07 avril 2022

06/1934, Hawthorne - Photo école "Gladys Kelly's Class"

Portrait de classe en juin 1934 de la classe 3ème niveau de Madame Gladys Kelly -école sur la 5ème rue à Hawthorne, Los Angeles; Norma Jeane est debout, dans la rangée du haut et Lester Boldener, assis accroupi, dans la rangée en bas.

Portrait of classroom in June 1934 of the 3rd Grade of Mrs. Gladys Kelly's class -school on 5th Street in Hawthorne, Los Angeles; Norma Jeane is standing, in the top row and Lester Boldener, sitting crouched, in the bottom row.

1934-06-school-Hawthorne-Gladys Kelly's third-grade class-NJ_Lester-1a 


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.

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04 avril 2022

1929, LA - Norma Jeane

Norma Jeane (Marilyn Monroe),
peut être dans le jardin des Bolender à Hawthorne,
vers 1929

Norma Jeane (Marilyn Monroe),
possibly in the Bolenders' garden at Hawthorne, circa 1929

1929s-norma_jeane-photo-010-1 


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copyright text by GinieLand.

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1927, LA - Norma Jeane

Norma Jeane (Marilyn Monroe) vers 1927

Norma Jeane (Marilyn Monroe) circa 1927

1927-norma_jeane-photo-011-1d 

1927-norma_jeane-photo-011-1c 


photographie annotée
noted photograph

"marilyn monroe
aged 15 ms
."

1927-norma_jeane-photo-011-1a  1927-norma_jeane-photo-011-1a-age_15_months 


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copyright text by GinieLand.

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28 mars 2022

28/09/1930 - Certificat de l'école "Community Sunday" d'Hawthorn

Certificat de promotion de l'école du dimanche de la communauté d'Hawthorn (quartier de Los Angeles).
Ce diplôme certifie que Norma Jeane Baker a été promue du département Cradle Roll de l'école du dimanche communautaire de Hawthorn au département des débutants, signé par Charles H. Weiskopf, surintendant de l'école, Mme M. Dennee, surintendante de Cradle Roll et Rolf Chas Lewis, ministre, daté du 28 septembre 1930.
Le nom et l'école inscrits à l'encre bleue de la main de Mme M. Dennee, avec un petit griffonnage enfantin au crayon à droite du texte.

 1930-09-28-Hawthorn_Community_Sunday_School-certificate-1 

A certificate of promotion from Hawthorn Community Sunday School.
This Diploma Certifies that Norma Jeane Baker has been Promoted From the Cradle Roll Department of the Hawthorne Community Sunday school to the Beginners Department, signed by Charles H. Weiskopf, School Supt., Mrs M. Dennee, Cradle Roll Supt. and Rolf Chas Lewis, Minister, dated Sept 28 1930.
The name and school entered in blue ink in the hand of Mrs M. Dennee, with a small childish doodle in pencil to the right of the text.


source: vendu en 2013 par Christies


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copyright text by GinieLand.

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20 août 2021

12/01/1955, The Australian Women's Weekly

The Australian Women's Weekly

country: Australia
date: 1955, January, 12
content: 4 pages article on Marilyn Monroe
part 1 of a series of articles in 4 parts - "This is my story"

1955-01-12-The_Australian_Women_s_Weekly-cover 

 pays: USA
date: 12 janvier 1955
contenu: article de 4 pages sur Marilyn Monroe
partie 1 sur une série d'articles en 4 parties - "This is my story"

1955-01-12-The_Australian_Women_s_Weekly-p16  1955-01-12-The_Australian_Women_s_Weekly-p17 
1955-01-12-The_Australian_Women_s_Weekly-p18  1955-01-12-The_Australian_Women_s_Weekly-p19 


Article: "This is my story - by Marilyn Monroe"

I thought the people I lived with were my parents. I called them Mamma and Dad. The woman said to me one day: "Don't call me Mama. You're old enough to know better, I'm not related to you in any way. You just board here. Your Mamma's coming to see you tomorrow. You can call her Mama, if you want to."
I said thank you. I didn't ask her about the man I called Dad. He was a letter-carrier. I used to sit on the edge of the bathtub in the morning and watch him shave, and ask him questions - which way was East or South or how many people there were in the world. He was the only one who had ever answered any questions I asked.
The people I had thought were my parents had children of their own. They weren't mean. They were just poor. They didn't have much to give anybody, even their own children. And there was nothing left over for me. I was seven, but I did my share of the work. I washed floors and dishes and ran errands.
My mother called me the next day. She was a pretty woman who never smiled. I'd seen her often before, but I hadn't known quite who she was.
When I said, "Hello, Mama", this time she stared at me. She had never kissed me or held me in her arms or hardly spoken to me. I didn't know anything about her then, but a few years later I learned a number of things.
When I think of her now my heart hurts me twice as much as it used to when I was a little girl. It hurts me for both of us.
My mother was married at fifteen. She had two children (before me) and orked in a movie studio as a film-cutter. Her young husband got mixed up with another woman; there was a big row, and he left home.
While my mother was crying over the collapse of her marriage he sneaked back one day and kidnapped her two babies. My mother spent all her savings trying to get her children back. She hunted them for a long time.
Finnaly she traced them to Kentucky and hitch-hiked to where they were.
She was broke and with hardly any strenght left when she saw her children again. They were living in a fine house. Their father was married again, and well off.
She met him, but didn't ask him for anything, not even to kiss the children she had been hunting for so long. But like the mother in the movie "Stella Dallas", she went away and left them to enjoy a happier life than she could give them.
She came back to Hollywood and went to work as a film-cutter again. I wasn't born yet.
The day my mother called for me at the letter-carrier's house and took me to her rooms for a visit was the first happy day in my life that I remember.
I had visited my mother before. Being sick, and unable to take care of me and keep a job, too, she paid the letter-carrier five dollars a week to give me a home. Every once in a while she brought me to her rooms for a visit.
I used to be frightened when I visited her and spent most of my time in the closet of her bedroom hiding along her clothes. She seldom spoke to me except to say, "Don't make so much noise, Norma." She would say this even when I was lying in bed at night, and turning the pages of a book. Even the sound of a page turning made her nervous.
There was one object in my mother's rooms that always fascinating me. It was a photograph on the wall. There were no other pictures on the walls, just this one framed photograph.
Whenever I visited my mother I would stand looking at this photograph and hold my breath for fear she would order me to stop looking. I had found out that people always ordered me to stop doing anything I like to do.
This time my mother caught me staring at the photograph, but didn't scold me. Instead, she lifted me up in a chair so I could see better.
"That's your father," she said.
I felt so excited I almost fell off the chair. It felt so good to have a father, to be able to look at this picture and know I belonged to him. And what a wonderful photograph it was. He wore a slouch hat a little gaily on the side. There was a lively smile in his eyes, and he had a fin moustache like Clark Gable's. I felt very warm towards the picture.
My mother said: "He was killed in an auto accident in New York city."
I believed everything people told me at that time, but I didn't believe this. I didn't believe he was run over and dead.
I asked my mother what his name was. She wouldn't answer, but went into the bedroom and locked herself in.
Years later I found out what his name was, and many other things about him. The strange thing was that everything I heard about him, even if it wasn't good, made me feel warmer towards him. The night I met his picture, I dreamed of it when I fell asleep. And I dreamed of it a thousand times afterwards.
That was my first happy time, finding my father's picture. And every time I remember how he smiled and how his hat was tipped I felt warm and not alone. When I started a sort of scrapbook a year later the firt picture I put in it was a photograph of Clark Gable because he looked like my father - especially the way he wore his hat and moustache.
And I used to make up daydreams, not about Mr. Gable, but about my father. When I'd be walking home from school in the rain and feeling bad, I'd pretend my father was waiting for me, and that he would scold me for not having worn my rubbers.
I didn't own any rubbers. Nor was the place I walked to any kind of home. It was a place where I worked as a sort of child servant, washing dishes, clothes, floors, running errands, and keeping quiet.
But in a daydream you jump over facts as easily as a cat jump over a fence. My father would be waiting for me, I daydreamed, and I would come into the house smiling from ear to ear.
Once, when I lay in a hospital after having my tonsils out, and running into complications, I had a daydream that lasted a whole week without stopping.
I kept bringing my father into the hospital ward and walking him to my bed, while the other patients looked on with disbelief and envy at so distinguished a visitor; and I kept bending him over my bed, and having him kiss my forehead, and I gave him dialogue, too.
"You're be well in a few days, Norma Jean. I'm very proud of the way you're behaving, not crying all the time like other girls."
And I would ask him to please take off his hat. But I could never get him in my largest, deepest daydream to take his hat off and sit down.
When I went back to my "home", I almost sick again. A man next door chased a dog I had loved, and who had been waiting for me to come home. The dog barked because he was happy to see me. And the man started chasing him, and ordering him to shut up. The man had a hoe in his hand. He swung the hoe. It hit my dog's back and cut him in half.
My mother found another couple to keep me. They were English people, and needed the five dollars a week that went with me. Also, I was large for my age, and could do a lot of work.
One day my mother came to call. I was in the kitchen washing dishes. She sttod looking at me without talking. When I turned around I saw there were tears in her eyes, and I was surprised.
"I'm going to build a house for you and me to live in," she said. "It's going to be painted white and have a backyard." And she went away.
It was true. My mother managed it somehow, out of savings and a loan. She built a house. The English couple and I were both taken to see it. It was small and empty, but beautiful, and was painted white.
The four of us moved in. I had a room to myself. The English couple didn't have to pay rent, just take care of me as they had done before. I worked hard, but it didn't matter. It was my first home.
My mither bought furniture, a table with a white top and brown legs, chairs, beds, and curtains. I heard her say, "It's all on time, but don't worry. I'm working double shift at the studio, and I'll soon be able to pay it off."
One day a grand piano arrived at my home. It was out of condition. My mother had bought it second-hand. It was for me. I was going to be given piano lessons on it. It was a very important piano, despite being a little banged-up. It had belonged to the movie star Fredric March.
"You'll play the piano over here, by the windows," my mother said, "and here on each side of the fireplace there'll be a love seat. And we can sit listening to you. As soon as I pay off a few other things I'll get the love seats, and we'll all sit in them at night and listen to you play the piano."
But the love seats were not to be. Mother had a nervous breakdown, fell seriously ill, and hed to be taken to the hospital. All the furniture disappeared. The white table, the chairs, the beds, and white curtains melted away, and the grand piano, too.
The English couple disappeared also. And I was taken from the newly painted house to an orphan asylum, and given a blue dress and white shirtwaist to wear, and shoes with heavy soles. And for a long time when I lay in bed at night I could no longer daydream about anything.
I never forgot the white painted house and its furniture. Years later, when I was beginning to earn some money modelling, I started looking around for the Fredric March piano. After about a year I found it in an oid auction room, and bought it.
I have it in my home now in Hollywood. It's been painted a lovely white, and it has new strings and plays as wonderfully as any piano in the world.

My mother's best friend was a woman named Grace. I called nearly everybody I knew Aunt or Uncle, but Aunt Grace was a different sort of make-believe relative. She became my best friend, too.
Aunt Grace worked as a film librarian in the same studio as my mother -Columbia Pictures. She was the first person who ever patted my head or touched my cheek. That happened when I was eight. I can still remember how thrilled I felt when her kind hand touched me.
Grace had almost as rough a time as my mother. She lost her job in the studio and had to scrape for living. Although she had no money she continued to look after my mother, who was starting to have mental spells, and to look after me.
At times she took me to live with her. When she ran out of money and had only a half-dollar left for a week's food, we lived on stale bread and milk. You could buy a sackful of old bread at the Holmes Bakery for 25 cents. Aunt Grace and I would stand in line for hours waiting to fill our sacks.
When I looked up at her she would grin at me and say: "Don't worry, Norma Jean. You're going to be a beautiful girl when you grow up. I can feel it in my bones."
Her words made me so happy that the stale bread tasted like cream puffs.

EVERYTHING seemed to go wrong for Aunt Grace. Only bad luck and death ever visited her. But there was no bitterness in my aunt. Her heart remained tender and she believed in God.
Nearly everybody I knew talked to me about God. They always warned me not to offend Him. But when Grace talked about God she touched my cheek and said that He loved me, and watched over me. Remembering what Grace had said, I lay in bed at night crying to myself. The only One who loved me and watched over me was Someone I couldn't see, or hear, or touch.
I used to draw pictures of God, whenever I had time.
In my pictures He looked a little like Aunt Grace, and a little like Clark Gable.
As I grew older I knew I was different from other children because they were no kisses or promises in my life. I often felt lonely and wanted to die. I would try to cheer myself up with daydreams. I never dreamed of anyone loving me as I saw other children loved. That was too big a stretch for my imagination. I compromised my dreaming of my attracting someone's attention (beside God), of having people look at me and say my name.
When my mother was taken to the hospital Aunt Grace become my legal guardian.
I could hear her friends arguing in her room at night when I lay in her bed pretending to be asleep. They advised her against adopting me because I was certain to become more and more of a responsability as I grew older. This was on account of my "heritage", they said.
They talked about my mother and her father and brother and grandmother all beign mental cases, and said I would certainly follow in their footsteps. I lay in bed shivering as I listened. I didn't know what a mental case was, but I knew it wasn't anything good. And I held my breath waiting to hear whether. Aunt Grace would let me become a State orphan or adopt me as her own.
After a few evenings of argument, Aunt Grace adopted me, heritage and all, and I fell asleep happy.
Grace, my new guardian, had no money, and was out looking for a job all the time, so she arranged for me to enter the Orphan Asylum - the Los Angeles Children's Home Society. I didn't mind going there because even in the orphanage I knew I had a guardian outside - Aunt Grace.
It wasn't till later that I realised how much she had done for me. It not for Grace I would have seen sent to a State or COunty institution where there are fewer privileges, such as being allowed to have a Christmas tree, or seeing a movie sometimes.
I lived in the orphanage only off and on. Most of the time I was placed with a family, who were given five dollars a week for keeping me. I was placed in nine different families before I was able to quit being a legal orphan. I did this at 16 by getting married.
The families with whom I lived had one thing in common - a need for five dollars. I was also an asset to have in the house. I was strong and healthy; and able to do almost as much work as a grown-up. And I had learned not to bother anyone by talking or crying.
I learned also that the best way to keep out of trouble was by never complaining ar asking for anything. Most of the families had children of their own, and I knew they always came first. They wore the colored dresses, and owned whatever toys there were, and they were the ones who were believed.
My own costume never varied. It consisted of a faded blue skirt and a white waist. I has two of each, byt since they were exactly alike everyone thought I wore the same outfit all the time. It was one of the things that annoyed people - my wearing the same clothes.
Every second week the home sent a woman inspector out to see how its orphans were getting along in the world. She never asked me any questions, but would pick up my foot and look at the bottom of my shoes. If my shoe bottoms weren't worn through I was reported in a thriving condition.
I never minded coming "last" in these families except on Saturday nights, when everybody took a bath. Water cost money, and changing the water in the tub was an unheard of extravagance. The whole family used the same tub of water. And I was always the last one in.
One family with whom I lived was so poor that I was often scolded for flushing the toilet at night.
"That uses up five gallons of water," my new "uncle" would say, and "five gallons each time can run into money. You can do the flushing in the morning."
No matter how careful I was there were always troubles. Once, in school, a little Mexican boy started howling that I had hit him. I hadn't. And I was often accused of stealing things... a necklace, a comb, a ring, or a nickel. I never stole anything.
When the troubles came I had only one way to meet them -by staying silent. Aunt Grace would ask me when she came to visit how things were. I would tell her alwayds they were fine, because I didn't like to see her eyes turn unhappy.
Some of my troubles were my own fault. I did hit someone occasionally, pull her hair and knock her down. But worse than that were my "character faults" A slightly overgrown child who stares and hardly ever speaks, and who expects only one thing of a home -to be thrown out- can seem like a nuisance to have around.
There was one home I hoped wouldn't throw me out. This is was a house with four children who were watched over by a great-grandmother who was over a hundred years old.
She took care of the children by telling them bloodcurling stories about Indian massacres, scalpings, and burnings at the stake, and other wild doings of her youth. She said she had been a close friend of Buffalo Bill and had fought at his side in hand-to-hand battles with the savage Redskins.
I listened to her stories with my heart in my mouth and did everything I could to make her like me. I laughed the loudest and shivered the most at her stories.
But one d y one of her own great-grandchildren came running to her with her dress torn from her neck. She said I had done it. I hadn't. But the old Indian-fighter wouldn't believe me and I was sent back to the orphanage in disgrace.
Most of my troubles were of this minor sort. In a way they were not troubles at all, because I was used to them. When I look back on those days I remember, in fact, that they were full of all sorts of fun and excitement. I played games in the sun and races. I also had draydreams, not only about my father's photograph but about many other things.
I daydreamed chiefly about beauty. I dreamed of myself becoming so beautiful that people would turn to look at me when I passed. And I dreamed of colors -scarlet, gold, green, white. I dreamed of myself walking proudly in beautiful clothes and being admired by everyone, and overhearing words of praise. I made up the praises and repeated them aloud as if someone else were saying them.
Daydreaming made my work easier. When I was waiting on the table in one of the poverty - stricken, unhappy homes where I lived,I would daydream I was a waitress in an elegant hotel, dressed in a white waitress uniform, and everybody who entered the grand dining-room where I was serving would stop to look at me and openly admire me. 
But I never daydreamed about love.

