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18 juillet 2020

Dédicace pour Maggie

Dédicace d'une photographie de Marilyn Monroe
Marilyn Monroe dedication of a photography

" To Maggie,
Joe is one of the
greatest performers
of our time.
I think
he is the most
attractive male
I have ever met,
Marilyn Monroe
"

autographe-to_maggie 

 (photographie de Marilyn avec l'équipe de BaseBall de ChicagoWhite Sox en mars 1951 )
- provenance: enchères du collectionneur Barry Halper en 1999 -
(source: site  icollector.com )


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.   

Posté par ginieland à 16:10 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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Dédicace Marilyn, Joe & O Doul -2

Autographe de Marilyn Monroe, Joe DiMaggio et de Lefty O'Doul sur une photo
à une réception à l'Impérial Hôtel lors de leur arrivée au Japon, le 01/02/1954.

Marilyn Monroe, Joe DiMaggio and Lefty O Doul signed photograph
at a reception during their arrival in Japan, in 1954/02/01.

autographe-marilyn_joe-1954-02-01-imperial_hotel 

autographe-marilyn_joe-1954-02-01-imperial_hotel-2  

autographe-marilyn_joe-1954-02-01-imperial_hotel-3 

(source: vente Heritage Auction mai 2006)


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.  

Posté par ginieland à 15:33 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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Dédicace Marilyn, Joe & O Doul -1

Autographe de Marilyn Monroe, Joe DiMaggio et de Lefty O'Doul sur une photo
à un dîner au camp de Brady Air Base à Fukuoka, au Japon, le 09/02/1954.

Marilyn Monroe, Joe DiMaggio and Lefty O Doul signed photograph
at a dinner at the Brady Air Base at Fukuoka, in Japan, in 1954/02/09.

autographe-marilyn_joe-1954-02-09-brady_air_base 

(source: vente Heritage Auction août 2017)


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.  

Posté par ginieland à 15:28 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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09 août 2019

Timbres Sierra Leone, Joe DiMaggio, 2019

mm-merchand-timbres-sierra_leone-joe-2019-a 

Posté par ginieland à 18:16 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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04 décembre 2018

Timbres République Togolaise, 2018

Série 1

stamp-togo-2018-serie1-a

stamp-togo-2018-serie1-b 


Série 2

stamp-togo-2018-serie2-a  stamp-togo-2018-serie2-d  
stamp-togo-2018-serie2-b  stamp-togo-2018-serie2-c 

Posté par ginieland à 16:36 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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16 novembre 2018

Lots Entertainment & Music Memorabilia - Heritage Auctions - 04/2018

Lots sur Marilyn Monroe des enchères
'Entertainment & Music Memorabilia'

organisées le 15 avril 2018
par Heritage Auctions
à Dallas aux Etats-Unis.


Lot 89001A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, Circa 1953.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star in one of her most famous publicity headshots, signed in blue ballpoint ink on the center right side "To Rick, / It's a pleasure to / work with you, / Marilyn Monroe" -- 'Rick' being bit-part actor Dick Ryan (who did sometimes go by 'Rick') who worked in Hollywood from the 1940s to the 1980s; consigned directly by Ryan's family. (Please note there is a dirt smudge on the upper left side and there are very slight dents on the right side seen in raking light only but image and inscription are not affected.)
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Lot 89002: A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, Circa 1953.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star in one of her well-known cheesecake publicity poses, signed in green fountain pen ink on the center right side "To Dick, / It's a pleasure to work with / you. / Marilyn Monroe" -- 'Dick' being bit-part actor Dick Ryan who worked in Hollywood from the 1940s to the 1980s; consigned directly by Ryan's family. (Please note the inscription is somewhat faded but it looks like the ink was probably running out as MM was signing it.)
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Lot 89003: A Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio Signed Menu from Their Honeymoon, 1954.
From the famous Trader Vic's restaurant in Honolulu where the couple ate dinner during their quick stop while en route to Japan and Korea, signed in blue ballpoint ink on an interior page "The food was wonderful / Marilyn Monroe DiMaggio" and "Lefty O'Doul" [one of DiMaggio's baseball buddies who accompanied them on their trip]; further signed in the same ink on another page of the menu "Joe DiMaggio." (Please note the menu is somewhat wrinkled and yellowed due to age but Monroe's signature is still clear.)
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Lot 89004: A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, Circa 1947.
Six total, all original prints with a glossy finish; four taken the same day and two taken other days, all showing MM in an outdoor setting either alone or with Aviv Wardimon (who later changed his last name to 'Blackman'); according to his distant relatives who consigned this lot, he was a security guard at one of the movie studios (most probably 20th Century Fox) who evidently struck up a friendship with the then-starlet as these images seem to indicate; also included is one extra black and white snapshot of Wardimon with actor John Carroll (who is wearing western garb on a movie set) -- coincidentially, Monroe was living with Carroll and his wife at this time. (Please note there is handwriting in blue ink on the verso of some and a faint typed note on another.)
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Lot 89005: A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Photographs, Circa 1947.
Three total, all original prints with a matte finish; all showing MM in an outdoor setting next to Aviv Wardimon (who later changed his last name to 'Blackman'); according to his distant relatives who consigned this lot, he was a security guard at one of the movie studios (most probably 20th Century Fox) who evidently struck up a friendship with the then-starlet as these images seem to indicate; also included is one extra black and white photograph of Wardimon with actor John Carroll (who is wearing a period tuxedo on a movie lot) -- coincidentially, Monroe was living with Carroll and his wife at this time. (Please note there is handwriting in blue or black ink or typed text on the verso of some; there is a small tear on the bottom margin of one; and sadly all were shot somewhat blurry.)

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Lot 89006: A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Small Black and White Publicity Photographs, Circa 1947.
Six total, all original prints with a glossy finish, each depicting the then-starlet in typical of-the-era poses; also included is a postcard featuring a black and white image of MM and others on the front next to text reading in part "Official / Souvenir / Post Card / Postmasters / Convention / Los Angeles / October 12-16, 1947" -- evidently some PR stunt poor MM was forced to do in her salad days; consigned by the family of Aviv Wardimon (see two previous lots). (Please note one image has a slight 1" tear on the top margin.)

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Lot 89007: A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Small Black and White Publicity Photographs, Circa 1947.
Nine total, all original prints with a glossy finish, each depicting the then-starlet wearing bathing suits in typical of-the-era cheesecake poses, some of which are quite uncommon; consigned by the family of Aviv Wardimon (see three previous lots). (Please note there is slight wrinkling and/or staining on a few.)
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Lot 89008: A Marilyn Monroe Group of Black and White Never-Before-Seen Snapshots from Korea, 1954.
Six total, all original prints with a glossy finish, shot by a soldier on base; three depict the star in a bomber jacket and pants; three depict her on stage in her spaghetti-strapped dress; though similar to hundreds we've already seen, we have not seen these exact ones before!

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Lot 89009: A Marilyn Monroe-Related Group of Black and White Film Stills from "Some Like It Hot." United Artists, 1959.
Eighteen total, all original prints with with either a glossy or semi-gloss finish; comprising five 11" x 14" ones and thirteen 8" x 10" ones; with thirteen showing Marilyn (either alone or with other cast members) and five showing people such as Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon, and director Billy Wilder, among others. (Please note some photographs exhibit minor wear and curling at the edges.) 
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Lot 89653: A Marilyn Monroe Group of B&W Photographs by Jean Howard, 1953.
Seven total, all original prints with a glossy finish, all depicting MM mainly with co-star Betty Grable but also with Lauren Bacall and William Powell (while director Jean Negulesco appears in four) on the set of their 1953 20th Century Fox film, "How To Marry A Millionaire," all shot by Jean Howard -- the 1930s-era actress turned photographer who was married to the Hollywood power player Charles K. Feldman who was MM's agent for a number of years; Howard had access to the set of this now-classic film for a few days where she shot a number of still photographs in-between and during filming; directly from Howard's own files as consigned to this auction by her grand-niece. (Please note the negatives, which are not included, appear to have been scratched or dusty when the photographs were printed.)

