1/4 by 4 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246586_0 


Bobines films & Matériel photographique
Home Movies & Photographic Equipment


Lot 76: MARILYN MONROE JOHN F. KENNEDY 1962 BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION FILM REEL
 An 8mm film reel of clips from the May 19, 1962, John F. Kennedy 45th birthday celebration held at Madison Square Garden. The eight-minute film shows clips of the venue, performers, and attendees, including John F. Kennedy; Marilyn Monroe, who appears for approximately 30 seconds; Robert Kennedy; Maria Callas; Henry Fonda; Jack Benny; Peter Lawford, who hosted the event; and Lyndon B. Johnson among others. The film was transferred from its original tin reel to a plastic reel. Accompanied by a DVD of the footage.
Reel, 5 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 41, "Entertainment Memorabilia," Christie's, New York, Sale number 1391, June 24, 2004
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

245208_0   245209_0 
245210_0 245211_0 245212_0 
245213_0 245214_0 245215_0 
245216_0 245217_0 245218_0 
245219_0 245220_0 245221_0 


Lot 248: MARILYN MONROE IN KOREA FILM
An 8mm film reel containing five minutes and 34 seconds of silent film footage, in both black and white and color, of Monroe in Korea in 1954. The first minute and a half features Monroe arriving to camp via helicopter and being escorted by various military personnel. The footage then shifts to color and shows approximately one minute of footage of some of the performers leading up to Monroe. Monroe appears for another minute of footage performing "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend" and then signing autographs for the crowd. The remaining footage features atmospheric shots of the camp and soldiers. The footage has been transferred to a DVD that is included with this lot.
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

245488_0 
245489_0 245490_0 245491_0 
245492_0 245493_0 245494_0 


Lot 696: MARILYN MONROE FRIEDA HULL'S PERSONAL SLIDE INDEX AND VIEWER
 A 1950s era Fodeco photography slide index and viewer, manufactured by Technical Devices Corporation, that originally belonged to Frieda Hull.
10 1/2 by 5 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700

246197_0 246198_0 247277_0 


Lot 697: MARILYN MONROE FRIEDA HULL 35MM CAMERA
 A Mercury II, model CX, serial no. 164404, with Universal 2.7 Tricor lens and original leather case. Together with an external flash and reflector, unrelated lens hood and telephoto lens accessory. Frieda Hull can be seen using this camera in lot 726.
Largest, 4 1/4 by 6 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300

246199_0 246200_0   


Lot 727: MARILYN MONROE HOME MOVIE REEL
 A vintage home movie reel featuring Marilyn Monroe at multiple locations. June 29, 1956, Monroe, soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, and Miller's parents are seen at a press conference at Miller's farm in Roxbury, Connecticut. Monroe and Miller were married later this day. This scene from the film is approximately 23 seconds. Note that parts of this scene are repeated at the end of the film. Various footage from 1956 shows Monroe at airports traveling to and from Los Angeles to film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). These scenes from the film are approximately 40 seconds in length. Total length: one minute, 37 seconds.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $3,000 - $4,000
246236_0 246237_0 246238_0 
246239_0 246240_0 246241_0 


Lot 769: MARILYN MONROE JAMES HASPIEL HOME MOVIE REEL
 A vintage home movie reel in the original box addressed to James Haspiel, featuring Marilyn Monroe at multiple locations. May 30, 1958, Monroe is seen leaving her 444 East 57th Street apartment in New York City. She carries a large bouquet of flowers as she, husband Arthur Miller, and others pack luggage into a station wagon and then depart. Just three days prior, Monroe was photographed by Richard Avedon for Life magazine. This scene from the film is approximately one minute, two seconds and likely never before publicly seen. May 13, 1959, Monroe and Miller are seen arriving at the Italian Consulate on Park Avenue in New York City, where Monroe received the David di Donatello Award, the equivalent of the Academy Award, for her work in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). This film includes extensive coverage of Monroe inside the Consulate and waving to fans from an upper floor window in the building. This scene from the film is approximately one minute, 22 seconds. July 8, 1961, Monroe is seen posing after having just completed hair and costume tests for The Misfits (United Artists, 1961). Haspiel appears with Monroe in part of this footage. This scene from the film is approximately 38 seconds. Total length: three minutes, three seconds.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000 
246294_0 246295_0  246296_0 
246297_0 246298_0 246299_0 
246300_0 246301_0 246302_0 
246303_0 246304_0 

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22 octobre 2016

Marilyn Monroe Auction - 11/2016 - effets personnels 2


Maison, Meubles, Déco
House, Furnitures, Deco


Lot 582: MARILYN MONROE HOME RENOVATION NOTEBOOK
 An extraordinary, blue cloth over board, "project management" three-ring binder kept by one of Monroe's assistants chronicling the purchase and ongoing renovation and decoration of her home located at 12305 Fifth Helena Drive in Brentwood, California. The notebook begins with an information sheet and lot diagram as well as a typed renovation and additions budget for the property totaling $34,877.36 against a purchase price of $57,609.95. The book also contains four pages of phone numbers, including neighbors, utilities, friends, secretaries, and professional colleagues, dated January 20, 1962; a list of the appliances in the kitchen and their cost; three pages regarding furniture and shipments from Mexico; approximately 36 business cards from various contractors; approximately 28 pages of notes on various renovation projects and to-do lists; a page with notes regarding terracing and planting the hillside; seven drawings of exterior floor plan for possible apartment above the garage for a cook; three renderings of options for a table and another decorative element for the home; and a listing of bills due as of August 16, 1962. The last page of the book lists "Moet - Champagne vintage 1952/ et Chandon a Epernay/ Cuvee Dom Perignon - 13.88." The book lists dates that furniture is due to be delivered from various suppliers, many after Monroe's death, as well as dimensions of each room of the home for the purpose of ordering "white India" carpet. It also has estimates to have the pool resurfaced, water heater moved, fountain built, and laundry room and shower expanded for people using the pool as well as notes about decoration of a "play room," fabrication of a new gate, bars for windows, and shelving to be built, among many other things. The notebook makes it very clear that the home was a work in progress at the time of Monroe's death.
11 1/4 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

246043_0 
246044_0 246045_0 
246046_0 246047_0 
246048_0 246049_0 
246050_0  246051_0   


Lot 586: MARILYN MONROE DOCUMENTS REGARDING FURNISHING HER HOME
 A group of invoices dating to February 28, 1962, from various Mexican boutiques listing the purchase of a great number of pieces of furniture and home furnishings, including enamel trays, benches, chairs, tables, and other pieces purchased in Mexico for Monroe's Fifth Helena Drive residence. Together with a two-page typed signed letter dated July 26, 1962, signed "Mura," giving a full report to Monroe's secretary Eunice Murray regarding her buying trip in Mexico and status of custom-ordered tin panels, fabric, rugs, iron fire screen, and tiles. The letter demonstrates the fact that Monroe was still quite actively working on her home at the time of her death.
Largest, 8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600 

246060_0 


Lot 476: MARILYN MONROE SILVER STEELMASTER FOUR-DRAWER FILING CABINET
 A vintage filing cabinet marked "Steelmaster/ Art Steel Cabinet/ New York." The third drawer has a false front concealing a combination lock safe.
52 1/4 by 18 by 26 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

245881_0  
245882_0 245883_0 


 Lot 477: MARILYN MONROE BROWN DEVON FOUR-DRAWER FILING CABINET
 A vintage filing cabinet marked "W.H. Harper Co./ Devon/ El Segundo." With a metal security rod attached by a padlock.
52 1/4 by 18 by 26 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

245884_0  245885_0  


Lot 479: MARILYN MONROE FILE FOLDERS
 Two blue Oxford file folders with tab tops and labels reading "MM - Personal" and "MM - Paid Bills - 1961." These are original folders as they were found in Monroe's filing cabinets.
9 1/2 by 11 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $80 - $120
245887_0   


Lot 3: MARILYN MONROE CURIO CABINET
 A wood curio five-tier shelf from Marilyn Monroe's New York home, located at 444 East 57th Street, gifted to her friend and personal masseur, Ralph Roberts. Accompanied by a copy of a letter from Roberts.
31 by 13 ½ by 6 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial lot 340, “Film and Television Memorabilia,” Christie's East, New York, Sale number 7821, December 18, 1995
 Estimate: $300 - $500

245012_0  


Lot 539: MARILYN MONROE BARCELONA CHAIR
 Vintage black button tufted leather and chrome frame. Unmarked.
29 1/2 by 29 1/4 by 30 inches
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
245974_0    


Lot 540: MARILYN MONROE BUTLER TRAY ON FOLDING STAND
 A metal and wood tray and stand.
24 by 31 by 22 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
245975_0    


Lot 541: MARILYN MONROE CORDUROY UPHOLSTERED CLUB CHAIR
 With a loose seat cushion.
33 by 32 by 36 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245976_0   


Lot 542: MARILYN MONROE TWO DECORATIVE METAL BENCHES
 Including a loveseat with a silk tapestry cover and a single seat with a floral needlepoint pillow cover.
Larger, 29 by 53 by 17 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245977_0    


Lot 543: MARILYN MONROE CANED CHAISE LOUNGE
 With turned wood frame.
24 by 76 by 26 inches
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
245978_0    


Lot 544: MARILYN MONROE CANED LOVESEAT
 With a carved walnut frame and decorative back.
32 by 40 by 18 inches
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
245979_0    