At 12 I looked like a girl of 17. My body wase developed and shapely. But no one knew this but me. I still wore the blue dress and the blouse the orphanage provided me. They made me look like an overgrown lummox.
I had no money. The other girls rode to school in a bus. I had no nickel to pay for the ride. Rain or shine, I walked the two miles from my "aunt's" home to the school.
I hated the walk. I hated the school. I had no friends.
The pupils seldom talked to me, and never wanted me in their games. Nobody ever walked home with me, or invited me to visit their homes. This was partly because I came from the poor part of the ditrict, where all the Mexicans and Japanese lived. It was also because I couldn't smile at anyone.
Once a shoemaker standing in the doorway of his shop stopped me as I was walking to school.
"What's your name ?" he asked me.
"Norma," I said.
"What's your last name ?" he asked.
I wouldn't give him the name I had - Norma Mortensen - because it wasn't the name of the man with the slouch hat and the Gable moustache. I didn't answer.
"You're a queer kid,' the shoemaker said. "I watch you pass here every day, and I've never seen  you smile. You'll never get anywhere like that."
I went on to school, hating the shoemaker.
In school the pupils often whispered about me and giggled as they stared at me.
They called me dumb and made fun of my orphan's outfit. I didn't mind beign thought dumb. I knew I wasn't.
One morning both my white blouses were torn, and I would be late for school if I stopped to fix them. I asked one of my "sisters" in the house if she could loan me something to wear. She was my age, but smaller. She loaned me a sweater.
I arrived at school just as the maths class was starting. As I walked to my seat everybody stared at me. It was a very tight sweater.
At recess a half dozen boys crowded around me. They made jokes and kept looking at my sweater as if it were a gold mine. I had known for sometime that I had shapely breasts and thought nothing of the fact. The maths class, however, was more impressed.
After school four boys walked home with me, wheeling their bicycles by hand. I was excited but acted as if I nothing unusual were happening.
The next week the shoemaker stopped me again.
"I see you've taken my advice," he said. "You'll find you get along much better if you smile at folks."
I noticed that he, also, looked at my sweater as he talked. I hadn't given it back to my "sister" yet.
The school and the day became different after that. Girls who had brothers began inviting me to their homes, and I met their folks, too. And there were always four or five boys hanging around my house. We played games in the street and stood around talking under the trees till suppertime.
I wasn't aware of anything sexual in their new liking for me and there were no sex thoughts in my mind. I didn't think of my body as having anything to do with sex. It was more like a friend who had mysteriously appeared in my life, a sort of magic friend.
A few weeks later I stood in front of the mirror one morning and put lipstick on my lips. I darkened my blonde eyebrowns. I had no money for clothes, and I had no clothes except my orphan rig and the lone sweater. The lipstick and the mascara were like clothes, however. I saw that they improved my looks as much as if I had put on a real gown.
My arrival in school with painted lips and darkened browns, and still encased in the magic sweater, started everyone buzzing. And the buzzing was not all friendly. All sorts of girls, ont only 13-year-olds, but seniors of 17 and 18, set up shops as my enemies.
They told each other and whoever would listen that I was a drunkard and spent my nights sleeping with boys on the beach.
The scandals were lies. I didn't drink, and I didn't let any boys take liberties. And i had never been on any beach in my life. Bu I couldn't feel angry with the scandal-makers. Girls being jealous of me ! Girls frightened of losing their boyfriends because I was more attractive ! These were no longer daydreams made up to hide lonely hours. They were thruths !
And by summertime I had a real beau. He was 21, and despite being very sophisticated, he thought I was 18 instead of 13. I was able to fool him by keeping my mouth shut, and walking a little fancy. Since taking the maths class by storm a few months ago I had practised walking languorously.
My sophisticated beau arrived at my home one Saturday with the news that we were going swimmings. I rushed into my "sister's" room (the one who was a little smaller than me) to borrow her bathing suit. Standing in front of the bureau mirror I spent an hour putting it on and practising walking in it.
My beau's impatient cries finally brought me out of the bedroom in an old pair of slacks and a sweater. The bathing suit was under them.
It was a sunny day and the sand was crowded with bathers and with mothers and their children. Despite being born and raised only a few miles from the ocean I had never seen it close up before. I stood and stared for a long time. It was like something in a dream, full of gold and lavender colors, blue and foaming white. And there was a holiday feeling in the air that surprised me. Everybody seemed to be smiling at the sky.
"Come on, let's get in," my beau commanded.
"In where ?" I asked.
"In the water," he laughed, thinking I had made a joke.
I thought of my tight bathing suit. The idea of hiding myself in the water while wearing it seemed to me ridiculous. But I said nothing. I sttod watching the girls and women and felt a little disappointed. I hadn't expected that half the feminine population of Los Angeles would be parading the sands with almost nothing on. I thought I'd be the only one.
My beau was getting impatient again so I removed my slacks and sweater and stood in my skimpy suit. I thought, "I'm almost naked," and I closed my eyes and stood still.
My sophisticated boyfriend had stopped nagging me. I started walking slowly across the sand. I went almost to the water's edge and then walked down the beach. The same thing happened that had happened in the maths class, but on a larger scale. It was also much noisier.
Young men whistled at me. Some jumped up from the sand and trotted up for a better view. Even the women stopped moving as I came nearer.
I paid no attention to the whistles and whoops. In fact, I didn't hear them. I was full of a strange feeling, as if I were too people. One of them was Norma Jean from the orphanage who belonged to nobody. The other was someone whose name I didn't know. But I knew where she belonged. She belonged to the ocean and the sky and the whole world.
BUT nothing happened out of the great vision that smote me on the beach. I went back to my blue dress and white blouse and returned to school. But instead of learning anything I grew more and more confused. So did the school. It had no way of coping with a thirteen year old siren.
Why I was a siren, I hadn't the faintest idea. I didn't want to be kissed and I didn't dream of having a duke or a movie star fall in love with me. The thruth was that with all my lipstick and mascara and precocious curves, I was as unsensual as a fossil. But I seemed to affect people quite otherwise.
The boys took to wooing me as if I were the only girl in the district. I used to lie awake at night wondering why they chased after me. Occasionally I let one of them kiss me to see if there was anything interesting in the performance.
There wasn't.
I decided finally that the boys came after me because I was an orphan and had no parents to look after me. This decision made me cooler than ever to my train of admirers. But neither coolness nor disdain nor "get out of here," "don't bother me," none of my frozen attitudes changed the pictures.
The boys continued to pursue me as if I were a vampire with a rose in my teeth.
The girl pupils were another problem, but one I could understand. They disliked me more and more as I grew older. Now, instead of being accused of stealing combs, nickels, or necklaces, I was accused of stealing young men.
Aunt Grace suggested a solution for my troubles.
"You ought to get married," she said.
"I'm too young," I said. I was still 15.
"I don't think you are," Aunt Grace laughed.
"But there's nobody wants to marry me," I said.
"Yes there is," she said.
"Who ?" I asked.
"Jim," said my aunt.
Jim was Mr. Dougherty. He lived near me. He was good-looking, polite, and fullgrown.
"But Jim is stuck on my 'sister'," I told her.
"It was you he took to the football game," Aunt Grace said, "not her."
"It was awful boring," I said. "I hate football games."
"How do you feel about Jim ?" she asked.
"I don't feel anything," I said, "He's like the others, except he's taller and more polite."
"That's a fine quality in a man," said Aunt Grace, "politeness".
The "aunt" and "uncle" with whom I was living - my ninth set of relatives - helped me to make up my mind. They were going to move. This meant I'd have to go back and live in the orphanage tii they unloaded me on another family.
I married Jim Dougherty.
The first effect marriage had on me was to increase my lack of interest in sex. My husband either didn't mind this or wasn't aware of it. We were both too young to discuss such an embarrassing topic openly.
Jim's folks didn't care much for me, for which I couldn't blame them. I was a peculiar wife. I disliked grown-ups. I preferred washing dishes to sitting and talking to them.
As sson as they started playing cards or having arguments I would sneak out of the house and join the kids in the street. I liked boys and girls younger than me. I played games with them until my husband came out and starting calling me.
My marriage brought me neither happiness nor pain. My husband and I hardly spoke to each other. This wasn't because we were angry. We had nothing to say. I've seen many married couples since that were just like Jim and me.
They were usually the more enduring kind if marriages, the ones that were pickled in silence.
The most important thing my marriage did for me was to end forever my status as orphan. I felt grateful to Jim for this. He was the Lochinvar who rescued me from my blue dress and white blouse.
My various advisers had been right about marriage putting an end to my popularity as a siren. The boys did not come after Mrs. Dougherty. The rose seemed to have fallen out of her teeth.
Jim joined the Merchant Marine in 1944, and I went to work in a parachut factory. The great war was on. Battles were being fought. Juke boxes were playing. People's eyes were lit up.

I WORE overalls in the factory. I was surprised that they insisted on this. Putting a girl in overalls is like having her work in tights, particularly if a girl knows how to wear them. As parachute inspector I was back in the maths class again. The men buzzed around me just as the high school boys had done.
I have noticed since that men usually leave married women alone, and are inclined to treat all wives with respect. This is no great credit to married women. Men are always ready to respect anything that bores them.
The reason most wives, even pretty ones, wear such a dull look is because they're respected so much.
Maybe it was my fault that the men in the factory tried to date me and buy me drinks. I didn't feel like a married woman. I was completely faithful to my overseas husband but that wasn't because I loved him or even because I had moral ideas. My fidelity was due to my lack of interest in sex.
Jim finally came home and we lived together again. It's hard to remember what you said, did, or felt when you were bored.
Jim was a nice husband. He never hurt me or upset me - except on one subject. He wanted a baby.
The thought of having a baby stood my hair on end. I could see it only as myself, another Norma Jean in an orphanage. Something would happen to me. Jim would wander off. And there would be this little girl in the blue dress and white blouse living in her "aunt's" home, washing dishes, being last in the bath water on Saturday night.
I couldn't explain thsi to Jim. After he fell asleep beside me at night I would lie awake crying. I didn't quite know who it was that cried, Mrs. Dougherty or the child she might have. It was neither.
It was Norma Jean, still alive, still alone, still wishing she were dead.
I feel different about having a child now. It's one of the things I dream of. She won't be any Norma Jean now. And I know how I'll bring her up - without lies. Nobody will tell her lies about anything. And I'll answer all her questions. It I don't know the answers I'll go to an encyclopedia and look them up. I'll tell her whatever she wants to know - about love, about sex, about everything !
But chiefly, no lies ! No lies about there being a Santa Claus, or about the world being full of noble and honorable people all eager to help each other and do good to each other. I'll tell her there are honor and goodness in the world, the same as there are diamonds and radium.
This is the end of my story of Norma Jean. Jim and I were divorced. And I moved into a room in Hollywood to live by myself. I was 19 and I wanted to find out who I was.
When I just wrote "This is the end of Norma Jean," I blushed as if I had been caught in a lie. Because this sad, bitter child who grew up too fast is hardley ever out of my heart. With success all around me I can still feel her frightened eyes looking out of mine.
She keeps saying: "I never lived, I was never loved," and often I get confused and think it's I who am saying it.
I had been a sort of "child bride." Now I was a sort of "child widow." Many things seemed to have happened to me. Yet, in a way, nothing had happened, except that I was 19 instead of nine, and I had to look for my own job.
The sort of instinct that leads a duck to water led me to photographer's studios. I got jobs posing for ads, and layouts. The chief trouble was that the photographers were also looking for work. Finding a photographer who wanted me as a model was easier than finding one who could pay more than promises.
But I made enough money for room rent and a meal a day, although sometimes I fell behind on my eating. It didn't matter, though. When you're young and healthy a little hunger isn't too important.
WHAT mattered more was being lonely. When you're young and healthy loneliness can seem more important than it is.
I looked at the streets with lonely eyes. I had no relatives to visit or chums to go places with.
My aunt Grace and Aunt Anna were working hard to keep food in their kitchens and the rent paid. When I called on them they felt sorry for me and wanted to help me. I knew how they neede the half-dollars in their purses, so I stayed away unless I had money and could take them to a restaurant or the movies.
I had only myself. When I walked home from the restaurant in the evening with the streets lighted up and a crowd on the sidewalks, I used to watch the people chatting to each other and hurrying some place. I wondered where they were going and how it felt to have places to go or people who knew you.
There were always men willing to help a girl be less lonely. They said "Hi! baby," when you passed. When you didn't turn to look at them they sneered, "Stuck up, eh ?"
I never answered them. Sometimes I felt sorry for them. They seemed as lonely as I was. These lonely street-corner wolves "Hi babying" me sounded like voices out of the past calling me to be Miss Nobody again.
One evening I met a man in a restaurant.
"This town has sure changed a lot in the past 40 years," he said. "Used to be Indians right where we're walking."
"Did you use to live here 40 years ago," I asked.
"Yes, ma'am," he said. "How old do you think I am ?"
"About 60," I said.
"Seventy-seven my last birthday," he corrected me. "The name is Bill Cox. You going anywhere ?"
I said I wasn't.
"Why not to drop in on me and the missus ?" he said. "Live right near here. I'm taking her home a sandwich."
I became a friend of Bill Cox and his wife. The three of us would walk together in the streets at night sometimes.
He talked chiefly about the Spanish-American War, in which he had been a soldier, and about Abraham Lincoln. These two topics were very exciting him.
I had never heard of the Spanish-American War. I must have been absent from school the week it was studied by my history class.
Walking with Bill Cox in the lighted Hollywood streets and hearing stories about the Spanish-American War and Abraham Lincoln, I didn't feel lonely and the sidewalk wolves didn't "Hi-baby" me.
One evening Bill Cox told me he was going back to Texas.
"I'm felling sick," he said, "and I'd hate to die any place except in Texas."
He sent me a few letters from texas. I answered them. Then a letter came from his wife saying Bill Cox had died in an Old Soldier's Home in Texas. I read the letter in the restaurant where I had met him, and I walked home crying. The Hollywood streets seemed lonelier than ever without Bill Cox, his favorite war, and Abraham Lincoln.

YOU sit alone. It's night outside. Automobiles roll down Sunset Boulevard like and endless string of beetles. Their rubber tyres make a purring, highclass noise. You're hungry and you say "It's good for my waistline not to eat. There's nothing finer than a washboard belly."
And you say your speech lesson out loud:
"Ariadne arose from her couch in the snows in the Akrakaronian mountains." Followed by "Hail to thee, blithe spirit, bird thou never wert."
The lessons are a dollar apiece. For a dollar you could buy a pair of stockings and a hamburger will never make you an actress. Speech lessons may. So with bare legs and an empty stomach you hit the consonants of, "Hail to thee, blithe spirit."
I used to think as I looked out on the Hollywood night, "There must be thousands of girls sitting alone like me dreaming of becoming a movie star. But I'm not going to worry about them. I'm dreaming the hardest."
You don't have to know anything to dream hard. I knew nothing about acting. I had never read a book about it, or tried to do it, or discussed it with anyone. I was ashamed to tell the few people I knew of what I was dreaming. I said I was hoping to make a living as a model. I called on all the model agencies and found a job now and then.
But there was this secret in me -acting. It was like being in gaol and looking at a door that said "This Way Out."
Acting was something golden and beautiful. It was like the bright colors Norma Jean used to see in her daydreams. It wasn't an art. It was like a game you played that enabled you to step out of the dull world you knew into worlds so bright they made your heart leap to think of them.
When I was eight I used to look out of the orphan asylum window at night and see a big lighted-up sign that read: "R.K.O. Radio Pictures." I hated the sign. It reminded me of the smell of glue. My mother had one taken me to the studio where she worked. The smell of the wet film she cut and spliced had stuck to my nose.
That was Norma Jean's nose. Norma Dougherty, the aspiring actress, had no such fellings towards studio signs. To her they were the beacons of a Promised Land - the land of Ingrid Bergman, Claudette Colbert, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Olivia De Havilland, Gene Tierney, Jennifer Jones.
That's the way it was when I sat alone in my Hollywood room. I went to sleep hungry and woke up hungry. And I thought all actors and actresses were geniuses sitting on the front port of Paradise - the movies.

To be continued

Next week
. Marilyn Monroe writes about a Hollywood you don't see on the screen - "the Hollywood of failure... where we were the prettiest tribe of panhandlers that ever overan a town... and around us were the wolves."


Traduction
"C'est mon histoire - par Marilyn Monroe"
 
Je croyais que les gens avec qui je vivais étaient mes parents. Je les appelais maman et papa. La femme me dit un jour : "Ne m'appelle pas maman. Tu es assez grande pour savoir, je ne suis en aucun cas apparentée à toi. Tu es juste de passage ici. Ta maman vient te voir demain. Tu pourras l'appeler maman, si tu veux."
Je lui ai dit merci. Je ne lui ai pas posé de questions sur l'homme que j'appelais papa. Il était facteur. J'avais l'habitude de m'asseoir sur le bord de la baignoire le matin pour le regarder se raser et lui poser des questions - où était l'Est ou le Sud ou combien de gens il y avait dans le monde. Il était la seule et unique personne à toujours répondre à mes questions.
Les gens que je pensais être mes parents avaient eux-mêmes des enfants. Ils n'étaient pas méchants. Ils étaient juste pauvres. Ils n'avaient pas grand-chose à donner à qui que ce soit, pas même à leurs propres enfants. Et il ne restait alors rien pour moi. J'avais sept ans, mais j'ai fait ma part du travail. Je lavais par terre, faisais la vaisselle et les courses.
 