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Lot 89654: A Marilyn Monroe Group of B&W Photographs by Jean Howard, 1953.
Five total, all original prints with a glossy finish, all depicting MM and co-stars Lauren Bacall and William Powell on the set of their 1953 20th Century Fox film, "How To Marry A Millionaire," all shot by Jean Howard -- the 1930s-era actress turned photographer who was married to the Hollywood power player Charles K. Feldman who was MM's agent for a number of years; Howard had access to the set of this now-classic film for a few days where she shot a number of still photographs in-between and during filming; directly from Howard's own files as consigned to this auction by her grand-niece. (Please note the negatives, which are not included, appear to have been scratched or dusty when the photographs were printed.)

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Lot 89655: A Marilyn Monroe Group of B&W Photographs by Jean Howard, 1953.
Five total, all original prints with a glossy finish, all depicting MM and co-star William Powell on the set of their 1953 20th Century Fox film, "How To Marry A Millionaire," all shot by Jean Howard -- the 1930s-era actress turned photographer who was married to the Hollywood power player Charles K. Feldman who was MM's agent for a number of years; Howard had access to the set of this now-classic film for a few days where she shot a number of still photographs in-between and during filming; directly from Howard's own files as consigned to this auction by her grand-niece. (Please note the negatives, which are not included, appear to have been scratched or dusty when the photographs were printed; four have slight paper loss in the corners but main images are not affected.)

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Lot 89656: A Marilyn Monroe Group of B&W Photographs by Jean Howard, 1953.
Four total, all original prints with a glossy finish, all depicting MM and co-stars Lauren Bacall, Rory Calhoun, and Betty Grable on the set of their 1953 20th Century Fox film, "How To Marry A Millionaire," all shot by Jean Howard -- the 1930s-era actress turned photographer who was married to the Hollywood power player Charles K. Feldman who was MM's agent for a number of years; Howard had access to the set of this now-classic film for a few days where she shot a number of still photographs in-between and during filming; directly from Howard's own files as consigned to this auction by her grand-niece. (Please note the negatives, which are not included, appear to have been scratched or dusty when the photographs were printed.)

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Lot 89657: A Marilyn Monroe Group of B&W Photographs by Jean Howard, 1953.
Four total, all original prints with a glossy finish, all depicting MM, Lauren Bacall, and William Powell on the set of their 1953 20th Century Fox film, "How To Marry A Millionaire," all shot by Jean Howard -- the 1930s-era actress turned photographer who was married to the Hollywood power player Charles K. Feldman who was MM's agent for a number of years; Howard had access to the set of this now-classic film for a few days where she shot a number of still photographs in-between and during filming; directly from Howard's own files as consigned to this auction by her grand-niece. (Please note the negatives, which are not included, appear to have been scratched or dusty when the photographs were printed.)

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Lot 89658: A Marilyn Monroe Pair of B&W Photographs by Jean Howard, 1953.
Both original prints with a glossy finish, both depicting MM and co-star Lauren Bacall on the set of their 1953 20th Century Fox film, "How To Marry A Millionaire," both shot by Jean Howard -- the 1930s-era actress turned photographer who was married to the Hollywood power player Charles K. Feldman who was MM's agent for a number of years; Howard had access to the set of this now-classic film for a few days where she shot a number of still photographs in-between and during filming; directly from Howard's own files as consigned to this auction by her grand-niece.

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Lot 89659A Marilyn Monroe-Related Group of Documents, 1955-1956.
Three total including:
1) an invoice addressed to "Mlle. Marilyn Monroe / Hotel Waldorf-Astoria / Park Avenue / New York City" from 'Signorina Eugenia Inc.,' dated "June 29, 1955," in the amount of "$39.14 for special order shoes;"
2) a check from 'Marilyn Monroe Productions, Inc.,' dated "July 14, 1955," to the shoemaker, interestingly signed in black fountain pen ink in the lower right corner "Milton H. Greene" [her short-lived business partner in MMP, Inc.];
and 3) another check from MMP, Inc., dated "Feb 3, 1956," written out to MM in the amount of "$404.30," also signed by Greene in blue ballpoint ink. (Please note there is a small hole in the upper center of the invoice and its original fold marks are still evident.)

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Lot 89660: A Marilyn Monroe Collectible Outdoor Thermometer, Circa 1970s.
Oblong, made of tin, depicting the star from "The Seven Year Itch" though text reads "Some / Like / It / Hot!;" further text on the lower margin reads "Nostalgia Lane, Inc. New York, New York." (Please note there are rust stains throughout due to age.)

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Lot 89661: A Marilyn Monroe Display Piece Related to "The Prince and the Showgirl." Warner Bros., 1957.
Featuring ten trimmed film cells from the beloved romantic comedy mounted in a shadow box around a miniature facsimile of the film's poster, with a placard below reading "Marilyn Monroe / 'The Prince and the Showgirl' / Limited Edition Filmcell #20 : 100." (Please note the glass covering the back of the display exhibits a diagonal crack going through the top-left corner.)

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Lot 89662: A Marilyn Monroe "Life" Magazine, 1952.
An April 7, 1952 issue of the periodical featuring Monroe on the cover with the words "Marilyn Monroe / The Talk of Hollywood" to the left of the star; inside, a mostly-pictorial four-page story on Monroe begins on page 101. (Please note the magazine is toned, very fragile, with flaking to the edges of each page.)

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© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.

06 mai 2018

Icons and Idols: Hollywood - 11/2017 - Julien's Auction

Photographies diverses


Lot 129: VINTAGE PUBLICITY IMAGES
A group of 15 vintage publicity images of Hollywood celebrities including Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor, Elvis Presley, Betty Grable, Rita Hayworth (whose name has been written on the photograph), and Shirley Temple. Accompanied by an envelope of news clippings and other ephemera primarily related to Monroe.
Estimate: $200 - $400 | Winning Bid: $256
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Lot 130: MARILYN MONROE NEGATIVE, CIRCA 1947
A black and white negative of Marilyn Monroe, believed to have been taken on the Fox Studios back lot set by Joseph Jasgur, circa 1947. Accompanied by a black and white photograph recently printed from this negative.
Estimate: $500 - $1,000 | Winning Bid: $640
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Lot 141: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE SILKSCREEN PRINT
A limited edition silkscreen print of a Milton Greene photograph of Marilyn Monroe, taken during the famed "Black Sitting" photo session in New York in 1956. Printed later. Signed by the artist in pencil lower right, “AP” lower left.
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $1,280
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 Lot 142: MARILYN MONROE BERT STERN PHOTOGRAPH
A photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken in 1962 by Bert Stern during “The Last Sitting.” The black and white image was printed and signed by the artist in 1994; it is numbered on the photographer's stamp 91/5000. Stern wrote in the lower margin “Marilyn 1962 Bert Stern.”
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $1,600
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Lot 145: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY MANFRED KREINER
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner. The image shows Monroe walking onto a photo set and is marked with red pencil. Photographer’s stamp on verso (multiple times) with handwritten notation in red pencil. Accompanied by a small typed message written in German regarding Monroe and this photograph.
Estimate: $600 - $800 | Winning Bid: $448
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 Lot 146: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY MANFRED KREINER
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner. The image shows Monroe descending an airplane staircase and has been scribbled on in red ink. Photographer’s stamp on verso with handwritten notation in pencil and the words “Kill Kill” in red ink. “Kill” here refers to the fact that Monroe did not want this image published. Accompanied by a small typed message written in German by Kreiner regarding Monroe and this photograph.
Estimate: $600 - $800 | Winning Bid: $640 
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Lot 147: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
A group of three original never before seen original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 30, 1958, as she exited her apartment at 444 East 57th Street in New York City. Just three days prior, Monroe was photographed by Richard Avedon for Life magazine.
PROVENANCE Lot 755, "Marilyn Monroe Auction," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, November 17, 2016 
Estimate: $800 - $1,200 | Winning Bid: $1,024
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Lot 156: SOME LIKE IT HOT BEHIND-THE-SCENES SLIDES WITH COPYRIGHT
A group of 23 original color slides taken on the set of Some Like It Hot (United Artists, 1959) sold with copyright to the images. The slides include approximately eight images of Marilyn Monroe and five of Tony Curtis, among others on and around the set of the film, including Coronado Beach.
While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection of copyright given.
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $1280
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Lot 159: MARILYN MONROE PRINT BY RUSSELL YOUNG (BRITISH, 1959)
A screenprint on paper titled “Marilyn in Korea (Pink + Midori Blue)” by Russell Young, signed by the artist at lower right and numbered 10/50. Additionally marked in pencil on verso in an unknown hand “56105/ 12.”
Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000 | unsold
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Photographies Bruno Bernard