Lot 545: MARILYN MONROE THREE WICKER CHAIRS
Including a Heywood-Wakefield style armchair, a rocker with a caned seat, and a small barrel-back chair (damaged).
Largest, 39 by 25 by 20 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245980_0    


Lot 546: MARILYN MONROE TWO VINTAGE SIDE CHAIRS
 One with a caned seat and one with a woven seat (damaged).
Taller, 35 by 17 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500
245981_0   


Lot 553: MARILYN MONROE VICTORIAN PAPIER MÂCHÉ CHAIR
 With shell and mother of pearl inlay and a caned seat.
32 by 15 by 13 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245989_0   


Lot 557: MARILYN MONROE ROCOCO STYLE BENCH
 A carved wood and parcel gilt satin upholstered bench.
24 by 40 1/2 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
245993_0    


Lot 558: MARILYN MONROE ROCOCO STYLE COFFEE TABLE
 A carved wood coffee table with canted edges and inset parchment top.
19 by 46 by 38 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
245994_0  245995_0 


Lot 547: MARILYN MONROE BURLWOOD VENEER THREE-DRAWER DRESSER
 With movable jewelry display trays inside the top drawer.
36 by 47 1/2 by 22 inches
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
245982_0    


Lot 548: MARILYN MONROE BAKER CAMPAIGN DRESSER
 A modern four-drawer dresser in a British 19th Century style, with brass mounted hardware.
22 by 62 by 19 inches
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
245983_0    


Lot 549: MARILYN MONROE WOOD CHEST
 A locked wood chest in a rococo style.
21 by 48 by 20 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245984_0  245985_0 


Lot 550: MARILYN MONROE WOVEN CHEST ON CASTERS
 A woven hamper on wood casters. With interior painted decoration.
15 by 28 by 14 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
245986_0   


Lot 551: MARILYN MONROE CERAMIC PINK AND WHITE DOOR PANEL
 With transfer printed rose decoration, together with two key-shaped items. Marked on the back "1960 BLD."
11 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245987_0    


Lot 552: MARILYN MONROE HANDPAINTED WOODEN DOOR PANEL
 With floral decoration and ivory crackle finish.
11 by 3 1/8 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245988_0    


Lot 4: MARILYN MONROE OWNED LAMP BASE
 A painted plaster chalkware lamp base in the image of a girl sitting by a tree from Marilyn Monroe's New York home, located at 444 East 57th Street, gifted to her friend and personal masseur, Ralph Roberts. Accompanied by a copy of a letter from Roberts.
Height, 12 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 340, “Film and Television Memorabilia,” Christie's East, New York, Sale number 7821, December 18, 1995
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245013_0 


Lot 10: MARILYN MONROE OWNED OIL LAMP BASE
 An opaque glass oil lamp base from Marilyn Monroe's New York home, located at 444 East 57th Street, gifted to her friend and personal masseur, Ralph Roberts. In a letter to the consignor, Roberts states Monroe won the lamp at a country auction and used it as a flower vase, usually placed on a round table in front of a window looking toward the river. Accompanied by a copy of a letter from Roberts.
Height, approximately 11 inches
PROVENANCE: Lot 340, “Film and Television Memorabilia,” Christie's East, New York, Sale number 7821, December 18, 1995
Estimate: $300 - $500
245019_0 


Lot 554: MARILYN MONROE CUT CRYSTAL PERFUME ETUI
 With a sterling finial marked "Sterling."
Length, 4 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245990_0  


Lot 555: MARILYN MONROE CUT CRYSTAL CHATELAINE ETUI
 With a rim marked "Sterling." (Lacking lid.)
Length, 2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245991_0   


Lot 244: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ABSTRACT PARCEL GILT FAN
 A folding paper Japanese hand fan with abstract parcel gilt decoration.
15 1/2 by 24 1/2 by 2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245481_0    


Lot 245: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE JAPANESE PAINTED FAN
 A folding paper hand fan featuring a peacock and pink flowering vines. In a frame under glass.
13 1/2 by 21 1/4 by 2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245482_0  


Lot 559: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE BROWN SILK HANDPAINTED FAN
 A folding hand fan featuring an 18th Century man and woman. With parcel gilt birds and floral decoration. (Glass lacking.)
18 by 27 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245996_0    


Lot 560: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE HANDPAINTED FRENCH FAN
 A white silk fan featuring a handpainted lady in a landscape, signed "A. Ravaux." (Glass broken.)
16 by 25 by 2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245997_0  245998_0 


Lot 566: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE BLACK PEACOCK FEATHER FAN
 A folding feather hand fan with carved ebonized handle.
16 by 25 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

246004_0   


Lot 567: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE BLACK LACE FAN
 A lace folding hand fan with gilt decoration. In a frame under glass.
13 1/2 by 21 1/4 by 2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800 

246005_0 


Lot 561: MARILYN MONROE RED FRAMED NEEDLEPOINT PICTURE
 Featuring a bouquet of poppies. Marked "From D.M. Ferry/ 1926" lower right.
16 1/2 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245999_0 


Lot 562: MARILYN MONROE GLASS COVERED WOODEN BREAKFAST TRAY
 With a hand embroidered textile featuring a violet bouquet.
15 by 25 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246000_0  


Lot 563: MARILYN MONROE RED NEEDLEPOINT PILLOW CUSHION
 Red flowers on a black ground, in a later unassociated shadowbox frame.
19 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246001_0 


Lot 564: MARILYN MONROE BLACK NEEDLEPOINT PILLOW CUSHION
 Needlepoint with pink flowers on a black ground, in a later unassociated shadowbox frame.
19 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246002_0   


Lot 565: MARILYN MONROE NEEDLEPOINT PIANO STOOL
 An ebonized carved wood stool with opening top featuring a needlepoint upholstery of three red robins on a flowering tree branch.
19 1/4 by 19 1/4 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246003_0   


Lot 505: MARILYN MONROE CALENDAR PENCIL HOLDER
 A metal pencil holder cup imprinted with a calendar and having a leather swiveling cover.
Height, 4 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

245924_0  245925_0  


Lot 583: MARILYN MONROE PENCIL HOLDER
A vintage paper decorated tin pencil holder. The pencil holder can be seen on the coffee table of the sunroom in Monroe's Brentwood, California, home.
 Estimate: $600 - $800

246052_0  246053_0 


Lot 596: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE GENERAL ELECTRIC TELECHRON CLOCK
 With faux wood pattern face and black hands. Model 2H103-S.
6 by 6 1/2 by 2 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246070_0 


Lot 597: MARILYN MONROE TABLE LAMP
 A green and brass metal table lamp with electrical cord stripped in some places. No shade.
8 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500

246071_0   


Lot 595: MARILYN MONROE COLORLESS CRYSTAL TEARDROP VASE
 A vintage teardrop form bud vase.
Height, 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246069_0


Lot 599: MARILYN MONROE EDWARDIAN SILVERPLATED VASE
 A double-handled urn-form vase marked "J.B." and "1937" on the base.
Height, 8 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

246073_0 


Lot 952: MARILYN MONROE PRINT
 A Marilyn Monroe owned untitled print by artist, set designer and director Edward Gordon Craig from Hamlet. The woodblock print is signed with initials EGC in the lower right corner. The prints were made for the Cranach Press German edition of Hamlet printed in 1928.
Sight, 5 1/2 by 9 1/4 inches; 22 by 21 1/4 inches, overall
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 424, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000 

246596_0  246597_0 


Lot 953: MARILYN MONROE LITHOGRAPH AFTER TOULOUSE-LAUTREC
 A Marilyn Monroe owned lithograph printed with the words “Catalogue d’Affiches artistiques A.ARNOLD 7 rue Racine Paris.” Housed in a frame, not examined outside of frame.
Sight, 8 3/4 by 12 inches; 21 by 24 1/2 inches, overall
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 424, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

246598_0  246599_0  


Lot 956: MARILYN MONROE BELL
 A Marilyn Monroe bronze bell with wood handle, stamped on the interior.
Height, 10 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 460, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200 

246604_0   


Lot 957: MARILYN MONROE MEXICAN WOOL THROW
 A Marilyn Monroe Mexican wool throw with multicolor woven design.
Approximately 60 by 50 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 450, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500 

246605_0  246606_0 


Lot 278: MARILYN MONROE GROUP OF THREE ASHTRAYS
 Including a printed and parcel gilt Maxim's Paris porcelain ashtray, marked on the back "Pillivuyt/ France" and "Edite par A. Simon Paris," circa 1950, a patinated metal scallop shell ashtray, and a black glazed terra cotta ashtray displaying the Christie's 1999 sale sticker.
5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 408, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

245570_0  


Lot 279: MARILYN MONROE ASHTRAY
 A black plastic ashtray with matchbook holder from Dan Stampler's The Steak Joint Inc. with address listed as "58 Greenwich Avenue in Greenwich Village." The Steak Joint was a village favorite run by Dan Stampler for nearly 25 years.
5 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500

245571_0   


Lot 280: MARILYN MONROE AMERICAN EXPRESS KEYCHAIN
 Has "American Express" and "5 year member" on the tag. .37 troy oz.
Length, 1 inch
 Estimate: $400 - $600

245572_0  245573_0 


Cuisine
Kitchen


Lot 5: MARILYN MONROE OWNED SPOONS 
A pair of spoons from Marilyn Monroe's New York home, located at 444 East 57th Street, gifted to her friend and personal masseur, Ralph Roberts. The spoons have embossed portraits of women. The first has an embossed signature that reads “Lois Wilson,” the second an embossed signature that reads “Norma Shearer.” Accompanied by a copy of a letter from Roberts.
6 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 340, “Film and Television Memorabilia,” Christie's East, New York, Sale number 7821, December 18, 1995
 Estimate: $300 - $500