Ma mère est venue me voir le lendemain. C'était une jolie femme qui ne souriait jamais. Je l'avais souvent vue auparavant, mais je ne savais pas vraiment qui elle était.
Quand je lui ai dit cette fois là "Bonjour maman", elle m'a regardé fixement. Elle ne m'avait jamais embrassée ni tenue dans ses bras, ni à peine parlé. Je ne savais rien d'elle à l'époque, mais quelques années plus tard, j'ai appris un certain nombre de choses.
Quand je pense à elle maintenant, mon cœur me fait deux fois plus mal qu'au temps où jétais une petite fille. Ça me fait mal pour nous deux.
Ma mère s'est mariée à quinze ans. Elle a eu deux enfants (avant moi) et a travaillé dans un studio de cinéma en tant que monteuse de pellicules. Son jeune mari a fréquenté une autre femme; il y a eu une grande dispute, et il a quitté la maison. 
Alors que ma mère pleurait sur l'effondrement de son mariage, il est revenu en douce un jour et a enlevé ses deux bébés. Ma mère a dépensé toutes ses économies pour essayer de récupérer ses enfants. Elle les a cherchés pendant longtemps.
Finalement, elle a retrouvé leur trace dans le Kentucky et a fait de l'auto-stop pour y aller.
Elle était fauchée et à bout de forces quand elle a revu ses enfants. Ils vivaient dans une belle maison. Leur père s'était remarié etgagnait bien sa vie.
Elle a discuté avec lui, mais ne lui a rien demandé, pas même d'embrasser ses enfants qu'elle cherchait depuis si longtemps.
Mais comme la mère dans le film "Stella Dallas", elle est repartie et les a laissés profiter d'une vie plus heureuse qu'elle ne pouvait leur offrir. 
Elle est revenue à Hollywood et est retournée travailler comme monteuse de pellicules. Je n'étais pas encore née.
Le jour où lors de l'une de ses visites, ma mère est venue me chercher chez le facteur pour m'emmener chez elle, fut le premier jour heureux de ma vie dont je me souvienne.
J'avais déjà été chez ma mère. Étant malade et incapable de s'occuper de moi, et comme elle travaillait, elle payait le facteur cinq dollars par semaine pour que je puisse bénéficier d'un foyer. De temps en temps, elle venait me chercher.
J'avais peur quand j'allais chez elle et passais le plus clair de mon temps dans le placard de sa chambre à me cacher le long de ses vêtements. Elle me parlait rarement, sauf pour me dire : "Ne fais pas autant de bruit, Norma." Elle disait cela même quand j'étais allongée dans mon lit le soir et que je feuilletais un livre. Rien que le bruit d'une page qu'on tourne la rendait nerveuse.
Il y avait quelque chose dans sa chambre qui m'avait toujours fasciné. C'était une photographie accrochée au le mur. Il n'y avait pas d'autres photos sur les murs, juste cette photo encadrée.
Chaque fois que je rendais visite à ma mère, je restais debout à regarder cette photo et retenais mon souffle de peur qu'elle ne m'ordonne d'arrêter de regarder. Je m'étais rendu compte que les gens m'ordonnaient toujours d'arrêter de faire ce dont j'avais envie.
Ce jour là, ma mère m'a surprise en train de regarder la photo, mais ne m'a pas grondé. Au lieu de cela, elle m'a soulevé sur une chaise pour que je puisse mieux voir.
"
C'est ton père", a-t-elle dit.
Je me sentais tellement excitée que j'ai failli tomber de la chaise. C'était si bon d'avoir un père, de pouvoir regarder cette photo et savoir que je lui appartenais. Et quelle magnifique photo c'était. Il portait un chapeau mou, cavalièrement incliné sur un côté. Son regard était vif et souriant, et il avait une fine moustache comme celle de Clark Gable. Je me sentais réconfortée à voir cette image.
Ma mère a dit : "Il a été tué dans un accident de voiture à New York." D'ahbitude, je croyais toujours ce que les gens me disaient, mais cette fois-là, je n'y croyais pas. Je ne croyais pas qu'il avait été renversé et qu'il était mort.
J'ai demandé à ma mère comment il s'appelait. Elle ne répondit pas, mais alla s'enfermer dans sa chambre.
Des années plus tard, j'ai découvert son nom et bien d'autres détails à son sujet. Le plus étrange était que tout ce que j'entendais à son sujet, même si ce n'était pas glorieux, me faisait me sentir encore plus chaleureuse envers lui. La nuit où j'ai vu sa photo pour la première fois, j'en ai rêvé en m'endormant. Et par la suite, j'en ai rêvé des milliers de fois.
Ce fut le premier moment heureux de ma vie, celui de découvrir la photo de mon père. Et chaque fois que je me rappelais de son sourire et comment son chapeau était incliné, je me sentais réconfortée et plus seule. Un an après, quand j'ai commencé à faire un album photos, la première photo que j'ai mise dedans était une photo de Clark Gable parce qu'il ressemblait à mon père - surtout la façon dont il portait son chapeau et sa moustache.
Et j'avais l'habitude de rêvasser, non pas de M. Gable, mais de mon père. Quand je rentrais de l'école à pied sous la pluie et que je me sentais déprimée, je faisais comme si mon père m'attendait et qu'il me grondait de ne pas avoir porté mes bottes en caoutchouc.
Je ne possédais aucune bottes en caoutchouc. Ce n'était pas non plus l'endroit où je rentrais chez moi. C'était un endroit où je travaillais comme une sorte d'enfant domestique, lavant la vaisselle, la lessive, les sols, faisant des courses, tout en gardant le silence.
Mais dans nos rêveries, on saute par-dessus les faits aussi facilement qu'un chat saute par-dessus une clôture. Je rêvais que mon père m'attendrait et que j'entrais dans la maison avec un immense sourire d'une oreille à l'autre. Un jour que j'étais à l'hôpital après l'opération d'ablation de mes amygdales suivies de complications, je me suis laissée emportée par mes rêves qui ont duré une semaine entière sans s'arrêter.
Je ne me lassais pas d'imaginer que mon père venait me voir à l'hôpital, s'approchant de mon lit, pendant que les autres patients regardaient avec incrédulité et envie un visiteur si distingué; et il se penchait sur mon lit pour m'embrasser sur le front, tout en discutant avec lui aussi.
"Tu seras guérie dans quelques jours, Norma Jean. Je suis très fier de la façon dont tu te comportes, ne pleure pas tout le temps comme les autres petites filles."
Et je lui demandais de bien vouloir enlever son chapeau. Mais même dans mes pensées de rêveries les plus folles et des plus intenses, je n'ai jamais réussi à lui faire enlever son chapeau, ni qu'il s'asseye à côté de moi.
Quand je suis rentrée "chez moi", j'ai failli retomber malade. Un voisin s'est mis à chasser un chien que j'aimais tellement et qui attendait mon retour. Le chien aboyait parce qu'il était content de me voir. Et l'homme s'est mis à le chasser en lui hurlant de la boucler. L'homme avait une houe à la main. Il a balancé la houe qui a touché le dos de mon chien et l'a coupé en deux.
Ma mère a trouvé un autre couple pour me garder. C'était des anglais et avaient besoin des cinq dollars par semaine pour me garder. De plus, j'étais grande pour mon âge, et je pouvais faire beaucoup de travail.
Un jour, ma mère est venue me voir. J'étais dans la cuisine en train de faire la vaisselle. Elle resta debout à me regarder sans parler. Quand je me suis retournée, j'ai vu qu'elle avait les larmes aux yeux, et j'ai été surprise. "Je vais construire une maison pour que toi et moi y vivions", a-t-elle déclaré. "Elle sera peinte en blanc et aura une arrière-cour." Et elle s'en alla.
C'était vrai. Ma mère s'est débrouillée d'une manière ou d'une autre, avec ses économies et en faisant un prêt. Elle a construit une maison. Le couple anglais et moi avons tous deux été emmenés pour la voir. Elle était petite et vide, mais belle, et était peinte en blanc.
Nous y avons emménagé tous les quatre. J'avais une chambre pour moi toute seule. Le couple anglais n'avait pas à payer de loyer, il s'occupait juste de moi comme ils le faisaient avant. Je travaillais dur, mais ce n'était pas grave. C'était mon premier foyer. Ma mère a acheté des meubles, une table avec un dessus blanc et des pieds marron, des chaises, des lits et des rideaux. Je l'ai entendue dire : "Tout est à crédit, mais ne t'inquiète pas. Je travaillerai deux fois plus au studio et je pourrai bientôt tout payer."
Un jour, un piano à queue est arrivé à la maison. Il était hors d'état. Ma mère l'avait acheté d'occasion. C'était pour moi. On me donnerait des leçons de piano avec. C'était un piano très important, même s'il était un peu cabossé. Il avait appartenu à la star de cinéma Fredric March.
"Tu joueras du piano ici, près des fenêtres", dit ma mère, "et ici, de chaque côté de la cheminée, il y aura une causeuse. Et nous pourrons nous asseoir à t'écouter. Dès que j'aurai fini de payer les autres choses, j'achèterai les causeuses, et nous nous assiérons tous dessus la nuit pour t'écouter jouer du piano."
Mais il n'y eut jamais de causeuses. Maman a fait une dépression nerveuse, est tombée gravement malade et a dû être emmenée à l'hôpital. Tous les meubles ont disparu. La table blanche, les chaises, les lits et les rideaux blancs, ainsi que le piano à queue.
Le couple anglais a disparu aussi. Et j'ai quitté ma maison fraîchement repeinte pour être emmenée dans un orphelinat, où on m'a donné une robe bleue et une blouse blanche à porter, et des chaussures à grosses semelles. Et pendant longtemps, quand j'était couchée la nuit, je ne pouvais plus rêver de rien. Je n'ai jamais oublié la maison peinte en blanc et ses meubles. Des années plus tard, alors que je commençais à gagner un peu d'argent en tant que mannequin, j'ai commencé à chercher le piano Fredric March. Environ un an après, je l'ai retrouvé dans une salle des ventes aux enchères et je l'ai acheté.
Je l'ai chez moi maintenant à Hollywood. Il a été peint d'un beau blanc, et il a de nouvelles cordes et joue aussi merveilleusement que n'importe quel autre piano au monde.

La meilleure amie de ma mère s'appelait Grace. J'appelais presque toutes les personnes que je connaissais par ma 'tante' ou mon 'oncle', mais tante Grace était différente de tous mes autres pseudo-parents. Elle est aussi devenue ma meilleure amie.
Tante Grace travaillait comme documentaliste dans le même studio que ma mère, à la Columbia. Elle a été la première personne à m'avoir tapoté la tête ou caressé ma joue. C'est arrivé quand j'avais huit ans. Je me souviens encore à quel point j'ai été ravie lorsque sa main bienveillante m'a touchée.
Grace a eu des moments presque aussi difficiles que ma mère. Elle a perdu son travail au studio et a dû s'escaner pour vivre. Bien qu'elle n'ait pas d'argent, elle a continué à s'occuper de ma mère, qui commençait à avoir des troubles mentaux, et à s'occuper de moi. Parfois, elle m'emmenait chez elle. Quand elle a manqué d'argent et qu'il ne lui restait plus qu'un demi-dollar pour manger dans la semaine, nous vivions de pain rassis et de lait. On pouvait acheter un sac de pain rassis à la boulangerie Holmes pour 25 centimes. Tante Grace et moi faisions la queue pendant des heures pour remplir nos sacs.
Quand je la regardais, elle me souriait et me disait: "Ne t'inquiète pas, Norma Jean. Tu seras une belle fille quand tu seras grande. Je peux le sentir au plus profond de moi".
Ses mots me rendaient si heureuse que le pain rassis avait le goût de choux à la crème.

TOUT semblait mal tourner pour tante Grace. Seules la malchance et la mort ont fait parti de sa vie. Mais il n'y avait aucune amertume chez ma tante. Son cœur restait tendre et elle croyait en Dieu.
Quasiment toutes les personnes que je connaissais me parlaient de Dieu. On m'a toujours averti de ne pas l'offenser. Mais quand Grace me parlait  de Dieu, elle caressait ma joue et me disait qu'Il m'aimait et veillait sur moi.
Me rappelant de ce que Grace m'avait dit, je restai dans mon lit la nuit à pleurer. LE seul qui m'aimait et veillait sur moi était quelqu'un que je ne pouvais ni voir, ni entendre, ni toucher.
J'avais l'habitude de dessiner des portraits de Dieu, chaque fois que j'en avais le temps.
Dans mes dessins, il ressemblait un peu à Tante Grace et un peu à Clark Gable.
En grandissant, je savais que j'étais différente des autres enfants parce qu'il n'y avait ni baisers ni promesses dans ma vie. Je me sentais souvent seule et je voulais mourir. J'essayais de me remonter le moral avec mes rêveries. Je ne rêvait jamais que quelqu'un m'aime comme j'ai vu d'autres enfants aimés. C'était trop d'imagination pour mes rêveries. Je me contentais de rêver d'attirer l'attention de quelqu'un (Dieu mis à part), des gens qui me regarderaient et prononceraient mon nom.
Quand ma mère a été emmenée à l'hôpital, Tante Grace est devenue ma tutrice légale. Je pouvais entendre ses amis discuter dans sa chambre la nuit quand j'étais allongé dans mon lit en faisant semblant de dormir. Ils lui ont déconseillé de m'adopter car il était certain que je deviendrai une responsabilité de plus en plus lourde à gérer en grandissant. C'était à cause de mon « héritage », disaient-ils. Ils ont parlé de ma mère, de son père, de son frère et de sa grand-mère, tous atteints de troubles mentaux, et ont dit que je suivrais certainement leurs traces. J'étais allongée sur le lit, frissonnant en les écoutant. Je ne savais pas ce qu'était un trouble mental, mais je savais que ce n'était rien de bon. Et je retenais mon souffle en attendant de savoir si Tante Grace me laisserait devenir orpheline d'État ou m'adopterait comme da propre enfant. Après quelques soirées de discussions, Tante Grace m'a adoptée, héritage ou autre, et je me suis endormie heureuse. Grace, ma nouvelle tutrice, n'avait pas d'argent et passait son temps à chercher du travail, alors elle s'est arrangée pour que j'entre à l'orphelinat - celui du Los Angeles Children's Home Society. Cela ne me dérangeait pas d'y aller parce que même à l'orphelinat, je savais que j'avais une tutrice à l'extérieur - tante Grace.
Ce n'est que plus tard que j'ai réalisé tout ce qu'elle avait fait pour moi. Sans Grace, j'aurais été envoyée dans une institution d'État ou de comté où il y a moins de privilèges, comme l'arbre de Noël ou de voir un film de temps en temps.
J'ai vécu dans l'orphelinat seulement par intermittence. La plupart du temps, j'étais placée dans une famille qui recevait cinq dollars par semaine pour me garder. J'ai été placée dans neuf familles différentes avant de pouvoir mettre un terme au statut légal d'être orpheline. Je l'ai fait à 16 ans en me mariant.
Les familles avec lesquelles je vivais avaient un point commun : le besoin d'avoir les cinq dollars. J'étais aussi un atout à avoir dans une maison. J'étais forte et en bonne santé ; et capable d'abattre autant de travail qu'un adulte. Et j'avais appris à ne déranger personne en parlant ou en pleurant.
J'ai aussi appris que la meilleure façon d'éviter les ennuis était de ne jamais se plaindre, ni de demander quoi que ce soit. La plupart des familles avaient leurs propres enfants et je savais qu'ils passaient toujours en premier. Ils portaient des vêtements colorés et possédaient toutes sortes de jouets, et c'étaient toujours eux que l'on croyait.
Mon habillement n'a jamais varié. Il se composait d'une jupe bleu délavée et d'une blouse blanche. J'en avais deux exemplaires de chaque, parfaitement identiques, si bien que tout le monde pensait que je portais toujours les mêmes vêtements. C'était l'une des choses qui agaçaient les gens - le fait d'être toujours habillée pareil.
Tous les quinze jours, le foyer envoyait une inspectrice pour voir comment ses orphelins se débrouillaient dans le monde. Elle ne me posait jamais de questions, mais soulevait mon pied pour regarder la semelle de mes chaussures. Si mes semelles n'étaient pas usées, elle signalait que j'étais placée dans de bonnes conditions.
Cela ne me dérangeait pas d'être la « dernière » dans ces familles, sauf le samedi soir, quand tout le monde prenait un bain. L'eau coûtait cher, et changer l'eau de la baignoire était une extravagance inouïe. Toute la famille utilisait la même baignoire d'eau. Et je passais toujours en dernier.
Une famille avec laquelle je vivais était si pauvre que j'étais souvent réprimandée pour avoir tiré la chasse d'eau la nuit.
"Cela consomme 15 litres d'eau", pouvait dire mon nouvel "oncle", et "15 litres à chaque fois, ça coûte de l'argent. Tu peux tirer la chasse d'eau que le matin."
Peu importe que je sois prudente ou non, il y avait toujours des problèmes. Une fois, à l'école, un petit garçon mexicain s'est mis à hurler que je l'avais frappé. Je ne l'avais pas fait. Et j'ai souvent été accusée d'avoir volé des choses... un collier, un peigne, une bague ou une pièce de cinq cents. Je n'ai jamais rien volé. Lorsque les problèmes surgissaient, je n'avais qu'un seul moyen de les confronter - c'était de garder le silence. Quand elle venait me voir, Tante Grace me demandait comment ça se passait. Je lui disais toujours que tout allait bien, parce que je n'aimais pas voir son regard empli de tristesse.
Certains de mes problèmes étaient de ma faute. De temps en temps, je frappais une fille, je lui tirais les cheveux et je la jetait par terre. Mais le pire cela était mes "défauts de caractère". Une enfant un peu trop grande qui regarde fixement et ne parle presque jamais, et qui s'attend à une seule chose d'un foyer -en être mise à la porte- peut sembler être une nuisance autour de soi.
Il y avait une maison dont j'espérais ne pas être chassée. C'était une maison avec quatre enfants qui étaient gardés par une arrière-grand-mère qui avait plus de cent ans.
Elle s'occupait des enfants en leur racontant des histoires sanglantes sur les massacres indiens, les scalps et les incendies sur le bûcher, et d'autres actes sauvages de sa jeunesse. Elle a dit qu'elle avait été une amie proche de Buffalo Bill et qu'elle avait combattu à ses côtés dans des combats au corps à corps avec les sauvages Peaux-Rouges.
J'écoutais ses histoires le coeur au bord des lèvres et j'ai fait tout ce que j'ai pu pour qu'elle m'aime. C'est moi qui riait le plus fort et qui frissonnait le plus à l'écoute de ses histoires.
Mais un jour, l'une de ses arrière-petites-filles accourut vers elle avec sa robe arrachée au col. Elle a dit que c'était moi. Je n'avais rien fait. Mais la vieille ennemie des Indiens n'a pas voulu me croire et j'ai été renvoyée à l'orphelinat en disgrâce.
La plupart de mes problèmes étaient de ce genre, plutôt sans importance. D'une certaine manière, ce n'étaient pas du tout des problèmes, parce que j'y étais habituée. Quand je repense à cette période, je me souviens qu'en fait je prenais beaucoup de plaisir et d'excitation. Je jouais au soleil et je faisais la course. Je rêvassais toujours, non seulement sur la photographie de mon père, mais aussi de bien d'autres choses.
Je rêvais surtout de beauté. Je rêvais de devenir si belle que les gens se retourneraient sur mon passage. Et je rêvais de couleurs - écarlate, or, vert, blanc. Je rêvais marchant fièrement dans de beaux vêtements et admirée par tout le monde, entendant leurs éloges. J'inventais ces louanges et me les répéter à haute voix comme si quelqu'un d'autre me les disait.
Ces rêves me faciliateint le travail. Quand je servais à table dans l'une des maisons misérables et malheureuses où je vivais, je rêvais que j'étais serveuse dans un hôtel élégant, vêtue d'un uniforme blanc, et tous ceux qui entraient dans la grande salle à manger où je servais, s'arrêtaient pour me regarder et m'admiraient ouvertement.
Mais je n'ai jamais rêvé d'amour.

À 12 ans, j'en paraissais 17. Mon corps s'était développé et j'étais bien galbée. Mais personne ne le savait à part moi. Je portais toujours la robe bleue et le chemisier que l'orphelinat m'avait fourni. J'avais l'air d'une grosse nunuche.
Je n'avais pas d'argent. Les autres filles allaient à l'école en bus. Je n'avais pas un nickel pour payer le trajet. Sous la pluie ou le soleil, je faisais les trois kilomètres à pied de la maison de mes "tantes" à l'école.
Je détestais marcher. Je détestais l'école. Je n'avais pas d'amis.
Les élèves me parlaient rarement et ne voulaient jamais jouer avec moi. Personne n'a jamais fait le trajet avec moi, ni ne m'a invité à venir chez eux. C'était en partie parce que je venais du quartier pauvre du district, où vivaient les Mexicains et les Japonais. C'était aussi parce que je ne sourais à personne.
Un jour, un cordonnier qui se tenait à la porte de son magasin m'a arrêté alors que j'allais à lécole.
"Comment t'appeles-tu ?" me demanda-t--il.
"Norma," lui dis-je.
"Quel est ton nom de famille ?" me demanda-t-il.
Je ne voulais pas lui dire mon nom - Norma Mortensen - parce que ce n'était pas le nom de l'homme au chapeau mou et à la moustache de Gable. Je n'ai pas répondu.
"Tu es une gamine étrange", dit le cordonnier. "Je te regarde passer ici tous les jours et je ne t'ai jamais vu sourire. Tu n'arriveras à rien comme ça."
J'ai repris mon chemin, détestant le cordonnier.
À l'école, les élèves chuchotaient souvent à mon sujet et ricanaient en me fixant.

