19 mars 2014

Julien's Auction Hollywood Legends 04/2014


Photographies


lot 981: MARILYN MONROE INSCRIBED PHOTOGRAPH
A photograph of Marilyn Monroe mounted to board and inscribed on the board “Oh George,/ You’re a genius!/ Marilyn Monroe.” The black and white image was taken by Cecil Beaton and said to be Monroe’s favorite image of herself.
The consignor relates that in the late 1950s he attended an event at Frank Sinatra’s Palm Springs home as a guest of Sammy Davis Jr. The consignor remembers the photograph being given by Monroe, who was also a guest of Sinatra’s, to Davis’ valet, whom he named as “George.” This is a possible inaccuracy and may have been given to Frank Sinatra’s longtime valet, George Jacobs. The consignor was given the image by the valet George, who said he could not take the item back to Los Angeles. The consignor has had the photograph in his possession since that time.

165203_0  165205_0 


lot 986 à 999: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
165221_0 165223_0
165225_0 165227_0
165230_0  165231_0
165233_0 165236_0 165238_0
165240_0 165243_0 165245_0
165248_0 165251_0 165253_0 
165255_0 165257_0 165259_0
165262_0 165264_0 165266_0
165268_0 165270_0 165273_0
165276_0 165279_0 165281_0
165283_0 165285_0 
165288_0  165296_0
165290_0 165292_0 165298_0 


Lot 1001: COLLECTION OF MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS
A group of approximately 35 unsigned copies of photographs and images of Marilyn Monroe taken by various photographers, collected by photographer Joseph Jasgur.
165308_0 


Lot 1003: MARILYN MONROE 1941 SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPH
A vintage original Marilyn Monroe school photograph from Ralph Waldo Emerson Junior High School. Titled "Class of Summer, 1941." Monroe appears in the seventh row from the bottom and the 15th person from the right. inscriptions on verso are written to a student named Barbara. The then named Norma Jeane Baker was 15 years old.
165311_0 
165313_0 


Lot 1004 à 1023: MARILYN MONROE ANDRE DE DIENES PHOTOGRAPHS
165315_0 165317_0 165319_0
165321_0    165325_0
165323_0   165327_0
165329_0 165333_0 165339_0 
165341_0 165344_0 165346_0
165348_0 165350_0
165352_0 165354_0
165357_0 165361_0 165363_0


Lot 1027: MARILYN MONROE HAROLD LLOYD PHOTOGRAPH PRINT
165375_0 165379_0 165382_0


Lot 1028: MARILYN MONROE BEHIND-THE-SCENES PHOTOGRAPHS
A pair of photographs of Marilyn Monroe on the set of Niagara (20th Century, 1953). The black and white images show Monroe in a skirt suit and beret. One marked on verso "Marilyn Monroe/ in film 'Niagara'/ taken June 11, 1952/ Park St. Niagara Falls." The images are believed to have never been published.
1952-06-11-set_niagara-1 1952-06-11-set_niagara-2 1952-06-11-set_niagara-3 


Lot 1029: MARILYN MONROE AND BILLY WILDER PHOTOGRAPH
165388_0 


Lot 1031: DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK WARDROBE AND PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE
165398_0 165401_0
165403_0 165405_0 165407_0


Lot 1032: THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS ARCHIVE
 165409_0 165411_0
165413_0 165415_0 165417_0
165418_0 165420_0 165422_0
165424_0 165426_0 165428_0
165430_0 165432_0 165434_0


Lot 1033-34, 1036-37: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS PHOTOGRAPHS
165436_0 165438_0
165450_0 165452_0 
165454_0 165456_0 
165458_0 165460_0 165462_0


 Lot 1035: MARILYN MONROE IMAGES
165440_0 
165442_0 165446_0 


Lot 1038: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP MILTON GREENE NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHTS
165464_0


Lot 1039: MARILYN MONROE AND TONY CURTIS PHOTOGRAPH
165467_0


Lot 1046 à 1050: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED LINUS KREINER PHOTOGRAPHS 
165785_0  165786_0  165787_0 
165788_0  165789_0


 Lot 1051: MARILYN MONROE AND MARLON BRANDO AT PREMIERE
165506_0 


Lot 1055: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
165522_0 


lot 1061-62: THE MISFITS NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
The photographs offered here were taken on the Nevada set of the film by Thomas Kaminski in 1960.
165542_0 165544_0
165546_0 165548_0 


Lot 1067: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH SIGNED BY ALLAN GRANT
An original vintage photograph signed by Allan Grant. This photograph was taken on July 7, 1962, in Monroe’s Brentwood home for an article in LIFE magazine that went to newsstands on August 3. Monroe died on August 5, two days later.
165568_0 165569_0 


lots 1074 à 1079: MARILYN MONROE BERT STERN "THE LAST SITTING" PHOTOGRAPH
165593_0 165596_0 165604_0 
165607_0 165611_0 165613_0


Documents papiers


lot 982: PRESIDENT KENNEDY’S BIRTHDAY GALA TICKETS AND PROGRAM
A pair of two tickets to President John F. Kennedy’s Birthday Party at Madison Square Garden on May 19, 1962. Side Balcony Seats 305 J 1 &2. With a color program titled on the cover "Happy Birthday Mr. President." The four-page booklet includes a list of the dinner committee and sponsors and order of appearance: Jack Benny, Ella Fitzgerald, Jerome Robbins Ballets, Danny Kaye, Henry Fonda, Maria Callas, Peggy Lee, Peter Lawford, Marilyn Monroe, Jimmy Durante and Eddie Jackson, Bobby Darin, Henry Fonda, Mike Nichols and Elaine May, and Diahann Carroll.

165207_0 165209_0


Lot 1002: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED MODEL RELEASE FORM
A signed model release form for Marilyn Monroe’s third modeling session with Joseph Jasgur. Jasgur photographed Norma Jeane Dougherty and the cast of a local production titled “The Drunkards” in color and black and white at Zuma Beach, California. The form is dated “March23-’46” and signed in ink “Norma Jeane Dougherty.” The form is also signed by Mary Lou Bennett and Tom Burton, who participated in the session.
165309_0  


Lot 1042: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED FAN MAIL
A postcard and pair of envelopes received by Marilyn Monroe from fans. The fan mail was sent to Monroe at 20th Century Fox from international fans; envelopes are postmarked 1954. Accompanied by a contemporary print publicity still showing Monroe surrounded by fan mail.

165474_0 165476_0 


Lot 1044: MARILYN MONROE PRODUCTIONS BANK REGISTRY
A page of transaction activity for a Colonial Trust Company account of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. dating from July 1, 1959, to July 30, 1959. Showing an ending balance of $78, 476.80.
165480_0


Lot 1045: MARILYN MONROE TRUSTEE ACCOUNT CHECK
A typed check written to the Screen Actors Guild, Inc. in the amount of $25.00, drawn from a Marilyn Monroe Trustee Account at Bank of America. The check is numbered 655 and dated March 9, 1956, signed by Inez Melson, Monroe's business manager. Description notes that this check was for Monroe's current SAG dues.
165482_0  165484_0  


lot 1056: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER CHECK
An unwritten check from Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller's joint account at The First National City Bank of New York. The check is numbered 44 on the top right and still has the attached ledger on the left. 8 by 2 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 142, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe and Other Collections," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, California,
June 4, 2005
165523_0


 lot 1057: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CARD
A Marilyn Monroe signed card. The card, from Saks Fifth Avenue, is signed in blue ink and upside down from the department store name. 2 3/4 by 3 1/2 inches 
165525_0 


lot 1059: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS TO AND ABOUT
A collection of letters sent to and about Marilyn Monroe. The group includes a letter written to Marilyn Monroe from Jack Hirschberg on Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) stationery, dated December 17, 1958. Hirschberg was the publicist for the film. He wrote to offer his condolences regarding Monroe’s miscarriage. Also included are a letter from American Airlines dated August 1, 1960, regarding a lost piece of luggage and attached form that was supposed to be filled out and returned to the airline, accompanied by return envelope; copies of letters written by Cherie Redmond and attached note dated July 27, 1962, ten days before Monroe’s death, to Eunice Murray explaining the two letters that are in regard to a furniture order of Monroe’s.

165538_0


lot 1060: LET'S MAKE LOVE ORIGINAL SCRIPT
A Let's Make Love script dated January 15, 1960. Blue paper cover, reads at upper right "Second Revised Shooting/ Final/ 4014-79/ Permanent File," 139 pages. The comedic film starred Marilyn Monroe opposite Yves Montand. The pair were rumored to have had an affair during the the production of the film.
165541_0 


Lot 1064: MARILYN MONROE TAX DOCUMENT AND TYPED LETTER
Relating to Marilyn Monroe's purchase of her home at 12305 5th Helena Drive in Brentwood, California. The typed letter, dated "March 6, 1962," reads, "Dear Sir: Please change your records to show that I am the owner of Lot 20, Tract No. 5462. Very Truly Yours, Marilyn Monroe."
Larger, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
165555_0 165557_0 


Lot 1068: MARILYN MONROE REAL ESTATE DOCUMENT
A Marilyn Monroe signed, typed purchase offer for Monroe's Los Angeles home on Helena Drive. This is the only home Monroe ever purchased. Document dated January 9, 1962, with a purchase price of $52,500. Monroe would die eight short months later.
15 by 9 1/4 inches
165571_0 165573_0 


Lot 1071: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED AND SENT CORRESPONDENCE
A group of correspondence sent and received by Marilyn Monroe, including a two-page typed, signed letter to Monroe from Jean Negulesco, typed on Negulesco’s stationery and dated July 14, 1958. The letter is in regard to flowers and a book sent by the director to Monroe. The book was The Midwife of Pont Clary , which Negulesco wanted to adapt into a film for Monroe. He wrote, “The thing of The Midwife of Pont Clary is fundamentally sex …” and later suggests Monroe give the book to her husband, Arthur Miller, to read. Also included are a copy of a wire message sent by Monroe to Inez Melson dated June 10, 1959, regarding the boarding of a bird named Clyde; a typed, signed letter from playwright William Inge complimenting Monroe on her performance in Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959), dated April 6, 1959, and signed “Bill Inge"; and a confirmation copy of a telegram sent by Monroe to Roberto Boss in Mexico regarding a furniture order, with a typed, dictated copy of same, dated June 16, 1962, less than two months before Monroe’s death.
165584_0 


Vêtements, Bijoux


lot 983: MARILYN MONROE/ANDY WARHOL LAVENDER TRIBUTE DRESS
A lavender Travilla tribute dress honoring Marilyn Monroe and Andy Warhol. The sheer crepe sunburst pleated halter dress was inspired by the white dress Monroe made famous in The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) and attributed by the Travilla estate as being re-created for an Andy Warhol memorial service at The Beverly Hilton in the colors of his iconic "Marilyn" silkscreen images. A label reads "Travilla." No size present.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of William Travilla
165211_0 165212_0
165215_0


Lot 1052: MARILYN MONROE EARRINGS
A pair of clip-on rhinestone earrings owned by Marilyn Monroe. Each earring is composed of a single full-cut prong-set rhinestone and five strands of cascading prong-set baguette cut rhinestones with simple clip backs. Monroe wore these earrings to the premiere of The Rose Tattoo (Paramount Pictures, 1955) and Actor's Studio benefit dinner which she attended with Marlon Brando. Also believed to have been worn to the opening of The Middle of the Night on Broadway in 1956. The play was produced by Joshua Logan who also directed Monroe in Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The link below contains video of Monroe wearing the earrings.
noseasboba.tumblr.com/post/56723074922
PROVENANCE Lot 200, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
165508_0 165768_0 165779_0 
165510_0 165512_0


 lot 1053: MARILYN MONROE SKIRT
 A black wool straight skirt with arched seams down the front, a back zipper and a back slit; interior label reads "Jax." Marilyn Monroe had numerous basic black wool straight skirts that were virtually all identical, this being one of them. Accompanied by a reprinted image of Monroe in the same or similar skirt.
PROVENANCE Lot 32, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe and Other Collections," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, California, June 4, 2005
165514_0 165791_0 165518_0 


lot 1058: MARILYN MONROE BLACK BRASSIERE
Marilyn Monroe’s black brassiere. Underwire brassiere, sheer black material covers each cup with solid black fabric covering demi-cup. Originally intended for sale at the landmark Marilyn Monroe auction at Christie’s in 1999, it still bears a Christie’s tag. Housed with an image of Monroe with a small plaque that reads “From the Wardrobe of Marilyn Monroe.”
21 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches, Framed
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 72,"Property From the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
165528_0 165536_0 165532_0
165530_0 165534_0 