245014_0  


Lot 6: MARILYN MONROE OWNED GLASS CREAMER
 A pink glass creamer from Marilyn Monroe's New York home, located at 444 East 57th Street, gifted to her friend and personal masseur, Ralph Roberts. In a letter to the consignor, Roberts states Marilyn bought the creamer at an antique shop between the Nevada cities of Virginia City and Reno during an outing with him and Paula Strasberg. Accompanied by a copy of a letter from Roberts.
Height, 3 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 340, “Film and Television Memorabilia,” Christie's East, New York, Sale number 7821, December 18, 1995
 Estimate: $300 - $500

245015_0  


Lot 7: MARILYN MONROE OWNED SERVING TRAY
 A round metal and glass serving tray that Marilyn Monroe used to deliver food to a party at the home of Ralph Roberts. The event was a Bon Voyage gala for May Reis and Maureen Stapleton in April 1961, both of whom were headed to Europe: Reis for vacation and Stapleton to work on the European film production of A View from the Bridge (Vu du pont). According to Roberts, guests at the party included Gloria Vanderbilt, Walter and Carol Matthau, Clifford David, and Sidney Lumet. Accompanied by a copy of a letter from Roberts.
Diameter 12 ½ inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 340, “Film and Television Memorabilia,” Christie's East, New York, Sale number 7821, December 18, 1995
 Estimate: $300 - $500

245016_0 


Lot 8: MARILYN MONROE OWNED COOKING PRESS
 An aluminum Wearever cooking press from Marilyn Monroe's New York home, located at 444 East 57th Street, gifted to her friend and personal masseur, Ralph Roberts. Accompanied by a copy of a letter from Roberts.
Length, 8½ inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 340, “Film and Television Memorabilia,” Christie's East, New York, Sale number 7821, December 18, 1995
 Estimate: $300 - $500

245017_0  


Lot 9: MARILYN MONROE OWNED CHAMPAGNE COOLER
 A metal champagne cooler brought by Marilyn Monroe to a party at the home of Ralph Roberts. The event was a Bon Voyage gala for May Reis and Maureen Stapleton in April 1961, both of whom were headed to Europe: Reis for vacation and Stapleton to work on the European film production of A View from the Bridge (Vu du pont). According to Roberts, guests at the party included Gloria Vanderbilt, Walter and Carol Matthau, Clifford David, and Sidney Lumet. Accompanied by a copy of a letter from Roberts.
Height, 9 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 340, “Film and Television Memorabilia,” Christie's East, New York, Sale number 7821, December 18, 1995
Estimate: $300 - $500 
245018_0   


Lot 111: MARILYN MONROE BAKE KING CAKE PAN
 A vintage coated tin cake pan.
2 by 9 by 9 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

245294_0


Lot 112: MARILYN MONROE YAAD DECORATIVE COPPER TRAY AND TWO OTHERS
 A decorative tray marked "Yaad/ Made in Israel," together with a circular brass saucer and a large metal dish.
Copper tray, 9 3/4 by 12 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

245295_0 245296_0 


Lot 113: MARILYN MONROE GROUP OF THREE DECORATIVE PIECES
 Two wood bowls and a woven basket.
Largest, diameter, 17 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

245297_0   


Lot 114: MARILYN MONROE BRONZE ROOSTER NUTCRACKER
 With scrolled terminals.
Length, 5 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

245298_0 


Lot 115: MARILYN MONROE METLOX POPPY TRAIL DINNERWARE
 In the Sculpted Grape pattern, including four dinner plates, six salad plates, five large bowls, six small bowls, eight saucers, a butter dish, a double serving bowl with handle, and a large serving bowl. Thirty-two pieces total.
Size varies
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

245299_0  


Lot 116: MARILYN MONROE ASSORTED GROUP OF COPPER COOKWARE
 Including a chafing dish marked "Bazar Francais 666," three pots marked "Country Kitchen," and an unmarked pot.
Chafing dish, 13 by 16 by 10 1/2 inches
See Lot 401 for pots from the same set, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200 

245300_0  


Lot 117: MARILYN MONROE SAUTÉ PAN
 A copper and brass sauté pan, made in Italy, stamped number "24."
Diameter, 10 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700

245301_0   


Lot 118: MARILYN MONROE GROUP OF VINTAGE COPPER HOLLOWWARE
 Including a coffeepot with a wood handle marked "Majestic," a teapot marked "Old Dutch," an unmarked pitcher, and a pot marked "Bazar Francais."
Tallest, 11 inches
See Lot 401 for pots from the same set, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $600 - $800

245302_0   


Lot 119: MARILYN MONROE ASSORTED WOOD AND METAL KITCHEN UTENSILS
 Including cooking spoons, spatulas, spreaders, knives, a serving fork, and a baster in the original vintage packaging. Twelve items total.
Size varies
 Estimate: $600 - $800

245303_0   


Lot 121: MARILYN MONROE SET OF VINTAGE ECKO UTENSILS
 A set of 10 stainless Ecko kitchen cooking utensils with black handles.
Longest, 13 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

245305_0 


Lot 122: MARILYN MONROE ASSORTED METAL KITCHEN UTENSILS
 Including vintage beaters, graters, strainers, measuring cups and spoons, a paring knife, and aluminum salt and pepper shakers. Fifteen items total.
Size varies
 Estimate: $600 - $800

245306_0  


Lot 123: MARILYN MONROE CHROME TOASTMASTER TOASTER
 A vintage toaster with two slots, brown Bakelite trim, and original cord and socket. Model 1B21.
6 1/4 by 9 1/2 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000

245307_0 245308_0 


Lot 124: MARILYN MONROE CHROME JUICE-O-MAT TILT-TOP JUICER
 A vintage juicer with a mechanical hand crank. Model NJ-848.
6 1/2 by 8 by 6 inches
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000

245309_0 245310_0   


Lot 125: MARILYN MONROE DESCOWARE BELGIAN CAST IRON POT
 A vintage enamelware pot with a lid, together with another lid.
Pot, diameter, 5 3/4 inches
See Lot 401 for pots from the same set, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $600 - $800

245311_0   


Lot 126: MARILYN MONROE LAMBERTON SCAMMELL HOTEL SERVICE PLATE
 A porcelain charger with pink edges and thistle pattern on the rim, with a center monogram and gilt edges. Backstamp dates to circa 1928.
Diameter, 11 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

245312_0   


Lot 127: MARILYN MONROE GROUP OF THREE CHINESE ENAMELED DISHES
 Three decorative enameled metal dishes, each picturing flowers and animals, each marked "China."
3 1/8 by 4 1/8 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

245313_0   


Lot 128: MARILYN MONROE BRONZE ENAMELED KOVSH
 With a bronze bowl and polychrome enameled handle, marked "China."
Length, 7 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

245314_0   


Lot 129: MARILYN MONROE ASSORTED GROUP OF DECORATIVE DISHES
 Including a French glazed stoneware plate with a printed rhyme, a KPM Bavaria handpainted and parcel gilt saucer, and a decorative Italian pottery dish.
Largest, diameter, 8 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500

245315_0


Lot 130: MARILYN MONROE ASSORTED DECORATIVE CERAMICS
 Including a majolica oyster plate with gilt rim, marked "C.T.," a majolica double-handled sugar bowl with floral decoration, and a painted figural vase.
Plate, diameter, 9 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

245316_0 


Lot 131: MARILYN MONROE PARTIAL SET OF HAVILAND LIMOGES DINNERWARE
 In a parcel gilt and leaf and painted design, white porcelain with an ivory band, including four dinner plates, six luncheon plates, eight salad plates, three cream soup bowls with four underplates, two bread and butter plates, and seven saucers. Twenty-nine pieces total.
Size varies
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

245317_0  


Lot 240: MARILYN MONROE DINNER SERVICE
 A dinner service for eight, each piece stamped "Noritake Hand Painted Japan Dresdoll" comprising one oval serving bowl, one round serving bowl, eight dinner plates, eight salad plates, seven saucers, eight small serving bowls, and eight bread plates. 41 pieces.
Dinner plates, 10 inches
 Estimate: $5,000 - $7,000
245476_0 245477_0 


Lot 241: MARILYN MONROE ASSORTED ASIAN INSPIRED TABLEWARE
 Including an earthenware Regout Timor plate, a set of four Nippon double-handled dishes decorated with birds, and a set of five Chinese soup spoons. Ten pieces total.
Largest, diameter, 8 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245478_0 


Lot 242: MARILYN MONROE TWO ANTIQUE ASIAN CARVED SNUFF BOTTLES
 One decorated with dragons, the other with swords and instruments. (Both lacking stoppers.)
Height, 2 1/2 inches each
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 
245479_0 


Lot 352: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE DAISY TRIPLE ICE CRUSHER
 With a hand crank. Model 16Q.
Height, 4 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245681_0 


Lot 354: MARILYN MONROE ICE BUCKET
 A Walker & Hall, Sheffield, England, electroplate ice bucket with lion head ring handles. The bucket has seen so much use that the plating has worn off, and there are a good number of scratches on interior from bottles. Engraved design on side of bucket featuring flag with the letters "N C S."
8 1/4 by 7 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
245683_0 245684_0 245685_0 


Lot 355: MARILYN MONROE PRESSED GLASS MARTINI SHAKER
 With triple ridge design and metal lid.
Height, 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245686_0 