Il me traitaient d'idiote et se moquaient de ma tenue d'orpheline. Je me fichais qu'on me croie idiote. Je savais que je ne l'étais pas.
Un matin, mes deux chemisiers blancs étaient déchirés et j'aurais été en retard à l'école si je les aurais raccommodés. J'ai demandé à l'une de mes «sœurs» de la maison si elle pouvait me prêter quelque chose à porter. Elle avait mon âge, mais était plus petite que moi. Elle m'a prêté un pull.
Je suis arrivé à l'école au moment où le cours de maths commençait. Pendant que je me dirigeais vers ma chaise, tout le monde me regardait. C'était un pull très serré.
A la récréation, une demi-douzaine de garçons m'entouraient. Ils faisaient des blagues et continuaient à regarder mon pull comme s'il s'agissait d'une mine d'or. Je savais depuis quelque temps que j'avais des jolis seins mais je n'y pensais pas. La classe de maths, cependant, en était plus impressionnée.
Après l'école, quatre garçons ont fait le chemin avec moi, tenant leurs vélos à la main. J'étais excitée mais j'agissais comme si rien d'inhabituel ne se passait.
La semaine suivante, le cordonnier m'a de nouveau arrêté.
"Je vois que tu as suivi mon conseil," dit-il. "Tu t'endendras mieux avec les gens si tu leur souris."
J'ai remarqué qu'il regardait aussi mon pull en me parlant. Je ne l'avais pas encore rendu à ma "soeur".
L'école et les journées sont devenues différentes après cela. Des filles qui avaient des frères ont commencé à m'inviter chez elles, et j'ai aussi rencontré leurs parents. Et il y avait toujours quatre ou cinq garçons qui traînaient près de chez moi. On jouait dans la rue et on restait à discuter sous les arbres jusqu'à l'heure du souper.
Je ne me rendais pas compte de l'aspect sexuel à travers les égards qu'ils me portaient et il n'y avait aucune pensée sexuelle dans mon esprit. Je ne pensais pas que mon corps avait un rapport avec le sexe. C'était plutôt un ami qui était mystérieusement apparu dans ma vie, une sorte d'ami magique.
Quelques semaines plus tard, un matin, devant le miroir, je me suis mise du rouge à lèvres. J'ai foncé mes sourcils blonds. Je n'avais pas d'argent pour acheter des vêtements, et je n'avais pas de vêtements à part ma tenue d'orpheline et le seul et unique pull. Le rouge à lèvres et le mascara étaient cependant comme des vêtements. J'ai vu qu'ils amélioraient mon apparence autant que si j'avais porté une vraie robe.
Mon arrivée à l'école, avec les lèvres peintes et les sourcils noircis, et toujours moulée dans le pull magique, a fait vibrer tout le monde. Et les réactions n'étaient pas toutes amicales. Pleins de filles, pas seulement celles de 13 ans, mais les plus âgées de 17 et 18 ans, sont devenues mes ennemies déclarées.
Elles racontaient entre elles, et à qui voulait bien les entendre, que j'étais une ivrogne et que je passais mes nuits à coucher avec des garçons sur la plage.
Les scandales étaient des mensonges. Je ne buvais pas et je ne laissais aucun garçon prendre des libertés avec moi. Et je n'avais jamais été sur aucune plage de ma vie. Mais je ne pouvais pas me sentir en colère contre les faiseurs de scandales. Des fillesjalouses de moi ! Des filles avaient peur de perdre leurs copains parce que j'étais plus attirante ! Ce n'étaient plus là des rêveries pour tromper ma solitude. C'étaient des vérités !
Et en été, j'ai eu un vrai soupirant. Il avait 21 ans, et bien qu'il soit très intelligent, il pensait que j'avais 18 ans au lieu de mes 13 ans. Je parvins à l'abuser en parlant le moins possible et en marchant d'une manière suggestive. Depuis que j'avais fait la conquête du cours de maths quelques mois avant, je m'étais entraînée à marcher langoureusement.
Mon soupirant intelligent est arrivé chez moi un samedi pour m'annoncer que nous partons nous baigner. Je me suis précipitée dans la chambre de ma "soeur" (celle qui était un peu plus petite que moi) pour lui emprunter son maillot de bain. Debout devant le miroir du bureau, j'ai passé une heure à m'entraîner à marcher après l'avoir mis.
Les cris d'impatience de mon soupirant me firent enfin sortir de la chambre, vêtue d'un vieux pantalon et d'un pull. Le maillot de bain était en-dessous.
C'était une journée ensoleillée et le sable envahi de baigneurs et de mères avec leurs enfants. Bien que née et ayant été élevée à seulement quelques kilomètres de l'océan, je ne l'avais jamais vu de si près auparavant. Je suis restée debout et je l'ai regardé pendant un long moment. C'était comme dans un rêve, pleins de couleurs or et lavande, d'un bleu et blanc mousseux. Et il y avait un esprit de vacances dans l'air qui m'a surprise. Tout le monde semblait sourire au ciel.
"Viens, allons-y", ordonna mon cavalier.
"Où ?" je lui ai demandé.
"Dans l'eau" dit-il en riant, pensant que je plaisantais. J'ai pensé à mon maillot de bain moulant. L'idée de me cacher dans l'eau en le portant me paraissait ridicule. Mais je n'ai rien dit. J'ai regardé les filles et les femmes et je me suis sentie décue. Je ne m'attendais pas à ce que la moitié de la population féminine de Los Angeles défile sur le sable portant presque rien sur elles. Je pensais être la seule.
Mon soupirant s'impatientait enocre alors j'ai enlevé mon pantalon et mon pull et restait plantée là, dans ma tenue étriquée. J'ai pensé : "Je suis presque nue", et j'ai fermé les yeux et je suis restée immobile.
Mon petit ami intelligent avait cessé de m'embêter. J'ai commencé à marcher lentement sur le sable. Je suis presque allée jusqu'au bord de l'eau, puis j'ai longé la plage. La même chose s'est produite que ce qui qui s'était produit dans la classe de maths, mais à plus grande échelle. C'était aussi beaucoup plus bruyant.
Les jeunes hommes me sifflaient. Certains ont sauté du sable et couraient en trottinant pour mieux voir. Même les femmes s'arrêtèrent de bouger à mesure que je m'approchais.
Je ne prêtais aucune attention aux sifflets et aux cris. En fait, je ne les ai pas entendus. J'étais envahie d'un sentiment étrange, comme si j'étais deux personnes. L'une d'elles était Norma Jean de l'orphelinat qui n'appartenait à personne. L'autre était quelqu'un dont je ne connaissais pas le nom. Mais je savais où elle se trouvait. Elle appartenait à l'océan, au ciel et au monde entier.

MAIS rien ne s'est passé en dehors de la vision grandiose qui m'avait frappée sur la plage. Je retrouvai à ma robe bleue et ma blouse blanche et je suis retournée à l'école. Mais au lieu d'apprendre quoi que ce soit, je suis devenue de plus en plus confuse. A l'école aussi. Ils ne savaient comment appréhender face à une sirène de treize ans.
Pourquoi j'étais une sirène, je n'en avais pas la moindre idée. Je ne voulais pas être embrassée et je ne rêvais pas qu'un duc ou une star de cinéma tombe amoureux de moi. La vérité était qu'avec tout mon rouge à lèvres, mon mascara et mes courbes précoces, j'étais aussi sensuelle qu'un fossile. Mais il semble que j'exerçais un effet opposé sur les gens.
Les garçons se sont mis à me courtiser comme si j'étais la seule fille du quartier. Je restais éveillée la nuit en me demandant pourquoi ils me poursuivaient. De temps en temps, je laissais l'un d'eux m'embrasser pour voir s'il y avait quelque chose d'intéressant dans la performance.
Il n'y en avait pas.
J'en ai finalement conclu que les garçons me couraient après parce que j'étais orpheline et que je n'avais pas de parents pour s'occuper de moi. Cette conclusion m'a rendu encore plus froide face à ma meute d'admirateurs. Mais ni ma froideur, ni mon dédain, ni mes « sors d'ici », « ne me dérange pas », aucune de mes attitudes figées ne changeaient les choses.
Les garçons continuaient à me poursuivre comme si j'étais un vampire avec une rose entre les dents.

Les filles de l'école étaient un autre problème, mais je pouvais le comprendre. Elles me détestaient de plus en plus à mesure que je vieillissais. Désormais, au lieu de m'accuser de voler des peignes, de la monnaie ou des colliers, j'était accusée de voler les garçons.
Tante Grace a suggéré une solution à mes problèmes.
"Tu devrais te marier", dit-elle.
"Je suis trop jeune," lui dis-je. J'avais encore 15 ans.
"Je ne pense pas que tu l'es", riait Tante Grace.
"Mais il n'y a personne qui veuille m'épouser," dis-je.
"Si, il y a quelqu'un", a-t-elle dit.
"Qui ?" ai-je demandé.
"Jim," dit ma tante.

Jim était M. Dougherty. Il habitait près de chez moi. Il était beau, poli et adulte.
"Mais Jim vise ma 'soeur'," lui dis-je.
"C'est toi qu'il a emmenée au match de football", a déclaré tante Grace, "pas elle."
"C'était terriblement ennuyeux," lui dis-je. "Je déteste les matchs de football."
"Que penses-tu de Jim ?" m'a-t-elle demandé.
"Je ne ressens rien," lui ai-je répondu, "Il est comme les autres, sauf qu'il est plus grand et plus poli."
"C'est une belle qualité chez un homme", a déclaré tante Grace, "la politesse".
La "tante" et "l'oncle" avec qui je vivais - ma neuvième famille - m'ont aidé à me décider. Ils allaient déménager. Cela signifiait que je devais retourner vivre à l'orphelinat où on m'aurait replacé dans autre famille.
J'ai épousé Jim Dougherty.
Le premier effet que le mariage a eu sur moi a été d'augmenter mon manque d'intérêt pour le sexe. Mon mari ne s'en souciait pas ou n'était pas au courant. Nous étions tous les deux trop jeunes pour discuter ouvertement d'un sujet aussi embarrassant.

Les parents de Jim ne se souciaient pas beaucoup de moi, ce dont je ne pouvais pas les blâmer. J'étais une femme particulière. Je n'aimais pas les adultes. Je préférais faire la vaisselle plutôt que de m'asseoir et leur parler.
Dès qu'ils commençaient à jouer aux cartes ou à avoir des discussions, je sortais de la maison en douce et je rejoignais les enfants dans la rue. J'aimais les garçons et les filles plus jeunes que moi. Je jouais avec eux jusqu'à ce que mon mari sorte de la maison et commence à m'appeler.

Mon mariage ne m'a apporté ni bonheur, ni douleur. Mon mari et moi ne nous parlions à peine. Ce n'était pas parce que nous étions fâchés. Nous n'avions rien à nous dire. J'ai vu beaucoup de couples mariés depuis qui étaient comme Jim et moi.
Ce sont généralement les mariages les plus durables, ceux qui sont vécus dans le silence.

La chose la plus importante que mon mariage a eu comme effet pour moi, a été de mettre fin à jamais à mon statut d'orpheline. J'étais reconnaissante envers Jim pour cela. C'est le chevalier qui m'a délivrée de ma robe bleue et de ma blouse blanche.
Mes différents conseilleurs avaient eu raison de dire que le mariage mettait fin à ma popularité de sirène. Les garçons ne venaient plus après Mme Dougherty. La rose semblait être tombée de ses dents.
Jim a rejoint la marine marchande en 1944, et je suis allée travailler dans une usine de parachutes. La grande guerre était lancée. Des batailles se livraient. Des juke-box jouaient. Les yeux des gens étaient illuminés.

JE PORTAIS des salopettes à l'usine. J'ai été surprise qu'ils ai insisté là-dessus. Mettre une fille en salopette, c'est comme la faire travailler en collants, surtout si une fille sait comment les porter. En tant qu'inspectrice de parachutes, j'étais de nouveau comme en classe de maths. Les hommes bourdonnaient autour de moi comme les lycéens l'avaient fait.
J'ai remarqué depuis que les hommes laissent généralement les femmes mariées tranquilles et ont tendance à les traiter avec respect. Ce n'est pas glorieux pour les femmes mariées. Les hommes sont toujours prêts à respecter ce qui les ennuie.
La raison pour laquelle la plupart des femmes, même les plus jolies, paraissent aussi ternes, c'est parce qu'elles sont trop respectées.
C'était peut-être de ma faute si les hommes de l'usine ont essayé de sortir avec moi et de m'offrir à boire. Je ne me sentais pas comme une femme mariée. J'étais complètement fidèle à mon mari parti en mer mais ce n'était pas parce que je l'aimais ou même parce que j'avais des idées morales. Ma fidélité était due à mon manque d'intérêt pour le sexe.
Jim est finalement rentré à la maison et nous avons de nouveau vécu ensemble. C'est difficile de se rappeler ce qu'on a dit, fait ou ressenti quand on s'ennuie.
Jim était un mari gentil. Il ne m'a jamais blessé ou contrarié - sauf sur un sujet. Il voulait un bébé.
L'idée d'avoir un bébé me dressait les cheveux sur la tête. Je ne pouvais l'imaginer que comme un double de moi-même, une autre Norma Jean dans un orphelinat. Il se passerait quelque chose. Jim s'éloignerait. Et il y aurait cette petite fille en robe bleue et chemisier blanc vivant chez une "tante", faisant la vaisselle, étant la dernière à aller dans l'eau du bain le samedi soir.
Je ne pouvais pas expliquer cela à Jim. Dès qu'il s'endormait à côté de moi le soir, je restais éveillée à pleurer. Je ne savais pas trop qui pleurait, Mme Dougherty ou l'enfant qu'elle aurait pu avoir. Ce n'était ni l'une ni l'autre.
C'était Norma Jean, toujours vivante, toujours seule, souhaitant toujours d'être morte.
Je ressens différemment les choses maitenant sur le fait d'avoir un enfant. C'est l'une des choses dont je rêve. Elle ne sera plus une Norma Jean maintenant. Et je sais comment je l'élèverai - sans mensonges. Personne ne lui dira des mensonges sur quoi que ce soit. Et je répondrai à toutes ses questions. Si je ne connais pas les réponses, j'irai les chercher dans une encyclopédie. Je lui dirai tout ce qu'elle veut savoir - sur l'amour, sur le sexe, sur tout !

Mais surtout, pas de mensonges ! Pas de mensonges sur le fait qu'il y ait un Père Noël, ou que le monde soit rempli de gens nobles et honorables tous désireux de s'entraider et de se faire du bien. Je lui dirai qu'il y a de l'honneur et de la bonté dans le monde, tout comme il y a des diamants et du radium.
C'est la fin de mon histoire de Norma Jean. Jim et moi avons divorcé. Et j'ai emménagé dans une chambre à Hollywood pour vivre seule. J'avais 19 ans et je voulais savoir qui j'étais.
Quand je viens d'écrire "C'est la fin de Norma Jean", j'ai rougi comme si j'avais été surprise dans un mensonge. Parce que cette enfant triste et amère qui a grandi trop vite n'est presque jamais sortie de mon cœur. Avec le succès qui m'entoure aujourd'hui, je peux encore ressentir ses yeux effrayés regarder au-delà des miens.
Elle n'arrête pas de dire : "Je n'ai jamais vécu, je n'ai jamais été aimée", et souvent je suis confuse et je pense que c'est moi qui dis ça. J'avais été une sorte d'«enfant épouse». J'étais maintenant devenue une sorte d'«enfant veuve». Beaucoup de choses semblaient m'être arrivées. Pourtant, d'une certaine manière, il ne s'était rien passé, sauf que j'avais 19 ans au lieu de 9 et que je devais me chercher un boulot.
L'espèce d'instinct qui conduit un canard à l'eau, m'a conduit vers les studios des photographes. J'ai obtenu des emplois posant pour des publicités et des mises en page. Le principal problème était que les photographes cherchaient eux aussi du travail. Trouver un photographe qui me voulait comme modèle était plus facile que d'en trouver un qui pouvait payer plus que des promesses.
Mais je gagnais assez d'argent pour me payer le loyer d'une chambre et un repas par jour, même si parfois je faisais l'impasse sur le repas. Cela n'avait pas d'importance, cependant. Quand vous êtes jeune et en bonne santé, avoir un peu faim n'est pas très important.

CE qui importait le plus, c'était d'être seule. Quand on est jeune et en bonne santé, la solitude peut sembler plus importante qu'elle ne l'est. Je regardais les rues avec des yeux solitaires. Je n'avais pas de parents à visiter ni de copains avec qui sortir.
Ma tante Grace et tante Anna travaillaient dur pour se nourrir et payer le loyer. Quand je les ai appelés, elles ont eu pitié de moi et ont voulu m'aider. Je savais qu'elles avaient grand besoin des demi-dollars restant dans leurs sacs à main, alors je restais à l'écart jusqu'à ce que j'ai assez d'argent pour pouvoir les emmener au restaurant ou au cinéma.
Je n'avais que moi. Quand je rentrais du restaurant à pied le soir dans les rues illuminées avec la foule sur les trottoirs, j'avais l'habitude de regarder les gens bavarder entre eux et se dépêcher de partir quelque part. Je me demandais où ils allaient et ce que ça faisait d'avoir des endroits où aller ou de connaître des gens.

Il y avait toujours des hommes prêts à aider une fille à se sentir moins seule. Ils disaient "Salut ! bébé", quand vous passiez dans la rue. Quand vous ne vous retourniez pas pour les regarder, ils ricanaient: "Coincée, hein ?"

Je ne leur ai jamais répondu. Parfois, je me sentais désolée pour eux. Ils semblaient aussi seuls que moi. Ces loups solitaires du coin de la rue à beugler "Salut bébé" me résonnait comme des voix du passé m'appelant à être à nouveau Madame Personne.
Un soir, j'ai rencontré un homme dans un restaurant. "Cette ville a certainement beaucoup changé au cours des 40 dernières années", a-t-il déclaré. "Avant, il y avait des Indiens là où nous sommes."
"Est-ce que vous habitiez ici il y a 40 ans ?", lui ai-je demandé.
"Oui, m'dame", dit-il. "Quel âge pensez-vous que j'ai ?"
"Environ 60", dis-je.

"Soixante-dix-sept ans à mon dernier anniversaire", me corrigea-t-il. "Mon nom est Bill Cox. Vous allez quelque part ?"
J'ai dit que non.

"Pourquoi ne pas venir chez moi et madame ?" dit-il. "On vit juste à côté d'ici. Je lui ramène un sandwich."
Je suis devenue amie avec Bill Cox et sa femme. Nous nous promenions tous les trois dans les rues parfois le soir.
Il parlait principalement de la guerre hispano-américaine, dans laquelle il avait été soldat, et d'Abraham Lincoln. Ces deux sujets l'excitaient beaucoup.

Je n'avais jamais entendu parler de la guerre hispano-américaine. Je devais être absente de l'école la semaine où on l'a étudié en cours d'Histoire. En marchant avec Bill Cox dans les rues éclairées d'Hollywood et en écoutant les histoires sur la guerre hispano-américaine et Abraham Lincoln, je ne me sentais pas seule et les loups des trottoirs ne m'accostaient plus par "Salut bébé".
Un soir, Bill Cox m'a dit qu'il retournait au Texas.
"Je suis malade", m'a-t-il dit, "et je détesterais l'idée de mourir ailleurs qu'au Texas."

Il m'a envoyé quelques lettres du Texas. Je lui répondais. Puis une lettre est parvenue, écrite par sa femme, disant que Bill Cox était mort dans une maison retraite pour soldats au Texas. J'ai lu la lettre dans le restaurant où je l'avais rencontré et je suis rentrée chez moi en pleurant. Les rues d'Hollywood semblaient plus vides que jamais sans Bill Cox, sa guerre préférée, et Abraham Lincoln.

VOUS êtes assise seule. Il fait nuit dehors. Les voitures roulent sur Sunset Boulevard comme un chapelet interminable de scarabées. Leurs pneus en caoutchouc émettent un ronronnement distingué. Vous avez faim et vous vous dîtes "C'est bon pour ma ligne de ne pas manger. Il n'y a rien de plus beau qu'un ventre plat." Et vous récitez votre leçon de diction à voix haute :
"Ariane s'est levée de son canapé parmi les neiges des montagnes d'Akrakaronian." Suivi de "Salut à toi, esprit joyeux, oiseau que tu n'as jamais été."
Les cours sont à un dollar. Pour un dollar, vous pourriez vous acheter une paire de bas et un hamburger, mais qui ne fera jamais de vous une actrice. Les cours de diction le peuvent. Ainsi, avec les jambes nues et l'estomac vide, vous frappez les consonnes de "Salut à toi, esprit joyeux".
J'avais l'habitude de penser en observant dehors la nuit à Hollywood: "Il doit y avoir des milliers de filles assises seules comme moi qui rêvent de devenir une star de cinéma. Mais je ne vais pas m'inquiéter pour elles. Je suis celle qui en rêve le plus fort."
Vous n'avez pas besoin de savoir quoi que ce soit pour rêver si hardemment. Je ne connaissais rien au métier d'acteur. Je n'avais jamais lu un livre à ce sujet, ni essayé de le faire, ni discuté avec qui que ce soit. J'avais honte de dire aux quelques personnes que je connaissais ce dont je rêvais. Je disais que j'espérais gagner ma vie en tant que mannequin. J'ai fait appel à toutes les agences de mannequins et je trouvais du travail ici et là.
Mais il y avait ce secret en moi: jouer la comédie. C'était comme être en prison et regarder une porte qui disait "Sortie".

Jouer était comme de l'or et c'était beau. C'était comme les vives couleurs que Norma Jean avait l'habitude de voir dans ses rêveries. Ce n'était pas un art. C'était comme un jeu qui vous permettait de sortir du monde ennuyeux que vous connaissiez pour vous projeter dans des mondes si brillants qu'ils faisaient bondir votre cœur rien que d'y penser.
Quand j'avais huit ans, je regardais par la fenêtre de l'orphelinat la nuit et je voyais un grand panneau lumineux sur lequel était écrit : "R.K.O. Radio Pictures". J'ai détesté ce panneau. Cela m'a rappelé l'odeur de la colle. Ma mère m'avait amené une fois au studio où elle travaillait. L'odeur de la pellicule mouillée qu'elle découpait et collait s'était impregnée dans mes narines.
C'était les narines de Norma Jean. Norma Dougherty, elle, l'actrice en herbe, n'avait pas un tel ressenti envers l'enseigne du studio. Pour elle, ils représentaient des projecteurs menant à une terre promise - la terre d'Ingrid Bergman, de Claudette Colbert, de Joan Crawford, de Bette Davis, d'Olivia De Havilland, de Gene Tierney, de Jennifer Jones.
C'était comme ça quand je m'asseyais seule dans ma chambre à Hollywood. Je m'endormais affamée et je me réveillais affamée. Et je pensais que tous les acteurs et actrices étaient des génies assis devant la porte de ce paradis: le cinéma.

