08 février 2022

26/05/1947, Lettre de Len Cormier à Marilyn

Lettre datée du 26 mai 1947, écrite par Len Cormier à Marilyn Monroe, à son adresse de "11348 Nebraska Avenue, West Los Angeles, California"; lettre de 5 pages en recto, sur du papier à lettres "SkyMail", postée de Sydney, en Australie, où se trouve Cormier.
Len Cormier était un jeune pilote de la Marine qui est sorti quelques temps avec Marilyn en 1946. Ils ont eu au moins deux rendez-vous: un où ils ont dansé au Tommy Dorsey's Casino Gardens à Santa Monica (en 1946), et un autre où il l'a emmenée voler dans son avion (le seul civil qu'il n'ait jamais embarqué dans un avion, se souviendra-t-il plus tard).

Dans sa lettre du camp d'entraînement, il écrit: "Je dois admettre que je ne garde pas ta photo avec moi tout le temps, car personne ne travaillerait si c'était le cas." Il raconte ses expériences avec les opérations aériennes et les voyages, et termine sa lettre par un message réfléchi sur la carrière de Marilyn: "Je croise toujours les doigts, en espérant que toutes les perçées du monde viennent à toi."

Letter dated May 26, 1947, written by Len Cormier to Marilyn Monroe, at her address of "11348 Nebraska Avenue, West Los Angeles, California"; 5-page letter recto, on "SkyMail" stationery, posted from Sydney, Australia, where Cormier is located.
Len Cormier was a young Navy pilot who dated Marilyn for a while in 1946. They had at least two dates: one where they danced at Tommy Dorsey's Casino Gardens in Santa Monica (in 1946), and one another where he took her flying in his plane (the only civilian he ever took up in plane, he later recalled).

In his letter from training camp, he writes, "I'll have to admit that I don't leave your picture out all the time, since nobody would get any work done if it were." He relays his experiences with flight operations and traveling, and ends his letter with a thoughtful message to his career-oriented friend: "I've still got my fingers crossed, hoping that all the breaks in the world come to you."

1947-05-26-letter_len_cormier_to_norma_jeane-1 

Traduction de la 1ère page:
Chère Marilyn,
Peut-être que tu ne m'as pas cru quand je t'ai dit à quel point j'étais lent à écrire - mais tu es probablement convaincue maintenant.
Même s'il y avait une faible excuse (n'était pas sûr de l'adresse). Je suis vraiment désolé.
Quelle grande nouvelle concernant ton dernier casting - bon - j'espère. Ce ne sera qu'une question de temps avec toi de toute façon - mais ce sera un bon essai. (C'est beaucoup d'entraînement pour appeler cela un essai, n'est-ce pas ?)
Je dois admettre que je ne laisse pas ta photo à côté de moi tout le temps, car personne ne travaillerait si c'était le cas. Chaque fois que quelqu'un la voit, c'est parti pour quelques sifflets bas et une salve de questions.

1st page transcript:
Dear Marilyn,
Maybe you didn't believe me when I told you how slow I was about writing - but you're probably convinced now. Even though there was a feeble excuse (wasn't sure of the address). I am very sorry.
What's the big news about your last test - good - I hope. It will just be a matter of time with you either way - but it will be a nice shortcut. (That's a lot of training to call a shortcut, isn't it ?)
I'll have to admit that I d'ont leave your picture out all of time, since nobody would get any work done if it were. Everytime everyone sees it, it's good for a couple of low whistles and a salvo of questions.


- Marilyn Monroe & Len Cormier -
1946 au
Tommy Dorseys Casino

1946-Len_Cormier-1 


source Lettre vendue aux enchères en 2018 par Bonhams "TCM Presents ... The Dark Side of Hollywood" 


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copyright text by GinieLand. 

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17 août 2010

1946, Santa Monica, Tommy Dorseys Casino - Norma Jeane & Len Cormier

Marilyn Monroe et Len Cormier, un aviateur de l'armée avec qui elle sort, au club de Tommy Dorsey's Casino Gardens de Santa Monica - en 1946. Ils ont dansé sur de la musique de big-band et se sont promenés où Marilyn a visé des bouteilles de lait.
Len Cormier a fait la connaissance de Marilyn par l'intermédiaire d'un ami de la famille.

1946-santa_monica-Tommy_Dorsey_s_Casino_Gardens-norma_jeane_with_len_cormier-1 

Marilyn Monroe and Len Cormier, an army airman she is dating, at Tommy Dorsey's Casino Gardens club in Santa Monica - in 1946. They danced to big-band music and walked where Marilyn was aimed at bottles of milk.
Len Cormier met Marilyn through a family friend.

1946-santa_monica-Tommy_Dorsey_s_Casino_Gardens-norma_jeane-1
1946-santa_monica-Tommy_Dorsey_s_Casino_Gardens-norma_jeane-2 


source article He Dreamed of Flying to the Stars


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copyright text by GinieLand.

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24/08/2008, Washington Post

Washington Post

country: USA
date: 2008, August, 24
content: article

1946-santa_monica-Tommy_Dorsey_s_Casino_Gardens-press-2008-Washington_Post 

article complet sur washingtonpost
 


He Dreamed of Flying to the Stars, And Practiced by Dancing With One

Just after he got his wings and on the eve of his 20th birthday, Navy aviator Len Cormier danced the night away with Norma Jeane Dougherty at Tommy Dorsey's Casino Gardens in Santa Monica, Calif. He loved to dance almost as much as he loved to fly.