Lot 356: MARILYN MONROE TWO VINTAGE LIQUEUR BOTTLES
 Two vintage bottles, the first a green glass bottle labeled "Dolfi Framberry," the second of colorless glass with giltmetal mounts marked "Jacquin's Forbidden Fruit Liqueur."
Taller, 12 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245687_0 


Lot 357: MARILYN MONROE CASED AMBER GLASS DECANTER SET
 A mid-century decanter with crystal finial, five cordials, and a black ridged circular undertray.
Tallest, 10 inches
 Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800
245688_0 


Lot 359: MARILYN MONROE AMBER CUT-TO-CLEAR DECANTER
 Decorated with a hand cut floral and foliate pattern. Bottle marked "Handblown, Made in Czechoslovakia" with an affixed label marked "Bischoff Cordials/ Double Kummel."
Height, 15 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245690_0 


Lot 360: MARILYN MONROE RUBY CUT-TO-CLEAR WINE DECANTER
 With grape and leaf decoration. (Lacking stopper.)
Height, 11 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245691_0 


Lot 361: MARILYN MONROE ETCHED GLASS DECANTER
 A double-gourd shaped bottle with allover etched floral decoration and a sterling rim with marks for Birmingham, 1911-12. (Lacking stopper.)
Height, 11 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245692_0  


Lot 362: MARILYN MONROE PAIR OF PRESSED GLASS DECANTERS
 With floral decoration, unmarked.
Height, 15 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245693_0 


Lot 363: MARILYN MONROE ETCHED GLASS DECANTER
 With a handpainted parcel gilt base and rim and engraved floral and foliate design on the body.
Height, 8 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245694_0  


Lot 364: MARILYN MONROE GROUP OF THREE ASSORTED DECANTER STOPPERS
 One is ruby flashed cut glass and the other two are faceted glass with cork plugs.
Tallest, 4 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245695_0  


Lot 365: MARILYN MONROE STERLING COLLAPSIBLE TRAVEL CUP
 With hallmarks for Germany and "800." 2.47 troy oz.
Height, 3 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

245696_0 245697_0 


Lot 366: MARILYN MONROE METAL COLLAPSIBLE TRAVEL CUP
 A base metal cup with metal loops on the rim.
Height, 3 1/2 inches
Estimate: $400 - $600

245698_0 


Lot 367: MARILYN MONROE BRONZE AND METAL MIDDLE EASTERN CUP
 With punctured design throughout.
Height, 3 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600 

245700_0  


Lot 587: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS OF FIFTH HELENA DRIVE PROPERTY
 A group of four vintage black and white photographs, most likely of the kitchen and laundry room of the guest house at Monroe's Fifth Helena Drive property prior to her renovations and decorating.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500

246061_0


Lot 588: MARILYN MONROE HEART-FORM COASTER
 On three feet, marked "HW Limited/ EPNS."
4 by 4 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246062_0 


Lot 589: MARILYN MONROE GORHAM STERLING RETICULATED HEART DISH
 With scrolling bows and ribbons, marked "Sterling." 1.50 troy oz.
1 by 5 by 4 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

246063_0 


Lot 590: MARILYN MONROE COPPER HEART-FORM CANDLE HOLDER
 With a wooden ring handle, marked "Chase USA."
5 by 3 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246064_0   


Lot 591: MARILYN MONROE SCALLOPED EDGE METAL CANDLE BASE
 With faux hallmarks. Together with a shell fragment.
Diameter, 3 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246065_0 


Lot 592: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MOUNT WASHINGTON ROSE BOWL
 A hand decorated blue satin glass bowl with crimped rim.
Height, 3 3/4 inches; Diameter, 4 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246066_0   


Lot 593: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE FENTON HOBNAIL DISH
 A blue opalescent hobnail square dish.
4 1/2 by 4 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246067_0 


Lot 594: MARILYN MONROE TRI-FORM TRINKET BOX
 With figural scenes and putti on the lid and Hanau-type marks. 7.25 troy oz., but not marked sterling.
1 1/2 by 5 1/4 by 4 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246068_0 


Lot 598: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE GLO-MAR BRASS SHELL DISH
 A scallop shell trinket dish, marked on the base.
4 3/4 by 4 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246072_0


Lot 955: MARILYN MONROE GREEN GLASS CARAFE
 A Marilyn Monroe owned green-tinted mallet form glass carafe. A Christie's lot sticker is affixed to the underside.
Height, 10 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 406, "The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe," Christie's, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000

246603_0  


Livres & Magazines
Books & Magazines


Lot 12: MARILYN MONROE OWNED MAGAZINES
 A group of nine gossip magazines owned by Marilyn Monroe and packed into a trunk as she was moving out of her Roxbury, Connecticut, home when she and Arthur Miller were separating. Monroe is featured on most covers and in many articles; titles of magazines include 'Inside Hollywood' (May 1960), 'Hush-Hush' (November 1960), 'Confidential' (September 1961), 'Movie Fan' (July 1954), 'Untold Secrets' (October 1961), 'Screenland' (July 1962), 'Movie World' (March 1953), 'Movie Life' (May 1948) and 'Kroniek Van De Week' (March 1949). The original consignor was Ralph Roberts, Monroe's masseuse and confidant.
Largest, 14 ¼ by 10 ¼ inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 22, “Film and Television Memorabilia,” Christie's East, New York, Sale number 7821, December 18, 1995
 Estimate: $800 - $1,000

245021_0  


Lot 155: MARILYN MONROE BOOK OF POETRY
 A hardcover copy of Good Fellowship, a book of poetry compiled by Samuel Francis Woolard, 1909, by The Goldsmith-Woolard Publishing Co., Wichita, Kansas. Faint pencil marking on inside front cover reads, "MM 12/53." A number of page corners are creased as they had been dog eared. Additionally, some passages have brackets faintly drawn around them, including: "My character may be my own, but my reputation belongs to any old body that enjoys gossiping more than telling the truth"; "Here's to the woman who has a smile for every joy, a tear for every sorrow, a consolation for every grief, an excuse for every fault, a prayer for every misfortune, an encouragement for every hope. - Sainte Foix"; "Here's to the only true language of love: A Kiss," among others.
8 1/8 by 4 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

245349_0 245350_0  


 Lot 268: MARILYN MONROE CUSTOM BOUND COPY OF ARTHUR MILLER'S COLLECTED WORKS
 A red leather clamshell box with gilt designs, title on spine and a simple "MM" on the lower right corner. The ivory silk satin lined box contains a matching red leather bound volume with "MM" on cover, gilt edged pages and chartreuse silk satin boards and end papers. Special dedication page reads, "This first copy/ of the first edition/ has been specially hand-bound/ for Marilyn." Arthur Miller's Collected Plays, The Viking Press, copyright 1957. Bound by Gerhard Gerlach, stamped in gold inside back cover.
9 1/2 by 6 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $40,000 - $60,000

245543_0    245546_0 245547_0 
245544_0  245545_0  245548_0 
245549_0 245550_0 245551_0 
245552_0 245553_0  


Lot 106: MARILYN MONROE COOKBOOK
 A hardcover copy of The New Fannie Farmer Boston Cooking - School Cookbook, ninth edition, 3rd printing 1954 by Little Brown and Company, Boston. The encyclopedic cookbook also contains an index card with newspaper clippings stapled to the card featuring recipes for "Hearty Hot Lettuce Salad" and "Dinner with Lamb" and a small four-page booklet torn from a magazine featuring recipes for "Frankfurter Spaghetti," "Beefsteak Bundles," "Beef and Potato Loaf," among others. Page 53 features acid stains left by a piece of newspaper torn from the drama section of the Los Angeles Times dated December 26, 1956, used to mark the page about planning buffet meals for parties.
8 1/2 by 5 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500

245280_0 245281_0 245282_0 
245283_0  245284_0 


Lot 107: MARILYN MONROE MEXICAN COOKBOOK
 A soft cover spiral-bound copy of Elena's Famous Mexican and Spanish Recipes, copyright 1944 Elena Zelayeta, 30th printing June 1, 1950, by Dettners Printing House, San Francisco. This best selling cookbook by Zelayeta is credited with introducing traditional Mexican and Spanish cooking to many American households.
9 by 6 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500

245285_0 245286_0 245287_0 


Lot 108: MARILYN MONROE COOKBOOK
 A hardcover copy of The Household Searchlight Recipe Book, 13th printing 1940 by The Household Magazine, Topeka, Kansas. The pages are indexed in tabs by chapter, including chapters on "Fish and Wild Game," "Canning and Preserving," "Pastries," "Soups," and many others. Some cooking stains to the pages in the meat section, whose index tab has been lost.
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

245288_0 245289_0 


Lot 110: MARILYN MONROE HOMEMAKING BOOK
 A hardcover copy of the Searchlight Homemaking Guide, 2nd edition 1949 by Household Topeka, Kansas. The pages are indexed in tabs by chapter, including chapters on "Etiquette," "Exercise and Good Looks," "The Sickroom," "Physical Care of the Baby," "Building the Home," "Floors Woodwork and Walls," "Buying Fabrics," "The Laundry," "Destroying Household Pests," and others. A hole has been drilled through the upper margin starting at the back cover of the book and going through the last 60 pages.
10 1/4 by 7 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

245291_0 245292_0 245293_0 


Lot 868: MARILYN MONROE OWNED BOOK
 A Marilyn Monroe owned copy of The Open Mind by J. Robert Oppenheimer (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1955). Christie’s bookplate affixed to endpaper. The hardcover book is accompanied by a paper dust jacket and a lotted Christie's bookmark.
5 3/4 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 563, "The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe," Christie's, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