À suivre

La semaine prochaine
. Marilyn Monroe parle d'un Hollywood qu'on ne voit pas à l'écran - "le Hollywood de l'échec... où nous étions la plus jolie tribu de mendiants qui n'ait jamais envahi une ville... et autour de nous se trouvaient les loups".


pour info

Il s'agit ici de la publication dans la presse (et du vivant de Marilyn) de ce qui restera considéré comme son "autobiographie" débutée mais jamais achevée, le fruit d'une collaboration émaillée d'entretiens avec le journaliste Ben Hecht au début de l'année 1954 et publiée dans un livre intitulé (comme cet article) "My Story" en 1974 et publié en France en 2011 sous le titre de "Confession inachevée".

This is here the publication in the press (and during Marilyn's lifetime) of what will remain considered as her "autobiography" started but never completed, the result of a collaboration punctuated by several interviews with the journalist Ben Hecht at the early of the year 1954 and published in a book entitled (like this article) "My Story" in 1974 and published in France in 2011 under the title of "Confession inachevée".


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand. 

30 novembre 2019

25/04/1946 - Contrat photos Paul Parry

Le 25 avril 1946, Norma Jeane Dougherty signe un contrat avec le photographe Paul Parry. Les termes du contrat indiquent qu'elle reçoit 15 Dollars pour poser en tant que modèle, et cède les droits à l'image au photographe.
On April 25, 1946, Norma Jeane Dougherty signs a contract with photographer Paul Parry. The terms of the contract indicate that she receives 15 Dollars to pose as a model, and waives all the rights to the photographer.


- contrat -
- contract -
1946-04-25-contract-paul_parry-1 


- récépissé facture du salaire -
- receipt of salary invoice -
1946-04-25-contract-paul_parry-facture-1 


sources: enchères Bonhams - 12/2019


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.

Posté par ginieland à 13:25 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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23 février 2017

Saturday Evening Post, 1956/05/05

Saturday Evening Post
- The New Marilyn Monroe - Part 1

1956-05-05-saturday_evening_post-cover 

pays magazine: USA
paru le 5 mai 1956
article: 1ère partie "The New Marilyn Monroe"
en ligne sur saturdayeveningpost.com

1956-05-05-SEP 
1956-05-05-saturday_evening_post-p1 
1956-05-05-saturday_evening_post-p2-3 


The New Marilyn Monroe
This three-part series by Pete Martin was originally published in The Saturday Evening Post, May 5–19, 1956:
By Pete Martin
Originally published on May 5, 1956
A Post editor’s surprisingly candid report on the girl with the horizontal walk. He reveals things about the phenomenal blonde that even Marilyn herself doesn’t know.

1956-05-05-saturday_evening_post-pic1 
The new Marilyn Monroe in Hollywood after returning from
her self-imposed exile in New York. Not quite 30,
she possesses what is possibly the most
photographed face and figure in history. (Gene Lester, © SEPS)

I said to Marilyn Monroe, “Pictures of you usually show you with mouth open and your eyes half closed. Did some photographer sell you the idea that having your picture taken that way makes you look sexier?”

She replied in what I’d come to recognize as pure Monroese. “The formation of my lids must make them look heavy or else I’m thinking of something,” she told me. “Sometimes I’m thinking of men. Other times I’m thinking of some man in particular. It’s easier to look sexy when you’re thinking of some man in particular. As for my mouth being open all the time, I even sleep with it open. I know, because it’s open when I wake up. I never consciously think of my mouth, but I do consciously think about what I’m thinking about.”

Tucked away in that paragraph like blueberries in a hot muffin were several genuine Monroeisms. I had studied the subject long enough to be able to tell a genuine Monroeism from a spurious one.

When I asked her, “Has anyone ever accused you of wearing falsies?” she came through with a genuine Monroeism.

“Yes,” she told me, her eyes flashing indignantly. “Naturally,” she went on, “it was another actress who accused me. My answer to that is, quote: Those who know me better know better. That’s all. Unquote.”

Another Monroeism followed hard on the heels of that. I said, “I’ve heard that you wowed the marines in Korea when you climbed up onto a platform to say a few words to them, and they whistled at you and made wolf calls.”

“I know the time you’re talking about,” she said. “It wasn’t in Korea at all; it was at Camp Pendleton, California. They wanted me to say a few words, so I said, ‘You fellows down there are always whistling at sweater girls. Well, take away their sweaters and what have you got?’ For some reason they screamed and yelled.”

Another example came forth when Marilyn was asked if she and the playwright, Arthur Miller, were having an affair. “How can they say we’re having a romance?” she replied. “He’s married.”

Still another Monroeism had emerged from a press conference in the Plaza Hotel, in New York City. It was held to announce her teaming with Sir Laurence Olivier in an acting- directing-producing venture — a get-together described by one of those present as “one of the least likely duos in cinematic history.” The big Monroeism of that occasion was Marilyn’s answer to the query, “Miss Monroe, do you still want to do The Brothers Karamazov on Broadway?”

“I don’t want to play The Brothers,” she said. “I want to play Grushenka from that book. She’s a girl.”

Listening to her as she talked to me now, I thought, Nobody can write dialogue for her which could possibly sound half as much like her as the dialogue she thinks up for herself.

Nunnally Johnson, who produced the film, How to Marry a Millionaire, costarring Marilyn, told me, “When I talked to her when she first came on the lot, I felt as if I were talking to a girl under water. I couldn’t tell whether I was getting through to her or not. She lived behind a fuzz curtain.”

Johnson also directed How to be Very, Very Popular, and when Sheree North took Marilyn’s place in that film, he announced: “Sheree will not use the Monroe technique in How to be Very, Very Popular. She will play the entire role with her mouth closed.”

Marilyn’s last sentence to me: “I never consciously think of my mouth, but I do consciously think about what I’m thinking about” seemed a trifle murky, but I had no time to work on it, for, without pausing, she said, “Another writer asked me, ‘What do you think of sex?’ and I told him, ‘It’s a part of nature. I go along with nature.’ Zsa Zsa Gabor was supposed to write an article for a magazine on the subject: ‘What’s Wrong With American Men,’ and I did marginal notes for it. The editor cut out my best lines. I wrote, ‘If there’s anything wrong with the way American men look at sex, it’s not their fault. After all, they’re descended from the Puritans, who got off the boat on the wrong foot — or was it the Pilgrims? — and there’s still a lot of that puritanical stuff around.’ The editor didn’t use that one.”

I carefully wrote down every word she said to me. She told me that she’d rather I wouldn’t use a tape-recording machine while interviewing her. “It would make me nervous to see that thing going round and round,” she insisted. So I used pencils and a notebook instead. But I didn’t use them right away.

I had to wait for her to walk from her bedroom into the living room of her apartment, where I sat ready to talk to her. It took her an hour and a half to make that journey. At 3:45, Lois Weber, the pleasant young woman who handled the Monroe New York publicity, admitted me to the apartment Marilyn was occupying. She pushed the buzzer outside of a door on the eighth floor of an apartment building on Sutton Place South, and a voice asked, “Who is it?”

“It’s me,” said my chaperone.

The lock clickety-clicked open, but when we went in, Marilyn was nowhere in sight. She had retreated into a bedroom. Her voice said to us through the door, “I’ll be out in just seven minutes.”

A publicity man to whom I’d talked at Marilyn’s studio in Hollywood had warned me, “She’ll stand you up a couple of times before you meet her. Then she’ll be late, and when I say late, I mean real late. You’ll be so burned at her before she walks in that you’ll wrap up your little voice-recording machine and get ready to leave at least three times — maybe four times — before she shows. But somebody will persuade you to wait, and finally Marilyn will come in, and before you know it, she’ll have you wrapped up too. For she’s warmhearted, amusing and likable, even if her lateness is a pain in the neck. And after that, if somebody says, ‘That was mighty thoughtless of old Marilyn, keeping you waiting like that,’ you’ll want to slug him for being mean.

“What you won’t know,” that studio publicity man went on, “is that while you’re having hell’s own headache waiting for her, whatever publicity worker is trying to get her to see you is having an even bigger headache. Marilyn will be telling that publicity worker that her stomach is so upset that she’s been throwing up for hours; she hasn’t been able to get her make-up on right; or that she’s got a bum deal in the wardrobe department and hasn’t anything to wear.”

So, in an effort to be witty, when Marilyn said, through the closed door, “I’ll be out in just seven minutes,” I said, “I’ll settle for eight.” Time was to prove it the unfunniest remark I’ve ever made. One hour later I asked Lois Weber, “What do you suppose she’s doing in there?”

“You know how it is,” my publicity-girl chaperone said soothingly, “a girl has to put on her face.”

“What has she got, two heads?” I asked politely. A half hour later I suggested that Lois Weber go into the next room and see what was causing the delay.

Waiting for Lois Weber, I roamed the apartment. On a table lay a play manuscript. Typed on its cover was: Fallen Angels, by Noel Coward. Among the books which seemed in current use were Bernard Shaw’s Letters to Ellen Terry, Shaw’s Letters to Mrs. Patrick Campbell, Gertrude Lawrence as Mrs. A., by Richard Aldrich.

Mute evidence of Marilyn’s widely publicized drama studies at the Actors’ Studio, where she was said to be seeking out the secrets of artistic acting, was a copy of James Joyce’s Ulysses. Several lines of dialogue from that volume had been penciled on a piece of paper, obviously to be recited by or to a group of drama students; then the piece of paper had been thrust part way into the book. Lying on the floor was a large recording of John Barrymore as Hamlet.

That dialogue from Ulysses and the Barrymore recording represented one of the reasons why I was there. I’d read that Marilyn had gone “long hair” and “art theaterish,” and I wanted to see for myself. Just seeing it in print didn’t make it true.

Millions of words had been written about the alluring blonde in whose living room I sat, but most of those words had been of the “authorized” or “with-Marilyn’s-blessing” variety. Several millions of them had appeared in fan magazines — after having first been O.K.’d by the 20th Century-Fox publicity department.

I’d read a lot of those words, but I still felt that I didn’t understand this dame and I was sure that a lot of other people felt the same way about her and that, like myself, they’d been asking themselves for years, “What’s she really like?”

On top of that, they were probably asking themselves other questions — as I was doing. “Why did she blow her marriage with Joe DiMaggio? Why did she walk out on a movie career which was paying her heavy money? Why did she duck California in favor of New York? Why, after she holed up there, did she attend the art-for-art’s-sake Actors’ Studio — surely an unlikely place for a girl who, up to that time, had done most of her acting with her hips?”

I hoped that when I talked to her she would tell me the answers to some of these things. Maybe I’d even see the “new Marilyn Monroe” I’d heard existed.

Lois Weber came back to report: “She thinks the maid must have gone off with the top of her tapered slacks. She’s running around without a top on.”

In an effort to keep me from brooding, Lois Weber said, “The azalea people down in Wilmington, North Carolina, want her for a personal appearance in April, but I told them they’d have to call me in April. Who knows where she’ll be then?”

The minutes crawled by and I thought of various things that people had told me about Marilyn before I’d begun my marathon wait in her Sutton Place apartment. Every male friend I had told I was doing a story about Marilyn had asked me, “Can I go along to hold your notebook?” or “You call that work?” or “You get paid for that?” or “Can’t I go along and hold the flash bulbs?” Apparently they felt that if they failed to go into a blood-bubbling, heman routine at the drop of her name, their maleness was suspect. When Marilyn appeared breathless and friendly as a puppy, I told her of this phenomenon. “How do you explain it?” I asked. “Have you become a symbol of sex?”

She gave my query thought before answering. “There are people to whom other people react, and other people who do nothing for people,” she said. “I react to men, too, but I don’t do it because I’m trying to prove I’m a woman. Personally I react to Marlon Brando. He’s a favorite of mine. There are two kinds of reactions. When you see some people you say, ‘Gee!’ When you see other people you say, ‘Ugh!’ If that part about my being a symbol of sex is true, it ought to help at the box office, but I don’t want to be too commercial about it.” Quite seriously she said, “After all, it’s a responsibility, too — being a symbol, I mean.”

I told her I’d heard that among the titles bestowed upon her were Woo-Woo Girl, Miss Cheesecake, The Girl With the Horizontal Walk. “I don’t get what they mean by ‘horizontal walk,’” she said. “Naturally I know what walking means — anybody knows that — and horizontal means not vertical. So what?” I thought of trying to blueprint it for her; then decided not to.

The Hollywood publicity worker who had warned me that she would be “real late” had talked to me quite frankly about Marilyn; he had pulled no punches; but since it is unfair to quote a publicity worker by name, I’ll call him Jones. And since “flack” is Hollywood slang for publicity man, I’ll call him Flack Jones.

Jones worked for 20th Century-Fox during the years before Marilyn staged her walkout. Since then he has moved on to bigger — if not better — things. He has opened his own public-relations office, with branches in Paris and Rome. He is bald as a peeled egg. He is as broad as a small barn door; a junior-executive-size Mister Five-by-Five. He wears black-rimmed glasses instead of the clear tortoise-shell plastic variety.

“A thing that fascinates me is this,” I told Flack Jones: “the first time I ever saw her I was sitting with a friend in the Fox commissary and this girl came in without any make-up on. She was wearing a blouse and skirt, and she sat against the wall. She bore no resemblance to anybody I’d ever seen before, but, to my amazement, my friend said, ‘That’s Marilyn Monroe.’ What I want to know is: Does she have to get into her Marilyn Monroe suit or put on her Marilyn Monroe face before she looks like Marilyn Monroe?”

“This is true of all platinum blondes or whatever you call the highly dyed jobs we have out here,” Flack Jones said. “If their hair isn’t touched up and coiffured exactly right; if they’re not gowned perfectly and their make-up is not one hundred per cent, they look gruesome. This is not peculiar to Monroe; it’s peculiar to every other synthetic blonde I’ve ever known in picture business. There are very few natural blondes in Hollywood and, so far as I know, there have been no natural platinum blondes in mankind’s history, except albinos. They are strictly a product of the twentieth century. They’re created blondes, and when you create a blonde you have to complete your creation with make-up and dramatic clothes, otherwise you’ve got only part of an assembly job.”

I also talked to a member of the Fox Studio legal staff, who told me a Monroe story I found provocative. “One day,” he said, “she was in this office, and I said to her, ‘It would be better for you to sign this contract this year instead of next. It will save you money.’ She looked at me and said, ‘I’m not interested in money. I just want to be wonderful.’ Then she walked out.” The legal light looked at me helplessly and shrugged. “What do you suppose she meant by that?” he asked. I said I had no idea, but that I’d try to find out.

And I asked a friend high enough up in the Fox hierarchy to know the answer, “Why do you think your studio let her come back to work for it after she walked out and stayed in New York for fifteen months?”

“Our attitude was that she’d never work on our lot again,” he announced firmly; then he grinned, “unless we needed her.”

One of my longer talks was with Billy Wilder, who directed her in the film The Seven Year Itch.

“What do you want to know?” he asked when I went to see him in his Beverly Hills home.

“One of the interesting things about this Monroe girl, to me,” I said, “is she seemed in danger of spoiling what had begun as a successful career by running away from it. I began to ask myself: How long can a movie actress afford to stay away from moviemaking and still remain a star? The mere strangeness of her staying away gets her a terrific press for a while and makes everyone in the country conscious of her, but is it possible to stay away so long that you’re forgotten? Was that about to happen to Marilyn?”

“I don’t think there was any danger of Marilyn sinking into oblivion,” Wilder said. “A thing like her doesn’t come along every minute.”

I asked, “What do you mean ‘a thing like her’?”

“She has what I call flesh impact,” he told me. “It’s very rare. Three I remember are Clara Bow, Jean Harlow and Rita Hayworth. Such girls have flesh which photographs like flesh. You feel you can reach out and touch it.”

“I’ve heard that it’s a moot question as to whether Marilyn’s an actress or not,” I said.

“I’ve heard that, too,” he replied. “Before we go further I must tell you that I like the girl, but it’s also moot whether you have to be an actor or an actress to be a success in pictures. I’m sure you’ve heard the theory that there are two kinds of stars — those who can act and those who are personalities. I’ll take a personality any time. Something comes down from the screen to you when you see them, in a way that it doesn’t always come from the indifferently paid actors, although they may be perfect at their jobs.”

“It’s nothing against them or for them,” Flack Jones said, when I repeated Wilder’s idea to him. “It’s the way this business is put together. If the public likes a personality, he or she goes over. You take Tab Rock,” he said (only Tab Rock is not the name he used). “Old Tab’s a terrific personality. I doubt if he’s ever made a flop picture, but he’s never made a really good picture. This fellow can’t pick up his hat without instruction, yet he’s always picking up villains and throwing them across a bar singlehanded. He can clean up any barroom on the frontier, but he can’t clean up a kitchen. He’s a nice guy, but no one has ever called him an actor. You take Lloyd Nolan now, or Van Heflin. That’s acting for you. You believe them. There are lights and shades and meaning to what they do. But when old Tab Rock comes on the screen, he’s got to throw somebody around to prove his art. He can do this quicker than anybody in Hollywood, and this is his great value.”

“He sounds brave,” I said.

“No one is braver or more scornful about it,” Flack Jones said. “His bravery is without parallel in the industry. He’s the only man I ever saw who could take a forty-five and go to the Near East and clean the whole mess up in a day or two. He never fails. That’s the difference between a personality and an actor.”

When I talked to Wilder I said that I’d read that when Marilyn had announced that she wanted to appear in a movie version of The Brothers Karamazov, some people hooted.

“The hooters were wrong,” Wilder told me. “She meant that she wanted to play the part of Grushenka in that book, and people who haven’t read the book don’t know that Grushenka is a sex pot. People think this is a long-hair, very thick, very literary book, but Dostoevsky knew what he was doing and there is nothing long-hair about Grushenka. Marilyn knows what she’s doing too. She would be a good Grushenka.

“It was after she said that she wanted to be in The Brothers Karamazov,” Wilder went on, “that she started going to the Actors’ Studio School of Dramatic Arts in New York. She didn’t do it for publicity. She’s sincerely trying to improve herself, and I think she should be admired for that. She could have sat here in Hollywood on her pretty little fanny and collected all of the money any ordinary actress would ever want, but she keeps trying.

“Right now, as of today, no matter what she thinks, Marilyn’s great value is as a personality, not as an actress. [Wilder told me these things while Marilyn was still in New York being groomed by the Actors’ Studio. It may be that what happened to her during her Eastern schooling in new dramatic ways may change his opinion, but 1 haven’t talked to him since her return to Hollywood.] If she sets out to be artistic and dedicated, and she carries it so far that she’s willing to wear Sloppy-Joe sweaters and go without make-up and let her hair hang straight as a string, this is not what has made her great to date. I don’t say that it’s beyond the realm of possibility that she can establish herself as a straight dramatic actress — it is possible — but it will be another career for her, a starting all over.”

Back in New York, when Marilyn made that long, long journey from her bedroom to her living room in her apartment, I said to her, “I’ve heard your childhood referred to as ‘the perfect Cinderella story.’”

“I don’t know where they got that,” she told me. “I haven’t ended up with a prince, and I’ve never had even one fairy godmother. My birth certificate reads Norma Jean Mortenson. I was told that my father was killed in an automobile accident before I was born, so that is what I’ve always told people. There was no way I could check on that because my mother was put into a mental institution when I was little, and I was brought up as an orphan.”

I had read that she spent her childhood being farmed out to foster parents and to orphanages, but, talking to her, I discovered that there’d been only one orphanage, although it was true about the foster parents. “I have had eleven or twelve sets of them,” she told me, “but I don’t want to count them all again, to see whether there were eleven or twelve. I hope you won’t ask me to. It depresses me. Some families would keep me longer; others would get tired of me in a short time. I must have made them nervous or something.”