It was a first date for the young pilot and the beautiful model-about-to-be-starlet, who had been introduced by a family friend. That night, they danced to big band music and walked along the midway, where Norma Jeane took aim at milk bottles.
len_cormier_JeaneDoughertyatTommyDorsey_sCasinoGardensinSantaMonica"She was good at that," Mr. Cormier told his family. "I know I had a great time and seems like she did too."
On one of their dates, Mr. Cormier took Norma Jeane flying. "We did half rolls and slow rolls and loops," he recalled. "She's still the only civilian I've ever taken up in an airplane."

Before he left California for training in Florida, she asked his advice on a career move suggested by a 20th Century Fox executive. He disagreed.

"Norma Jeane asked me about changing her name to Marilyn Monroe, and I didn't think it was too good of an idea, because she would get mixed up with Marilyn Maxwell," Mr. Cormier said of the movie actress and entertainer who performed often with Bob Hope. "I don't know how many people remember Marilyn Maxwell these days, but it's kind of a 'How wrong can you be,' I guess."


LenCORMIERMr. Cormier -- who always spoke fondly of those early years, said his wife -- went on to become a Navy fighter pilot and an executive officer in an anti-submarine warfare patrol squadron. After leaving active duty in 1947, the Boston native received a bachelor's degree in physics from the University of California at Berkley.

Eventually, Mr. Cormier's passion for flying took him to some heady places and brought him in contact with some of the top scientists in the space industry. He became an aerospace consultant and entrepreneur who designed a space van and worked feverishly to find funding for his craft, which would provide low-cost space travel.

Along the way, as one colleague once told him, he was "in the midst of people and organizations that were making history."

During the tense days of the Cold War, he was on the staff of the National Academy of Sciences. He attended the International Geophysical Year proceedings in 1957 and 1958, where U.S. and Soviet scientists were excited about new rocket technologies that made space exploration more than a distant notion.

Mr. Cormier, who spoke some Russian, was present at a reception in Russia on the October day in 1957 when the Soviets surprised everyone with the launch of Sputnik. It left an indelible impression on Mr. Cormier.

For one thing, he said he felt that there was a lot of psychological fallout with the Soviet launch. "However, in my opinion, this was not at all bad," he wrote in a posting on his Web site. "At the reception itself, I found it was almost immediately easier to communicate with some of the Russians -- as if some type of feelings of inferiority suddenly vanished."

Mr. Cormier -- who always spoke fondly of those early years, said his wife -- went on to become a Navy fighter pilot and an executive officer in an anti-submarine warfare patrol squadron. After leaving active duty in 1947, the Boston native received a bachelor's degree in physics from the University of California at Berkley.

Eventually, Mr. Cormier's passion for flying took him to some heady places and brought him in contact with some of the top scientists in the space industry. He became an aerospace consultant and entrepreneur who designed a space van and worked feverishly to find funding for his craft, which would provide low-cost space travel.

Along the way, as one colleague once told him, he was "in the midst of people and organizations that were making history."

During the tense days of the Cold War, he was on the staff of the National Academy of Sciences. He attended the International Geophysical Year proceedings in 1957 and 1958, where U.S. and Soviet scientists were excited about new rocket technologies that made space exploration more than a distant notion.

Mr. Cormier, who spoke some Russian, was present at a reception in Russia on the October day in 1957 when the Soviets surprised everyone with the launch of Sputnik. It left an indelible impression on Mr. Cormier.

 The launch also was the beginning of Mr. Cormier's quest toward low-cost, reusable space vehicles. He worked at NASA, at the Los Angeles Division of North American Aviation and at North American Rockwell before forming his own companies. PanAero Inc. is his last firm.

As a charter member of the Department of Transportation's Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee, he made recommendations and offered advice about the U.S. commercial space transportation industry.

He was always coming up with new approaches to space transportation, his family said. "He planned to be a pilot of his own spacecraft," said his wife of 29 years, Anne Greenglass.

During his career, he made improvements on satellites and had solid ideas on building launch systems. Some of his engineering approaches are "flying today," said Doug Postman, who met Mr. Cormier in 1983 while he was working as a consultant.
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"He was methodical in his approach to solutions," said Postman, who calls Mr. Cormier his mentor and friend. "He was a person who was ahead of his time because of the concepts and ideas he had."

Mr. Cormier was part of a small community of private entrepreneurs building affordable, reusable space vehicles. Funding was the biggest hurdle for Mr. Cormier's SpaceVan 2011. He tried but failed in 2003 to win the X Prize, a $10 million award offered to the first private team to fly a manned rocket into space.

Sergi Stepanenko, who lives in St. Petersburg, recalled Mr. Cormier's contacting him in the late 1990s about his ventures for "proposed space transportation, proposed space tourism and proposed space-based telecommunications."

They exchanged letters about ways they could work together. Stepanenko said in an e-mail that he was impressed by Mr. Cormier's boyish "admiration and excitement about the universe and a dream to explore it for himself."

Driven, yet always friendly, Mr. Cormier pushed his ideas and conceptual designs as far as he could for as long as he could, to government and private companies.

At 80, the great-grandfather of three renewed his pilot's license. But his dream of flying again, this time out of Earth's orbit, did not materialize. Leonard N. Cormier, a former Fairfax resident, died June 16 at age 82 of neck and head cancer at the Heartland Hospice in Wilmington, Del.


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