246465_0  246466_0 


Lot 869: MARILYN MONROE OWNED BOOK
 A Marilyn Monroe owned copy of Everyman’s Search by Rebecca Beard (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1950). Christie’s bookplate affixed to endpaper. The hardcover book is accompanied by a paper dust jacket and a lotted Christie's bookmark. Additionally stamped on the title page “Women’s League Library/ Old First Church/ Huntington, N.Y.”
5 3/4 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 563, "The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe," Christie's, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

246467_0 


Lot 870: MARILYN MONROE OWNED BOOK
 A Marilyn Monroe owned copy of The Devil's Advocate by Morris L. West (New York: William Morrow & Company, 1959). Christie’s bookplate affixed to endpaper.
5 1/2 by 8 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 546, "The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe," Christie's, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

246468_0  246469_0 


Lot 871: MARILYN MONROE OWNED BOOKS
  A copy of Karl A. Menninger's Man Against Himself (New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1938) and Dr. Joseph Murphy's The Miracles of Your Mind (San Gabriel, California: Willing Publishing Company, 1953) from the personal collection of Marilyn Monroe with a Christie's auction bookplate on the front inside covers.
Larger, 8 3/4 by 6 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 559, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

246470_0  246471_0 


Lot 905: MARILYN MONROE PRAYER BOOK FOR JEWISH WORSHIP
 A Marilyn Monroe Union Prayer Book for Jewish Worship. The cover is stamped “Marilyn Monroe Miller” and inscribed to Monroe “For Marilyn – with all of my best wishes and deepest respect – fondly – Bob.” Christie’s bookplate is affixed to the interior of the front cover.
6 3/4 by 5 by 1 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 9A, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $20,000 - $40,000

246527_0 246528_0 


Lot 584: MARILYN MONROE HORTICULTURE MAGAZINES
 Three copies of Horticulture, "America's Authentic Garden Magazine," dated October 1960, January 1961, and June 1962. Each magazine has typed adhesive labels addressed to Monroe, two reading "Mrs. Marilyn Miller" and the third "Miss Marilyn Monroe," all to her 444 East 57th Street address. The October 1960 issue has this address crossed out and "Beverly Hills Hotel/ Beverly Hills, California" written beside the label. Another issue of Horticulture magazine is visible on the coffee table of the sunroom in Monroe’s Brentwood home in the photograph on the right.
11 by 8 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

246054_0 
246055_0 246056_0 246057_0 


Lot 514: MARILYN MONROE SCULPTURE BOOK SIGNED BY THE ARTIST
 A copy of The Sculpture of William Zorach, by Paul S. Wingert, Pitman Publishing Corp., New York 1938 signed by Zorach to Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller January 1, 1957. Monroe owned one of Zorach's sculptures titled "Young Woman." The book is accompanied by a letter from The Downtown Gallery dated April 24, 1957, regarding this small sculpture, which Monroe had "purchased just before Christmas," to ensure that Monroe received the piece after lending it to the University of Illinois for an exhibition.
Book, 10 by 7 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

245939_0 245940_0 245941_0   


 Récompenses
Awards


Lot 26: MARILYN MONROE NEW FACES AWARD
 A Detroit Press New Faces Award, 1952, presented to Marilyn Monroe by Hollywood gossip columnist Hedda Hopper. The award is designed as a wall mirror of birch wood with a leather handle and surrounded is by fourteen electric light sockets. The plaque is engraved “Marilyn Monroe Winner-First Place Detroit Free Press New Faces Award 1952.” Accompanied by a copy of the 1999 Christie's The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe auction catalog.
22 by 18 by 2 inches
PROVENANCE: Lot 312, "The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe," Christie's, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $20,000 - $40,000

245052_0  245055_0 
245053_0  245054_0 


Lot 832: MARILYN MONROE 1953 AWARD
 A Marilyn Monroe trophy honoring Monroe as the 1953 World Film Favorite by The International Press of Hollywood.
Height, 23 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 320, "The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe," Christie's, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
 Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000 

246400_0   246401_0 


 Lot 856: MARILYN MONROE "I'M GONNA FILE MY CLAIM" RECORD AWARD
 An in-house record award presented to Simon House Music to commemorate the sale of more than 50,000 copies of the RCA Victor record release of “I’m Gonna File My Claim” as performed by Marilyn Monroe. Monroe performed the song in her film River of No Return (20th Century, 1954).
23 by 17 3/4 inches, framed
 Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000

246445_0 


 Divers
Various


 Lot 2: MARILYN MONROE ST. CHRISTOPHER PENDANT
 A silver tone St. Christopher pendant in the style of a wax seal given to Ralph Roberts by Marilyn Monroe. The religious medal is designed with the likeness of the patron saint. A neck chain loop is connected to the top of the medallion. According to Roberts, Natasha Lytess, Monroe's early acting coach, gave her the medal. Monroe gave the medal to Roberts together with a handwritten postcard in which she confirmed for him that she wasn't pregnant. When she gave Roberts the medal she stated, "I've outgrown Natasha." Accompanied by a copy of a letter from Roberts.
Diameter, 1 inch
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 334, “Film & Television Memorabilia,” Christie's East, Sale number 7821, December 18, 1995
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245011_0 


Lot 11: MARILYN MONROE OWNED BALLERINA PAPERWEIGHT
 A paperweight fashioned after a ballerina, from Marilyn Monroe's New York home, located at 444 East 57th Street, gifted to Ralph Roberts. According to Roberts, the paperweight was displayed next to a photo of Broadway star Marilyn Miller in a similar ballerina pose as the paperweight. Miller is believed to have been the inspiration for Norma Jeane's name change to "Marilyn Monroe," and Monroe herself later became "Marilyn Miller" after marrying playwright Arthur Miller. In a letter to the consignor, Roberts wrote Monroe stated, "That's the other Marilyn." Accompanied by a copy of a letter from Roberts.
Height 5 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 340, “Film and Television Memorabilia,” Christie's East, New York, Sale number 7821, December 18, 1995
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245020_0 


Lot 13: MARILYN MONROE PRESCRIPTION BOX
 A small box prescribed by Dr. Davis dispensed by Hilp’s Drug Store in Reno, Nevada, for “Mrs. Miller” and dated 09/15/60. The prescription occurs while Monroe was in Nevada working on her final completed film, The Misfits (United Artists, 1961).
2½ by 1½ inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245022_0 245023_0   


Lot 14: MARILYN MONROE PRESCRIPTION PILL BOTTLE
 A prescription pill bottle prescribed by Dr. Wechsler and dispensed by Pollock-Bailey New York for Mrs. A. Miller, dated 3/15/60. The prescription occurs while Monroe was working on Let’s Make Love (20TH Cent., 1960).
Height, 2½ inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245024_0 245025_0


Lot 44: MARILYN MONROE GIFTED MONEY CLIP
 A sterling silver money clip, engraved "To Harry" with the engraved signature in Monroe's hand "Love and Kisses/ Marilyn Monroe." The clip is stamped "Sterling CJS" to the reverse. 'Harry' is Harry Roberts, a soundman at 20th Century Fox. Originally, consigned by Harry Hooten, the grandson of Harry Roberts.
1 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
245096_0  


Lot 62: MARILYN MONROE 34TH BIRTHDAY PARTY DOLL
 A small plastic doll created in the likeness of Marilyn Monroe and distributed to guests at a party for Monroe's 34th birthday on the set of Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960) in 1960.
Height, approximately. 3 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
245160_0 245161_0 


Lot 68: MARILYN MONROE SOUVENIR
 A set of keys with a brass metal tag, originally sold as a novelty souvenir. The tag reads “M. Monroe, Dressing Room 5.”
6 ½ by 2 inches
 Estimate: $250 - $500
245177_0   


Lot 95: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE WOOD SKI
 A single wood ski with metal binding, with a label marked "Made in Czechoslovakia," and another marked "White Mountain Ski Shop New York."
Length, 65 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245261_0 245262_0 


Lot 210: MARILYN MONROE CAMERA
 A Minolta-16 subminiature 16mm camera in a brown leather case, with matching wrist strap, together with original blue box and instruction book. The Minolta model 16 was first introduced in 1957.
Camera, 1 5/8 by 3 1/8 inches
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
245437_0   


Lot 216: MARILYN MONROE JOE DiMAGGIO ELECTRIC RAZORS
 Two Norelco electric Speed shavers with zipper closure Norelco case; top leather covering has become separated from the cardboard box lid. Together with power cord, one plastic shaver cap, three cleaning brushes, two loose shaver sharpeners, one sharpener in original unopened plastic bag with instruction paper and one loose sheet of sharpener instructions.
Shaver, 3 1/2 by 4 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245447_0   


Lot 246: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MINI PINECONE TREE GIFTED FROM JOE DIMAGGIO TO MARILYN MONROE
 A mini brown wire form holiday tree made of pinecones and other tree items, dusted with glitter. Wrapped in a black tulle base. The tree was purportedly a gift from Joe DiMaggio to Marilyn Monroe one Christmas when he discovered that she did not have a tree to celebrate the holidays.
Height, 23 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245483_0  


Lot 274: MARILYN MONROE TYPEWRITER
 A Royal Quiet De Luxe model typewriter in grey with tweed style hard carrying case. Partial sticker on side reads "San Leandro Co. Sales, Repairs 614 E. 14th Street."
13 1/2 by 7 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245560_0  245561_0 