Lot 1063: MARILYN MONROE CEIL CHAPMAN COCKTAIL DRESS
A black jersey figure hugging Ceil Chapman cocktail dress from the personal wardrobe of Marilyn Monroe. The dress has a ruched bodice, draping to the hips, 3/4 sleeves, a ballerina neckline with piping trim that plunges to the back.
PROVENANCE Lot 226, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
165550_0 165551_0
165553_0 


Objets Divers


Lot 1000: JOSEPH JASGUR GRAFLEX CAMERA
Vintage Graflex R.B. Super D 4x5 film camera used by Joseph Jasgur to take photos of Norma Jeane (Marilyn Monroe). Accompanied by a 4x5 Graflarger back, five 4x5 film magazines, one Ektalite field lens for 4x5 back, one Polaroid Land back for Graflex camera, one box of Polaroid Polapan 4x5 Land Film Type 52, and four shutter release cables.
165300_0   165303_0   
165301_0  165305_0   

 


lot 1024: PLAYBOY MAGAZINE FIRST ISSUE SIGNED BY HUGH HEFNER
A first issue of Playboy magazine (HMH Publishing, 1953) with Marilyn Monroe on the cover and signed by Hugh Hefner. The magazine, which launched in December 1953, sold for 50 cents a copy. Accompanied by a photograph of Hefner with the signed item.
165365_0  165367_0  165369_0


lot 1025: MARILYN MONROE 1954 "GOLDEN DREAMS" CALENDAR
165371_0


lot 1026: MARILYN MONROE 1955 GOLDEN DREAMS CALENDAR
165373_0 


Lot 1030: MARILYN MONROE 1952 PHOTOPLAY AWARD
 An award plaque presented to Marilyn Monroe by Photoplay magazine. The bronze-tone plaque affixed to a wood frame reads "Photoplay Magazine/ Presents/ The New Star Award/ To/ Marilyn Monroe/ for her/ Rapid Rise to Stardom/ in 1952." Monroe wore the Travilla designed gold lamé gown from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953) to the February 9, 1953, event where the award was presented. 14 by 11 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 313, "The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe," Christie's, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27-28, 1999
165390_0  165393_0 
165394_0  165396_0  


Lot 1043: MARILYN MONROE HAIR ROLLER
A spring-style wire hair roller owned by Marilyn Monroe.
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 245, "Property From the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
165479_0 


lot 1054: MARILYN MONROE MASCARA
A gold-toned metal tube of Helena Rubinstein mascara.
Length, 4 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Partial lot 275, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe and Other Collections," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, California, June 4, 2005
165519_0 


Lot 1065: MARILYN MONROE MEXICAN TAPESTRY
A Mexican wall hanging wool tapestry owned by Marilyn Monroe. Tapestry reads “Chac Mool,” with figure holding a bowl of fire.  Accompanied by a Gene Anthony photograph of the tapestry in Monroe’s Brentwood home.
77 by 55 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 450, "The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe," Christie's, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27-28,1999; Lot 893, "Julien's Summer Sale," Julien's Auctions, Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino, Las Vegas, June 27, 2009
165559_0 165561_0 165562_0 


Lot 1066: MARILYN MONROE OWNED PAINTING
A framed oil on canvas painting, signed "Olga" on lower left corner.
30 1/4 by 49 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 426, “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27-28, 1999
165564_0 165566_0 


 Lot 1069: MARILYN MONROE OWNED BOOK
A copy of Relax and Live by Joseph Kennedy (New York: Prentice Hall, 1953) from the personal collection of Marilyn Monroe with Christie's auction bookplate on front inside cover. Pencil markings can be found on page 43 and evidence of candle wax on page 47.
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 559, “The Personal Collection of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
165574_0 165576_0


Lot 1070: MARILYN MONROE OWNED BOOK
 A copy of Some Characteristics of To - Day by Dr. Rudolf Steiner (London: Steiner Publishing, 1942) from the personal collection of Marilyn Monroe with Christie's auction bookplate on front inside cover. Accompanied by a contemporary image of Monroe in front of a bookshelf.
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 559, “The Personal Collection of Marilyn Monroe,” Christie’s, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
165578_0 165580_0 165582_0 


Lot 1072: LIFE MAGAZINE "REMEMBER MARILYN"
from September 8, 1972
165586_0 


Lot 1073: MARILYN MONROE BERT STERN AVANT GARDE 2 MAGAZINE
published in March 1968
165587_0 165589_0 165591_0 

30 juin 2013

'Hollywood Auction' Profiles In History 07/2013 - Documents papiers

Lot 61: Marilyn Monroe handwritten letter signed (5) times "Marilyn Monroe Miller"
(c. 1956-1961) Autograph letter signed (5) times “Marilyn Monroe Miller”, 2pp., on a torn 5.25 x 8.5 in. leaf of “Marilyn Monroe Productions” stationery [Undated]. The simple “thank you” note is handwritten in blue pen and reads, in full: “Thank you so much for your kind note / yours and all the other good wishes were a great comfort to me / Many many thanks”. Assumed to have been written around the time of the star’s marriage to Arthur Miller as Monroe has signed “Marilyn Monroe Miller” as if she is practicing her new autograph.
Signed (3) times on the front of the page and (2) times on the verso. Monroe has also repeatedly written “M” and “Marilyn” on both sides of the document. The note, originally torn in 4 pieces, has been mended on the verso with archival tape to good legible condition.
Estimate: $1 000
H3257_L45060923  H3257_L45060924 


Lot 62: Marilyn Monroe handwritten letter signed (6) times “Marilyn Monroe Miller”.
(c. 1956-1961) Autograph letter signed (6) times “Marilyn Monroe Miller”, 2pp., on a torn 5 x 8.25 in. leaf of “Marilyn Monroe Productions” stationery [Undated] with the printed Lexington Ave. address at the bottom edge. The simple “thank you” note is handwritten in blue pen and reads, in full: “Thank you so much for your kind note / yours and all the other good wishes were a great comfort to me / Many many thanks”. Assumed to have been written around the time of the star’s marriage to Arthur Miller as Monroe has signed, “Marilyn Monroe Miller” as if practicing her new autograph.
Signed (2) times on the front of the page and (4) times on the verso. Monroe has also written “Marilyn” and “Marilyn Monroe” on both sides of the document. The note, originally torn in 4 pieces, has been mended on the verso with archival tape to good legible condition.
Estimate: $1 000
H3257_L45060690 H3257_L45060691 


Lot 63: Marilyn Monroe handwritten letter signed “Marilyn Monroe Miller”.
(c. 1956-1961) Autograph letter signed, “Marilyn Monroe Miller”, 1 page, on torn 8.5 x 11 in. leaf of “Marilyn Monroe Productions” stationery [Undated]. A simple “thank you” note is handwritten in pen and reads, in full: “Dear Mr. Fluff / Thank you so much for your kind note / yours and all the other good wishes were a great comfort to me. Thank you so much / Many many thanks”. Assumed to have been written around the time of the star’s marriage to Arthur Miller. Monroe has signed “Marilyn Monroe Miller” (1) time and “Marilyn” six times. The note, originally torn in eight pieces, has been mended on the verso with archival tape to good legible condition.
 Estimate: $1 000
H3257_L45061206 


Lot 64: Marilyn Monroe handwritten letter signed (12) times “Marilyn Monroe Miller”.
(c. 1956-1961) Autograph letter signed, (12) times, “Marilyn Monroe Miller” on torn 8.5 x 9 in. leaf of “Marilyn Monroe Productions” stationery [Undated]. A simple “thank you” note is handwritten multiple times in blue pen and reads, in full: “Thank you so much for your kind note / yours and all the other good wishes were a great comfort to me / Many many thanks”. Assumed to have been written around the time of the star’s marriage to Arthur Miller as Monroe has signed, “Marilyn Monroe Miller” as if practicing her new autograph. Signed “Marilyn Monroe Miller” (3) times on the front of the page and (9) times on the verso. The note, originally torn in 6 pieces, has been mended on the verso with archival tape and is in good legible condition.
Estimate: $1 500  
H3257_L45060930 H3257_L45060932 


Lot 65:  Marilyn Monroe signed Chanukah card with envelope.
(c. 1956-1961) Signed greeting card, “with love, from Marilyn & Daddy”. A 4.25 x 5.5 in. commercial Chanukah greeting card. Front features three children lighting a menorah on a windowsill. Inside is an illustration of a menorah, Hebrew characters and “Happy Chanukah” printed and the inscription and signature in blue ink. “An Israel Publication By Lion The Printed” is printed on the verso. The card shows age soiling and toning. Bumped lower right corner. Comes with original envelope with, “To Bobby” written in pen in Monroe’s hand. Overall, in fair condition.
 Estimate: $1 000 
H3257_L45060933 H3257_L45060934 


Lot 66: Marilyn Monroe romantic signed card.
(c. 1956-1961) Autograph Card Signed, “Marilyn” on torn 2 x 3.5 in. calling card [Undated]. The romantic note handwritten in pen and reads, in full: “For my love / I love you with all of my heart Happy Christmas” and signed “Marilyn”. Card shows signs of age, soiling and mild toning. Bumped corners and slight .25 inch tear with no paper loss at top center. In overall vintage fair condition.
 Estimate: $1 000
 H3257_L45060935


Lot 68:  Marilyn Monroe handwritten signed note to her niece on “Mrs. Arthur Miller” stationery.
(c. 1956-1961) Autograph letter signed, “Marilyn” on 2-page 6 x 8 in. leaf of “Mrs. Arthur Miller” stationery [Undated]. A heartfelt note to her niece handwritten in pen and reads, in full:
Dear Mona Rae, I hardly know what to write about -- it’s been so long since I’ve seen you. Your mother told me you are away at school and I’m very proud of you. Also she told me what a lovely girl you are. I would love to see you and know you again. Are you going to get married soon? Your mother said you might. If it’s really so, I wish you all the happiness there is. I’m sure he must be wonderful if you love him. And the whole world must be a beautiful place because he’s there -- you see your old Auntie isn’t so old -- I know how it is. But please don’t rush -- but don’t hesitate either. You will know what you want and if you’r [sic] unsure life teaches us. Take care of yourself. I still see you as a little blonde headed brown eyed thin little girl as when I met you -- very sweet and you wanted to be an actress. You have time -- time for everything. “Love, Marilyn your Auntie.”
Marilyn gives encouragement and advice to her young niece. The note concludes on the verso and is signed at bottom right. Mild toning .25 in. tear with no paper loss at top center. Original folds. In overall good condition.
Estimate: $4 000 
H3257_L45060769 H3257_L45060770

Posté par ginieland à 13:02 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
Tags : ,

01 avril 2013

Julien's Auction 04/2013 - Documents papiers

lot n°732: MARILYN MONROE 1950 CAR TITLE AND DOCUMENTS
A Marilyn Monroe car title and service brochures. The 1950 State of California car title is issued to Marilyn Monroe at 1301 N. Harper Avenue, Los Angeles, California, for a 1950 Pontiac, license number 19B2992. Accompanied by a Pontiac battery warranty brochure dated July 1, 1950, and a Pontiac owner service policy brochure that lists the vehicle body style as " 2527D ." Both brochures have Monroe's information typed on them.
Estimate: $2 500 - $5 000

lot128270 


lot n°740: MARILYN MONROE SHEET OF PERSONAL STATIONERY
A sheet of Marilyn Monroe stationery with envelope. The cream color paper is blind embossed "Marilyn Monroe" on the top of the stationery sheet and on the flap of the envelope.
Estimate: $200 - $300
  
lot128305 lot128308 


 lot n°741: MARILYN MONROE CHECK
      A blank check for an account at Irving Trust Company of New York. "Marilyn Monroe" is printed at the top of the check. Check number 2372.
Estimate: $200 - $300
 
lot128309 


lot n°745: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CHECK
      A Marilyn Monroe signed check. The check, dated December 17, 1952, is made out to "Cash" in the amount of $5. Monroe has written in the name of her bank, and below her signature she has written her address as "Beverly Hills Hotel."
Estimate: $1 000 - $2 000
  
lot128371 lot128372 


lot n°746: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CHECK
      A Marilyn Monroe signed counter check written to Milton F. Kreis Drugs in the amount of $50.71. Monroe has filled in her bank name and its address as well as her own address at 882 Doheny in Los Angeles. The check is dated "March 9,1953." Milton F. Kreis Drugs was a drugstore and luncheonette located in the Beverly Wilshire hotel.
Estimate: $1 000 - $2 000
 
lot128373 lot128374 


lot n°747: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED BANK DEMAND NOTE
      A Marilyn Monroe signed bank demand note with Bank of America, dated November 9, 1953, in the amount of $8,000. The typed document is signed by Marilyn Monroe, whose signature has been partially stamped over with a "renewed" stamp. The back of the document notes one interest and principal payment made on February 9, 1954.
Estimate: $1 500 - $2 000
   