Lot 134: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
A black and white pin-up photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard, circa 1946. According to the book Marilyn: Intimate Exposures by Susan Bernard “Marilyn said to Mr. Bernard ‘Can you take some sexy pictures of me?’ and he replied ‘But Norma, you are the girl next door.” Estate signed at lower right and numbered 1/90.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $2,500 - $3,000 | unsold
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Lot 135: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard, circa 1946, titled “Norma Jean Sailor Girl.” This is a seldom seen outtake photograph from a shoot intended for magazine cover images. Estate signed at lower right and numbered 5/50.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $2,500 - $3,200 | unsold
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Lot 136: MARIYLN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1953. This photograph was taken of Monroe backstage at the Hollywood Bowl for an appearance benefiting St. Jude’s. Monroe wore a costume from the film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953). Estate signed at lower right and numbered 6/90.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000 | unsold
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Lot 137: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1953. This photograph was taken of Monroe backstage at the Hollywood Bowl deciding what message to describe on a guest wall at a charity event benefiting St. Jude’s. This image was never published and comes from a contact sheet of artist’s proofs. Estate signed at lower right and numbered 6/90.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000 | Winning Bid: $2,560
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Lot 138: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1954. The photograph shows Monroe on the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) having her makeup applied by Whitey Snyder. According to the book Marilyn: Intimate Exposures by Susan Bernard, Snyder stated that this is the only color photograph of himself and Monroe that he had ever seen. Estate signed at lower right and numbered 5/50.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500 | Winning Bid: $1,920

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Lot 139: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1954. The photograph shows Monroe in a screening room at the 20th Century Fox studios wearing her iconic white dress from the film The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). Estate signed at lower right and numbered 14/50.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $2,500 - $3,000 | Winning Bid: $3,437.50

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Lot 140: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
An original vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard on the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) and signed by Bernard on verso “Bernard of Hollywood.” Housed in a Bernard of Hollywood vintage photograph folder.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $10,000 - $20,000 | unsold

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Vêtements & Accessoires


 Lot 143: MARILYN MONROE WORN BLACK COLOBUS COAT
A mid-1940s black colobus coat worn by Marilyn Monroe to the 1948 film premiere of The Emperor Waltz (Paramount, 1948). The coat has broad shoulders, a cordé collar, a satin lining, and a Jerrold's Van Nuys, Calif. label. Although the black colobus is currently on the endangered species list, it was quite fashionable in the 1940s. Monroe wrote in a letter to Grace Goddard dated December 3, 1944, "I found out that its [sic] possible to buy a Gold Coast Monkey Coat. I shall write to you about it later." The coat was gifted from Monroe to Jacquita M. Rigoni (Warren), who was the great-niece to Anne Karger, mother of Monroe's voice coach, Freddie Karger. Monroe had a close relationship with the family, and the coat has remained in their possession. Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Jacqui Rigoni detailing the family's relationship to Monroe and the history of the coat.
The monkey species used to make this Marilyn Monroe monkey fur coat is on the Endangered Species list. U.S. Endangered Species Act regulations required by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service impose certain regulations on the sale of this coat. Please read the following carefully:
Please read the following carefully: The Marilyn Monroe monkey fur coat may be sold to a resident of California without requiring a Federal permit. A non-California resident may bid on this coat and if he or she were the winning bidder could apply for a Federal permit to remove the coat from the state of California. Julien’s has been advised that a Federal permit would likely be REFUSED by the governing offices. It is vehemently advised that non-residents of California DO NOT bid on this Marilyn Monroe owned monkey fur coat. If you bid on this lot and are unable to obtain a permit Julien’s has no liability and will be unable to refund you for your purchase.
A California resident who purchases this coat and later moves from California to another state would not be required to obtain a permit if he or she maintained ownership of the coat when changing state of residence. However, the owner would need to make sure there are no state regulations prohibiting the transfer of the coat from one state to another.
Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000 | Winning Bid: $32,000

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Lot 144: MARILYN MONROE FAN FROM THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL
A vintage lace fan used by Marilyn Monroe in the film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). The folding hand fan is used by Monroe in the ballroom scene in the film. The frame and guard are embellished with floral motif carvings embellished with pink, blue, and gold-metallic paint. The accompanying letter from the consignor explains that the fan was gifted by Monroe to William Louis George Le Brun, known as Louis Le Brun in the film industry, who was the Chief Production Accountant for Warner Bros. in the United Kingdom. When Monroe was taken ill while filming, Le Brun, who was responsible for overseeing the distribution of all finances, which involved the insurance and wellbeing of the cast and production team, stayed by her side. As a thank-you, Monroe gave him this fan, or more specifically gave the fan to his wife as an apology for keeping Le Brun from his family. At the time the fan was received several of the fan blades were broken, presumed to be from use during filming. The fan has remained in the possession of the Le Brun family since the gift was made by Monroe.
Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000 | Winning Bid: $10,000 

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Lot 149: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MINI PINECONE TREE GIFTED FROM JOE DIMAGGIO TO MARILYN MONROE
A mini brown wire form holiday tree made of pinecones and other tree items, dusted with glitter. Wrapped in a black tulle base. The tree was purportedly a gift from Joe DiMaggio to Marilyn Monroe one Christmas when he discovered that she did not have a tree to celebrate the holidays.
Height, 23 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 246, "Marilyn Monroe: Property from The Estate of Lee Strasberg," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, November 17-19, 2016
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000 | Winning Bid: $7,500 

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Lot 150: MARILYN MONROE ROCOCO STYLE COFFEE TABLE
A carved wood coffee table with canted edges and inset parchment top.
PROVENANCE Lot 558, "Marilyn Monroe: Property from The Estate of Lee Strasberg," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, November 17-19, 2016
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $2,880

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Lot 151: MARILYN MONROE FLOWER SWAG
Gold tone wirework floral wall ornament, with enameled blue and purple flowers formed from Australian pennies dated 1942. Two leaves and one flower detached.
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 456, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27-28, 1999
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | unsold