Lot 277: MARILYN MONROE VANITY CASE
 A tan leather suitcase by Mark Cross, England with hinged front panel that opens to access vanity compartment containing two tone blue vanity set including hand mirror, two empty glass bottles, glass powder container, glass jar containing hairpins, glass jar containing soap powder, hairbrush, garment brush, long glass tube bottle, small leather box containing triangular tube of lipstick, nail file, and hair comb. The top of case has custom stamped "A.L." Mark Cross is considered among the first American luxury brands that expanded its operations overseas with a store in London. It is perhaps most famous for the overnight bag it designed for Grace Kelly to use in Rear Window.
14 by 20 3/4 by 7 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500

245565_0 245566_0  245567_0 
245568_0 245569_0 


Lot 281: VINTAGE MARILYN MONROE SUITCASE
 A fabric lined luggage case with leather edging and metal hardware.
With a label reading "Royal Gascogne Bordeaux/ Garage dans L'Hotel."
8 by 25 1/4 by 14 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245574_0  245575_0 


Lot 348: MARILYN MONROE CHINESE STERLING FAN SHAPED PILLBOX
 A pillbox, the lid with a figure of a dancer, a fan with Chinese characters, and a hand. Marked "Sterling" and "Made in {...}," (partly effaced but believed to read "China"). Weight, .84 troy oz.
3/4 by 2 1/4 by 1 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245677_0 


Lot 349: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE BRASS PILLBOX
 Marked "M.R. Morais," the top inset with a 500 reis coin reading "7 de Setembro 1 Centenario da Independencia 1822-1922"
Diameter, 1 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245678_0 


Lot 63: MARILYN MONROE GIFTED BOX
 A rectangular silver tone presentation cigarette box gifted from Marilyn Monroe to Frankie Vaughan. The interior of the lid is in engraved Monroe's handwriting “Dear Frankie, It was really wonderful working with you. Best always, Marilyn.“ The box was gifted to Vaughan by Monroe at the end of filming Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960).
Approximately 9 ½ by 4 by 1 ½ inches
PROVENANCE: Lot 132, "Film and Entertainment,” Christie's, London, Sale number 5515, December 14, 2004 
Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

245162_0 


Lot 452: MARILYN MONROE MINAUDIERE
 A ladies evening minaudiere with original box reading "Pandora by Wadsworth." The small evening compact features three compartments. When opened, the center features a loose powder compartment and original cotton buffer with mirror. The top compartment features a lipstick holder, with a tube of lipstick, a clear plastic comb and two loose Mercury dimes dated 1943 and 1945. The lower compartment contains eight Philip Morris cigarettes. Each end of the gold metal case is embellished with a citrine crystal floret. The compact is accompanied by a black velvet and white silk carrying case terminating in a black tassel. The case features a gold metal ring that closes down below the wrist to hold the case in place.
Case, 4 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000

245840_0 245841_0 245842_0 
245843_0 245846_0 
245844_0 245845_0 

245847_0 245848_0 245849_0


Lot 143: MARILYN MONROE MARGIT TEVAN BRONZE CIGARETTE BOX
 A bronze lidded box with figural Old Testament scenes on the lid and partition inside. Marked "Hungarian Handmade" on the bottom.
1 by 5 by 5 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

245331_0  


Lot 847: MARILYN MONROE CIGARETTE CASE GIVEN TO JOE DiMAGGIO
 A sterling silver cigarette case given by Marilyn Monroe to Joe DiMaggio. The front of the case is engraved “Memory of Japan” with a landscape scene. The back of the case is engraved “Joe” at the center and “Love Marilyn” at lower right.
3 1/4 by 7 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $20,000 

246428_0 
246429_0 246430_0 


Lot 214: MARILYN MONROE JOE DiMAGGIO ACCESSORY CASE
 A burgundy alligator jewelry case with hinged lid, removable tan suede divided tray that fits into a partitioned interior with matching leather pad. The lid to the case features gold metal letters reading "J Dim" and a front three-digit combination lock closure with "555" code, a repetition of DiMaggio's Yankee number, 5.
20 1/2 by 11 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000

245443_0 245444_0 245445_0 


Lot 951: MARILYN MONROE UNEDITED AUDIO RECORDING OF "RUNNING WILD" AND "I WANT TO BE LOVED BY YOU"
 An unedited audio recording of Marilyn Monroe performing multiple takes of the song “Running Wild” and “I Want to be Loved by You.” Both of these songs are performed in the film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Recorded on a reel of 1/4-inch magnetic acetate tape housed in a Maestro reel box. The reel comes from the estate of Myrton Blackler who owned and operated Studio 7612, a recording studio in Hollywood. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Blackler was hired by MGM for recording sessions, including Monroe’s. On the approximately 30-minute recording, an unknown person can be heard giving Monroe direction in the background. The tape includes a CD copy of the recording.
Reel diameter, 7 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $20,000

246595_0 

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10 juillet 2016

45 things you didn't know about Marilyn Monroe

telegraph_logo

 45 things you didn't know about Marilyn Monroe
published on June, 1st, 2016
by Horatia Harrod - online Telegraph

telegraph-93572502_NOT_ORIGINAL_FILESNorma_Jeane-large_trans++eo_i_u9APj8RuoebjoAHt0k9u7HhRJvuo-ZLenGRumA 
Norma Jeane Mortenson - better known as Marilyn Monroe 

1. Marilyn was relatively poorly paid. Jane Russell was paid around 10 times as much as Marilyn when they co-starred in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Her salary for her final unfinished film, Something’s Got to Give, was $100,000. Compare that with Elizabeth Taylor, who was getting a million dollars for Cleopatra; or even Marilyn’s co-star in the film, Dean Martin, who was on $500,000. Today, her estate makes around five million dollars a year.

2. But she died having become a million-dollar movie star. In 1962 she was fired by Twentieth-Century Fox from the production of Something’s Got to Give because of her chronic lateness and no-shows (she didn’t appear for the first two weeks of filming). But on August 1, four days before her death, she was rehired by Fox on a $1million, two-picture deal.

3. She found it almost impossible to learn lines, and took 60 takes to deliver the line “It’s me, Sugar”, in Some Like it Hot.

4. She was Playboy’s first Sweetheart (later Playmate) of the Month, in 1953. Marilyn had been paid $50 to model for the picture in 1949; Hugh Hefner bought it for $500.

5. Several of the burial vaults near to Marilyn’s have been put on sale. When Elsie Poncher, the widow of the man in the vault above Marilyn’s, put his space up for sale on eBay, she received dozens of bids, including one for £2.8million.

6. Hugh Hefner owns the burial vault next to Marilyn at the Westwood Memorial Park in Los Angeles. He bought it in 1992 for £50,000.

telegraph-marilynplayboy-xlarge-large_trans++Rp36Ti1MFCYr8PMuS2fHb17hoDUspm84EYl8tHPMRlk
Marilyn Monroe on the cover of the first issue of 'Playboy'

7. She went by many names. On her birth certificate she is Norma Jeane Mortenson; she was baptised Norma Jeane Baker; she modelled under the names Jean Norman and Mona Monroe; her initial idea for a screen name was Jean Adair; she signed into hotels as Zelda Zonk and into a psychiatric clinic as Faye Miller. She only legally changed her name to Marilyn Monroe in March 1956, when she was already a star.

8. She was placed with 11 sets of foster parents after her mother, Gladys, was institutionalised. She also spent almost a year in the Children’s Aid Society Orphanage in Los Angeles.

9. Goya was her favourite artist: “I know this man very well, we have the same dreams, I have had the same dreams since I was a child.”

telegraph-Marilyn_Monroe-large_trans++JHdcdf2GVVAxqFUVx44KkG3aDu2EzoHtePRkZrtWfLs 
Marilyn Monroe poses over the updraft of a New York subway grating
during a photo session to promote the film The Seven Year Itch in September 1954
Credit: Matty Zimmerman 

10. Marilyn became a Christian Scientist at the age of 18; later in her life she dabbled in alternative spiritualities, including Anthroposophy, the philosophy espoused by Rudolf Steiner. She converted to Judaism before her 1956 marriage to Arthur Miller.

11. Her weight went up and down so dramatically during the filming of The Prince and the Showgirl that the costume designer, Beatrice Dawson, had to create facsimile dresses in different sizes. “I have two ulcers from this film,” she said, “and they’re both monogrammed MM.”

12. She was rarely without an acting coach. Her first, Natasha Lytess, worked with her for six years and 22 films, clashing with directors, whose authority she challenged, and studio heads, who paid her bills. (Marilyn also paid her a wage – and settled her £11,000 debt at the dentist.)
Later, Paula Strasberg took Lytess’s role; unlike Lytess, who tried to direct Marilyn’s every movement from behind the camera, Strasberg was consulted between takes. To coach Marilyn in The Prince and the Showgirl, she was paid $25,000 – as much as some of the featured actors were getting.

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Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl

13. For 20 years after Marilyn’s death, Joe DiMaggio arranged to have roses sent to her crypt three times a week.

14. In January 2011, Authentic Brand Groups bought the licensing rights to the Marilyn Monroe estate, for a price in the range of $30million. “On the media and entertainment side,” said the company’s chief executive, Jamie Salter, “I think she’s got a career in front of her, just based on technology.

15. At the 1999 auction of Marilyn’s effects, her white baby grand piano was bought by Mariah Carey, the singer, for $662,500. (The estimate had been $10,000-$15,000.) The piano had been bought by Marilyn’s mother, and sold after she had her breakdown, but Marilyn eventually found it and bought it back, keeping it with her until her death.