She thought of something else. “I had one pair of foster parents who, when I was about ten, made me promise never to drink when I grew up, and I signed a pledge never to smoke or swear. My next foster family gave me empty whisky bottles for playthings. With them I played store. I guess I must have had the finest collection of empty whisky bottles any girl ever had. I’d line them up on a plank beside the road, and when people drove along I’d say, ‘Wouldn’t you like some whisky?’ I remember some of the people in the cars driving past my ‘whisky’ store saying, ‘Imagine! Why, it’s terrible!’ Looking back, I guess I used to play-act all the time. For one thing, it meant I could live in a more interesting world than the one around me.

“The first family I lived with told me I couldn’t go to the movies because it was sinful,” Marilyn said. “I listened to them say the world was coming to an end, and if I was doing something sinful when it happened, I’d go down below, below, below. So the few times I was able to sneak into a movie, I spent most of the time that I was there praying that the world wouldn’t end.”

1956-05-05-saturday_evening_post-pic2 
The famous British photographer, Cecil Beaton, shoots Marilyn.
Says the lady: “It’s a responsibility — being a symbol of sex, I mean.”
(Hans Knopf, © SEPS)

Apparently I had been misinformed about her first marriage, to a young man named Jim Dougherty. I’d got the idea that she’d married him while they were both in Van Nuys High School; that she’d got a “crush” on him because he was president of the student body there, and a big wheel around school.

“That’s not true,” she told me. “In the first place, he was twenty-one or twenty-two — well, at least he was twenty-one and already out of high school. So all I can say is that he must have been pretty dumb if he were still in high school when I married him. And I didn’t have a crush on him, although he claimed I did in a story he wrote about us. The truth is the people I was staying with moved East. They couldn’t afford to take me because when they left California they’d stop getting the twenty dollars a month the county or the state was paying them to help them clothe and feed me. So instead of going back into a boarding home or with still another set of foster parents, I got married.

“That marriage ended in a divorce, but not until World War Two was over. Jim is now a policeman. He lives in Reseda, in the San Fernando Valley, and he is happily married and has three daughters. But while he was away in the merchant marines I worked in the dope room of a plane factory. That company not only made planes, it made parachutes.

“For a while I’d been inspecting parachutes. Then they quit letting us girls do that and they had the parachutes inspected on the outside, but I don’t think it was because of my inspecting. Then I was in the dope room spraying dope on fuselages. Dope is liquid stuff, like banana oil and glue mixed.

“I was out on sick leave for a few days, and when I came back the Army photographers from the Hal Roach Studios, where they had the Army photographic headquarters, were around taking photographs and snapping and shooting while I was doping those ships. The Army guys saw me and asked, ‘Where have you been?’

“’I’ve been on sick leave,’ I said. “Come outside.’ they told me. ‘We’re going to take your picture.’

“‘Can’t,’ I said. ‘The other ladies here in the dope room will give me trouble if I stop doing what I’m doing and go out with you.’ That didn’t discourage those Army photographers. They got special permission for me to go outside from Mr. Whosis, the president of the plant. For a while they posed me rolling ships; then they asked me. ‘Don’t you have a sweater?’

“‘Yes,’ I told them, ‘it so happens I brought one with me. It’s in my locker.’ After that I rolled ships around in a sweater. The name of one of those Army photographers was David Conover. He lives up near the Canadian border. He kept telling me, ‘You should be a model,’ but I thought he was flirting. Several weeks later, he brought the color shots he’d taken of me, and he said the Eastman Kodak Company had asked him, ‘Who’s your model, for goodness’ sake?’

“So I began to think that maybe he wasn’t kidding about how I ought to be a model. Then I found that a girl could make five dollars an hour modeling, which was different from working ten hours a day for the kind of money I’d been making at the plane plant. And it was a long way from the orphanage, where I’d been paid five cents a week for working in the dining room or ten cents a month for working in the pantry. And out of those big sums a penny every Sunday had to go into the church collection. I never could figure why they took a penny from an orphan for that.”

“How did you happen to sign your first movie contract?” I asked.

She tossed a cascade of white-blond tresses from her right eye and said, “I had appeared on five magazine covers. Mostly men’s magazines.”

What, I asked, did she mean by men’s magazines? “Magazines,” she said, “with cover girls who are not flat-chested. I was on See four or five months in a row. Each time they changed my name. One month I was Norma Jean Dougherty — that was my first husband’s name. The second month I was Jean Norman. I don’t know what all names they used, but I must have looked different each time. There were different poses— outdoors, indoors, but mostly just sitting looking over the Pacific. You looked at those pictures and you didn’t see much ocean, but you saw a lot of me.

“One of the magazines I was on wasn’t a man’s magazine at all. It was called Family Circle. You buy it in supermarkets. I was holding a lamb with a pinafore. I was the one with the pinafore. But on most covers I had on things like a striped towel. The towel was striped because the cover was to be in color and the stripes were the color, and there was a big fan blowing on the towel and on my hair. That was right after my first divorce, and I needed to earn a living bad. I couldn’t type. I didn’t know how to do anything. So Howard Hughes had an accident.”

I wondered if I’d missed something, but apparently I hadn’t. “He was in the hospital,” she went on, “and Hedda Hopper wrote in her column: ‘Howard Hughes must be recuperating because he sent out for photographs of a new girl he’s seen on five different magazines.’ Right after that Howard Hughes’ casting director got my telephone number somehow, and he got in touch with me and he said Howard Hughes wanted to see me.

“But he must have forgotten or changed his mind or something,” she said, “because instead of going to see him, I went over to the Fox Studio with a fellow named Harry Lipton, who handled my photography modeling. Expensive cars used to drive up beside me when I was on a street corner or walking on a sidewalk, and the driver would say, ‘I could do something for you in pictures. How would you like to be a Goldwyn girl?’ I figured those guys in those cars were trying for a pick-up, and I got an agent so I could say to those fellows, ‘See my agent.’ That’s how I happened to be handled by Harry Lipton.”

Harry took her to see Ivan Kahn, then head of Fox’s talent department, and also to see Ben Lyon, who was doing a talent-scouting job for Fox.

asked her how it happened that she changed her name from Norma Jean Dougherty to Marilyn Monroe.

“It was Ben Lyon who renamed me,” she said. “Ben said that I reminded him of two people, Jean Harlow and somebody else he remembered very well, a girl named Marilyn Miller. When all the talk began about renaming me, I asked them please could I keep my mother’s maiden name, which was Monroe; so the choice was whether to call me Jean Monroe or Marilyn Monroe, and Marilyn won.”

I asked Flack Jones, “What happened when she came to your studio?”

“She came twice,” he said. “The first time was in 1946. We did our best with her, but she just hadn’t grown up enough. She was great as far as looks went, but she didn’t know how to make the most of her looks — or what to do with them. That came with practice. Not that you have to mature mentally to be a star. In fact, it can be a holdback. It might even defeat you. Stars who are mature mentally are in the minority. But actually we had no stories lying around at that time in which she would appear to advantage. So we tried her out in a picture or two in which she played bit parts — secretaries, the pretty girl in the background. Then we let her go, and she went over to RKO and did a picture with Groucho.”

“I didn’t see the film,” I said, “but you’d think with the Marx Brothers chasing her, like a bosomy mechanical bunny romping about the sound stage a couple of jumps ahead of the greyhounds, the fun would have been fast and furious.”

“The trouble was that while the Marx Brothers always chased a dame in their pictures,” Flack Jones told me, “they never caught the dame. And usually the dame never became a star, so the whole thing was a waste of time. It was amusing while you were watching it, but the girls usually outran the Marx boys and a career.”

1956-05-05-saturday_evening_post-pic3 
The author interviewing Marilyn. Says Pete Martin:
“Every male friend I told
I was doing a story about
her asked me, ‘Can I go along to hold your notebook?'”
(Hans Knopf, © SEPS)

Marilyn gave me her own version of Flack Jones’ story:

“Most of what I did while I was at Fox that first time was pose for stills. Publicity made up a story about how I was a baby sitter who’d been baby-sitting for the casting director and that’s how I was discovered. They told me to say that, although it strictly wasn’t true. You’d think that they would have used a little more imagination and have had me at least a daddy sitter.”

Flack Jones had filled me in on some more Monroe chronology: “After she left us she went to Metro and appeared in The Asphalt Jungle, directed by John Huston,” he said. “Marilyn’s role was small. She was only a walk-on, but she must have looked good to Darryl Zanuck, for when he saw it, he re-signed her. Asphalt Jungle was one of those gangster things. There was a crooked legal mouthpiece in it, a suave fellow, played by Louis Calhern. Marilyn was his ‘niece’; which was a nice word for ‘keptie.’ She’d say a few lines of dialogue; then she’d look up at him with those big eyes and call him ‘Uncle.’”

“When did you first notice her impact on the public?” I asked.

“Once we got her rolling, it was like a tidal wave,” he said. “We began to release some photographs of her, and as soon as they appeared in print, we had requests for more from all over the world. We had the newspapers begging for art; then the photo syndicates wanted her; then the magazines began to drool. For a while we were servicing three or four photos to key newspapers all over the world once a week — and that was before she had appeared in a picture.

“Once this building-up process started,” Flack Jones explained, “other people got interested in her. We called up the top cameramen around town who had their own outlets, and we told them what we had, and we asked them if they’d like to photograph her. They said, ‘Ho, boy, yes.’

“We told them what the deal was,” Flack Jones went on. “We said, ‘We think this girl has a great future; she’s beautiful, her chassis is great, and are you interested?’ Each guy had his own idea of what he wanted, and he let his imagination play upon her. This is the way such things get done. They’re not created by one person. They’re the creation of all of the press representatives who cover Hollywood for all the publications in the world, which means about three hundred and fifty people.

“Everybody in the studio publicity department worked on her.” Jones ticked them off on his fingertips, “The picture division, the magazine division, the fan-magazine division, the planters who plant the columnists, the radio planters, and so forth. Then, when you make a motion picture, a ‘unit man’ or ‘unit woman’ is assigned to cover its shooting, and he or she handles publicity for that film alone. In addition, the whole department works on the same picture. Our department is highly specialized, but each specialist makes his contribution to the personality we’re erecting in the public’s mind.”

“I’ve met a couple of press agents who’ve been unit men on Marilyn’s films,” I said.

“But the unit man is not always the same for a certain star’s pictures,” Jones said. “Sonia Wilson’s been unit woman on Monroe pictures, and Frankie Neal’s been a unit man on her pictures, but Roy Craft has been her unit man more than anyone else. Roy likes her. He gets along with her fine.”

There was something else I wanted to know. “In addition to distributing her photographs,” I asked, “did you have her show up at different places where you thought her appearance would do her good?”

“We took her to all of the cocktail parties we thought were important,” Flack Jones said. “For instance, one picture magazine had its annual cocktail party, and we told Marilyn she ought to show so we could introduce her to various editors, columnists and radio and TV people. She waited until everybody had arrived; then she came in in this red gown. That gown became famous. She’d had sense enough to buy it a size or two too small, and it had what Joe Hyams calls ‘break-away straps.’

“When she came in, everybody stopped doing what they were doing and their eyes went, ‘Boing, boing,’” Flack Jones went on. “The publisher of the magazine who was picking up the tab for the party shook hands with her a long, long time. After a while he turned to one of his associate editors and said, ‘We ought to have a picture of this little girl in our book.’ Then he looked at her again and said, ‘Possibly we should have her on the cover.’”

Flack Jones grinned. “So that’s the way things went,” he said. “Some months there were as many as fifteen or sixteen covers of her on the newsstands at once. She came back to the Fox lot in 1950 to appear in All About Eve, but she was not anyone’s great, big, brilliant discovery until we got our still cameras focused on her and started spreading those Marilyn Monroe shots all over the universe.”

“What did she do in All About Eve?” I asked. “I don’t remember.”

“She’s the dumb broad who walks into a party at Bette Davis’ place leaning on George Sanders’ arm,” he said. “There’s dialogue which shows you that Sanders is a critic, like George Jean Nathan; and he brings this beautiful dish Marilyn in, and he sights a producer played by Gregory Ratoff. Sanders points at Ratoff and says to Marilyn, ‘There’s a real live producer, honey. Go do yourself some good.’ So Marilyn goes off to do herself some good while Sanders stays in his own price class with Bette.”

“Do you remember the first day she came to work?” I asked.

“Do I remember?” he said. “She was in an Angora sweater out to there. While we were shooting her in photography, the word got around and the boys rushed across the hall to get an eyeful. Next we did some layouts with her for picture magazines. We put her in a negligee, and she liked it so much that she wouldn’t take it off. She walked all over the lot in it, yelling, ‘Yoo hoo’ at strangers as far away as the third floor of the administration building. Pretty soon the whole third floor was looking down at her. The first and second floors looked too.”

Flack Jones did an abrupt shift into the present tense, “It’s a bright, sunny day; the wind is blowing and she has Nature working with her. It has taken Nature quite a while to bring her to the ripe-peach perfection she reaches on that day, but it finally makes it. The wind does the rest. She walks all over the lot, has a ball for herself, and so does everybody else.”

Then he shifted back again, “After that we took her to the beach with a lot of wardrobe changes. But the basic idea was that this is a beautiful girl with a great body, and that idea was always the same, although we had different approaches to it. We had color shots, we had black-and-white shots, we had mountain shots, we had field shots, faked water-skiing shots — every type of approach we could think of. Picnicking, walking — anything a person does, we let her do it. When we began to see what she did best, we concentrated on it.

“Women always hate the obvious in sex,” Flack Jones said, “and men love it.” Apparently he had given this matter a lot of thought. He had even worked out a philosophy about it. “Guys are instinctively awkward and blundering and naïve — even worldly-wise ones — and subtlety in sex baffles them. Not only that, but they don’t have the time. Women who are not supporting a husband have all the time in the world for it. But men have other things to do, like making a dollar; and they like their love-making without preliminaries which last four or five hours. Instinctively Marilyn knows this. She is very down-to-earth, very straightforward.”

I asked Marilyn when I talked to her back on Sutton Place, “Do you think men like their sex subtle or fairly obvious?” This was a double check. I already had the male answer.

It seemed to me that she hedged. “Some men prefer subtleties and other men don’t want things so subtle,” she said. “I don’t believe in false modesty. A woman only hurts herself that way. If she’s coy she’s denying herself an important part of life. Men sometimes believe that you’re frigid and cold in the development of a relationship, but if they do, it’s not always your fault. Religion has to do with it and how you’re brought up. You’re stuck with all that.”

I remembered something else Wilder had told me before Marilyn’s recent return to Hollywood to make the film version of the New York stage hit Bus Stop. “You take Monroe, now,” he remarked. “Aside from whether she’s an actress or not, she’s got this lovely little shape, it twitches excitingly, and the public likes to watch it, either coming toward them or going away. There are two schools of thought about her — those who like her and those who attack her — but they both are willing to pay to watch her. Their curiosity is good for eighty cents or a dollar and a quarter or whatever the price of the ticket.”

He shook his head thoughtfully. “And she went back East to study at a slow-take arty place, where they feature understatement. Here’s a girl who’s built herself a career on overstating something, and she’s made up her mind to understate. It won’t be long before we’ll know whether she’s right and whether she needs the wardrobe department and the hairdressing department as much as she needs artistic lines to say. It’ll be interesting to watch and I hope it works out the way she wants it to, but the lines that the public really wants from her so far are not written in English. They are her curves.”

The voice of Flack Jones echoed in the back of my head. “I forgot to tell you. When she finished that Marx Brothers picture, she went over to Columbia for a couple of shows, but she didn’t click, and they released her too. After that she was around town for a while going broke. It was then that she posed for that famous nude calendar — the composition of glowing flesh against a red velvet background which threw the public into a tizzy when they learned about it.”

I asked Marilyn to tell me the story of that nude calendar herself, and she said, “When the studio first heard about it, everybody there was in a frenzy. They telephoned me on the set where I was working in a quickie called Don’t Bother to Knock. The person who called asked me, ‘What’s all this about a calendar of you in the nude? Did you do it?’

“‘Yes,’ I said. ‘Is there anything wrong with it? So they’ve found out it’s me on that calendar. Well, what do you know!’

“‘Found out!’ he almost screamed. ‘There you are, all of you, in full color!’ Then he must have gotten mixed up, for first he said, ‘Just deny everything’; then he said, ‘Don’t say anything. I’ll be right down.’”


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by Saturday Evening Post.

Enregistrer

09 novembre 2016

Marilyn Monroe Auction - 11/2016 - photos 2 -photographies


Photographies - Famille, Enfance & Adolescence
Photographs - Family, Childhood & Teens


Lot 18: MARILYN MONROE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH
 An original snapshot of Gladys Baker and Marion Otis Monroe, Marilyn Monroe's mother and uncle, with a handwritten note on the photo indicating they were aged 8 and 10 at the time the photo was taken.
3 3/4 by 2 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 81, “Fine Manuscripts,” Christie's Los Angeles, Sale 9814, September 20, 2001
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245039_0  


Lot 19: MARILYN MONROE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH
 An original snapshot of Gladys Baker, Marilyn Monroe's mother, with a handwritten note on the photo indicating Baker was 13 at the time the photo was taken.
3 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 81, “Fine Manuscripts,” Christie's Los Angeles, Sale 9814, September 20, 2001
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245040_0  


Lot 85: MARILYN MONROE BABY PICTURE
 A vintage black and white photograph of Monroe as an infant printed on heavy photo paper stock. Verso of image has note in the hand of Grace Goddard reading "Marilyn Monroe age 6 ms."
5 7/8 by 3 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245241_0 245242_0  


Lot 86: MARILYN MONROE BABY PICTURE
 A vintage black and white photograph printed as a postcard. The image features Monroe as a toddler posing with floral dress and matching bonnet. Verso has note in the hand of Grace Goddard reading "Marilyn Monroe age 2 yrs." Coffee mug ring stain to image.
5 3/8 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245243_0  245244_0  


Lot 87: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A hand tinted vintage photograph of Monroe at the age of five. The vintage photograph has writing on the back in the hand of Grace Goddard, her legal guardian, reading "Marilyn Monroe age 5yrs." Additional writing on verso in another hand has instructions for the tinting of the photograph listing that her dress should be pink with light hair and blue eyes.
5 3/4 by 3 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800
245245_0  245246_0  


Lot 88: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Monroe at the age of five with Lester Bolender. A note on verso in the hand of Grace Goddard reads "Marilyn Monroe age 5 yo." An earlier notation has been erased beneath that read "Norma Jeane and Lester."
4 1/2 by 2 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245247_0 
245248_0 


Lot 89: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPHS
 Two vintage black and white photographs featuring a young Monroe, one showing Monroe with Lester Bolender. Monroe's first foster home placement was with the Bolenders, and she and Lester became known as the twins. Each photograph has notes on verso in the hand of Grace Goddard reading "Marilyn Monroe age 4yrs." One of the images had previous writing reading "Lester Bolender and Norma Jeane Baker" that has been erased and written over.
4 1/2 by 2 7/8 inches 
245249_0 
245250_0  245251_0  


Lot 92: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A small frame with Art Deco style matte containing a vintage oval portrait of a woman circa 1900 based upon hairstyle. This image could possibly be of a young Ana Lower, whom Marilyn Monroe referred to as Aunt Ana, an important mother figure in her life. Lower was born Edith Ana Atchinson in Los Angeles in 1880. Behind this image in the same frame were found two small black and white portraits of Monroe's first husband, Jim Dougherty, in his Merchant Marine uniform.
Frame, 6 1/8 by 4 1/8 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245257_0 245258_0  


Lot 790: MARILYN MONROE HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOK
 A 1942 Chieftain yearbook that includes Marilyn Monroe. Monroe's picture is on page 48 under the name Norma Baker. Monroe attended University High School in Los Angeles as a tenth grader until February, when she dropped out to marry Jim Dougherty. This yearbook belonged to Barbara Abston, also a tenth grade student. The book has numerous inscriptions to Abston.
9 by 12 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246332_0  246333_0  