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Lot 153: MARILYN MONROE MIRROR
A small handheld sterling silver mirror accompanied by a handwritten note reading in full on the recto: “11/1/00/ This make-up mirror was owned/ by Marilyn Monroe. It was left in/ her 57 St Apart-/ ment when she/ moved to California./ The super of/ the building/ ”liberated” it.’ Hopefully, you/ will find a good/ home for it!/ Thanks./ Terry Seymour (212) 777-0157” as well as “Mrs. S:/ will write thank you/ letter when donate it”; on the verso is “Super’s daughter used it/ a few years. T. Seymour/ in real estate, were (sic)/ selling MM apartment a few/ years ago./ Super gave it to her./ Super said/ MM bought it in/ London, used it/ a lot at home./ I thanked her and said/ you would like to/ donate it to Hollygrove.”
Approximate diameter, 7 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 224, “Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe,” Julien’s Auctions, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000 | Winning Bid: $1,920

270866_0  270867_0  
270868_0  270869_0  


Lot 154: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ABSTRACT PARCEL GILT FAN
A folding paper Japanese hand fan with abstract parcel gilt decoration.
15 1/2 by 24 1/2 by 2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 244, "Marilyn Monroe: Property from The Estate of Lee Strasberg," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, November 17-19, 2016
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $1,024
270870_0 


Documents papiers


Lot 131: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTER FROM UNCLE ART
A double-sided two-page letter written to Marilyn Monroe from "Uncle Art," who was a relative of Monroe's foster mother, Grace Goddard. The letter reads in part "So glad you are making satisfactory progress in school. I advise that you be particularly diligent in the cultural subjects...sad is the fate of the young woman who has not the ambition to so model and mold her language and conduct as to have [illegible] herself to the point where she can mingle with cultured people inconspicuously." The letter is written on International Correspondence Schools of Scranton, Pennsylvania, stationery, undated and signed "Devotedly Yours, Uncle Art."
PROVENANCE Sotheby’s Parke-Bernet, Sale number 94, October 21, 1973
Estimate: $500 - $1,000 | Winning Bid: $640
270816_0  


 Lot 133: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CHECK TO JAX
A Marilyn Monroe completed and signed Jax counter check in the amount of $63.83; address is listed as the Beverly Carlton Hotel. Monroe did not fill in the date; the check is stamped on verso May 12, 1952.
Estimate: $500 - $1,000 | Winning Bid: $640
270820_0  270821_0   


Lot 148: MARILYN MONROE 1954 SIGNED CHECK
A counter check fully completed and signed by Marilyn Monroe. The check is dated October 11, 1954, to The Christian Community in the amount of $50.00. On October 6, 1954, Monroe announced her separation from then-husband Joe DiMaggio.
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000 | Winning Bid: $4,480
270859_0  270860_0 


 Lot 152: MARILYN MONROE SKIN CARE REGIME INSTRUCTIONS
A typed instruction sheet dated June 11, 1958, for Marilyn Monroe’s skin care regime from the Erno Laszlo Institute. The instructions are for morning care of skin, evening “ ’if’ dressing” for formal occasions, and in the evening before retiring. The sheet also includes a list of foods not to eat.
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 334, "Marilyn Monroe: Property from The Estate of Lee Strasberg," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, November 17-19, 2016
Estimate: $400 - $600 | Winning Bid: $3,840
270865_0 


 Lot 155: MARILYN MONROE BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S SCRIPT AND REPORT
A clean copy of the screenplay for Breakfast at Tiffany's written by George Axelrod and dated July 9, 1959. Monroe was considering the part, and she sought the opinions of her professional team including the Strasbergs, her husband, and management team. The script is accompanied by a single-page, typed "report" dated September 23, 1959, which also has the name "Parone" typed to the left of the date. Literary luminary Edward Parone was at the time running Monroe's production company and most likely is the one who wrote this single-page, scathing review of the script, leading with the simple sentence, "I think not." It goes on to criticize the screenplay, determining, "I can see Marilyn playing a part like Holly and even giving this present one all the elan it badly needs, but I don't feel she should play it: it lacks insight and warmth and reality and importance." It has been long reported that Monroe declined the part upon the advice of Lee Strasberg, but this document provides further evidence that other people in her inner circle advised her not to take the role. Together with a four-page shooting schedule for November 4, 1960, for the film.
PROVENANCE Lot 441, "Marilyn Monroe: Property from The Estate of Lee Strasberg," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, November 17-19, 2016
Estimate: $6,000 - $9,000 | Winning Bid: $12,500

270871_0 
270872_0 


Lot 160: JOHN F. KENNEDY 1962 BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION PROGRAM
A program from President John F. Kennedy's birthday celebration at Madison Square Garden, New York, in 1962. The program, with "Happy Birthday Mr. President" and an image of Kennedy on the cover, lists the entertainers of the evening: Marilyn Monroe - who sang her now-famous rendition of "Happy Birthday" to Kennedy, Ella Fitzgerald, Maria Callas, Henry Fonda, Peggy Lee, and Danny Kaye, among others.
Estimate: $600 - $800 | Winning Bid: $1,600 

270887_0  270888_0  


Medical


Lot 157: MARILYN MONROE PELVIC X-RAY
A Marilyn Monroe pelvic X-ray dated November 9, 1954. Information ghost printed in the upper right of the X-ray reads "Cedars of Lebanon Hospital/ Drs. E. Freedman and S. Finck/ Name Di Maggio, Mrs. Marilyn/ No. 50612 Date 11-9-54/ Ref. By Dr. L. Krohn." Dr. Leon Krohn was Monroe’s gynecologist.
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000 | Winning Bid: $3,840
270876_0 
270877_0 


Lot 158: MARILYN MONROE MEDICAL FILE
A medical file pertaining to cosmetic surgery performed on Marilyn Monroe. The file includes facial X-rays and doctors' notes from the office of Dr. Michael Gurdin, M.D., and the X-ray office of Drs. Conti and Steinberg. Dr. Gurdin's chart on Monroe begins on July 14, 1958, and lists the patient as Marilyn Miller with addresses in New York and Los Angeles. The chief complaint listed is "chin deformity" and goes on to give a medical history that begins in 1950 and ends in 1962. Listed are a 1956 bout of neutropenia in England; 1957 ectopic pregnancy in New York; and 1950 cartilage implant in chin that the doctor observed had slowly begun to dissolve. Those with knowledge of the implant procedure have explained that this was done in association with a tip rhinoplasty, a procedure involving the tip of Monroe's nose only, not the bones. The last entry is dated June 7, 1962, and reports a fall at between 2 and 3 a.m. resulting in swelling and tenderness of the nose. Monroe was brought to Dr. Gurdin by her psychoanalyst, Dr. Ralph Greenson. Monroe was referred to Drs. Conti and Steinberg for X-rays. For her visit to the radiologists she was given the alias "Miss Joan Newman," and that name appears on the paperwork with Monroe's Brentwood home address. Six X-rays are in the folder: a frontal facial bones X-ray; a smaller X-ray that is a composite of the right and left sides of her nasal bones; and four small dental X-rays into the roof of Monroe's mouth, looking upward toward the nasal bones. The conclusion, written by Dr. Conti and dated June 7, 1962, is that there was no damage to Monroe's nose due to her fall. A more recent evaluation of the X-rays indicates a very minute hairline fracture of this bone. Monroe had turned 36 less than a week earlier. On June 8, the following day, Monroe was fired from the film Something's Got to Give (20th Century Fox, 1962).
Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000 | unsold
270878_0 270879_0 270880_0 
270881_0 270882_0 
270883_0 270884_0 


Presse


Lot 132: PLAYBOY MAGAZINE FIRST ISSUE SIGNED BY HUGH HEFNER
An original first issue of Playboy magazine (HMH Publishing, 1953) featuring Marilyn Monroe on the cover and signed by Hugh Hefner. The magazine, which launched in December 1953, sold for 50 cents a copy. Housed in a protective plastic case.
  Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000 | Winning Bid: $12,800
270817_0  270819_0 
270818_0 


Art


Lot 198: AL HIRSCHFELD ABE HIRSCHFELD PRINT
A print of Al Hirschfeld’s "Abe Hirschfeld and Friends" caricature commissioned by Abe Hirschfeld in 1988. The image shows Abe surrounded by Shirley MacLaine, Luciano Pavarotti, Michael Jackson, Jackie Mason, Anthony Quinn, Donald Trump, Barbra Streisand, Carol Channing, Jackie Onassis, Jackie Gleason, Elvis Presley, and Marilyn Monroe. With a faded inscription that reads "To Mary [illegible] With appreciation from all of us Abe Hirschfeld."
Estimate: $100 - $300 | Winning Bid: $1,600
270994_0   


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.