lot128375 lot128376 


lot n°748: MARILYN MONROE CHANGE OF RATE CARD FROM 20TH CENTURY FOX
      Marilyn Monroe Change of Rate card from 20th Century Fox, dated "5 - 11 - 1953," changing Monroe's weekly pay rate from $750 to $1,250.
Estimate: $200 - $400
 
lot128377 


lot n°750: MARILYN MONROE "GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES" WARDROBE PLOT BOOK PAGES
      A group of 22 pages from the wardrobe plot book for the film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953) for Marilyn Monroe's character, Lorelei Lee. The collection includes handwritten and typed transcriptions. Costumes for the film were designed by Travilla.
Estimate: $800 - $1 200
 
lot128379 
lot128380 lot128381 lot128382


lot n°756: MARILYN MONROE SCRIPT
      A mimeographed 124-page script titled Horns for the Devil, an unmade film. Housed in red paper cover that reads "Famous Artists Corporation," dated May-June, 1954, and written by Lou Breslow. Also present is a large paper folder from Christie's indicating that this was originally intended to be part of Lot 497 in that auction.
11 1/2 by 9 inches
Lot 165, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
Estimate: $500 - $700

lot128396 lot128397 lot128398 lot128399


lot n°757: "SEVEN YEAR ITCH" PREMIERE INVITATION
      An invitation to the July 1, 1955, premiere of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century Fox, 1955) at Loew's State Theatre in New York. Attached to black scrapbook page. The item came from the Estate of Peter Leonardi.
PROVENANCE Lot 705, "Julien's Summer Sale," Julien's, Las Vegas, June 26, 2009
Estimate: $200 - $400
  
lot128400 


lot n°762: MARILYN MONROE APRIL 1955 WALDORF-ASTORIA INVOICE
      A Marilyn Monroe invoice from the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City. The one-page typed Waldorf-Astoria invoice lists 10 telephone charges from April 12-18, 1955. Typed at the top of the page: "2728 Monroe Miss Marilyn NR JNS / 30 / 4 - 12 D 819 PZ MW." Monroe rented a suite on the 27th floor of the Waldorf Towers for several months in 1955.
Estimate: $400 - $600
 
lot128420    


lot n°763: MILTON GREENE SIGNED MARILYN MONROE PRODUCTIONS CHECK
      A Marilyn Monroe Productions, Inc. check signed by Milton Greene. The check, dated July 14, 1955, is written to the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in the amount of $500 and is drawn from an account at the Colonial Trust Company.
Estimate: $200 - $400
 
lot128421 lot128422 


lot n°765: MARILYN MONROE AMBASSADOR HOTEL INVOICE AND MILTON GREENE SIGNED CHECK
      A Marilyn Monroe invoice from the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City. The one-page typed Waldorf-Astoria invoice lists 10 telephone charges from April 7-8, 1955, in the amount of $1,035.36. Typed at the top of the page: "Monroe Miss Marilyn / 480 Lexington Ave / New York NY / ARR 3 - 24 - 55 / ACC 191509 - C." The charges include a balance forward, phone, room, restaurant and garage. Stamped paid on April 8, 1955. Accompanied by a Milton Greene signed Marilyn Monroe Productions, Inc. check in the amount of $1,035.36 made out to "The Ambassador " and dated " April 8 , 1955."
Estimate: $400 - $600
 
lot128426 


lot n°766: MARILYN MONROE BANK STATEMENT AND DEPOSIT SLIP
      Marilyn Monroe Productions, Inc. bank statement from Colonial Trust Company showing checks paid and the account balance from April 1957. Accompanied by a deposit slip from April 22, 1957, and matching calculation receipts in triplicate. Only days prior to this, Monroe took control of her production company and ousted former friend, business partner and photographer Milton Greene from her company.
Largest, 10 by 7 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 771, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Las Vegas, June 26, 2010
Estimate: $400 - $600

lot128427 


lot n°771: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED "SOME LIKE IT HOT" NOTE
      A letter dated April 1, 1959, addressed to Mrs. Arthur Miller, on Mirisch Company Inc/Some Like It Hot stationery, signed by Harold Mirisch. Letter reads, in part, “You know, of course, that the picture is doing tremendous business, and you should be very happy. My best to Arthur and yourself.”
11 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 797, "Julien's Summer Sale," Julien's Auctions, Las Vegas, June 26, 2009

 Estimate: $600 - $800
 
lot128444 


lot n°772: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM 20TH CENTURY FOX
     A letter written to Marilyn Monroe from Lew Schreiber of 20th Century Fox advising that Monroe will begin shooting Time and Tide on April 14, 1959, under the direction of Elia Kazan. The letter is dated March 4, 1959, and signed by Schreiber. The date of this letter and the fact that filming did not begin on time is one battle in the Marilyn Monroe/20th Century Fox history.

 Estimate: $500 - $700
lot128445 
  


lot n°778: MARILYN MONROE CABLE SENT TO THE ACADEMIE DU CINEMA
     A typed one-page letter dictated by Marilyn Monroe to be sent to Georges Auric of the Academie du Cinema in Paris, thanking him for the invitation to become an honorary member of his organization. Pencil notation indicates this was sent on February 6, 1960.
11 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 798, "Julien's Summer Sale," Julien's Auctions, Las Vegas, June 26, 2009

 Estimate: $200 - $400
 
lot128484 


lot n°779: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CHECK
     A Marilyn Monroe signed check. Drawn from a Marilyn Monroe Productions, Inc. account at Colonial Trust Company. The check is dated July 15, 1960, and made out to MCA Artists, LTD. in the amount of $672.94.

 Estimate: $1 000 - $2 000
 
lot128485 lot128486 


lot n°782: MARILYN MONROE BANK SAVINGS BOOK
     A City National Bank of Beverly Hills bank statement book. Marilyn Monroe’s name appears written in ink, and stamped inside on the first page are “NOV 17 ’61” and her account balance of $40,000.00.
5 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 194, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005

 Estimate: $600 - $800

lot128492 lot128493 


lot n°788: MARILYN MONROE ARTHUR MILLER UNUSED CHECK
    An unused check from a First National Bank of New York account belonging to Marilyn (Monroe) and Arthur Miller.
2 3/4 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 142, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005

 Estimate: $200 - $400
 
lot128504 


lot n°811: MARILYN MONROE LIVERY SERVICE RECEIPT
    A carbon receipt from Carey Cadillac Renting Company of California, Inc. dated "4/2/1962." It lists 7 1/2 hours of time spent driving and waiting for Marilyn Monroe. The service receipt shows Monroe going to her therapist Dr. Greenson's home at 902 Franklin Street twice that day.

 Estimate: $100 - $200
 
lot128546 


lot n°812: MARILYN MONROE FUNERAL CARD
    An original card from the funeral of Marilyn Monroe on Wednesday, August 8, 1962, at the Westwood Village Mortuary in Los Angeles. The front of the card bears an image of the Bok Singing Tower. The inside reads in part "In Memory of Marilyn Monroe" with the details of her funeral service and Psalm 23.

 Estimate: $600 - $800
lot128547 lot128548

28 mars 2013

Heritage Auctions 30/03/2013

lot n°46001: Marilyn Monroe Early Signed Black and White Photograph,
Circa 1946.

An original print with a matte finish, depicting a young headshot of the twenty year-old before she looked like "Marilyn," signed in blue fountain pen ink on the lower right side "To Roy, / My favorite guard. / Always / Marilyn Monroe;" "Roy" being Roy Volker, a security guard at Twentieth Century Fox Studios throughout the 1940s-1950s; the inscription on this particular photograph is noteworthy because it appears to have been signed just as MM was changing her name -- it shows the childhood writing style of Norma Jeane Baker but is signed with her adult stage name of Marilyn Monroe. (Please note the inscription, especially the part reading "Marilyn Monroe," is now faded due to age and the photograph is somewhat yellowed and spotted.) 10" x 8
PROVENANCE: This piece was consigned directly to Heritage Auctions by Roy Volker's grandson.
Estimate: $8,000 - up.
lot46001 


 lot n°46002: A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Snapshot, 1953.... (Total: 2 Items)
 A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Snapshot, 1953. An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star likely on the set of "Niagara," signed in blue ballpoint ink on the verso "Marilyn Monroe;" together with another black and white snapshot depicting MM and Betty Grable (at Walter Winchell's birthday party which took place at Ciro's, the famous Sunset Strip nightclub, on May 13, 1953), signed in red ballpoint ink on the verso "Betty Grable." (Please note both snapshots have evident surface scratches.)
3 ¼" x 2 ¼" 
Estimate: $600 - up.
lot46002a lot46002b 


lot n°46003: A Marilyn Monroe Group of Likely Never-Before-Seen Black and White Photographs, 1956.
 Twenty-one total, all small as they were cut from contact sheets, all original prints with a matte finish, each depicting the star sitting in a restaurant called The Ram in Sun Valley, Idaho, during the filming of "Bus Stop" as actor Arthur O'Connell [her co-star who portrayed "Virgil Blessing"] is next to her in some shots (as are others), 13 images have a red handwritten check mark on them; from the files of Bob Beerman who took a number of photographs of MM throughout the years.
2 1/2" x 2 1/2"
Estimate: $4,000 - up.
lot46003   


lot n°46004A Marilyn Monroe Group of Likely Never-Before-Seen Black and White Photographs, Circa 1951.
 Ten total, all original prints with a glossy finish, each depicting the star in a black cocktail dress as she poses with different groups of men at a party (though one image does show MM with another woman and a man), all are numbered on the lower margins; MM was evidently the main attraction at this event which is believed to be the 1951 Hollywood Foreign Correspondents Association luncheon at Mocambo, the famous Sunset Strip nightclub.
4 1/2" x 4"
Estimate: $1 000 - up.
lot46004 


lot n°46005: A Marilyn Monroe Rare Headshot, Circa 1951.
 An original print with a glossy finish, depicting a stunning image of the actress wearing elaborate rhinestone earrings and a necklace, with her black top "painted on" (on the negative before it was printed, likely to cover up cleavage), verso has handwritten annotations reading "Marilyn Monroe / 1951 / silhouette," an illegible credit stamp, and a credit sticker. (Please note this photograph is just in marginal condition with many creases and indent marks.) 9" x 7 1/2"
Estimate: $500 - up.
lot46005a lot46005b 


  lot n°46006: A Marilyn Monroe Rare Black and White Cheesecake Photograph, Circa 1949.
 An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the then starlet wearing a sweater, shorts, and high heels as she kneels on a miniature chair; verso has two FPG [Free Lance Photographers Guild, Inc.] stamps, a photographer's credit stamp reading "Rothschild / Photo / Los Angeles / DU. 7-2284," and some other penciled annotations; believed to have been taken at the Pacific Coast Antiques Show on May 25, 1949. (Please note there were slight specs on the negative when the photograph was developed and there are slight indent marks on the surface.)
9 1/2" x 7 1/2"
Estimate: $500 - up.
lot46006a lot46006b 


lot n°46007: A Marilyn Monroe Set of Rare Black and White Cheesecake Photographs, Circa 1948.
Both original prints with a glossy finish, both depicting the then starlet wearing a white two-piece bathing suit, both with numbers on the lower margins. (Please note there is a very small dent on one but the image is not affected.) 5" x 4"
Estimate: $500 - up.
lot46007 


lot n°46008: A Marilyn Monroe Rare Black and White Photograph, 1952.
 An original print with a glossy finish, depicting a sweet image of the then newcomer wearing a formal dress as she smiles at Sidney Skolsky, the Hollywood gossip columnist who became her lifelong friend and protector; verso has an affixed typed snipe noting the two were "at the Look awards party at the Beverly Hills Hotel," the photographer's credit stamp reading "Hyman Fink," and a Photoplay Magazine Library stamp dated "Mar 6 1952." (Please note there are crease and indent marks on surface but overall image is not affected.) 9 1/2" x 7 3/4"
Estimate: $500 - up.
lot46008a lot46008b


lot n°46009: A Marilyn Monroe Set of Rare Black and White Publicity Photographs, 1953.
 Both original prints with a glossy finish, both depict the star in her room at the Beverly Carlton Hotel [still on Olympic Boulevard in Beverly Hills but now called The Avalon Hotel] doing household chores; the versos of both have the photographer's credit stamp of "Fink Smith," Photoplay Magazine stamps, Phil Burchman Agency stamps, and brief penciled annotations about the star. (Please note MM's face has been touched up in one image and there are very slight dent marks on both.) 9 1/2" x 7 1/2"
Estimate: $500 - up.
lot46009a lot46009b