Lot 791: MARILYN MONROE 1941 SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPH
 A 1941 Ralph Waldo Emerson Junior High School class photograph. The original vintage panoramic photograph is inscribed by a number of students on verso. Some inscriptions read "To Norma." The front of the photograph is marked "Belongs to Norma Jeane Baker." Monroe can be seen in the photograph in the seventh row from the bottom, and the 15th person from the right. Housed in a frame with a reproduction of the photograph at top and the reverse of the photograph at bottom. The frame is double-sided with a glazed window in the back to show the front of the photograph.
24 3/4 by 32 3/4 inches, framed
 Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000
246334_0 246335_0 246336_0 
246337_0  


Lot 792: MARILYN MONROE HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOK
 A Chieftain 1942 yearbook from University High School in Los Angeles. Norma Jeane Baker, soon to become Marilyn Monroe, attended University High School in Los Angeles for half of the year as a 10th grade student. Her picture appears on page 48. In February 1942, at age 16, Monroe dropped out of University High School to marry Jim Dougherty.
12 by 9 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246338_0  246339_0 


Photographies & Snapshots - en public
Photographs & Snapshots - Public Appearances


Lot 77: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS SOLD WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of five color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 19, 1962, at the birthday gala for President John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Three of these images show Monroe singing "Happy Birthday" on stage and are likely the only known color photos taken of Monreo during this performance. From the collection of Frieda Hull.
This item sold with copyright but not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $5,000 - $6,000
245222_0  245223_0  245224_0 
245225_0 245226_0 245227_0 


Lot 299: MARILYN MONROE SNAPSHOT
 A single color photograph on glossy Kodak Pavelle paper of Monroe as she appeared to kick the first ball at Ebbets Field in New York, May 12, 1957, for a match between the American Soccer League and a team from Israel.
3 1/4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245614_0  


Lot 420: MARILYN MONROE FILM PREMIERE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four vintage black and white glossy photographs of Monroe and Arthur Miller at the New York City premiere of her film Some Like It Hot on March 28, 1959.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245778_0  245781_0 
245779_0  245780_0  


Lot 531: MARILYN MONROE SNAPSHOTS
 Three black and white photographs of Monroe likely taken by a fan on the streets of New York City in the late 1950s.
4 3/4 by 3 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245966_0  


Lot 607: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on October 25, 1951, when she attended the Hollywood Foreign Correspondents Association dinner at the Mocambo club in Los Angeles.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246088_0  


Lot 614: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED SNAPSHOT
 A black and white snapshot of Marilyn Monroe in front of the Sherry Netherland Hotel in New York City, 1952. The image is signed in blue ballpoint pen "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246097_0   


Lot 615: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on April 4, 1952, as she attended a publicity event held at the Owl Drug Store in Los Angeles. The event was sponsored by Life magazine, and Monroe was there to sign copies of the magazines with her on the cover. Four of the photographs have writing on the back referencing the event, likely in Frieda Hull's own hand. Some of the photographs are never before seen.
Largest, 4 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246098_0  247261_0 


Lot 616: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original photo of Monroe taken on January 26, 1952, at the Henrietta Awards ceremony held at Club Del Mar in Santa Monica, CA.  Marilyn won the "Henrietta Award for Best Young box Office Personality," given by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246099_0 


Lot 617: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on June 3, 1952, at a Look magazine awards party held at the Beverly Hills Hotel. One image from this lot is likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400 
246100_0 


Lot 618: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on August 3, 1952, at a party thrown in her honor at the home of big band leader Ray Anthony in Sherman Oaks, California. This lot contains eight black and white and two color images, some likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246101_0  247262_0  


Lot 619: MARILYN MONROE REPRODUCTION PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of two reproduction black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on June 26, 1952, as she appeared in court to testify as part of a lawsuit against an entity using her name and likeness to sell pornographic photographs.
Largest, 3 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246102_0  


Lot 620: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on October 3, 1952, at a party sponsored by Photoplay magazine.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246103_0 


Lot 629: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe original black and white photographs, circa 1953, at an unknown event. Both are likely never before seen images.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246115_0  


Lot 630: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 9, 1953, at the Photoplay magazine awards ceremony where she received the award for Fastest Rising Star of 1953. Two of the photos have "Beverly Hills Hotel" written on verso. Some images in this lot are possibly never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246116_0 247263_0 247264_0  


Lot 631: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 13, 1953, when she was at a birthday party for Walter Winchell at Ciro’s restaurant in Los Angeles. Two photographs show Monroe with Jane Russell, and two show her with Betty Grable. Reverse of one black and white image is stamped "Photo by Darlene Hammond/ 1416 Belfast Drive/ Hollywood 46, Calif./ CR. 10747." This lot contains two color and two black and white images.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246117_0 


Lot 632: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 18 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on July 10, 1953, at a gala arranged by Danny Thomas to benefit St. Jude Hospital. The fundraiser, which was held at the Hollywood Bowl, also included appearances by Jane Russell, Robert Mitchum, and Danny Kaye. Thomas, Mitchum, and Kaye are photographed with Monroe in this set of photographs. This lot includes 17 black and white images and one color image. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246118_0  246119_0 
246120_0  247265_0 


Lot 634: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe original color and black and white photographs, circa 1953, taken at an unknown event. Both are likely never before seen.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246122_0 


Lot 636: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 13 color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, some reproductions, taken on December 19, 1953, when she appeared at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles to receive the Miss Press Club Award. This lot contains five color and eight black and white photographs. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246124_0  247266_0 


Lot 638: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe from March 9, 1954, when she appeared at the Beverly Hills Hotel to receive the Photoplay magazine award for The Most Popular Actress of 1953 due to her roles in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953) and How To Marry A Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). This lot contains two color photographs and one black and white photograph.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $500
246126_0  


Lot 639: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe with Jane Russell taken on June 26, 1953, at Grauman's Chinese Theatre as Monroe and Russell memorialized their autographs, shoe prints, and handprints in wet cement. Nine photographs are stamped on verso "Photo by Darlene Hammond/ 1416 Belfast Drive/ Hollywood 46, Calif./ CR. 10747."
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246127_0  246128_0   


Lot 640: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, one together with Jane Russell, taken on June 26, 1953, in conjunction with a Grauman's Chinese Theatre event where Monroe and Russell memorialized their autographs, shoe prints, and handprints in wet cement.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246129_0  246130_0 


Lot 647: MARILYN MONROE THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS SCREENING PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe, Gracie Allen, Jack Benny, Joan Collins, and Bing Crosby, among many other stars, attending a special screening of There’s No Business Like Show Business at 20th Century Fox studios in 1954.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246137_0  246138_0  


Lot 657: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original black and white photographs taken on June 1, 1955, at the premiere of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). Seven of the photographs show Marilyn Monroe with her date for the evening, husband Joe DiMaggio. Two photographs show the theater marquee with large cutout images of Monroe in the now famous skirt- blowing scene from the film. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 7 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246150_0 
246151_0  246152_0 


Lot 667: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe alone and with guests, taken on January 7, 1955, at an event announcing the launch of Marilyn Monroe Productions, a joint venture with friend and photographer Milton Greene. This lot contains three color and seven black and white photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246162_0 247271_0 247272_0 


Lot 669: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A pair of color slides of Marilyn Monroe from March 11, 1955, at the Friars Club Testimonial Dinner.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246164_0


Lot 670: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 24 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 11, 1955, at the Friars Club Testimonial Dinner. Monroe is pictured surrounded by fans signing autographs and talking to James Haspiel. Several photographs show her with friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene. This lot contains 22 black and white photographs and two color photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246165_0  246167_0  246168_0 
246166_0  247273_0 


Lot 676: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 24, 1955, when she attended the play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof with Milton and Amy Greene. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246174_0 


Lot 686: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 19 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken at the East of Eden premiere on March 9, 1955, at the Astor Theatre in New York City. Monroe was an official usherette at the event. Some images show friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene and his wife, Amy Greene. Some images are never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246185_0 247276_0  


Lot 687: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe wearing a white brocade gown with matching jacket and white evening gloves as she attended the New York City premiere of East of Eden starring James Dean on March 9, 1955. The photograph is signed in blue ballpoint pen "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246186_0 


Lot 691: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe in costume taken on March 30, 1955, for her appearance on opening night at the Ringling Bros. Circus at Madison Square Garden, which was a benefit produced by Mike Todd for the Arthritis and Rheumatism Foundation.
Largest, 7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246191_0 246192_0 


Lot 692: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PRESS AND PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPHS
 An archive of nine vintage press and publicity photographs featuring Marilyn Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246193_0  


Lot 693: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large, glossy black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe during her famous appearance on March 31, 1955, when she rode a Barnum & Bailey elephant painted pink as part of the Mike Todd memorial event to benefit victims of arthritis.
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246194_0   


Lot 703: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 20 slides of Marilyn Monroe, from the collection of Frieda Hull. Some are never before seen images, from August 6, 1955, as she was at the airport in New York City preparing to fly to Bement, Illinois. Together with an original "Automatic Slide Changer" storage box, owned by Hull.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246207_0   


Lot 704: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 11 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on August 6, 1955, when she was at the airport in New York City preparing to fly to Bement, Illinois. One of the photographs is an original press photograph from the United Press Association. This lot contains six black and white and five color photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 9 by 6 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200
246208_0 246209_0 247279_0 
247278_0 


Lot 706: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe wearing a white brocade gown with matching jacket and white evening gloves as she attended the New York City premiere of East of Eden starring James Dean on March 9, 1955. The photograph is signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246211_0 


Lot 711: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED SNAPSHOT
 A color snapshot of Marilyn Monroe posing in the backseat of a car circa early 1950s. The image is signed in blue ink “Marilyn Monroe.” The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the “Monroe Six, a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
3 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246218_0 


Lot 712: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken the evening of December 12, 1955, when she attended the premiere of The Rose Tattoo. This lot contains two color and three black and white photographs.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246219_0  


Lot 713: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of three slides of Marilyn Monroe from evening of December 12, 1955, when she attended the premiere of The Rose Tattoo.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246220_0 


Lot 714: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on December 18, 1955, at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel following her attendance at the premiere of Baby Doll. Two of the images show Monroe with husband Arthur Miller. Research indicates that this may be the only documented occasion where Monroe parted her hair on the right. Her regular part was always on the left.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246221_0 


Lot 718: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 wearing a white gown and white fur, signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246225_0 


Lot 719: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 8, 1956, when she attended the premiere of Middle of the Night in New York City. This lot contains seven black and white photographs and one color photograph. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246226_0 246227_0 247282_0 


Lot 720: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
A pair of original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, taken on June 11, 1956. Monroe and Miller were outside her Sutton Place apartment. Miller's divorce from Mary Slattery had just been granted.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246228_0 


Lot 721: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, taken at a press conference in front of Monroe's Sutton Place apartment on June 22, 1956. Miller was in the throes of defending himself against accusations of communist activities. Monroe transitioned the focus of the press conference away from Miller toward their impending marriage, their plans to travel to England for their honeymoon, and the filming of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246229_0 


Lot 722: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 14 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, taken on June 29, 1956. Monroe and Miller were married in a civil ceremony later that day. The photographs also show Milton Greene and Miller's parents, Isidore and Augusta. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246230_0 246231_0 247283_0 


Lot 724: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original candid color photograph of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, taken on January 7, 1957, following their return from their honeymoon in Jamaica.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246233_0 


Lot 726: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe as she boarded a plane for Hollywood at Idlewild Airport in New York on February 25, 1956. The image is signed in blue ballpoint pen over a photographer's arm, "To Frieda Love & Kisses," and below along the line of the white railing, "Marilyn Monroe." In the photograph Frieda Hull is pictured with her camera, which is lot 697 in this auction.
8 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246235_0 


Lot 728: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 20 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe that document her 1956 travels to and from Los Angeles to film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Several of the photographs show Monroe walking across the tarmac to a plane among a sea of fans and photographers, then posing for photographs at the top of the stairs leading to the plane. One photograph shows the crowd on hand at the airport to see Monroe. This lot includes eight color and 11 black and white photographs, many that have never been seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246242_0 247284_0 


Lot 729: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 18 slides of Marilyn Monroe from the collection of Frieda Hull, documenting Monroe’s travels to and from Los Angeles to film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956) in 1956. Several slides show Monroe posing for photographs at the top of the stairs leading to the plane. Together with an original "Automatic Slide Changer" storage box, owned by Frieda Hull. Many of the slides have never been seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246243_0 


Lot 730: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 19 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 25, 1956, when she held a press conference at Los Angeles Airport. Monroe had flown to Los Angeles to work on Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246244_0 247285_0


Lot 737: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large matte black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the Plaza Hotel in New York City during a 1956 press conference for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246255_0 


Lot 738: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe signing autographs for fans on February 8, 1956, when she attended the premiere of Middle of the Night in New York City.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246256_0   


Lot 739: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from July 13, 1956, as she and husband Arthur Miller departed New York City for England to film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246257_0   


Lot 740: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original candid black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on July 13, 1956, as she and husband Arthur Miller departed New York City for England to film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
3 1/2 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246258_0 


Lot 742: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 11 slides of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, from May 13, 1959, at the Italian Consulate on Park Avenue in New York City, where she attended a ceremony to receive the David di Donatello Award, the equivalent of the Academy Award, for her work in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200
246263_0  


Lot 743: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY IMAGE ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 30 vintage black and white publicity images related to Marilyn Monroe and The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). The photographs show Monroe at various press conferences, publicity events, and the premiere of the film.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246264_0  


Lot 746: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller taken on May 13, 1959, as she arrived at the Italian Consulate on Park Avenue in New York City to receive the David di Donatello Award, the equivalent of the Academy Award, for her work in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246267_0  


Lot 747: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A pair of color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from February 26, 1959, as Monroe was on her way to the French Film Institute to receive the Crystal Star Award, the French equivalent of the Academy Award, for her performance in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300

246268_0  


Lot 748: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 26, 1959, when she was on her way to the French Film Institute to receive the Crystal Star Award, the French equivalent of the Academy Award, for her performance in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Monroe is seen in the photographs with members of the "Monroe Six," including Frieda Hull, Eileen Collins, Gloria Milone, and Edith Pitts. Three photographs show Monroe with James Haspiel. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246269_0 


Lot 749: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS SOLD WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of 15 photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1957, likely taken at a New York City showing of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). These photographs show Monroe with husband Arthur Miller at what appears to be a movie theater as a poster for the film can be seen on the theater lobby wall. Monroe is shown in the back of a cab signing autographs for fans, walking to the theater, and inside the lobby of the theater. This lot contains 12 color and three black and white photographs that are believed to be never before seen images.
This item sold with copyright but is not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $8,000 - $9,000
246270_0 246271_0 247287_0 


Lot 750: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, from January 7, 1957, following their return from their honeymoon in Jamaica.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246272_0 


Lot 751: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from November 18, 1957, when she and husband Arthur Miller attended Conversation Piece, a play in which Miller's sister Joan Copeland appeared.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246273_0   


Lot 752: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on November 18, 1957, when she and husband Arthur Miller attended Conversation Piece, a play in which Miller's sister Joan Copeland appeared. James Haspiel appears in two images, "Monroe Six" member Gloria Malone in another. Some images in this lot are never before seen. This lot contains four black and white and three color photographs.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246274_0  247288_0 


Lot 755: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original never before seen original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 30, 1958, as she exited her apartment at 444 East 57th Street in New York City. Just three days prior, Monroe was photographed by Richard Avedon for Life magazine.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246277_0 


Lot 756: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four never before seen original color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from May 30, 1958, as she exited her apartment at 444 East 57th Street in New York City. Just three days prior, Monroe was photographed by Richard Avedon for Life magazine.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246278_0   


Lot 753: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original candid color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 12, 1957, at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. Monroe was on hand to make the ceremonial first kick at a soccer match between the USA and Israel. It's reported that she sprained two of her toes while kicking the ball, yet she stayed until the end of the match to award the trophy to Israel, the winning team by a score of 6-4.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246275_0 


Lot 754: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of eight color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from May 12, 1957, at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. Monroe was on hand to make the ceremonial first kick at a soccer match between the USA and Israel. It's reported that she sprained two of her toes while kicking the ball, yet she stayed until the end of the match to award the trophy to Israel, the winning team by a score of 6-4.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900

246276_0 


Lot 757: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four slides of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, from their departure from New York for Los Angeles for her to film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246279_0   


Lot 758: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller as they departed New York for Los Angeles for her to film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). This lot contains five color and three black and white photographs, some never before seen.
Largest, 5 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246280_0  


Lot 759: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 15 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 29, 1959. These images are believed to have been taken following the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) as Monroe and husband Arthur Miller traveled from the theater to the home of Lee and Paula Strasberg for a party they were throwing for Monroe. Many images are never before seen. This lot contains eight black & white and seven color photographs.
Largest, 6 3/4 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246281_0  246282_0 
246283_0  247289_0  


Lot 760: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 11 slides of Marilyn Monroe, from March 29, 1959. These images are believed to have been taken following the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) as Monroe and husband Arthur Miller traveled from the theater to the home of Lee and Paula Strasberg for a party they were throwing for Monroe. Many images are never before seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200
246284_0   


Lot 761: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from September 18, 1959, as she left her apartment at 444 East 57th Street. She was leaving to fly to Los Angeles to attend a gala in honor of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev held by Twentieth Century Fox Studios.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246285_0   


Lot 762: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller taken on September 18, 1959, when the couple left their apartment at 444 East 57th Street. Miller was escorting his wife to the airport, where she would fly to Los Angeles to attend a gala in honor of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev held by Twentieth Century Fox Studios. Because this was an event in honor of a Communist leader, Miller didn't attend the gala as it wouldn't have been appropriate considering his appearance before the House Committee on Un-American Activities about his political leanings in June 1956.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246286_0 


Lot 763: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on September 27, 1959, at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel, where Monroe and husband Arthur Miller were attending the American Friends of The Hebrew University Awards Banquet, where Miller was honored for Distinguished Achievement in the Dramatic Arts. All the photographs in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400 
246287_0 


Lot 764: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, likely reproductions, taken on September 21, 1959, at Henry Miller's Theatre on Broadway in New York City, where Monroe was attending An Evening with Yves Montand, accompanied by friend and co-star Montgomery Clift. All four photographs reference Terri Arden on the reverse.
Largest, 6 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246288_0 


Lot 765: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of three color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from November 2, 1959, when she and husband Arthur Miller departed New York City for Los Angeles to film Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960). Of note, one slide in particular shows Monroe sitting in the back of a car holding a bird in a birdcage, likely Butch, the Millers' pet parakeet.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246289_0   


Lot 766: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original candid color photograph of Marilyn Monroe, likely taken on April 16, 1960, as she attended Josephine Baker's show at the Hollywood Hartford Theatre, accompanied by Yves Montand.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246290_0


Lot 767: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original candid color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, likely taken on June 1, 1960, her 34th birthday. The cast and crew of Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960) celebrated her birthday earlier that day. That evening, Monroe attended a party in her honor held by press agent Rupert Allan at his Beverly Hills home. In these photographs, Monroe wears the same clothing worn on the set earlier in the day.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246291_0 


Lot 773: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original Marilyn Monroe black and white photographs, one of her with Clark Gable, believed to have been taken on July 24, 1960, at an event held for the cast and crew of The Misfits (United Artists, 1961) at the Mapes Hotel in Reno, Nevada. This was Monroe's final completed film.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246308_0 


Lot 779: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe surrounded by fans and security, from March 14, 1961. Monroe was attending a benefit for the Lee Strasberg Actors Studio held at the Roseland Dance Hall in New York City.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246321_0  


Lot 780: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 14, 1961. Monroe was attending a benefit for the Lee Strasberg Actors Studio held at the Roseland Dance Hall in New York City.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246322_0 