14 janvier 2018

TV - Cette semaine là

gif_tvmarilyn

 Dimanche 14 janvier 2018 - 15h15 - France 3
à revoir en replay pendant 7 jours

Magasine:  Cette semaine là

Présentation: Wendy Bouchard

un sujet est consacré au mariage de Marilyn Monroe et Joe DiMaggio
(date du 14 janvier 1954)

Posté par ginieland à 15:19 - - Commentaires [12] - Permalien [#]
Tags : ,

23 février 2017

Saturday Evening Post, 1956/05/19

Saturday Evening Post
- The New Marilyn Monroe - Part 3

1956-05-19-saturday_evening_post-cover 

pays magazine: USA
paru le 19 mai 1956
article: 3ème partie "The New Marilyn Monroe"
en ligne sur saturdayeveningpost.com


Blonde, Incorporated
By Pete Martin
Originally published on May 19, 1956
The story of Marilyn’s brief marriage to Joe DiMaggio, her battle with Hollywood, and her surprising new career.

SEP-3-01 
Milton Greene, vice-president of Marilyn Monroe Productions, playwright Terence
Rattigan, Sir Lawrence Olivier and Marilyn in New York. The occasion: To announce
plans for a movie version cf a Rattigan play, costarring Olivier and Monroe. (Hans Knopf, © SEPS)

I put this question to my friend and confidant, whom I call Flack Jones: “How did Joe DiMaggio happen to come into Marilyn’s life?” Jones is one of my principal sources of Marilyn Monroe information. As a skilled and articulate employee of the publicity department of the 20th Century-Fox motion-picture studio, he had worked closely with Marilyn for several years before her highly publicized departure from Hollywood to live in New York and “learn to be an actress.”

“Marilyn met him in a café one night on a blind double date,” Jones said. “DiMaggio had heard about her and wanted to meet her. They met through friends and had dinner. Everything went just fine and dandy, until ultimately their friendship ripened into a romance which led to their marriage.

“But to complicate things, late in 1952 she decided to mix her first holdout with her romance,” Flack Jones said. Then he corrected himself, “It must have been ’53, for she had made River of No Return and How to Marry a Millionaire. Anyhow, she decided — or else her confidential advisers had persuaded her — that she was worth more money. But instead of stalking into Darryl Zanuck’s office, slapping her next script down and saying, ‘I won’t do it!’ she simply hid out. She sneaked down alleys, didn’t answer her phone and couldn’t be reached by anybody.

“This was before she ran off and married Joe DiMaggio, and the studio was taking a firm tone with her — a very firm tone. But when the romance reached full flower, the studio had to do a fast switch,” Jones said. “Here we were, issuing communiqués about this ‘silly and stubborn girl who was ill-advised enough not to come back and take this important part’ in whatever the picture was — Pink Tights, I think — when all of a sudden she ups and marries Joe, the All-American Boy. After that, if we kept on beefing about her absence, the studio would be the big bully in the plot so far as the public was concerned.

“Then, to add to the studio’s confusion, the pair went off to Korea to entertain the troops. How are you going to snap a blacksnake whip at a girl’s calves for doing a thing like that? Snow White has married Prince Charming and they’ve gone off to Korea together to entertain the servicemen. So the studio started talking sweet in a hurry.

“However, the sharp-eyed and cynical could tell that that marriage was in danger as early as their arrival in the Orient,” Flack Jones went on. “The press interviewed Marilyn in Tokyo, and a story was radioed back which said that Marilyn had talked about this and about that, and — oh yes — there was a man in the far corner of the room whose name was Joe DiMaggio. It didn’t take much of a genius to figure that situation was the beginning of the end. Then, after an interval, the lovebirds flew back to Beverly Hills.”

“Did the studio start having its troubles making her report for work before she married DiMaggio or after she married him?” I asked.

“We were having trouble before,” Flack Jones told me.

“When was the first fly in the Monroe-Fox ointment?” I asked.

“I don’t know the exact time,” he said. “But it was not peculiar to Monroe alone. It’s peculiar to life in Hollywood. It almost invariably happens when money and success make an impact on a male or female ego. We expect it to set in when the fan mail of the party in question zooms up to over two thousand a week. It’s almost as much of a sure thing as the thermostat in your house turning on the heat. Two thousand fan letters a week is when we begin to say. ‘We’ll be having troubles with this doll.”

“What form does it usually take?” I asked. “‘I want more dough,’ or ‘I don’t like my contract.’ or ‘My script stinks’?”

“A better way to answer your question is to say that when they realize they’ve got weight to throw around, they start throwing it,” Flack Jones said. “They don’t do those things you mentioned right away; they do less serious things first. They complain about wardrobe, or, if it’s a musical, they complain about the songs or the dances, or, if it’s a plain comedy or a straight drama, they gripe about how a certain scene is being directed. Whatever’s handy, that’s what they complain about. It makes no sense, but it’s a means of saying that they have some weight now, and they want you to know it.”

“What’s the next move?” I asked.

Flack Jones rubbed his fingers over his scalp thoughtfully and said, “Ordinarily it’s a preliminary test of strength, like bracing the front office for more dough for your dramatic coach.

“When she found out that she had that much weight, she decided to go out for herself, and she did. Some people think that she has always been a naive, flibbertigibbet girl moving through life. This is utter nonsense. She wasn’t that way when she first was under contract; she was a grown person then. She kept her dates, she was always on time.”

From now on,” Jones said, “what I say is merely my own opinion, but I think that it was then that she discovered that there are people in Hollywood who respect other people who kick their teeth in. That’s not just Hollywood for you. Most people do.”

“Let’s cut to the split-up between Joe and Marilyn,” I said. “As I recall it, first there were rumors of strife, then things reached an impasse.”

“Joe and Marilyn had a rented house on Palm Drive, in Beverly Hills,” Jones said. “We had a unique situation there with the embattled ex-lovebirds both cooped in the same cage. Marilyn was living on the second floor and Joe was camping on the first floor. Then a famous attorney, Jerry Giesler, was brought into the act for Marilyn, although why they had to employ such a great lawyer to handle a simple divorce case I don’t know. The public was all worked up, the press was, too, and they’re circling the house like Indians loping around a wagon tram, waiting for somebody to poke a head out. The next move was Giesler’s announcement that came Wednesday, at eleven o’clock, Marilyn would hold a press conference in his office.

“In the Fox publicity department,” Jones said, “we concluded that if you call a press conference in a lawyer’s office, it presupposes an obligation to say something, and what could Snow White say when she was breaking up with Prince Charming, or Cinderella say when she was splitting from the All-American Boy? Any press conference would only bring more characters out to chase Marilyn from her house to Giesler’s office. And once they got there, if anybody issued one of those ‘They’re just a young couple who couldn’t make a go of it’ statements, it would only irritate everybody.

“So the studio issued a statement of its own in advance. We said that Marilyn wasn’t going to hold any press conference, but she’d be leaving for work at ten o’clock from her house, to fulfill her commitment on Seven Year Itch, based on the Broadway play of the same name and costarring Tom Ewell, in Cinemascope. Once we’d got in that plug, we said that while we didn’t promise an interview, the boys would get some pictures. So forty or fifty of the press congregated. In addition, there were several hundred volunteer reporters and photographers in the trees and trampling the lawn.