  lot n°46010: A Marilyn Monroe Classic Black and White Headshot, 1952.
 An original print with a glossy finish, depicting one of the most famous headshots of the star as she wears a low-cut black and white dress (the same one she wore when she served as Grand Marshall of the 1952 Miss America beauty pageant in Atlantic City, New Jersey where it caused a scandal), bottom right corner displays filing numbers, verso has stamps reading "Marilyn Monroe / 20th Century-Fox Player" and "George Zeno / Collection" (a well-known MM photograph collector) plus another illegible one. (Please note there are some crease marks evident. 9 1/2" x 7 1/2"
Estimate: $500 - up.
lot46010a lot46010b 


lot n°46011: A Marilyn Monroe Rare Black and White Cheesecake Photograph, 1952.
 An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the then starlet in an elaborate bathing suit and platform sandals as she stands next to an oversized heart form; verso has stamps reading "Return to / Time Inc. / Feb. 11 1952 / File" and "MM File," an affixed typed snipe reading in part "Actress Marilyn Monroe, pin-up queen of the / armed forces, says 'Be My Valentine'...," and some brief penned annotations. (Please note there are some very minor surface dents.) 9" x 7"
Estimate: $500 - up.
lot46011a lot46011b 


lot n°46012: A Marilyn Monroe Chest X-Ray, 1954.
 Appearing to be a vintage 1954-era copy of the original that was likely made for another doctor's use; image depicts the star's sternum, ribcage, and outline of her breasts as she rests her hands on her hips, a somewhat blurred notation in the upper left corner reads "Cedars of Lebanon Hospital / Drs. E. Freedman and S. Finck / DiMaggio Marilyn / 11-10-54." 17" x 14"
Interestingly, Julien's Auctions offered a different copy of this same X-ray in June 2010 and its hammer price was $25,000.
Estimate: $1 000 - up.
lot46012a lot46012b 


 lot n°46013: A Marilyn Monroe-Received Group of Professional Letters, 1957-1958. 
 Three total, all sent to the actress from colleagues in the industry including:
> 1) a two-page note typed on yellow paper, dated "July 30, 1957," sent to MM in "Amagansett, Long Island, New York," from Ray Stark [Hollywood producer], reading in part "It was good seeing you, if even so briefly, at / the East Hampton airport. /...We would love to do a project with you and also with / Arthur / ...such as doing 'Casablanca' / as a musical" (thankfully, MM didn't take him up on that offer);
> 2) a one-page note (the first page now missing) typed on white paper, dated "May 7, 1958," from Joe Wolhandler [MM's NYC press agent], reading in part "...the fittings, costuming, etc., we will try to do / without you;"
> and 3) a one-page note typed on white paper, no date, from Lionel Newman [Musical Director/Composer], reading in part "...I would like very much for / you and Arthur to have dinner with Beverly and me;"
> also included is a rare 1959 pamphlet titled 'Times Talk' with an article on page 3 noting how on September 29th "Marilyn Monroe paraded through the building inhaling culture, the guest of Sunday Editor Lester Markel." 11" x 8 1/2"
Estimate: $1 000 - up.
lot46013 


lot n°46150 A Warner Bros. 'Key to the Studio,' Circa 1950s.
 In the form of an oversized key, made of brass, designed with the famous 'WB' shield logo while one side reads "Welcome to Warner Bros. Studios" and the other "The Greatest in the World;" given to actors and other VIPs when they had an important association with the studio. (Please note this particular key is NOT Marilyn Monroe's key, though a similar one was given to her in 1956.) 10" x 4"
Estimate: $1 000 - up.
lot46150a lot46150b

18 octobre 2012

Julien's Auction 11/2012 - Documents papiers

lot n°551: MARILYN MONROE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION PROGRAM
    A program for the June 26, 1941, graduation ceremony held at Ralph Waldo Emerson Junior High School in Los Angeles. The program is separated into a list of girl and boy graduates. Norma Jeane Baker, the future Marilyn Monroe, is listed as a graduate. The cover of the paper program reads "Ralph Waldo Emerson/ Junior High School/ Class of Summer 1941/ New Frontiers of Friendship/ June The Twenty-Sixth at Four-Thirty."
9 by 6 1/4 inches

 Estimate: $200 - $400
 
lot109166 


lot n°551: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED 1957 LETTER
    A typed letter from Marilyn Monroe, dated "May 7, 1957" and written to Warner Bros. Pictures, permitting them to use her name in the dialogue of their film Green Eyes ; signed by Monroe in blue fountain pen ink. Attached is a typed page of dialogue from the film where Monroe's name was used, in part, "JOYCE: / (before mirror)/ How's my hair?/ BETSY:/ (genuine admiration)/ It's beautiful, Joyce!/ JOYCE:/ (preening herself)/ It's kind of the way Marilyn Monroe does hers." The letter is framed with an image of Monroe and two other documents; a carbon copy of a letter sent to Warner Bros. Pictures from Monroe's secretary regarding this matter; and the original request letter sent to "Mrs. Lilian Dean" at Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc.
Letter, 11 by 8 1/2 inches; 23 by 38 1/2 inches, framed

 Estimate: $3 000 - $4 000
 lot109230 lot109232


lot n°552: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CUT SHEET 
  
A Marilyn Monroe signed piece of paper, affixed to larger board. Monroe has signed her name in red ink.
5 1/2 by 8 1/2 inches, overall
 Estimate: $800 - $1 200
lot109233 


lot n°596: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER SIGNED PLAYBILL
   A playbill cover signed in pencil by Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller. The playbill was from a 1957 production of The Waltz of the Toreadors at the Coronet Theatre in New York City. Affixed at corners to black matte board.
Playbill, 9 by 6 3/4 inches; Board, 12 3/4 by 10 inches
Estimate: $2 000 - $4 000
lot596  
lot596a lot596b


lot n°598: MARILYN MONROE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT
  A three-page "conformed" copy of Marilyn Monroe's Last Will & Testament administered by Weisberger & Frosch (New York) one year before her death, dated January 14, 1961. She bequeathed her belongings to several recipients, which provides great insight into her wishes shortly before her passing. Half-sister Berniece Miracle inherited $10,000.00, secretary and friend May Reis received the same amount, Norman and Hedda Rosten received $5,000.00, and mother Gladys Baker received $5,000.00 per year for her upkeep in institutions. Also present is original document cover and transmittal envelope.
14 by 9 inches, unfolded
PROVENANCE Lot 163, "Property From the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
Estimate: $5 000 - $7 000
lot598 
lot598a lot598b lot598c
lot598d lot598e

 


   lot n°599: MARILYN MONROE FUNERAL CARD
  An original card from the funeral of Marilyn Monroe on Wednesday, August 8, 1962, at the Westwood Village Mortuary in Los Angeles. The front of the card bears an image of the Bok Singing Tower. The inside reads in part "In Memory of Marilyn Monroe" with the details of her funeral service and Psalm 23.
Estimate: $600 - $800
lot599 lot599a lot599b

 


lot n°600: MARILYN MONROE CECIL BEATON TRIPTYCH
  A three-panel sterling silver custom-made Cartier frame, gifted to Marilyn Monroe by Nedda and Joshua Logan. The center frame houses a black and white silver gelatin print of the portrait Cecil Beaton took of Monroe in 1956. This image is purported to be Monroe’s favorite image of herself. The portrait is mounted to board and signed on matte by Beaton. The center frame is engraved at the top “For Marilyn Monroe Miller” and at the bottom “Love Nedda and Joshua Logan.” Joshua Logan directed Monroe in her 1956 film Bus Stop . The left and right frames house a handwritten letter from Cecil Beaton describing Monroe. It reads in part, “But the real marvel is the paradox – somehow we know that this extraordinary performance is pure charade, a little girl’s caricature of Mae West. The puzzling truth is that Miss Monroe is a make-believe siren, unsophisticated as a Rhine maiden, innocent as a sleepwalker. She is an urchin pretending to be grown-up, having the time of her life in mother’s moth-eaten finery, tottering about in high-heeled shoes and sipping gingerale as though it were a champagne cocktail. There is an otherworldly, a winsome naiveté about the child’s eyes…” The portrait can be seen in images of Monroe’s living room, where it was housed from 1956 until the actress’ death in 1962.
PROVENANCE Lot 22 "The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe," Christie's, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
Estimate: $35 000 - $40 000
lot600 lot600e  
lot600b lot600c lot600d 
lot600a  
lot600f lot600g 

25 juillet 2012

Heritage Auction 07/2012

lot n°46001: A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, Circa 1956
A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, Circa 1956. An original print with a matte finish, depicting the star in one of her legendary glamour poses, her blue fountain pen ink inscription on the right side reads "To Roy, / Love & Kisses and - / thanks for keeping me / out of the clink! / Marilyn Monroe." (Please note there are slight creases in all four corners, especially the lower left one, plus a few minor chips to the surface, but the overall image and signature are not affected.) 14" x 11"
PROVENANCE: The "Roy" noted above was Beverly Hills police officer, Roy Garrett, who joined the force in 1946, and who had a habit of asking movie stars to send him an autographed photograph (which most did - see various lots throughout this auction). He evidently let Marilyn go without a ticket as he received this from her in the mail a few days later.
Sold: $31,250.00

heritage-lot46001


Lot 46002: A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, Circa 1955
A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, Circa 1955. An original print with a matte finish, depicting the star in her most famous headshot, her white fountain pen ink inscription in the lower right corner reading "To Vern / It was a pleasure / to work with you / Love and Kisses / Marilyn Monroe;" "Vern" being Vernon Rickard, a bit player and "gofer" in the early days of Hollywood. (Please note there are many creases and wrinkles on lower margin that somewhat affect the autograph and there is a slight dent in the upper right corner.) 10" x 8"
Sold: $11,250.00
heritage-lot46002  heritage-lot46002a 


Lot 46003: A Marilyn Monroe Likely Final Signed Check, August 4, 1962
A Marilyn Monroe Likely Final Signed Check, August 4, 1962. From the star's personal checking account at City National Bank of Beverly Hills, check 281, penned in blue ballpoint ink (in another hand, possibly Eunice Murray's, MM's caretaker) reading "Aug 4 62 / Pilgrim / $228.80 / Two hundred twenty-eight and 80," signed in same ink in Marilyn's own hand "Marilyn Monroe," a red stamp on front reads "Paid / Aug 6 1962 / 901-1606," further stamps on back read in part "For Deposit Only / Pilgrim Modern Furniture" and "Santa Monica Bank.../ Aug 6 62;" included is a photocopy (not the original) of an invoice that Pilgrim's Furniture gave to MM (see below footnote). 3" x 6"
Coincidentally, two years ago, Heritage Auctions sold the original invoice that was given to Marilyn by this company [Pilgrim's Furniture then at 12217 Wilshire Boulevard in West Los Angeles] in Sale 7018, Lot 50225. That invoice was also dated August 4, 1962, so it appears that Pilgrim's made a delivery to MM's house and that she paid for her "Chest Roman white" on the spot with the above check from her personal checkbook. Interestingly, on that invoice, the evident delivery man wrote "Rec'd Check #281 in amount $228.80 / Payment in full / Earl Shero." At this point in time, this seems to be the last check Marilyn ever signed as she died that night, August 4, 1962. This check can be used to argue the point that Marilyn did not commit suicide -- would one be concerned with new furniture on the last day of one's life? Probably not!
Sold: $15,000.00
heritage-lot46003a  heritage-lot46003b  heritage-lot46003c 


Lot 46005: A Marilyn Monroe Signed Note, 1952
A Marilyn Monroe Signed Note, 1952. Typed on one page, dated "October 27th, 1952," to the "Wm. Morris Agency, Inc.," reading in part "...you are no longer authorized to represent me," signed in blue fountain pen ink on the lower right side "Marilyn Monroe;" two-hole punch marks on top margin. 11" x 8 1/2"
Sold: $5,312.50 
heritage-lot46005  


Lot 46006: A Marilyn Monroe Signed Menu, 1953
A Marilyn Monroe Signed Menu, 1953. From the famous Cocoanut Grove nightclub inside the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles (infamous for being the place where RFK got assassinated in June, 1968), menu is dated "Sat., June 27, 1953," signed in blue ballpoint ink on the inside left side "Marilyn Monroe." 13 1/2" x 11"
Sold: $2,375.00 
heritage-lot46006a  heritage-lot46006b  heritage-lot46006c  