16. There was an open casket at her funeral. She wore an apple green Pucci sheath dress made of nylon jersey and a platinum wig (her head had been partially shaved during the autopsy).

17. She was thought to have been planning to remarry Joe DiMaggio at the time of her death. After the failure of their marriage, DiMaggio had undergone therapy, stopped drinking alcohol and expanded his interests beyond baseball: he and Marilyn read poetry together in these later years.

telegraph-monroedimaggio-xlarge-large_trans++Rp36Ti1MFCYr8PMuS2fHb17hoDUspm84EYl8tHPMRlk 
Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio Credit: Reuters 

18. Marilyn’s beaded Jean Louis gown, worn when she sang Happy Birthday to President Kennedy, was sold in 1999 for £820,000. At the time it was the record price for a single item of clothing, until Marilyn’s billowing white Seven Year Itch dress was put up for sale by Debbie Reynolds in 2011, where it made £2.8 million.

19. Marilyn owned many dogs during her life; her last was a Maltese terrier given to her by Frank Sinatra, which she named Maf (short for Mafia Honey). At the Christie’s sale in 1999, two Polaroids of Maf sold for £220,000.

20. Marilyn left 75 per cent of her estate to the Strasbergs; eventually this fell to Anna Strasberg, Lee Strasberg’s third wife. She vetoes the use of all images in which Marilyn wears fur, citing Marilyn’s love of animals as a reason.

21. The Anna Freud Centre, a child therapy clinic in Hampstead, north London, owns the remaining 25 per cent of Marilyn Monroe’s estate. The centre was left its share by Dr Marianne Kris, one of Marilyn’s therapists, and the original beneficiary of her will.

22. Before her marriages to Joe DiMaggio and Arthur Miller, Marilyn was married to James Dougherty. She was 16 when they tied the knot. Dougherty, who later became a detective in the LAPD, was forbidden by his second wife from going to see any of Marilyn’s films.

telegraph-marilynhusband-xlarge-large_trans++Rp36Ti1MFCYr8PMuS2fHb17hoDUspm84EYl8tHPMRlk 
 Marilyn Monroe with her first husband, James Dougherty Credit: EPA

23. Marilyn whitened her skin with hormone cream, one side effect of which was to encourage the growth of blonde down on her face; Marilyn would not remove this peach fuzz, believing that it gave her face a soft glow on camera.

24. She was never nominated for an Academy Award, but she was voted the “Oomph Girl” at Emerson Junior High in 1941; crowned Castroville’s first Artichoke Queen in 1948; and was Stars and Stripes magazine’s Miss Cheesecake of 1950.

25. She was named “The Most Advertised Girl in the World” by the Advertising Association of the West in 1953. Among the brands she represented were American Airlines, Kyron Way Diet Pills, Pabst Beer, Tan-Tan Suntan Lotion and Royal Triton Oil.

26. In 1950, Johnny Hyde, her agent, paid for her to have two plastic surgeries: a tip rhinoplasty (reshaping the soft cartilage at the end of her nose); and a chin implant.

27. She was an early devotee of yoga, and was taught by Indra Devi, a Swedish-Russian Bollywood film star who also taught Greta Garbo and Gloria Swanson.

28. Marilyn’s intervention got Ella Fitzgerald her first major engagement at a Los Angeles nightclub. In 1955 the colour bar was still in force, but Marilyn convinced the management to let Fitzgerald play by promising to sit in the front row for a week.

29. Marilyn was only the second woman to head her own production company (Mary Pickford was the first).

30. Marilyn had a fixation on Clark Gable, her co-star in The Misfits; as a young girl, Marilyn dreamed that he was her father. When he died, she said that she cried for two days.

31. She preferred to go naked. Among female studio employees – wardrobe mistresses, hairdressers, make-up artists – she often went without clothes. She gave interviews in the nude and often went out wearing nothing under the black mink that Joe DiMaggio had given her.

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Montgomery Clift, Marilyn Monroe and Clark Gable, stars of 'The Misfits' Credit: AP 

32. Writers loved her. Jean-Paul Sartre wanted her to play the role of a hysterical patient in the film Freud, for which he wrote the first draft of a screenplay; she was Truman Capote’s first choice for the part of Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

33. Marilyn’s death was ruled a “probable suicide”, but toxicology tests were only carried out on her liver. When the deputy coroner, Thomas Noguchi, tried to obtain her other organs for testing, he was told they’d been destroyed.

34. Veronica Hamel, an actress, bought Marilyn’s house in 1972. She claimed that when she was renovating the house she discovered an extensive system of wire-taps.

35. Marilyn’s hero was Abraham Lincoln: “I used to read everything I could find about him,” she wrote in her (ghosted) autobiography, My Story. “He was the only famous American who seemed most like me, at least in his childhood.

36. The books she was reading at the time of her death were Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird and Captain Newman MD, a novel by Leo Rosten based on the life of Monroe’s psychiatrist, Ralph Greenson.

37. Two men claimed paternity of Marilyn on their deathbeds: C Stanley Gifford, who both Marilyn and her mother believed was her father, but who refused to meet Marilyn when she was alive; and Edward Mortensen, who was married to her mother at the time of her birth, and whose (misspelled) surname appears on her birth certificate.

38. She was athletic. As a young married woman on Catalina Island in the early Forties, she studied weightlifting with a former Olympic champion named Howard Corrington. She later went tandem surfing with a boyfriend, Tommy Zahn, balancing on his shoulders as they cut through the waves.

39. She was a talented producer. Marilyn Monroe Productions, which she formed in 1955 with Milton Greene, the photographer, only solely produced one film, The Prince and the Showgirl. Marilyn showed her nous in winning the script: she managed to wangle a meeting with the writer, Terence Rattigan, in New York, where he was stopping over en route to Hollywood to discuss the script with the director William Wyler, luring him from the airport to a downtown bar. When Wyler failed to make him a concrete offer, Rattigan went with Monroe.

40. Many of her friends believed she was murdered. Among the potential suspects: Robert Kennedy (with whom she had had an affair); John F Kennedy (ditto); mafioso Sam Giancana; the FBI; the CIA; her psychiatrist, Ralph Greenson.

41. During the filming of Let’s Make Love, Marilyn’s no-shows added 28 days to the shooting time and $1 million to the budget.

telegraph-marilynmakeup-xlarge-large_trans++Rp36Ti1MFCYr8PMuS2fHb17hoDUspm84EYl8tHPMRlk  
Allan 'Whitey' Snyder applying Marilyn Monroe's makeup
on the set of 'Let's Make Love' Credit: AP

42. Her career in front of the camera began when she was discovered working on the assembly line at Radioplane, a munitions factory, by a photographer called David Conover.

43. Arthur Miller’s play After the Fall is generally thought to be a thinly veiled portrayal of his marriage to Marilyn. The writer James Baldwin walked out of the play because he thought that “Maggie”, the Monroe character, was written so cruelly.

telegraph-monroemiller-xlarge-large_trans++Rp36Ti1MFCYr8PMuS2fHb17hoDUspm84EYl8tHPMRlk  
 Marilyn Monroe with then-husband Arthur Miller in July 1956 Credit: AP

44. She only owned one home by herself: the house she died in at 12305 Fifth Helena Drive, Brentwood.

45. When she met Nikita Khrushchev, they discussed The Brothers Karamazov. She dreamed of playing the part of Grushenka in a film of the book.

22 mai 2016

New York Mirror 08/08/1962

1962-08-08-new_york_mirror-usa  Le journal américain de New-York New York Mirror du mercredi 8 août 1962, titre en Une "Hunt MM's Last Caller".

1962-08-08-new_york_mirror-usa-p1 
1962-08-08-new_york_mirror-usa-p1a 1962-08-08-new_york_mirror-usa-p1b 
1962-08-08-new_york_mirror-usa-p2  1962-08-08-new_york_mirror-usa-p3 

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Posté par ginieland à 16:27 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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07 mai 2016

Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction 02/2016 -2


Photographies


Lot 89009A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, an enlarged snapshot depicting the star wearing a white evening gown and a white fur coat, signed in blue ballpoint ink in the lower right corner "To Jim / Love & Kisses / Marilyn Monroe;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs); included is a black and white photograph of Collins: an original print with a matte finish, depicting Collins as a teenager in 1955 standing at a typewriter that was set up outside of a shop on an NYC street, verso is stamped in part "Life Magazine / ...Photo by Michael Rouger / ... Apr 13 1955;" Collins remembers that this photograph of him actually ran in the magazine with a caption noting what he had just typed which was "Marilyn Monroe is a beautiful girl." (Please note the photograph of MM is heavily wrinkled on the lower margin and has a 1 1/2" tear in same area which somewhat affects her signature; the photograph of Collins is heavily wrinkled with two lower corners missing.)
10" x 8"  
More Information:
"Marilyn Monroe is a beautiful girl!" were the words I was typing when as a 17 year-old, this picture of me was shot by a photographer from LifeMagazine in 1955. The photo, which actually appeared in the magazine a couple of months later, launched my own collection of Marilyn Monroe photos taken overseveral years by me and fivefellow teenage fans who became known as "The Monroe 6." During Marilyn's time in New York, I and the others photographed herin various locations around the city. We would then run to the drugstore to get our snapshots developed in multiples so that all of us could have all the shots we had taken of her (thus the reason for the different shapes and sizes of the photos my collection). In the era before Google and GPS and TMZ and smartphones, we were alerted to Marilyn's appearancesand whereabouts by sources ranging fromVariety Magazinetoher Upper East Side hairdresser. Marilyn got to know the six of us well as we journeyed around the city with her and I remember her always being gracious and friendly. We wanted nothing from her except the opportunity to take her picture or to get her autograph - and often times she would sign on the very photographs we had just taken of her the day before. After Marilyn died, I put these photographs in a closet for many decades, though over the last few years, I have posted a few of them on the Internet for fans to see. I am now ready to let others have my original 1950s-era snapshots of the movie star I had the luck and pleasure to see many times up close and in the flesh - Miss Marilyn Monroe! And she did not disappoint - she was absolutely beautiful as all these photos clearly indicate. When you saw her in person, shewas THE movie star, no doubt about it!
James Collins
New York City, 2016  
lot89009-a  lot89009-b  lot89009-c 