“Then an unbelievable thing happened,” Flack Jones said. He grinned when he thought of it. “They were all there to get a picture of Marilyn going to work, because it would be the first picture since her announcement that she wanted a divorce, and all at once, in front of the house a great, big, beautiful automobile pulled up. In it was a friend of Joe’s from San Francisco. As I’ve said, Joe’s been in that house for three days on the first floor, with Marilyn on the second. There was a back alley, and a rejected husband could have snuck out of that back alley and disappeared if he’d wanted to. But Joe faced up to his responsibilities and took them like a man. So what do the press and newsreels get? A bonus! Out of the front door comes Joe, grim-lipped, walking the last long mile, with his pal carrying his suitcase.

“The press stopped him on the lawn, but Joe had no comment to make. They got pictures of him as he climbed into the car slowly, and one guy asked, ‘Where you going, Joe?’

“‘I’m going home,’ Joe said.

“‘We thought this was your home, Joe,’ chirped the press like a Greek chorus.

“San Francisco has always been my home,’ Joe said. He stood there waving farewell, then he drove away.”

Looking at Flack Jones, I could see that he was still marveling at a scene which no press agent would have thought of inventing in his wildest dreams. He said, “I’ve always admired Joe for that. A lot of guys would have sneaked out the back way and gone to San Francisco, avoiding that encounter in the front yard. Not old Joe.

“About ten minutes later, Marilyn came down the stairs, sobbing, on Giesler’s arm. She was all broken up. Everybody was shoving and pushing. A lady columnist kicked the crime reporter for the Los Angeles Mirror in the shins. He turned on her and asked, ‘Who do you think you’re kicking?’ and she said, ‘I’ll kick you in the pants if you don’t get out of my way.’ All in all, there was quite a hubbub. The newsreel guys were grinding away, and somebody asked, ‘How about Joe, Marilyn?’ and Marilyn said, between sobs, ‘1 can’t talk! I can’t!’ And she got in a car and drove off.”

1956-05-19-SEP-pic1  Later, when I talked to Marilyn in New York, I guided our conversation around to a story written by Aline Mosby, of the United Press. The story was about how Marilyn had told her that she had bought Joe a king-size, eight-foot bed because she didn’t approve of separate bedrooms. “People say it’s chic to have separate bedrooms,” Marilyn told me. “That way a man can have a place for his fishing equipment and guns as well as sleeping, and a woman can have a fluffy, ruffly place with rows and rows of perfume bottles. The way I feel, they ought to share the same bedroom. With a separate-bedroom deal, if you happen to think of something you want to say, it means you have to go traipsing down the hall, and you may be tired. For that matter, you may forget what you started out to say. Besides, separate bedrooms are lonely. I think that people need human warmth even when they’re asleep and unconscious.”

There were other things I wanted to ask her. “I’ve heard that in Asphalt Jungle you displayed a highly individual way of walking that called attention to you and made you stand out. I’ve heard a lot of people try to describe the way you walk, and some of those descriptions are pretty lurid. How do you describe it?”

She leaned forward, placed her elbows on a table and cupped her chin in her palms. She was very effective that way. “I’ve never deliberately done anything about the way I walk,” she said. “People say I walk all wiggly and wobbly, but I don’t know what they mean. I just walk. I’ve never wiggled deliberately in my life, but all my life I’ve had trouble with people who say I do. In high school the other girls asked me, ‘Why do you walk down the hall that way?’ I guess the boys must have been watching me and it made the other girls jealous or something, but I said, ‘I learned to walk when I was ten months old, and I’ve been walking this way ever since.’”

In California I had asked Flack Jones, “What would you say Marilyn does best? Is her walk her greatest asset?” Jones regarded the feathery top of a slender, swaying palm tree, as if searching for an answer. “She does two things beautifully,” he said. “She walks and she stands. Also, as I’ve already told you she has wit enough to buy her clothes one or two sizes too small, and with a chassis like hers, this infuriates women and intrigues guys. From a woman’s standpoint, there is no subtlety in such gowns. I remember when Marilyn came to a party. In a number which fitted her like a thin banana peel and the other women there thought it outrageous. Comments were made about that gown in a gossip column.”

“How did Marilyn react to that?” I asked.

“Marilyn asked me, ‘What should I have done?”’ Jones said. “I said, ‘Look, honey, the men loved it. Pay no attention to what the gossip-column cat said. You’re a man’s woman, so dress for men, not for other women. Any time you quit dressing for men you’re out of business.’”

I told Jones that I’d been trying to find a phrase which would describe her walk, but that I hadn’t been able to. “I can’t help you there,” Jones said. “I’ve heard the words ‘quivering’ and ‘trembling’ used in connection with her walk, but I don’t know a description that really does the job. But when she walks across a screen a couple or three times, she attracts attention — a whole lot. That much I know.

“The public laughed at her walk in Niagara,” Jones told me, “but Marilyn was only doing what the director wanted her to. It wasn’t up to her to cut the picture or to tell the director not to point the camera at her during a long walk across cobblestones. I challenge any girl to walkdown a cobblestoned street in high heels without wiggling at least once.”

After his analysis of Marilyn as a pedestrian, Flack Jones picked up our conversational threads where we’d broken them off with her parting from Joe DiMaggio, and tied them together again. “After that she came back and finished Seven Year Itch at Fox,” he said. “Her agent, Charlie Feldman, flung a snazzy party for her at Romanoff’s, and she went to New York. The next thing anybody knew, she announced that, with a New York photographer named Milton Greene, she had formed Marilyn Monroe, Inc. She’s the president of the corporation; Greene’s vice-president. But I have reason to think that she’d done that before she left Hollywood, for a hairdresser at the studio told me that one day when he had Marilyn in front of his mirror, she had said, ‘Gee, I feel good. I’m incorporated.’”

I put it to Jones, “When she left the studio that last time, was it a clean, sharp break or did her relations with the studio gradually become fuzzy and vague?”

“After Itch,” Flack Jones said, “she simply didn’t show up again. I don’t know whether you’d call that sharp or vague.”

I said, when I finally met Marilyn, “The way I get it, you invented a whole new system of holding out; you just disappeared.”

“I disappeared because if people won’t listen to you, there’s no point in talking to people,” Marilyn told me. “You’re just banging your head against a wall. If you can’t do what they want you to do, the thing is to leave. I never got a chance to learn anything in Hollywood. They worked me too fast. They rushed me from one picture into another.

“I know who started all of those stories which were sent out about me after I left Hollywood the last time,” she added. One paper had an editorial about me. It said: ‘Marilyn Monroe is a very stupid girl to give up all the wonderful things the movie industry has done for her and go to New York to learn how to act.’ Those weren’t the exact words, but that was the idea. That editorial was supposed to scare me, but it didn’t, and when I read it and I realized that it wasn’t frightening me, I felt strong. That’s why I know I’m stronger than I was.”

She thought for a while; then she said, “I’m for the individual as opposed to the corporation. The way it is, the individual is the underdog, and with all the things a corporation has going for them an individual comes out banged on her head. The artist is nothing. It’s tragic.”

Going back to a straight question-and-answer routine, I said, “You’re habitually late for appointments. What are the psychological reasons for your lateness?’

“I don’t know,” she said. “I’ve never come to any conclusion. If I knew, I’d get over it.”

I said that I’d heard she was so nervous before appointments that she was sometimes became nauseated. I asked if this was caused by a feeling of pressure — of people pushing and hauling and pulling at her.