Lot 46007: A Marilyn Monroe Group of Mostly Never-Before-Seen Black and White Negatives, 1950.
A Marilyn Monroe Group of Mostly Never-Before-Seen Black and White Negatives, 1950. Thirty-three total, all originals, each depicting Marilyn at age 24 posing in a fancy backyard during one photo session; 14 show MM wearing a black turtleneck, white shorts, and black strappy sandals as she sits on a chaise lounge chair; 18 show MM wearing a light-colored bikini and same sandals as she poses by a swimming pool; and one shows MM wearing a dark-colored bikini by the same pool; two depict other people in the shot with MM, evidently the photographer's assistants. (Please note some of these negatives are somewhat dirtied and scratched, but they still print up beautifully and MM is quite clear and vibrant-looking in all the shots.)
Each Negative: 2 1/2" x 2 1/2"
These photographs of Monroe were taken on October 10, 1950 by Bob Beerman, a staff photographer at 'Modern Screen' magazine. A few of the images did appear in a 1951 issue of the magazine, though not all of them. Additionally, the current owner published seven of them online, but the majority of these photographs have never before been seen.
Sold: $11,875.00  
heritage-lot46007a  heritage-lot46007b 


Lot 46008: A Marilyn Monroe Pucci Blouse, Circa 1962
A Marilyn Monroe Pucci Blouse, Circa 1962. Made of hot pink silk jersey, boatneck, long sleeves, inside labels read "Emilio Pucci / Florence, Italy / 12" (though seeming to be a modern-day Size 6) and "Made in Italy Exclusively for / Saks Fifth Avenue;" included with a typed signed letter reading in part "This blouse by the Italian designer... / was given to me by Marilyn Monroe. It had become too / large for her. / Joan Greenson Aebi," "Joan" being the daughter of Dr. Ralph Greenson, MM's longtime psychiatrist. (Please note there are sweat marks and other minor staining evident due to age, but overall condition is still good.)
Sold: $12,500.00 

heritage-lot46008a  heritage-lot46008b  heritage-lot46008d 
heritage-lot46008c 


Lot 46009: A Marilyn Monroe Pair of Jax Pants, Circa 1962
A Marilyn Monroe Pair of Jax Pants, Circa 1962. Made of black silk, in the cigarette style, inside label reads "Designed by Jax," no size evident but seeming to be a modern-day size 4; included with a typed signed letter reading in part "These black pants were given to me by / Marilyn Monroe. They had become too / large for her... / Joan Greenson Aebi," "Joan" being the daughter of Dr. Ralph Greenson, MM's longtime psychiatrist.
Sold: $6,875.00  

heritage-lot46009a  heritage-lot46009b  heritage-lot46009c  


Lot 46010: A Marilyn Monroe-Received Letter from an Associate, Circa 1960
A Marilyn Monroe-Received Letter from an Associate, Circa 1960. Two pages, handwritten in blue ballpoint ink on 'American Airlines' in flight stationery, a general newsy letter with some highlights reading in part "darling Marilyn / ...I read Lillian Hellman's / new play and I saw Clifford's [Odets] / movie. I was shattered by the play... / I think Ralph Roberts would be of / great help to you. He is at Beverly / Wilshire.../ I do wish I had a script of 'Misfits;' interestingly, MM took the advice of this friend and ended up hiring Roberts to be her personal masseur. 10" x 7"
Sold: $750.00 

heritage-lot46010 


Lot 46011: A Marilyn Monroe-Received Letter from Eunice Murray, 1962
A Marilyn Monroe-Received Letter from Eunice Murray, 1962. One page of lined notebook paper, handwritten on both sides in green ballpoint ink, dated "Monday nite / Feb. 5," outlining various ideas for home renovations that Murray was evidently researching for the star such as a "wardrobe dressing / room on the front of the house - using the front / window of (MM's) bedroom as the doorway," among others, Murray ends the note with "I would suggest / concentrating on the interior in the way we originally planned...E.M," additionally, two business cards of contractors are stapled to the front of note. 11" x 8 1/2"
Sold: $1,750.00 
heritage-lot46011a  heritage-lot46011b    


Lot 46012: A Marilyn Monroe-Received Note from William Inge, 1959
A Marilyn Monroe-Received Note from William Inge, 1959. One page, typed on personalized notepaper, dated "April 6, 1959," from the famous playwright [who wrote "Bus Stop"] who was evidently a big Marilyn Monroe fan, signed in black fountain pen ink in the lower right corner "Bill Inge." 8" x 6"
Sold: $391.25  

heritage-lot46012 


Lot 46013: A Marilyn Monroe-Received Group of Business Letters, 1950s-1960s
A Marilyn Monroe-Received Group of Business Letters, 1950s-1960s. Five total, all sent to the star by various professional associates including ones from: 1) Harry McIntyre, on Twentieth Century-Fox letterhead, dated "December 22, 1958," regarding rights to a novel the studio bought from MM; 2) Hugh French, on Hugh French Agency letterhead, dated "11 January 1961," regarding a television show he wanted MM to star in; 3) Matthew Fox, on his personal letterhead, dated "June 23, 1961," regarding a production he thought would be good for MM and Elizabeth Taylor (!); 4) Milton A. Rudin [MM's lawyer], on Gang, Type, Rudin & Brown letterhead, dated "December 19, 1961," regarding a special screening of the Bette Davis film, "Of Human Bondage;" and 5) Richard S. Meryman, Jr., on Life letterhead, dated "February 10, 1962," regarding an interview for the magazine and how MM would be able to "destroy negatives" (of photos she didn't like); months later, Meryman finally did get his interview, but sadly, it would be Marilyn's last one. 11" x 8 1/2"
Sold: $937.50
heritage-lot46013


Lot 46014: A Marilyn Monroe Group of Documents, 1962
A Marilyn Monroe Group of Documents, 1962. Including: 1) six typed letters between Cherie Redmond [MM's Los Angeles secretary] and a travel agent, dated from February to April 1962, regarding an ongoing issue about a refund MM needed for unused airline tickets; 2) a pale yellow 'Inter-Office Correspondence' memo to MM from Redmond, dated "7/25/62," regarding funds in the star's various banking accounts; and 3) a similar memo, dated "8/1/62," regarding overdraft protection MM needed in order to pay August's bills. 11" x 8 1/2" and smaller
Sold: $1,062.50 
heritage-lot46014  


Lot 46015: A Marilyn Monroe Group of Documents, 1950s
A Marilyn Monroe Group of Documents, 1950s. Three items including: 1) a receipt from the 76 Union gas station at 14478 Ventura Boulevard in Sherman Oaks, dated "5/1/54," in the amount of "$7.07," signed off by a "Vic Masi for Mrs. M. DiMaggio;" 2) a single page typed with Monroe's dictations for a telegram to Inez Melson [her business manager], dated "June 10, 1959," regarding "Clyde," a pet bird; and 3) a newspaper clipping of a short article about MM's fashion sense (likely from The Los Angeles Times, April 29, 1958). 11" x 8 1/2" and smaller
Sold: $437.50 

heritage-lot46015 


Lot 46016: A Marilyn Monroe Legal Form, 1953
A Marilyn Monroe Legal Form, 1953. A pale yellow quadruplicate copy titled "Notice of Attachment," reading in part "Matter of Shaeffer [sic?] Plaintiff / Marilyn Monroe Defendant / on Monday, 2-2-53 12:01 PM;" two hole punch marks on top margin. 9" x 4"
This is an odd document, possibly relating to MM's voice and musical coach, Hal Schaeffer, though the last name is spelled differently on this form. Schaeffer, who was having an affair with MM as she was divorcing Joe DiMaggio, unwittingly became part of the infamous 'Wrong Door Raid,' but this piece pre-dates that event by almost two years -- perhaps it relates to a different person altogether.
Sold: $212.50 
heritage-lot46016 


 Lot 46017: Two Marilyn Monroe-Received Fan Letters, 1950s-1960s
Two Marilyn Monroe-Received Fan Letters, 1950s-1960s. The first typed on a single page, dated "May 5, 1959," reading in part "I am a clergyman who is enthusiastic about all / your performances... / and would / like very much to have an autographed photograph...;" a penciled annotation (not in MM's hand) on the lower margin reads "Mae - I sent him one - But I / thought Marilyn would get / a kick out of the idea;" the second typed on a single page, dated "Janury [sic] 18, 1962," reading in part "I have written a novel which I think would make a / very good movie for you to star in;" a red penciled annotation (not in MM's hand) on the lower margin reads in part "To Cherie / Just reply not..." 11" x 8 1/2" and smaller
Sold: $375.00 
heritage-lot46017 


Lot 46018: A Marilyn Monroe Group of Never-Before-Seen Black and White Snapshots from Korea, 1954
A Marilyn Monroe Group of Never-Before-Seen Black and White Snapshots from Korea, 1954. Nine total, all vintage prints with a glossy finish; three depicting the star wearing military coveralls (though just the top of her blonde head can be seen in one); three depicting her posing for soldiers before she goes onstage; and three depicting her onstage at the microphone; consigned directly by the soldier who shot these photographs 58 years ago when Marilyn famously entertained the troops while she was on her ill-fated honeymoon with Joe DiMaggio. (Please note the snapshots are in poor condition now with tape residue, bends, slight tears, and fold marks, but one can still see MM in each image.) 5" x 4"
Sold: $1,875.00 
heritage-lot46018  


Lot 46019: A Marilyn Monroe Never-Before-Seen Black and White Snapshot, 1955
A Marilyn Monroe Never-Before-Seen Black and White Snapshot, 1955. An original print, depicting the star standing next to a woman (likely Amy Greene) at the premiere of "East of Eden" which took place on March 9, 1955 at the Astor Theatre in New York City. (Please note there are a few light creases but overall image is not affected.) 3 3/4" x 2 3/4"
Sold: $375.00 
heritage-lot46019a  heritage-lot46019b  


Lot 46020: Two Marilyn Monroe Black and White Publicity Photographs, Circa 1953
Two Marilyn Monroe Black and White Publicity Photographs, Circa 1953. Both original prints with a glossy finish, each depicting the star in classic cheesecake poses taken at the height of her career. 10" x 8"
Sold: $312.50 
heritage-lot46020 


Lot 46021: A Marilyn Monroe Acetate Record of 'My Heart Belongs to Daddy' from "Let's Make Love."
A Marilyn Monroe Acetate Record of 'My Heart Belongs to Daddy' from "Let's Make Love." 20th Century Fox, 1960. With a 20th Century Fox Film Corp. label typed with "F13 - Let's Make Love / 'My Heart Belongs to Daddy' / DS 25 / Monroe-Group-Orch. / 33 1/3;" Marilyn's version of the Cole Porter classic, this one being slightly different than the one she sings as "Amanda Dell" in the film co-starring Yves Montand and Tony Randall; condition is very good. Diameter: 12"
Sold: $3,125.00 

heritage-lot46021  


Lot 46022: A Marilyn Monroe-Related Vintage Lapel Button, 1956
A Marilyn Monroe-Related Vintage Lapel Button, 1956. Made of tin, featuring an image of the star surrounded by text reading "Gentlemen Prefer Marilyn Monroe," copyright information on bottom reads "MMNM 1956." (Please note there is some discoloration due to age.) Diameter: 1 3/8"
Sold: $325.00 

heritage-lot46022 

05 mars 2012

Julien's Auction 03/2012 - Documents papiers

lot n°424: MARILYN MONROE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
A diploma from Ralph Waldo Emerson Junior High School in Los Angeles, for the ninth grade graduation of Norma Jeane Baker in 1941. Norma Jeane was 15 at the time and facing an uncertain future as the health of her guardian at that time, Ana Lower, was about to cause another change of household for Monroe.
6 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 324, Books Auction, Sotheby Parke Bernet, Sale number 94, October 21, 1973
Estimate: $3 000 - $5 000
   
lot93074  


lot n°426: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTER FROM UNCLE ART
A double-sided two-page letter written to Marilyn Monroe from "Uncle Art," who was a relative of Monroe's foster mother, Grace Goddard. The letter reads in part "So glad you are making satisfactory progress in school. I advise that you be particularly diligent in the cultural subjects...sad is the fate of the young woman who has not the ambition to so model and mold her language and conduct as to have [illegible] herself to the point where she can mingle with cultured people inconspicuously." The letter is written on International Correspondence Schools of Scranton, Pennsylvania, stationery, undated and signed "Devotedly Yours, Uncle Art."
11 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Sotheby Parke Bernet, Sale number 94, October 21, 1973
Estimate: $600 - $800
   
lot93076  


lot n°427: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTER FROM SIDNEY SKOLSKY
A double-sided two-page letter from columnist Sidney Skolsky to Marilyn Monroe dated April 2, 1952. The letter is written on Albert Pike Hotel, Little Rock, Arkansas, stationery. In the letter Skolsky says he is writing because of a conversation the two just had and he cannot sleep. He writes words of encouragement to Monroe. In part, "What else can I say sweet Sunshine? How can I tell you how sure I am of you, for you?" He references an article written by LIFE magazine columnist Stan Flink: "...that putrid Stan Flink article...Can you undo it by torturing yourself?" On April 7, 1952, Monroe appeared on her first LIFE magazine cover. The affectionate letter is signed "Love ----Sid."
11 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Sotheby Parke Bernet, Sale number 94, October 21, 1973
Estimate: $600 - $800
  