Lot 89010A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, Circa 1955.
An original print with a matte finish, an enlarged snapshot showing the smiling star, signed in blue fountain pen ink on the right side "Love & Kisses / Marilyn Monroe;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs); also included with an identical photograph but not signed. (Please note the ink is slightly faded but still legible and there are a number of creases throughout which somewhat detract from the image.)
7" x 5" 
lot89010-a lot89010-b 


Lot 89011A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, 1955.
An original print with a matte finish, depicting an enlarged snapshot of the star standing next to her business partner, Milton Greene, as the two attend the New York City premiere of the James Dean film, "East of Eden," on March 9, 1955, signed in brown fountain pen ink on the lower left side "Love & / Kisses / Marilyn Monroe;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note the ink is slightly faded but still legible and there are a number of creases throughout but they don't detract from the overall image.)
9 3/4" x 7 3/4" 
lot89011-a 


Lot 89012A Marilyn Monroe Signed Color Snapshot, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star outside the Gladstone Hotel in NYC (where she briefly lived) wearing a black gown, black gloves, and a white fur coat, signed in blue fountain pen ink in the lower center "Marilyn Monroe," verso has stamp reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending Mar. 12, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note the ink is noticeably smudged from the time when it was signed.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2"  
lot89012-a  lot89012-b 


Lot 89013A Marilyn Monroe Signed Color Snapshot, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star outside the Gladstone Hotel in NYC (where she briefly lived) wearing a black gown, black gloves, and a white fur coat, signed in blue fountain pen ink in the lower center "Marilyn Monroe," verso has stamp reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending Mar. 12, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note the ink is somewhat smudged from the time when it was signed.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89013-a  lot89013-b 


Lot 89014 -  
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star outside the Gladstone Hotel in NYC (where she briefly lived) wearing a black gown, black gloves, and a white fur coat, signed in blue fountain pen ink in the lower center right "Marilyn Monroe," verso has stamp reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending Mar. 12, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note the ink is somewhat smudged from the time when it was signed.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89014-a  lot89014-b 


Lot 89015 A Marilyn Monroe Signed Color Snapshot, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star inside the Gladstone Hotel in NYC (where she briefly lived) wearing a black gown, black gloves, and a white fur coat (with two men seen in the background), signed almost illegibly in blue fountain pen ink in the upper right "Marilyn Monroe," verso has stamp reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending Mar. 12, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note much of signature is invisible as the pen MM was using evidently ran out of ink.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89015-a  lot89015-b 


Lot 89016 -  A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Twenty-one total, all original prints with a glossy finish, depicting the star wearing a gold lamé gown, a black fur coat, and black gloves as she arrives with Milton Greene at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in NYC to attend a Friar's Club dinner on March 11, 1955 (which honored Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin), MM is seen either alone or among others (including Milton Berle), some snapshots are clear, others are out of focus, in three different sizes; though these images have been seen, these are the original snapshots developed and printed in 1955; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook.)
5" x 3 1/2"; 3" x 3"; 3 1/2" x 2 1/2"  
lot89016   


Lot 89017 -  A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, Circa 1955-1956.
Twenty-seven total, all original prints with a glossy finish, three different sizes, each a candid shot depicting the star as she was out and about in NYC, sometimes in casual wear, other times in cocktail attire, many showing her surrounded by others (including business partner Milton Greene, photographer Sam Shaw, and super-fans Jimmy Collins and James Haspiel, to name a few); from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and some have slight wrinkles but overall, all are still in very good condition.)
3 1/2" x 5"; 3 1/2" x 3 1/2"; 2 1/2" x 3 1/2"  
lot89017  


Lot 89018 - A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955-1956.
Twenty-two total, all original prints with a glossy finish, four different sizes, all showing the star in evening wear on about five different occasions (judging from her different dresses), many depict others with MM such as Joe DiMaggio, business partners Milton and Amy Greene, and fans; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and some are slightly wrinkled but overall, all are in very good condition.)
5" x 3 1/2"; 3 1/2" x 4 1/2"; 3 1/2" x 3 1/2"; 2 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89018 


 Lot 89019 -  A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955-1957.
Twenty-two total, all original prints with a glossy finish (except one), four different sizes, all depicting the star at various public events she attended including seven showing her with then-husband, Arthur Miller; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and some have evident wrinkling due to age.)
10" x 8" (one only); 5" x 3 1/2"; 3 1/2" x 3 1/2"; 3 1/2" x 2 1/4" 

lot89019  


Lot 89020 -  A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Twelve total, all original prints with a glossy finish, three different sizes (with four slightly trimmed from their original size), all depicting the star next to others (including her business partners, Milton and Amy Greene) as she wears a brocade evening gown and matching cape at the March 9, 1955 NYC premiere of the James Dean film, "East of Eden" ; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook.)
5" x 3 1/2"; 3" x 3"; 3 1/2" x 2 1/2" 
lot89020 


Lot 89021A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Ten total, all original prints with a glossy finish, all sequentially shot as Marilyn goes from a NYC street into a parking garage and then takes off in a car while wearing white pedal pushers, a polka-dotted shirt, white flats, and a white summer coat, five are stamped on the right side margin "Jun 55," super-fan James Haspiel appears in one (as do a few others); all originally housed in a mint green "Photo Book" from "Berkey / Photo Service;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note one photo is severely creased across MM's face.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89021-a   lot89021-b 


Lot 89022 A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Seven total, all original prints with a glossy finish, each depicting the star wearing a lamé dress and a white fur coat as she sits in the lobby of The Hotel 14 in NYC while others surround her (including Milton Berle); from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs); Collins recalls that on this night he waited for MM and her group (which included her date, Milton Berle) to come out of the Copacabana night club which was located upstairs in the same building as The Hotel 14 at 14 East 60th Street in Manhattan -- his patience paid off when he was able to snap these great candid photos of the star as well as pose next to her in one (top row, center). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook.)
4 1/2" x 3 1/4" 
lot89022 


Lot 89023A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Eight total, two different sizes, all original prints with a glossy finish, depicting the star sitting in the lobby of the Gladstone Hotel (where she briefly lived) as she wears a black dress, black jacket, and black fishnet gloves, verso of all faintly stamped "Kodak / Velox / Paper;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" and 3 1/2" x 2 1/2" 
lot89023 


Lot 89024A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Eight total, all original prints with a glossy finish, three different sizes (two being trimmed from their original size), all depicting the star wearing a white cocktail dress and white fur as she and her date, Joe DiMaggio, attend the June 1, 1955 premiere of "The Seven Year Itch" (which was also MM's 29th birthday); most images are out of focus but still of interest as this is a now-historic event in film history; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and the largest one has a 1" tear on the center right side.)
6 1/2" x 5"; 3 1/2" x 5"; 3 1/2" x 2 1/2" 
lot89024  


Lot 89025A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Color Snapshots, Mid-1950s.
Thirty-eight total, all original prints with a glossy finish, seven different sizes, depicting the star at various times over a number of years, most are candid shots though many appear to have been taken by professional photographers due to their clarity, four have stamps on the verso reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending July 2, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and some are slightly wrinkled due to age.)
5" x 3 1/2" biggest; 2 3/4" x 1 3/4" smallest  
lot89025 


Lot 89026A Marilyn Monroe Rare Black and White Snapshot, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star wearing her famous 'white dress' with a fur coat thrown over her shoulders and a script in her hand as she leaves the St. Regis hotel in New York City, getting ready to promote a film (likely "The Seven Year Itch"); though this image has been seen, this is the original snapshot developed and printed in 1955; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when this was in a scrapbook and there are slight creases on the surface seen in raking light only.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2"  
lot89026-a  lot89026-b 


Film Footage


Lot 89027A Marilyn Monroe Never-Before-Seen Piece of Color Film Footage from Korea, 1954.
Shot on 8mm, approximately 1 minute and 21 seconds long, footage shows MM walking outside with a soldier escort (as she wears pants and a bomber jacket) while dozens of other soldiers surround her (to take her photograph), then it shows her getting into a car, then it (briefly) shows her performing on stage (as she wears the purple spaghetti-strapped sequined dress); shot by the current owner's father when he was stationed in Korea, he had close access to the star during the walking sequences, but was farther away when she was on stage; the original 1954 film was on three separate reels as the soldier shot tons of footage that didn't include MM (it's of the Korean people, the landscape, and fellow American soldiers) but it has now been spliced together and put on one modern-day plastic reel; the three 1954-era metal reels are still included as is a DVD transfer so the footage can be viewed.
Plastic Reel: 7"; Metal Reels: 5" 
lot89027-b 
lot89027-a lot89027-c lot89027-d