“You’d throw up, too, in some situations,” she told me. “I flew into New York at eight o’clock one morning and there were photographers waiting to take pictures of me at the airport, and all that morning I had a series of interviews with newspaper people. Those interviews came twenty minutes or a half hour apart. Then I was rushed to a luncheon with a group of magazine people, and right after luncheon I tore over to the Daily News Building. I don’t think anybody can take that routine very long. Another complication is that I have a certain stupid sincerity. I don’t want to tell everybody who interviews me the same thing. I want them all to have something new, different, exclusive. When I worry about that, I start to get sick at my stomach.”

I asked her if writers had ever prepared material for her to use in an “interview” or in a “by-line story.”

“I refuse to let articles appear in movie magazines signed ‘By Marilyn Monroe,” she said. “I might never see that article and it might be O.K.’d by somebody in the studio. This is wrong, because when I was a little girl I read signed stories in fan magazines and I believed every word of them. Then I tried to model my life after the lives of the stars I read about. If I’m going to have that kind of influence, I want to be sure it’s because of something I’ve actually said or written.”

“I’ve been told that you devote hours to selecting and editing pinup pictures of yourself,” I said.

“I haven’t so far,” she told me. “But maybe it’s time I did. At least I’d like to have my pictures not look any worse than I do. I’d like them to resemble me a little bit. With some photographers, all they ask is that a picture doesn’t look blurred, as if you’ve moved while they were taking it. If it’s not blurry they print it.”

“Somewhere,” I said, “I’ve read that at least half of the photographs taken of you are killed because they are too revealing.”

“That’s the Johnston Office for you,” she sighed. “They’re very small about stuff like that, and what the Johnston Office passes, the studio ruins with retouching. After one sitting of thirty poses, twenty-eight of those poses were killed. The Johnston Office spends a lot of time worrying about whether a girl has cleavage or not. They ought to worry if she doesn’t have any. That really would make people emotionally disturbed. I don’t know what their reasoning is,” she went on with a puzzled air. “They certainly can’t expect girls to look like boys.”

“I’ve read that your measurements are 37-23-34,” I told her.

“If you’re talking about my lower hips, they’re thirty-seven inches,” she said. “If you’re talking about my upper hips, they’re thirty-four.” Eying her, I tried to decide where “upper” hip left off and “lower” began. I gave up.

“Nowadays,” she said, “there’s a vogue for women with twenty-twenty-twenty figures. Models in the high-style magazines stick out their hipbones and nothing else. But I’m a woman, and the longer I am one the more I enjoy it. And since I have to be a woman, I’m glad I’m me. I’ve been asked, ‘Do you mind living in a man’s world?’ I answer, ‘Not as long as I can be a woman in it.’”

“There’s another thing I want to ask you,” I said. “It’s about something you said to a man in the Fox Studio legal department. You said, ‘I don’t care about money. I just want to be wonderful.’ He didn’t know what you meant by that.”

“I meant that I want to be a real actress instead of a superficial one,” Marilyn herself told me. “For the first time I’m learning to use myself fully as an actress. I want to add something to what I had before. I want to be in the kind of pictures where I can develop, not just wear tights. Some people thought that they were getting their money’s worth when they saw me in The Seven Year Itch, but in future I want people to get even more for their money when they see me. Only today a taxi driver said to me, ‘Why did they ever put you in that little stinker, River of No Return?’

“I thought it was a good question,” Marilyn told me. “I’m with that taxi driver. He’s my boy. Knowing what I know now, I wouldn’t accept River of No Return today. I think that I deserve a better deal than a Z cowboy movie, in which the acting finishes third to the scenery and CinemaScope. The studio was CinemaScope-conscious then, and that meant that it pushed the scenery instead of actors and actresses.” Without missing a beat, she switched gears into another subject. “One of the things about leaving Hollywood and coming to New York and attending the Actors’ Studio was that I felt that I could be more myself,” she said. “After all, if I can’t be myself, who can I be?” I shook my head. She had me puzzled too.

Nunnally Johnson had directed How to Marry a Millionaire, costarring Betty Grable, Lauren Bacall and Marilyn. “Do her pictures make a lot of money?” I asked him in Hollywood.

“Millionaire earned a tremendous amount,” Nunnally told me.

“What about The Seven Year Itch?” I asked.

“Variety reports it as the top Fox grosser for 1955,” he said. “But speaking for myself, I can’t say that I saw the ‘new Marilyn Monroe’ in The Seven Year Itch that some others did. I thought that essentially it was the same performance, just longer. Still, this could scarcely be a cause for worry for her; God had given her that equipment and it was still magnificent. She was still a phenomenon.”

“Maybe she’ll grow into a young Mae West and make people laugh at sex,” I suggested.

Johnson agreed that it might be a good thing if she could do that. “I believe that the first time anybody genuinely liked Marilyn for herself, in a picture, was in How to Marry a Millionaire,” he said. “She herself diagnosed the reason for that very shrewdly, I think. She said that this was the only picture she’d been in in which she had a measure of modesty. Not physical modesty, but modesty about her own attractiveness. In Millionaire she was nearsighted; she didn’t think men would look at her twice, because she wore glasses; she blundered into walls and stumbled into things and she was most disarming. In the course of the plot she married an astigmatic; so there they were, a couple of astigmatic lovers. In her other pictures they’ve cast her as a somewhat arrogant sex trap, but when Millionaire was released, I heard people say, ‘Why, I really liked her!’ in surprised tones.”

These comments of Johnson’s were made before Marilyn was enlightened by exposure to the Actors’ Studio. Upon her return from New York to work at Fox in Bus Stop, Johnson did see a “new Marilyn Monroe.”

“In contrast to the old Marilyn, in her present incarnation she is a liberated soul, happy, co-operative, friendly, relaxed,” he wrote me. “Actually, it is as if she had undergone a psychoanalysis so successful that the analyst himself was flabbergasted. Now she’s different; her behavior and her manner as a member of the social order are O.K. As for her acting, that remains to be seen.”

I told Marilyn that I had read an Associated Press story which estimated that her newest contract — scheduled to run for seven years — would bring her more than $8,000,000. When I mentioned this, she said, “Eight million dollars is a lot. However, no matter what they tell you, it’s not for money alone that I’m going back to Hollywood. I am free to make as many pictures for my own company as I do for Fox, and I can do TV and stage shows.”

Among others I’d talked to about Marilyn, before discussing her with herself, was Milton H. Greene, the New York photographer who’d become vice president of Marilyn Monroe Productions.

“I don’t know where they got that figure eight million, either,” Greene had told me. “Not from me or Marilyn.” He went on, “I don’t ask you what you make, do I? Everybody wants an exclusive release or an exclusive interview with Marilyn on the subject, and I want everybody to be happy, but things like that are confidential.”

Like Marilyn, Greene asked me not to use a tape-recording machine when interviewing him. “Makes me stutter,” he said. So, carefully, laboriously, and word for word, I wrote down everything he said to me. While doing it, I noticed no signs of stuttering. Evidently a notebook and pencils didn’t bother him. Greene had also asked me to put the initial “H” in his name, making it Milton H. Greene. “Would you mind very much?” he said. “There’re other Milton Greenes who are also in the photography business.”

He had met Marilyn when he had gone to California to do a series of photographs of Grace Kelly, Elizabeth Taylor, Jean Simmons and Marilyn Monroe. It hadn’t been his idea to do anything too sexy. “After all,” he said, “in a national magazine you can only expose so much of a girl, even if the girl is willing. Marilyn turned out to be different from what I thought she’d be. More sensitive.”