lot93077


 lot n°454: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN AND SIGNED CHECK
A Marilyn Monroe handwritten and signed check dated July 7, 1953, in the amount of $30, written to "Thrifty Mart." Monroe has entered all of the bank and personal information by hand as well as signed the check. Stamped by ThirftyMart Markets and bank on verso.
2 3/4 by 6 inches
Estimate: $1 000 - $2 000
 
lot93108


 lot n°455: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED LETTER
A one-page typed contractual letter signed in ink by Marilyn Monroe, dated May 8, 1951. In the letter to William Morris Agency Inc., Monroe requests a $200 deduction in her monthly salary from 20th Century Fox so that she may cover a dental bill of $1,800 for her acting coach, Natasha Lytess. Matted together with a black and white photograph of Monroe.
18 by 22 inches, matted
Estimate: $800 - $1 200

lot93109  


lot n°464: MARILYN MONROE INSCRIBED BOOK
A Marilyn Monroe inscribed copy of Anita Loos' Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (Grosset & Dunlap, 1926). Monroe inscribed the title page for Linda Bennett "To Linda/ Love & Kisses/ Marilyn Monroe."
7 1/2 by 5 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 144, "Pop Culture: Film & Entertainment Memorabilia," Christie's, London, Sale number 6214, November 23, 2011
Estimate: $2 000 - $4 000

lot93120 lot93121


lot n°468: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM JEAN NEGULESCO
A two-page typed letter on personalized stationery, dated "July 14, 1958," addressed to Marilyn Monroe at the Bel Air Hotel from director Jean Negulesco. The letter is regarding a book titled The Midwife of Pont Clary which Negulesco sent to Monroe and writes about wanting to adapt into a film role for her. The letter reads in part "The thing of 'The Midwife of Pont Clary' is fundamentally sex...I have quite an exciting idea for the treatment of the story...I would like to sit down and talk to you about it...Please give this book to Arthur [Miller] to read...;" signed in black ink "Jean." This movie was never made. Negulesco directed Monroe in Full House (20th Century Fox, 1952), How to Marry a Millionaire (20th Century Fox, 1953), and River of No Return (20th Century Fox, 1954).
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches 
Estimate: $200 - $400
  
lot93126 


 lot n°469: MARILYN MONROE RELATED LETTER
A two-page typed letter dated September 27, 1958, on Chateau Marmont hotel stationery, to Miss May Reis, Marilyn Monroe's secretary, and believed to be from Paula Strasberg. The letter reads in part "This week was a most difficult one for Marilyn. But I saw the rushes and they were extraordinary. I have kept minute notes on this weeks' work that will cover pages and pages through the type-writer. I will send a copy on to Arthur because I think it will more than interest him professionally insofar as what happens to the actor in the process of work" and "Tonight, Eli, Marilyn, Clifford...are going out for a quiet dinner. Tomorrow we leave for Coronado and will be there, I should think, until next Thursday." This letter was written during the time Monroe was filming the comedy Some Like It Hot (United Artists, 1959) and relates to some of Monroe's expenses incurred during that time. Signed "Paula" in blue ink.
10 3/8 by 7 1/8 inches 
Estimate: $400 - $600
 
lot93127


lot n°472: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED 1957 LETTER
A typed letter from Marilyn Monroe, dated "May 7, 1957" and written to Warner Bros. Pictures, permitting them to use her name in the dialogue of their film Green Eyes ; signed by Monroe in blue fountain pen ink. Attached is a typed page of dialogue from the film where Monroe's name was used, in part, "JOYCE: / (before mirror)/ How's my hair?/ BETSY:/ (genuine admiration)/ It's beautiful, Joyce!/ JOYCE:/ (preening herself)/ It's kind of the way Marilyn Monroe does hers." The letter is framed with an image of Monroe and two other documents; a carbon copy of a letter sent to Warner Bros. Pictures from Monroe's secretary regarding this matter; and the original request letter sent to "Mrs. Lilian Dean" at Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc.
Letter, 11 by 8 1/2 inches; 23 by 38 1/2 inches, framed
Estimate: $800 - $1 200
 
lot93130 lot93131


lot n°479: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CHECK
A Colonial Trust Company check for Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc., dated July 15, 1960, to 20th Century Fox Film Corporation for the amount of $70.44, signed in blue ballpoint pen by Marilyn Monroe. Framed with a black and white and color image of Monroe.
17 1/4 by 33 1/4 inches, framed
PROVENANCE Lot 129, "Film and Entertainment Memorabilia," Christie's, New York, Sale number 1854, May 30, 2007
Estimate: $800 - $1 200

lot93138  


lot n°484: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER CHECKS
Two unwritten checks from a First National City Bank of New York account of Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller. Miller and Monroe were married from 1956 to 1961. Miller wrote and performed in The Misfits , Monroe's final film.
Estimate: $400 - $600

lot93143


lot n°498: MARILYN MONROE TWICE-SIGNED CHECK
A Marilyn Monroe twice-signed check. Written from a Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. account at Colonial Trust Company in the amount of $10,000 to Marilyn Monroe. Dated July 15, 1960, and endorsed on verso by Monroe.
3 by 8 1/2 inches
Estimate: $2 000 - $4 000

lot93166 


lot n°500: MARILYN MONROE 1962 TELEGRAM TO GEORGE CUKOR
A Western Union telegram sent from Marilyn Monroe to director George Cukor dated June 8, 1962. Reads in full "Dear George Please believe me it was not my doing I had so looked forward to working with you Warmly Marilyn." On June 7 Fox fired Monroe and filed a lawsuit against her for breach of contract which ended filming of Cukor's Something's Got To Give .
5 3/4 by 8 inches

Estimate: $1 000 - $2 000

lot93169


lot n°501: MARILYN MONROE FUNERAL CARD
An original card from the funeral of Marilyn Monroe on Wednesday, August 8, 1962, at the Westwood Village Mortuary in Los Angeles. The front of the card bears an image of the Bok Singing Tower. The inside reads in part "In Memory of Marilyn Monroe" with the details of her funeral service and Psalm 23.
5 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches, folded

Estimate: $600 - $800
  
lot93170 lot94177


lot n°515: ALLAN "WHITEY" SNYDER LETTERS TO MARILYN MONROE
A one-page typed letter and signed letter to Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller from Allan "Whitey" Snyder, dated "July 16th, 1959," regarding working together on a future film ( The Misfits ) and his current work doing makeup for Tony Curtis. In original envelope addressed to Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. Together with a handwritten telegram from Snyder also to Marilyn Monroe Productions, stating that he is currently working at Paramount with Tony Curtis, but is able to start working with Monroe on a film when she is ready.
Letter, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Allan "Whitey" Snyder

Estimate: $400 - $600
  
lot93215 lot94184
lot94185


lot n°518: MARILYN MONROE TELEGRAM TO ALLAN "WHITEY" SNYDER
A typed Western Union telegram from Marilyn Monroe to Allan "Whitey" Snyder sent upon her being fired from the film Something's Got to Give (20th Century Fox, 1962). In full, "Dear Whitey, Please believe me it was not my doing./ I had so looked forward to working with you. Warmly/ Marilyn." Something's Got to Give was never finished and was Monroe's last work before her death on August 5, 1962.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Allan "Whitey" Snyder

Estimate: $800 - $1 200
 
lot93222  


lot n°519: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN LETTER TO ALLAN "WHITEY" SNYDER
A one-page handwritten and signed letter from Marilyn Monroe to Allan "Whitey" Snyder, dated December 22, 1960. In full, "Dear Whitey, Happy Holiday to you and Beverly and your family, even though you are making up Doris Day! Love, Marilyn." On Monroe's personal embossed stationery and envelope. Snyder was Monroe's makeup artist throughout her career, including for the films Niagara (20th Century Fox, 1953), Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century Fox, 1953), How to Marry a Millionaire (20th Century Fox, 1953), River of No Return (20th Century Fox, 1954), There’s No Business Like Show Business, The Seven Year Itch (20th Century Fox, 1955), Bus Stop (20th Century Fox, 1956), Some Like It Hot (United Arists, 1959), Let’s Make Love (20th Century Fox, 1960), and The Misfits (United Artists/Seven Arts, 1961).  Snyder also did Monroe’s makeup for her funeral in 1962.
9 by 6 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Allan "Whitey" Snyder
Estimate: $2 000 - $4 000

lot93223

03 décembre 2011

Marilyn Monroe: the unseen files

The_TelegraphMarilyn Monroe: the unseen files 
Par Tim Auld, publié le 21/02/2011,
en ligne
sur telegraph.co.uk 

A new book reveals the extraordinary contents of Marilyn Monroe's private filing cabinets, thought lost for over 40 years after her death

Marilyn_main_1835453c
Detail of a test print from the Marilyn Monroe archive
 Photo: MARK ANDERSON

In November 2005 Millington Conroy, a businessman living in Rowland Heights, 40 miles east of Los Angeles, contacted Mark Anderson, a successful magazine photographer, to discuss an unusual commission.

He had in his possession two metal filing-cabinets, one brown, one grey, containing private papers and a collection of furs, jewellery and other assorted memorabilia, all belonging to Marilyn Monroe. Would Anderson be interested in photographing the collection?

The material – about 10,000 documents – had been thought lost for more than 40 years since the death of Monroe on the night of 4 August 1962. Now, here it was, a treasure trove, languishing in a Californian suburb.

It was the commission of a lifetime, the largest undocumented Monroe archive in existence. Yes, of course Anderson was interested, and, with the help of the biographer and Monroe aficionado Lois Banner, he set about creating a record of the archive's contents, which is now to be published for the first time as a book.

There are letters from Monroe glowing with admiration for Robert Kennedy; a half-finished love letter to her ex-husband Joe DiMaggio found in her room after she died from a drug overdose; unseen pictures of Monroe as a child and young woman; touching fan mail; rare insights into her marriage to the playwright Arthur Miller; and extensive documentation of her squabbles with the Hollywood studio Twentieth Century-Fox.


In these documents the flesh-and-blood Monroe, usually lost in the heady blaze of the images of her on film and in glamour photographs, comes alive in the flotsam and jetsam of everyday life.

We can see her bookshop receipt for The Life and Works of Sigmund Freud, volumes one, two and three (she was a slave to therapy); the newspaper cuttings, both flattering and critical; her witty little telegrams. Then there are the bills for enemas, facials and prescription drugs, the uppers and downers that in her later years carried her through the day, and eventually killed her.

Frank Sinatra, one of Monroe's lovers, is said to have suggested she buy the filing cabinets to protect her privacy when she was living in New York in 1958. In early 1962, when she moved to Brentwood, Los Angeles, she had the cabinets shipped down.

The grey one, containing private correspondence, was kept in the guest cottage at the Brentwood house; the brown one, containing business records, was stored across town in her office at Twentieth Century-Fox studios.

One account of Monroe's last night claims that she actually died in the guest cottage and was subsequently moved to her bedroom in the main house and rearranged on her bed.

What is certain is that sometime on the night of 4 August the cabinet in the guest cottage was broken into, and that crucial files were removed – perhaps pertaining to Monroe's relationship with the Kennedys and their links with the Mafia boss Sam Giancana, perhaps to her contractual arrangements with Twentieth Century-Fox.

How did these immensely valuable cabinets manage to vanish for so long only to resurface in a quiet corner of suburban California? The key to the mystery is Inez Melson, Monroe's business manager in the mid-1950s, guardian of Monroe's schizophrenic mother, and, following Monroe's death, administrator of her Los Angeles holdings.

In the days and weeks after Monroe died Melson, who received nothing in Monroe's will (the bulk of the estate and her personal effects were left to Lee and Paula Strasberg, her acting coaches), made sure the filing cabinets ended up in her possession.

She had the brown cabinet at Twentieth Century-Fox transported to her home in Hollywood Hills, and, fraudulently, using the name of one of her nephews, bought the grey cabinet for $25 at the Monroe Estate auction she herself had organised. Upon her death in 1985 Melson left her collection, including the cabinets, to her sister-in-law Ruth Conroy, who, upon her death, bequeathed it to her son Millington.

In the course of their research, it soon became apparent to Anderson and Banner that Melson had acquired the contents of her archive illegally and that Strasberg's third wife, Anna, was in fact the legal owner of the material.

'We told Mill what we had found,' writes Banner. 'Realising that his ownership of the collection could be in jeopardy, he threatened to sell it on the black market… We wanted to ensure that the [collection] remained intact and that it would eventually be shown to the public; so we informed Anna Strasberg of its existence. We were not privy to her ensuing negotiations with Mill. All we know is that, in the end, they reached a settlement.'

What is astonishing about the archive, says Banner, is quite how much material has survived, and also its quality. Amid the mass of bills, cheques, contracts and publicity shots there are insights into the most private corners of her life.

Monroe grew up effectively an orphan. She never knew her father, and her mother's illness meant Monroe spent her childhood and teenage years being passed from family to family, including a spell at the Los Angeles Orphan Home. She was left with a lifelong desire to truly belong in a family, and to bring up children of her own.

Monroe's horror at the idea of not being able to get pregnant is made starkly and rather zanily clear by a handwritten letter she taped to her stomach before having her appendix removed in 1952: 'Cut as little as possible,' it reads. 'I know it seems vain but that doesn't really come into it. The fact I'm a woman is important. You have children and you must know what it means. For God's sakes Dear Doctor no ovaries removed.'

Monroe suffered three miscarriages in the mid-1950s while married to the playwright Arthur Miller, and the archive is full of reminders of how painful that time must have been. There's a receipt for a maternity dress Miller bought, and a letter of condolence from the poet Louis Untermeyer, which sums up the paradox of her life – at once adored by millions and isolated in her suffering: 'It's grimly ironic that while the rest of the country was enjoying the comedy of your impersonations in Life [the December 1958 issue had a shoot in which Monroe spoofed the great sirens of history], you were going through your personal tragedy… Arthur's tribute was a model of good taste, artistic balance, and love. It must be an added comfort to know that everyone loves you – especially now.'

Most extraordinary is a letter she and Miller received on 24 January 1958, in the aftermath of her third miscarriage, offering them a child to adopt: 'Wonder if you might be interested in the adoption of a baby girl, that was born to an unwed mother about the same time your wife lost her child. It is a healthy and beautiful baby and the mother feels that you people would really make a good happy home for her… If you are interested you can reach me by phone.'

Would Monroe have been a good mother? Who can tell? But letters she wrote to her stepchildren, Bobby and Jane Miller, reveal a playfulness and understanding of childhood needs and disappointments that would surely have stood her in good stead.

In August 1957 we find her writing to them at summer camp in the guise of their basset hound, Hugo (she also wrote to them as their Siamese cat, Sugar Finney): 'It sure is lonesome round here! I made a mistake and I am sorry, but I chewed up one of your baseballs. I didn't mean to. I thought it was a tennis ball and that it wouldn't make any difference but Daddy and Marilyn said that they would get you another one, so is it all right for me to keep playing with this one as long as you are getting a new one? Love from your friend and ankle-chewer.'

The light-hearted, but slightly wistful tone of these letters (the word lonesome crops up again and again in her letters to the children at this time) are made more poignant by the fact that on 1 August Monroe had suffered her second miscarriage.

Anderson and Banner's selection of material presents Monroe in a positive light. She is a woman fighting to control her image in a man's world; a talented comic actress compared by directors to Garbo and Chaplin; a caring stepmother; a clever correspondent; a trustworthy friend.

The authors do not, however, gloss over her petulance ('I am exceedingly sorry but I do not like it,' reads her curt telegram to Twentieth Century-Fox on being sent the script for Pink Tights, which she'd already decided she did not want to make); nor over her refusal to compromise, which during the filming of The Misfits led to Dorothy Jeakins – a major Hollywood costume designer who had done costumes for Monroe on both Niagara and Let's Make Love – leaving the film ('I'm sorry I have displeased you. I feel quite defeated – like a misfit, in fact,' wrote Jenkins). Angry legal spats also bear witness to her legendary lateness, which resulted in almost everything she worked on running over schedule.

Despite knowing how infuriating she could be, it remains impossible not to like Monroe. She had a wit worthy of Mae West ('There is only one way he could comment on my sexuality and I'm afraid he has never had the opportunity!' she wrote of Tony Curtis, though he would later claim to have been her lover) and an ability to remain winsome even in adversity.

After she was fired from the film Something's Got to Give in 1962, as her drug habit escalated, she wrote to George Cukor, the director: 'I blame myself but never you. The next weekend I will do any painting, cleaning, brushing you need around the house. I can also dust.'

Marilyn always said it was the people and not the studios who had made her famous, and we see the best of her when she reaches out to her public. She received thousands of fan letters each week, and was meticulous about filing away those that had particularly touched her.

There is a charming letter from a 17-year-old Italian boy, who is clearly entirely overcome: 'I imagine that you and I dance wrapped in a sky of stars, and they smile on us.' He requests a lock of Monroe's hair. Monroe is clearly touched because along with the letter is found a note by her: 'Pic of him and dedication autographed and returned also a lock of hair. Also a letter which I will carry next to my heart always.'

Equally moving is a note from the mother of a soldier who saw Monroe perform in Korea in 1955. She quotes from the letter her son sent her: 'When she appeared on the stage, there was just a sort of gasp from the audience – a single gasp multiplied by the 12,000 soldiers present… The broadcasting system was extremely poor… However, it didn't matter. Had she only walked out on stage and smiled it would have been enough.'

If representatives of the Kennedys did remove documents from the filing cabinet on the night of Monroe's death, and Lois Banner is certain that they did ('I know who took them and what happened to them, but I don't feel at liberty to say at this point,' Banner told me), they were pretty thorough. The archive now has almost no material relating to Monroe's relationships with JFK and Robert Kennedy, which are thought to have dominated the final months of her life.

Tantalisingly, she makes two references to Robert Kennedy in letters written on 2 February 1962, the day after she had attended a dinner in the attorney general's honour. To Arthur Miller's son, Bobby, she writes: 'I had to go to this dinner last night as [Robert Kennedy] was the guest of honor and when they asked him who he wanted to meet, he wanted to meet me. So, I went to the dinner and I sat next to him, and he isn't a bad dancer either. But I was mostly impressed with how serious he is about civil rights.'

She is rather more circumspect when relating the incident to Miller's father, Isidore: '[Robert Kennedy] seems rather mature and brilliant for his thirty-six years, but what I liked best about him, besides his Civil Rights program, is he's got such a wonderful sense of humor.'

Smitten? Maybe. There are certainly no other letters here that emanate this wide-eyed flirty glow. But the remaining documents from Monroe's last spring and summer offer no hint as to where this relationship might have gone.

Instead there are ledgers and memos charting the increasingly poor state of Monroe's finances and revealing that her main expenditure was on medical bills. There is an eerie absence of anything else. Where are the letters from friends, the fan mail, the urgent telegrams of former times?

Stolen, perhaps? Or had the isolation that Marilyn always so feared begun to close around her. The only hint of human warmth to be found among a sea of cheques and tumbling balances is a note, signed with a heart, from Monroe's acting coach Paula Strasberg: 'Have faith,' it reads.

MM – Personal: From the Private Archive of Marilyn Monroe (Abrams, £22.50), by Lois Banner with photographs by Mark Anderson, published on Tuesday, is available from Telegraph Books (0844 871 1515; books.telegraph.co.uk) at £20.50 plus £1.25 p&p

> sur le blog: le livre MM Personal 


The private files of Marilyn Monroe

theprivatefiles_1
  1/ PUBLICITY STILLS: Monroe in 1960 on the set of Let’s Make Love

theprivatefiles_2 theprivatefiles_3 theprivatefiles_4 
 2/LETTER TO HER SURGEON: A note Monroe taped to her stomach before her appendectomy in 1952, in which she urged the doctor to remove 'as little as possible... no ovaries’
3/ BOOKSHOP RECEIPT: When asked by journalists what her religion was, Monroe replied 'Freud’. She began reading his writings during her early years in Hollywood. This receipt shows the purchase of all three volumes of his life and works
4/ CLOTHING LIST: Favourite garments shipped to Monroe in New York in 1955. The seventh item is thought to be the dress she wore to perform to troops in Korea

theprivatefiles_5 theprivatefiles_6 theprivatefiles_7 
5/ LETTER FROM HER FOSTER MOTHER: Ida Bolender, who had looked after Monroe as a child, wrote to Marilyn’s half-sister after the star’s death to dispute stories of an unhappy childhood. The picture was taken by Monroe’s grandmother
6/ LETTER TO HER STEPCHILDREN: Monroe writes to Arthur Miller’s children at summer camp in the voice of their cat, Sugar Finney (or 'Feeny’ as she misspells it)
7/ FUR COAT: This leopardskin coat is thought to have belonged to Monroe and have been taken from her home after she died by Inez Melson

theprivatefiles_8 theprivatefiles_9 theprivatefiles_10 
8/ LETTER FROM A COSTUME DESIGNER: Dorothy Jeakins, a famous Hollywood costume designer, left The Misfits after a disagreement over her work. Here she writes to the actress to apologise for displeasing her
9/ FANMAIL: Two children from Brooklyn send a token of their esteem
10/UNUSED MATERNITY CLOTHES: Receipt for a bed-jacket Arthur Miller bought Monroe just before she suffered a miscarriage in December 1958

theprivatefiles_11 theprivatefiles_12 theprivatefiles_13
11/ FOSTER BROTHER: The Bolenders called Monroe and Lester, another of their foster children, 'the twins’
12/ LETTER FROM HER PUBLICIST: In a letter of 1959 Joe Wolhandler lists the several inaccurate press stories he has had to deny in the past 24 hours. He concludes, 'I am in the business 20 years and I still don’t know how these things happen’
13/ TEST PRINT: A costume and make-up test for Something’s Got to Give

theprivatefiles_14
14/ LETTER TO HER LAWYER: Monroe’s assistant writes to the lawyer’s secretary to make sure the parlous state of Monroe’s finances remains a secret

  theprivatefiles_15 theprivatefiles_16 theprivatefiles_17
15/ THE FILING CABINETS
16/ ADOPTION OFFER: Soon after one of Monroe’s miscarriages, she and Arthur Miller received this letter offering a baby girl
17/ RECORD RECEIPT: A bill for three records by Frank Sinatra, who is known to have had an affair with Monroe 

29 novembre 2011

Icons of Hollywood 12/2011 - The Seven Year Itch

lot n°720: Marilyn Monroe extensive archive of production
and publicity material from The Seven Year Itch
(TCF, 1955) Extensive archive of production and publicity materials representing all facets of the film, The Seven Year Itch. The archive contains significant correspondence and consultations, with 1,000+ individual pieces including Billy Wilder’s 5 pg. contract signed three (3) times and dated June 1st, 1954, author George Axelrod’s 10 pg. contract signed, Billy Wilder’s signed payment agreement, copy of producer Charles Feldman’s letter sent to “Mr. and Mrs. Joe DiMaggio” framing the reasons he, the director and the studio want Marilyn in the film, confidential correspondence between Wilder and Zanuck with heated exchanges at times, a pair of scripts bearing numerous annotations in Darryl Zanuck’s hand, together with extensive collections of copies of legal documents, inter-office memos, and telegrams, intimate exchanges between Zaunck and Charles K. Feldman, as well as other correspondence to and from Harry Sokolov, Irving Cohen, Irving “Swifty” Lazar, Spyros Skouras, and many other studio heads.

Charles K. Feldman (1904-1968) was one of the most powerful agents in Hollywood and had notable creative input as executive-producer on several important films, Pittsburgh, Red River, A Streetcar Named Desire, and notably, The Seven Year Itch. The archive begins with early correspondence regarding George Axelrod’s screenplay being purchased by Feldman and negotiating with Billy Wilder to direct. Lew Wasserman was acting as agent for Wilder and numerous exchanges are present with drafts of agreements including a fascinating dialogue on Wilder having no interest in Tom Ewell or Walter Mathau as the lead, but instead he wanted Jamest Stewart, Gary Cooper or William Holden. Wilder’s 5 pg. contract is present, dated June 1st, 1954, signed three (3) times and initialed five (5) times, as well as his signed payment agreement dated November 23, 1954.

An official secretarial copy of a fantastic 5 pg. letter, dated May 17, 1954, from Feldman to “Mr. and Mrs. Joe DiMaggio” frames the reasons that he, director Billy Wilder and Twentieth Century-Fox want Marilyn Monroe in the film, “When all of us met, you, Marilyn, expressed a repeated and definite desire to appear in THE SEVEN YEAR ITCH. I bought the play for over $250,000 and as I would not sell it today for a million dollars, it is conceivable…this film could show profits in the millions – for everyone believes it will be a tremendous hit!” Numerous secretarial copies of typed letters sent to Wilder from Zanuck about the lead male role include a number of insights, “If I had read the script at the time we were casting…I would never have recommended Holden or anybody else except Ewell. No one I can think can play this particular script. I didn’t quite understand at the time but in re-reading I believe that Holden would have been as big an error as Gary Cooper. That is a great play…but I tell you that in spite of the enormous success of this play on the stage it would not be, in my opinion, fifty percent of the picture it will be with Marilyn Monroe. She is an absolute must for this story…nothing would make up for her personality in this subject.” Another telegram from Zanuck states, “Monroe was particularly outstanding. Keep up the tempo of the dialogue…I’m really impressed by everything I saw.”