Greene had gone to California on a second assignment, and had begun to think of doing a book of photographs of Marilyn. “The book isn’t out yet,” he said, “but I’ll show you a few of the pictures I made for it. It will be Marilyn in different moods and settings, as if she were playing different parts.” He went to a shelf and brought back a box of aluminum squares. Each square contained a color transparency. “Here’s one where she looks as if she’s in England,” he said. “As you can see, she’s wearing an Edwardian hat. Here’s one where she looks like Bernadette in The Song of Bernadette.” I looked at that one for a long time. It was, I thought, a novel idea.

Milton H. Greene watched me write down what he’d said in my notebook; then he went off on a slight tangent. “One day I plan to do a cookbook for dogs,” he said. “It would contain dog-dish recipes. I think it would be amusing.” I brought him back from his dog cookbook project to his association with Marilyn. “In Hollywood,” he said, “we got to talking. This was after she’d made Seven Year Itch and after her divorce from Joe, and I told her that I hoped to go into television and theatrical production. I found that all Marilyn wants is to make just enough money to be able to afford to make good pictures. That’s the way I feel about it, too, so Marilyn Monroe Productions hopes to buy a good story property; then approach the right studio about making and distributing the picture.”

He stood up, walked around his office and came back to his chair. “If Marilyn had been only interested in making money,” he said, “she wouldn’t have been interested in me.”

When I asked Marilyn to tell me about her association with the Actors’ Studio, she said that she not only attended classes there, but had also had private lessons from Lee Strasberg and his wife, who are the mainsprings of the project.

Greene told me, “Marlon Brando, Jimmy Dean, Kim Stanley, Julie Harris and Montgomery Clift all studied under the Strasbergs. Marilyn observes, studies and watches. She listens to lectures. Occasionally she is allowed to take part.”

The Actors’ Studio lets interested people like Marilyn sit in on an informal, guest basis. She is not an officially enrolled student member of the Actors’ Studio, because you are not admitted there on that basis unless you have contributed something notable on the stage in a performance or have passed a series of exacting auditions. Just wanting to be in isn’t enough. This is very smart of the Strasbergs, because it eliminates all those who are without talent; otherwise the studio would be full of women all seven feet tall and all trying to be actresses.

I said to Marilyn that I’d heard she’d spent some time with Terence Rattigan, the British playwright, discussing the screenplay he was adapting for her from his London stage success, The Sleeping Prince, a vehicle in which Sir Laurence Olivier had played the prince. Sir Laurence had also agreed to play the same role opposite Marilyn and also to direct the film. “I had a bad cold the evening I spent with Mr. Rattigan, and he said I sounded like Tallulah Bankhead,” Marilyn told me proudly. Then she added thoughtfully, “Mr. Rattigan is young, but not too young.”

I asked her what she meant. She smiled and said, “I guess you want me to say over twelve and not quite ninety. I don’t know how old Mr. Rattigan is. I’d say he’s kind of ageless.”

I asked her to give me a hint of the story line followed by The Sleeping Prince. “I’m an American chorus girl in London, in it,” she said, “and the regent of a foreign country notices me and asks me to a reception at his country’s legation. I wriggle into my only formal and go, only it turns out it’s not a large gathering at all. In fact, it’s the same stale bit that’s been tried out on girls for the last three thousand years: dinner for two, candles, wine and soft music, when she’s expecting other guests. The next thing I know, I’ve had too much champagne and I’ve passed out. I won’t tell you any more. You ought to be willing to spend money to find out what happens next.

“The truth is,” she said, “the plot is about a man who’s been asleep — at least his emotional something or other has been asleep — but little by little a relationship builds up between him and this American chorus girl, and he begins to stir in his sleep, as you might say. He’s a married man, but that doesn’t complicate things because he’s sophisticated about the whole deal. Terence Rattigan describes it as ‘an occasional fairy tale or a comedy with serious overtones.’”

Weeks before, when I’d talked to Billy Wilder about Marilyn, I’d said to him, “I should think it would take a great deal of mature mental and moral strength to cope with becoming an enormous success overnight. It must be unsettling to suddenly become a sex symbol known all over the world.”

Wilder replied, “It’s my opinion that she’s basically a good girl, but what’s happened to her is enough to drive almost anybody slightly daffy, even someone who is armored with poise and calmness by his background and bringing up. You take a girl like Marilyn, who’s never really had a chance to learn, who’s never really had a chance to live, and suddenly confront her with a Frankenstein’s monster of herself built of fame and publicity and notoriety, and naturally she’s a little mixed up and made giddy by it all. However, I’d like to go on record with this: I worked with her in Seven Year Itch and I had a good time with her. She was seldom on time, but it wasn’t because she overslept. It was because she had to force herself to come to the studio. She’s emotionally upset all the time; she’s scared and unsure of herself — so much so that when I worked with her I found myself wishing that I were a psychoanalyst and she were my patient. It might be that I couldn’t have helped her, but she would have looked lovely on a couch.”

“You mean you didn’t get annoyed when she was late?” I asked.

“I understood the reasons for it,” Wilder told me. “There was no use getting annoyed. Even at the beginning, when I discovered that I had let myself in for a certain amount of trouble, I found myself liking her. At no time did I find her malicious, mean, capricious or anything but conscientious. There are certain urges and drives in her which make her different, but, as a director, I think it worth combating those things and living with them in order to work with her.”

I found myself hoping that Josh Logan, who will direct her in her next picture, the filmed version of Bus Stop, and Buddy Adler, the producer who bought that play for Fox, would feel the same way about her Wilder feels. That’s what she does to you. In spite of her spells of procrastination carried to fantastic lengths, in spite of her verbal convolutions, you wind up liking her.

By “her” I mean, of course, all of the various Marilyn Monroes — and there are several of them. There is the sexpot Marilyn Monroe; she’s the one who tries so hard to live up to the legend of her sexiness that even her own stomach sometimes can’t take it. Then there’s the frightened Marilyn Monroe, product of a broken home and a battered childhood — a girl named Mortenson who still can’t believe that she’s that girl on the screen they’re making all the fuss about. And last of all there is “The New Marilyn Monroe” — the one who is supposed to have emerged from the Actors’ Studio as a composed and studied performer, “having achieved growth” and “developed more.”

Somehow, as I neared the end of my interview, I found myself wondering if people would accept her as the new and different Marilyn Monroe she thinks she is. I had heard one man say, “Even if you hung Ethel Barrymore’s and Helen Hayes’ talent on Marilyn’s beautiful body, people wouldn’t take her acting seriously.”

To my surprise, I realized that I was dreading the possibility that when she turned on her new brand of acting, audiences might laugh at her, as they laughed at Zasu Pitts when she went in for “heavy drahma” after a lifetime as a comedienne.

“It doesn’t scare me,” Marilyn told me bravely, when I mentioned my fears. “If I have the same things I had before I started to go to the Actors’ Studio and I’ve added more — well, how can I lose?”

Whether she has really “added more” or not, I don’t know. But, as she herself points out, she does — emphatically — still have the same things she had before. My guess is that they’re still negotiable at the box office.


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by Saturday Evening Post.

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22 janvier 2017

1955, New York, Gladstone Hotel

Marilyn Monroe quitte le Gladstone Hotel de New York - vers 1955
Marilyn Monroe leaves the Gladstone Hotel, in New York City - circa 1955

 1955-ny-gladstone_hotel-snap-03-1  1955-ny-gladstone_hotel-snap-01-1  

> Marilyn et Joe DiMaggio
1955-ny-gladstone_hotel-snap-02-with_joe-1 


1955-01-ny-gladstone_hotel-snap-01-1  1955-01-ny-gladstone_hotel-snap-01-2 
1955-ny-gladstone_hotel-snap-collection_frieda_hull-1 
- de la collection de Frieda Hull, une fan des Monroe Six

-from the personal collection of Frieda Hull, one of the 'Monroe Six'


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand. 

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