A pair of Zanuck’s personally hand-annotated scripts are present, one a Temporary Incomplete with 11 pages of annotations with an interesting note during the scene Richard is scrutinizing the cover design for Little Women, where he Zanuck pens, “? The Scarlet Letter – play off the Adultress later.” Another Final script bears 24 pages of handwritten notations with suggestions for cutting the reading scene way down. Another Zanuck TLS to Charles Feldman, dated Sept. 20, 1954, advises against the “voice over” scenes and sends along his 10-page breakdown of differences between the play and the script and 12 pages of annotated dialogue with Zanuck’s suggestions stapled to the margins on small strips of blue paper.

When principal filming began and just after Marilyn and DiMaggio’s divorce, some exchanges become heated between Feldman and Zanuck, including a 2 pg. office memo from Oct. 22, 1954, “There have been tough days – rough days - immediately after the divorce proceedings, the 18-takes have only happened on rare occasions with the girl…For the last two weeks this girl has worked as hard as anyone I have known in my life. Incidentally I don’t know how Kazan worked with you but I can tell you that on STREETCAR, it was a daily occurrence for us to have 25 to 30 takes with Marlon Brando and Vivien Leigh. This has not been happening on ITCH. In my opinion, and I think you agree with me, Billy is probably one of the most cooperative of all the directors in the business, and he has never been accused, to my knowledge, of taking unnecessary time – certainly not on ITCH.” Five days later Feldman writes to Zanuck reiterating Billy and Marilyn’s hard work, the tightness of the script and requesting some retakes, including the dress blowing scene. There is criticism though, with some correspondence that relates to Wilder taking too long to film scenes and difficulties with Marilyn taking company time to rehearse.

There is a strong concentration of material on the risqué nature of the publicity done for the film, specifically relating to large promotional billboards that featured the iconic billowing white dress scene, “They’re replacing a big cardboard cutout of Marilyn outside Loew’s Theatre in Times Square. It was showing Marilyn with her skirts blowing above her waist. Not good taste…Some papers refuse to accept wind blowing ad because of Kefauver investigation and pressure groups…this is a very delicate situation…sensational business so far at opening.” Much difficulty arose with censors upon the film’s release, including a complete rejection by the Irish Censor & Appeal Board stating, “this film is incapable of cutting without destroying its continuity. It is indecent and unfit for general exhibition.” Even a telegram from Wilder to the president of the Catholic Legion of Decency states, “I do not have the reputation of having ever been connected with pictures of a lascivious character. Obviously, the picture deals humorously with a man’s temptations but they are very human and utterly harmless. As one reviewer put it quote the play has been laundered snow white unquote. Am afraid that additional bleaching will make the picture disintegrate into an incomprehensible nothing.”

All in all, a rich trove and fascinating glimpse into the project’s inception, it’s transformation from stage to screen, all the various legal wrangling between agents, producers, directors and other studio heads during filming, and finally the fallout over the overt sexuality that faced cinema goers after the film’s release. Interested parties are strongly encouraged to view this material in person.

Estimate: $30 000 - $50 000 

21604_0720_1_lg 21604_0720_2_lg 

21604_0720_3_lg 21604_0720_4_lg
21604_0720_5_lg 21604_0720_6_lg
21604_0720_7_lg 21604_0720_8_lg 21604_0720_9_lg
21604_0720_10_lg 21604_0720_11_lg
21604_0720_13_lg 21604_0720_14_lg
21604_0720_15_lg 21604_0720_16_lg 


lot n°726: The Seven-Year Itch German R’65 A-0 oversize
poster by Fischer-Nosbisch
(TCF, 1955/R1965) Executed in the very early style of Andy Warhol’s fashion illustrations (the smaller size German poster for this release is in his full pop-art style) by the husband and wife design team of Fischer and Nosbisch. Distinctive enough to have graced the pages of “In Style” magazine some years ago as a recommended décor suggestion. Near-Mint, unused folded condition, 33” x 47”.
Estimate: $200 - $300
21604_0726_1_lg

28 novembre 2011

Icons of Hollywood 12/2011 - Documents papiers

lot n°694: 18-year-old Marilyn Monroe amazing autograph letter signed
18-year-old Marilyn Monroe amazing autograph letter signed - MONROE, MARILYN. Amazing Autograph Letter Signed “Norma Jeane”, Four pages, blue-lined Octavo sheets, dated June 15, 1944. Penned at the top, and stricken-through, is the address “14668 Parthenia St, Van Nuys” (curiously, she never lived at that address). Written to Grace Goddard, Norma Jeane’s legal guardian and ‘mother’ figure during the tumultuous years of her youth. Norma Jeane — just 18 years of age — pens (in full):

Dearest Grace,
I was so happy to hear from you. I was so thrilled to read your letter and learn of all that you have been doing lately. [Grace had recently moved to West Virginia]
I will send you your picture very s[h]ortly now, I’m going down Saturday to find out more about it. Also will send you lots of snapshoots at the same time I send you the picture. I found out that a 10² x 12² (that was the size you wanted wasn’t it?) cost exactly $5.00.
Jimmie has been gone for seven weeks and the first word I received from him was the day before my birthday. He sent a cable night letter by Western Union saying ‘Darling, on you birthday, I send you a whole world of love’. I was simply thrilled to death to hear from him.
I have never really written and told you of Jimmies and my married life together. Of course I know that if it hadn’t been for you we might not have ever been married and I know I owe you a lot for that fact alone, besides countless others. That is why I feel that I should let you know about us. I love Jimmie just more than anyone (in a differn’t way I suppose than anyone) and I know I shall never be happy with anyone else as long as I live, and I know he feels the same towards me. So you see we are really very happy together that is of course, when we can be together. We both miss each other terribly. We will be married two years June 19th. And we really have had quite a happy life together.
I am working 10 hrs. a day at Radioplane Co., at Metropolitain Airport. I am saving almost everything I earn (to help pay for our future home after the war.) The work isn’t easy at all for I am on my feet all day and walking quite a bit.
I was all set to get a Civil Service job with the Army, all my papers filled out and everything set to go, and then I found out I would be working with all Army fellows. I was over there one day, there are just too many wolves to be working with, there are enough of those at Radioplane Co. with out a whole army full of them. The Personal [Personnel] Officer said that he would hire me but that he wouldn’t advice it for my own sake, so I am back at Radioplane Co. & pretty contented.
Well I guess that is about all for now.
With much love,
Norma Jeane

Summer of 1944 was a fateful time for young Norma Jeane Dougherty. Circa 1943-44, she landed her first job at Radioplane Co. (a defense contractor in Burbank, California), through the influence of her mother-in-law, Ethel. Her husband, Jim, had recently joined the U.S. Merchant Marine and shipped off to war just “seven weeks” previously.
Although she here thanks Grace for the instrumental role she played in organizing and consenting to her marriage, it is known that she later harbored feelings of resentment towards Grace for taking off to West Virginia (in effect, abandoning Norma Jeane), and believed that her “surrogate mother” had arranged the marriage as a convenient way to get rid of her. Despite Norma Jeane gushing over her love for her husband, her marriage was soon to unravel. Just a few months later, Norma Jeane met a man who would vault her to stardom: Army photographer David Conover. Conover had been tasked by his commanding officer (who was, interestingly enough, actor and future President Ronald Reagan) to photograph women factory workers who were helping with the war effort. Making the rounds at Radioplane he was naturally drawn to Norma Jeane, who, along with her stunning beauty and bubbly personality, seemed to have a certain “aura” around the camera.
She soon appeared on the cover of Yank magazine, and the die was cast. Heeding the advice of Conover and Grace, she obtained a divorce from Dougherty (September 13, 1946), and began one of the most famous careers in Hollywood.
A wonderful letter, showing how Norma Jeane viewed her world and her future with Jim Dougherty just two years into their marriage — though her life would soon change forever. Numerous corrections throughout, and page one exhibits original ink-blot. Overall, in excellent condition.
Estimate: $40 000 - $60 000

21604_0694_1_lg 21604_0694_2_lg 21604_0694_3_lg 21604_0694_4_lg


lot n°719: Marilyn Monroe’s personal annotated
working promptbook-script for The Sleeping Prince

(aka The Prince and the Showgirl) - (Warner Bros., 1957) Clasp-bound in crimson paper covers, and intentionally printed in half-size (5” x 8”) for ease of use on set, especially considering the elaborate costumes required for this drawing-room comedy starring, and co-produced by, Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier. This example is identified on the specially-printed titled front cover as “PERSONAL COPY OF MISS MONROE”. Many pages inside exhibit not only scene and dialogue notes attributed to Monroe’s own hand, but many personal thoughts and observations by her as well, namely “What am I doing here with this man/I can’t believe my eyes, ears/ watch him/’oh no’/this idiot/ Chanel #5/ I just think it’s a joke/ don’t take anyone else’s tone/ affective memory/ heart breaking” plus at least one slightly naughty joke, “like a music box: a tinkle”, among other ‘notes to self’. Accounts from the time agree that Marilyn had more trouble working with Olivier than with any other male lead in her career. At least (31) of this small, character-dialogue promptbook-script’s (68) pages exhibit anywhere from one to numerous notations by Miss Monroe, making this one of the most intensely personal artifacts extant from her professional career. Covers are significantly tattered all around the margins, and front cover, together with first (2) pages, are torn 2/3 down from top near spine, else intact and complete as originally issued.
Estimate: $30 000 - $50 000
21604_0719_1_lg 21604_0719_2_lg 21604_0719_3_lg 


lot n°723: Marilyn Monroe signed check to her housekeeper, Eunice Murray
Personal check signed, 3 in. x 8 ¼ in., dated July 10, 1962 and drawn from Marilyn Monroe’s account paying her housekeeper Eunice Murray $100.00. Signed “Marilyn Monroe” in blue ink. Cancellation stamps on recto and verso and bearing Murray’s endorsement signature on the verso. Murray was Monroe’s housekeeper during the last years of her life and accompanied Monroe during her trip to Mexico in February, 1962. Eunice Murray was staying with Monroe the night of the star’s death and reportedly called Monroe’s psychiatrist, Dr. Ralph Greenson, upon discovering the body the night of August 5, 1962. This check was signed just three weeks prior to Monroe’s death and amazingly stamped “PAID” on August 7, two days after she died. A wonderful association.
Estimate: $1 500 - $2 500
21604_0723_1_lg 


 lot n°724: Joe DiMaggio autograph postcard signed to Marilyn Monroe
Autograph Postcard Signed, “Joe,” to “Dearest Marilyn” from Copenhagen, Denmark and postmarked May 20, 1962. DiMaggio pens, “Dearest Marilyn, Have a short stop over here at Copenhagen enroute for the ‘long underwear country.’ Should be there in about three hours. Spent nine days here in 1958. Wonderful country. The famous Tivoli park was one of my favorite places. Love, Joe.” Addressed in DiMaggio’s hand to “Miss Marilyn Monroe, 12305 Fifth Helena Dr., Los Angeles 49, California, USA.” In February, 1961, Monroe was admitted to the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic where she contacted DiMaggio. He secured her release and she spent some time with him in Florida where the couple reconciled. Accompanied by a printed photograph of the couple on their wedding day
Estimate: $4 000 - $6 000
21604_0724_1_lg 21604_0724_2_lg 


  lot n°737: Marilyn Monroe invitation to JFK birthday celebration with call sheet from her personal property
From the Christie’s 1999 sale of the personal property of Marilyn Monroe, three items for one event which document one of the most significant personal moments for her. In chronological sequence, the first is the personal invitation from “New York’s Birthday Salute to the President” requesting her presence at Madison Square Garden on May 19, 1962 to celebrate President John F. Kennedy’s birthday gala party; the second is a 2pp mimeo call-sheet for the evening’s order of events, detailing Marilyn’s appearance at #35, “Marilyn Monroe and Stars”, which an unknown hand has doodled what might be a stage, and written in red grease pencil, with corrections in graphite, “Who do you have to be to ask- Who do you have to be to be disappointment-“ ; the last is the official illustrated program for the birthday event with iconic portrait of Kennedy on cover, with red, white and blue patriotic design. All three items were the personal examples in Marilyn Monroe’s possession during the time of this historic event, for which she performed an extraordinarily sexy, breathy rendition of “Happy Birthday”to the President (even calling in sick to work at Fox in order to do so), and each shows extra folds and slight handling by her, presumably to secure inside a purse that night. Kennedy remarked on stage that he could retire from politics after such a performance; Peter Lawford introduced her as “the late Marilyn Monroe”, and sadly she would be gone to a mysterious death in just over two months.
Provenance: Christie’s Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe, Lot 54, October 27-28, 1999 and sold for $129,000.
Estimate: $40 000 - $60 000
21604_0737_1_lg