Lot 835: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original photograph of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1950, with the words "Bel Air Hotel for Red Book Awards Party" written on verso. Likely never before seen.
3 3/4 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246404_0 


Lot 838: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE TRANSPARENCY
 A vintage color transparency of Marilyn Monroe with Herman Hover, owner of Ciro’s nightclub, circa 1953.
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246410_0 


Lot 846: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL SLIDES AND PHOTOGRAPHS WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of four color transparency slides and two color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Sgt. Marvin Stamness in Korea when Monroe entertained troops there in 1954. Copyright of the images has been applied for. Once copyright is granted, it will be transferred to the winning bidder. Stamness was with the 189th Field Artillery 45th Division of the United States Army and served in the Korean War. At that time, he was from Barrett, Minnesota.
While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Photographs, 2 1/8 by 3 1/8 inches; Slides, 2 by 2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246426_0  246427_0  


Lot 861: MARILYN MONROE SEVEN YEAR ITCH PREMIERE TRANSPARENCY
 A vintage color transparency of Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio at the premiere of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955).
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246455_0  


Lot 894: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage partial contact sheet of images of Marilyn Monroe and others. The black and white contact sheet includes nine images, six of which show Monroe taken by Milton Greene at the 1955 announcement of the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc.
5 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $400 
246512_0 


Lot 895: MARILYN MONROE MMP ANNOUNCEMENT CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white partial contact sheet of images of Marilyn Monroe taken by Milton Greene at the 1955 announcement of the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. The sheet contains 10 frames, with numbering below each image.
3 1/2 by 10 inches
 Estimate:  $200 - $400
246513_0  


Lot 896: MARILYN MONROE MMP ANNOUNCEMENT CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white contact sheet of images taken at the 1955 announcement of the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. Marlene Dietrich appears in many of the photographs along with Monroe and Milton Greene, among others. The sheet has 27 frames with grease pencil markings in red.
7 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

246514_0 


Lot 901: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage Milton Greene contact sheet of 34 black and white images taken at the Sheraton Astor Hotel in December 1955. Two of the images are of Marilyn Monroe.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246523_0 
246702_0 


Lot 903: MARILYN MONROE MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three vintage Marilyn Monroe media photographs. Each is stamped by a media outlet or includes a snipe. Two images are of Monroe with husband Arthur Miller. One image is of Monroe with Jack Warner and Milton Greene from a press conference announcing the production of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Accompanied by one contemporary print of Monroe at a party for the film Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960).
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $600
246525_0 


Lot 917: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 12 black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe with husband Arthur Miller. Each photograph is dated in the margin "Jul 56" and marked "Pitts" on verso in an unknown hand.
5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,200 - $1,400
246546_0  


Lot 934: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe.
Largest, 5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246567_0  


Lot 935: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 11 vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe attending various events.
Largest, 5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246568_0 


Lot 936: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe attending various events.
5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246569_0 


Lot 937: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five candid vintage black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe at an event.
4 3/4 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246570_0 


Lot 938: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Lois Weber on the street in New York City taken by photographer Hans Knopf. PIX Incorporated stamp on verso. A New York Post snipe is attached with a paperclip dating the photograph to February 22, 1956, and stating the pair were leaving Monroe’s apartment for lunch with Elsa Maxwell.
9 1/2 by 13 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246571_0  246572_0 


Lot 939: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Lois Weber on the street in New York City taken by photographer Hans Knopf. PIX Incorporated stamp on verso. A New York Post snipe is attached with a paperclip, dating the photograph to February 22, 1956, and stating the pair were leaving the Ambassador Hotel for a cocktail party.
10 3/4 by 11 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246573_0 246574_0 


Lot 940: MARILYN MONROE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Lois Weber on the street in New York City taken by photographer Hans Knopf. PIX Incorporated stamp on verso. A New York Post snipe is attached with a paperclip dating the photograph to February 22, 1956, and stating the pair were walking to the studio of Cecil Beaton.
14 by 10 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246575_0 246703_0 


Lot 944: MARILYN MONROE CONTACT SHEET
 A contact sheet containing 10 vintage black and white candid images of Marilyn Monroe and one additional photograph from the set of an unknown production. The photographs were taken by Lois Weber.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246587_0  


Lot 945: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of vintage candid black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe beside a plane.
5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246588_0 


Lot 946: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED KREINER PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner in 1959. The photograph shows Monroe during an interview in her hotel living room at the Ambassador East Hotel in Chicago, Illinois. Monroe was in Chicago to promote the film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer's and other stamps on verso.
9 1/2 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246589_0  


Lot 947: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED KREINER PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner in 1959 while Monroe was in Chicago to promote the film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer’s stamp on verso with additional stamp that reads “Kindler Und Schiermeyer Verlag AG Archiv.”
13 1/2 by 10 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246590_0 


Lot 948: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED KREINER PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner circa 1959. Photographer's stamp and other notations on verso.
14 by 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246591_0  


Lot 949: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER PHOTOGRAPH BY MANFRED KREINER
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller at the New York City premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) taken by Manfred Kreiner. Photographer's stamp on verso along with information about the photograph in an unknown hand, written with pencil in German.
10 1/2 by 13 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246592_0 


Lot 950: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller black and white vintage original photograph. Taken by Paul Schumach at the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer's stamp on verso.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246593_0 
246594_0 


Lot 971: MARILYN MONROE MONROE, MONTAND AND CUKOR SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe, Yves Montand, and George Cukor signed black and white photograph. The image was taken at a party for the film Let’s Make Love (20th Century ,1960) in which Monroe and Montand starred and Cukor directed. The photograph is inscribed “To Herbert Stern from his first director with every good wish George Cukor,” “For Herbert Love & Kisses Marilyn Monroe,” and “Pour Herbert Stern amical souvenir Y Montand 60.”
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $8,000 - $10,000
246621_0  


Lot 976: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN GLOBE CEREMONY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the 1962 Golden Globes award ceremony taken by Gene Daniels. Monroe won the award for Female World Film Favorite. Photographer's stamp on verso with additional “Revue” stamp and notation.
9 by 13 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246628_0  


Lot 977: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN GLOBE CEREMONY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the 1962 Golden Globes award ceremony taken by Gene Daniels. Monroe won the award for Female World Film Favorite. Photographer's stamp on verso with additional “Revue” stamp and notation.
13 1/2 by 9 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246629_0 


Photographies - Joseph Jasgur
Photograph
s


 Lot 796: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 with infrared film. Gelatin silver print. Printed by the artist. Artist’s copyright sticker on mount verso.
13 1/4 by 10 inches, mounted
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246343_0  


Lot 797: MARILYN MONROE COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of six color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by photographer Joseph Jasgur. The images are of Monroe alone, and one image shows her with other models at Zuma Beach in 1946.
Each, 11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246344_0 246345_0 246346_0 
246347_0 246348_0 246349_0  


Lot 798: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 Two black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 at Zuma Beach, California. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Each with photographer’s stamp on verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246350_0 


Lot 799: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVE
 A Joseph Jasgur black and white negative of Marilyn Monroe produced in 1946. Accompanied by a photograph of the image, printed 2000–2001. Signed in ink lower right.
Negative, 2 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches; Photograph, 14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246351_0  246352_0 


Lot 800: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 Six Joseph Jasgur black and white negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced in 1946. Accompanied by a photograph of a cropping of the image, printed 2000–2001. Library of Congress number VA 308-684. The winning bidder is responsible for transfer of copyright.
One Negative, 2 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches; Five Negatives, 5 by 4 inches; Photograph, 14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246353_0  246354_0   


Lot 801: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 A sepia toned photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Toned gelatin silver print. Printed by the artist.
20 by 16 inches, mounted
 Estimate: $400 - $600 
246355_0 


Lot 802: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 Two black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. One is a cropped portrait from the full image. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the artist. Each with the artist’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246356_0  246357_0 


Lot 803: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVE AND COPYRIGHT
 A Marilyn Monroe negative of an image taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946, accompanied by copyright. The black and white negative shows Monroe on the beach with Tom Burton.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arriving as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
5 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 986, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Beverly Hills, April 11, 2014
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246358_0 


Lot 804: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Each with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246359_0 


Lot 805: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Each with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246360_0  


Lot 806: MARILYN MONROE BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by photographer Joseph Jasgur. Jasgur photographed Monroe in 1946 when she was still known as Norma Jeane Dougherty and was a model with the Blue Book Model Agency.
Largest, 11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246361_0 246363_0 246364_0 
246362_0 
246365_0 246366_0 246367_0 
246368_0 246369_0 


Lot 807: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Two with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246370_0  


Lot 808: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 Three black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 using infrared film. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Two with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246371_0 246372_0 246373_0  


Lot 809: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver print. Printed by the artist. Artist’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches, mounted
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246374_0  


Lot 810: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of three Joseph Jasgur black and white negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced in 1946. Copyright to this image will be transferred to the winning bidder.
While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
5 by 4 inches, each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246375_0 
247292_0 247293_0 


Photographies - André De Dienes
Photograph
s


Lot 795: MARILYN MONROE LIMITED EDITION ANDRE DE DIENES PRINT
A Marilyn Monroe black and white photograph taken by Andre De Dienes in 1945, printed in a limited edition, gelatin print made from the original transparency, numbered 29/50. This print is stamped, signed, and hand numbered by the estate of Andre De Dienes and stamped and hand numbered by OneWest Publishing.
19 1/2 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246342_0  


Lot 813: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white gelatin silver print montage photograph of Marilyn Monroe. Taken in 1949 by Andre de Dienes, printed circa 1960. Hand stamped on verso.
16 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Andre de Dienes
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246700_0 


Lot 814: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white gelatin silver print montage photograph of Marilyn Monroe by Andre de Dienes. Notations on the front of the photograph read "7/7 1949 A.D." in black ink.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Andre de Dienes
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246701_0  


Lot 850: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin vintage print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. The photograph is hand printed circa 1958 on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer on verso.
19 1/2 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246434_0  


Lot 851: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin vintage print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. The photograph is hand printed circa 1958 on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer on verso.
20 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246435_0  


Lot 852: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ANDRE de DIENES PHOTOGRAPH
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Silver gelatin print, printed circa 1955. Signed at lower right, photographer's stamp on verso.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 420, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Beverly Hills, March 31, 2012
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246436_0 246437_0   


Lot 853: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ANDRE de DIENES PHOTOGRAPH
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Silver gelatin print, printed circa 1955. Signed at lower right, photographer's stamp on verso.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 421, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Beverly Hills, March 31, 2012
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246438_0  246439_0   


Lot 865: MARILYN MONROE INSCRIBED MAGAZINE PAGE
 A black and white page of an unknown magazine inscribed to child star Linda Bennett. Inscription reads "To Linda, I saw you in the Seven Little Foys - Great Marilyn Monroe."
17 1/2 by 14 inches, framed; 7 1/4 by 6 3/4 inches, sight
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246461_0  


Photos Tom Kelley & Calendriers 'Golden Dreams'
Tom Kelley's Photos & Calendars 'Golden Dreams'


Lot 35: MARILYN MONROE UNCUT TIN TRAY
 A circa 1950s uncut tin tray, illustrated with two nude photographs of Marilyn Monroe, "Golden Dreams" and "A New Wrinkle" both taken during a photo session with Tom Kelley in 1949.
Framed, 26 1/2 by 36 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 110, “Film & Entertainment,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale number 9771, December 16, 2003
 Estimate: $200 - $400

245078_0  


Lot 817: MARILYN MONROE RED VELVET SESSION PHOTOGRAPHS
A group of four color Marilyn Monroe photographs from the Red Velvet session with Tom Kelley in 1949. The group of contemporary prints includes an interesting composite image of Monroe and other less often seen images from the session. Mackie was given the photographs by a fan who knew that he had worked on Monroe’s costumes and that he was a fan of Monroe's. Printed circa 2004.
15 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Bob Mackie
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000

246384_0 


Lot 818: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH FROM THE REMASTERED RED VELVET COLLECTION
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe from the 1949 Red Velvet session with Tom Kelley. The limited edition print is part of the “Remastered Red Velvet Collection” issued by the estate of Tom Kelley in 2004. The image is numbered 2/500 and is signed by Tom Kelley Jr. in the lower right corner. The image is referred to as pose number 7.
27 3/4 by 23 1/2, framed
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246385_0  247296_0  


Lot 819: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NUDE PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe “New Wrinkle” photograph from her 1949 photo session with Tom Kelley. The black and white print is affixed to foam core board. The absence of optical brighteners in the print indicates that this print was made prior to 1953.
Photograph, 10 by 8 1/4 inches; 15 1/4 by 13 1/2 inches, overall
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246386_0 

 


Lot 36: MARILYN MONROE CALENDAR
 A U.S. calendar from 1952, featuring a color print of nude Marilyn Monroe photographed by Tom Kelley.
Matted, 30 by 21 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 64, “Film & Entertainment Memorabilia,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale number 5238, December 19, 2007
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245079_0  


Lot 310: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN DREAMS CALENDAR
 A calendar from Connors Bar & Grill New York City, 1958, all months intact. Paper loss to lower edge, tape residue along top edge.
15 1/2 by 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245625_0  


Lot 626: 1955 MARILYN MONROE CALENDAR
 A four-page calendar with spiral-bound top edge featuring images of Marilyn Monroe taken by Tom Kelley in the late 1940s. The calendar features a modesty cover with added lace overprint to cover Monroe and three pin-up images of Monroe in cowboy boots, all over triple month pages. Together with original envelope advertising the calendar as "The Most Talked of Calendar in the World" for 50 cents.
12 1/4 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246112_0 


Lot 833: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN DREAMS 1952 CALENDAR
 A 1952 Marilyn Monroe “Golden Dreams” calendar. This is an early version of Monroe’s famously posed calendar and does not have her name printed on the calendar itself. A note attached to the lower portion of the calendar does identify the model as Monroe, reading in part, “This Champion Calendar was posed by Marilyn Monroe. ...Since that time she has received much publicity in the daily newspapers and national magazines and has been [sic] starred in two movies.” The calendar advertises San Fernando Valley Motor. Housed in a frame.
37 by 19 inches, framed
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246402_0 


Photographies - Bert Stern
Photographs


Lot 984: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERT STERN
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe lying in bed, signed by Bert Stern. The photograph is contained in an orange portfolio.
23 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

246640_0  


Lot 985: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERT STERN
 A color photograph of a nude Marilyn Monroe holding a striped scarf, signed by Bert Stern.
23 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000

246641_0   


Lot 986: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERT STERN
 A Marilyn Monroe color photograph taken by Bert Stern in 1962 during "The Last Sitting." Numbered 188/250 and signed by Stern in the lower right. A Martin Lawrence Galleries label attached to backing of the framed photograph is typed with the title "Last Sitting: Not Bad For 36."
27 1/2 by 26 1/4 inches, framed
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

246642_0 


Lot 1006: MARILYN MONROE BERT STERN SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white digital print photograph of Marilyn Monroe resting her chin on her hand, inscribed and dated in black marker to the upper left "For Bill/ 3-3-08" and signed and dated in red grease pen to the lower right "Bert Stern/ 2008" with Stern's copyright stamp on the verso.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246671_0 


Photographies - George Barris
Photographs


Lot 996: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe talking on the telephone signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso.
7 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $400

246654_0 246655_0 


Lot 997: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe talking on the telephone signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246656_0 246657_0 247317_0  


Lot 998: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe dressed in orange signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246658_0 246659_0 247318_0   


Lot 999: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe leaning against a cinder block wall signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246660_0 246661_0 247319_0   


Lot 1000: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe standing in the surf signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
10 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246662_0 246663_0 247320_0 


Lot 1001: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe in a bikini signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246664_0 246665_0  247321_0 


Lot 1002: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe standing in the surf signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246666_0  246667_0 


Lot 1003: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY GEORGE BARRIS
 A photographic print of Marilyn Monroe, limited edition numbered 21/50, taken in 1962 by George Barris. Silver gelatin print, printed on double-weight fiber paper under the guidance and approval of George Barris by OneWest Publishing. Signed by the photographer and stamped by OneWest Publishing.
20 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

246668_0 


Photographies - Milton H Greene
Photographs


Lot 257: MARILYN MONROE OUTTAKE PHOTOGRAPH
A black and white test print on archival paper of Monroe during the Mandolin Sitting with photographer Milton Greene. The image is stamped on verso "Reproduction Forbidden" with additional pencil notations documenting the exposure settings for the print.
7 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245520_0 


Lot 890: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white partial contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe and Milton Greene. The sheet, which consists of two partial contact sheets stapled together, contains 17 images of Monroe.
4 1/2 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246508_0  


Lot 891: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage partial black and white contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe. The Milton Greene contact sheet includes 12 images of Monroe in a black cocktail dress.
3 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246509_0 


Lot 892: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE CONTACT SHEET
A  vintage partial black and white contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe. The Milton Greene contact sheet includes 10 frames with images of Monroe and others. The images were taken by Milton Greene at the 21 Club in New York in 1954. Monroe can be seen talking to the restaurant owner, Robert Kriendler.
4 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246510_0 


Lot 893: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white partial contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe and Milton Greene. The sheet includes 10 images of Monroe. Most of the images were likely taken by Greene circa 1955.
3 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246511_0  


Lot 909: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE PRINTS
 A group of four vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe, Laurence Olivier, Arthur Miller and others taken by Milton Greene circa 1956 during the preparation for and filming of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246535_0  


Lot 910: MARILYN MONROE MONROE, OLIVIER AND RATTIGAN CONTACT SHEET IMAGES
 A group of four vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe with Laurence Olivier and Terence Rattigan taken by Milton Greene. The photographs were taken during a 1956 publicity photo session for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Two of the images show Monroe with Olivier, who co-starred with Monroe and directed the film. One image is of Monroe and Olivier with Rattigan, author of the play on which the film was based and of the screenplay for the film, and one image is of Olivier and Rattigan. Notations on verso.
Each, 2 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246536_0  


Lot 911: MARILYN MONROE MONROE, OLIVIER AND RATTIGAN CONTACT SHEET IMAGES
 A group of four vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe with Laurence Olivier and Terence Rattigan taken by Milton Greene. The photographs were taken during a 1956 publicity photo session for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Three of the images show Monroe with Olivier, who co-starred with Monroe and directed the film. One image is of Monroe and Olivier with Rattigan, author of the play on which the film was based and of the screenplay for the film. Notations on verso.
Each, 2 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246537_0 


Lot 913: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE PRINTS
 A group of six vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe, Laurence Olivier, Arthur Miller, Vivien Leigh and others taken by Milton Greene circa 1956 during the preparation for and filming of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246539_0  246540_0   


Lot 921: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY MILTON GREENE
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier taken by Milton Greene in 1956. Photographer's stamp on verso.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246553_0  


Lot 922: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY MILTON GREENE
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe, Terence Rattigan and Laurence Olivier taken by Milton Greene in 1956. Photographer's stamp on verso.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246554_0 


Lot 1010: MARILYN MONROE PRINT BY MILTON GREENE
 A large-scale silkscreen print of Marilyn Monroe removing her stockings. Marked "A/P" [Artist's Proof] to the lower left and signed to the lower right by photographer Milton H. Greene.
46 by 35 1/2 inches, framed
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Allan Rich
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246684_0 
246685_0  246686_0  


Lot 1011: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE SILKSCREEN PRINT
 A limited edition silkscreen print of a Milton Greene photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken during the "Black Sitting" photo session in New York in 1956. Numbered 218/300 and signed by Greene at lower right.
35 by 46 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246687_0 
246688_0  246689_0  


Lot 1012: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE SILKSCREEN PRINT
 A silkscreen print of a Milton Greene photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken during the "Black Sitting" photo session in New York in 1956. Numbered 44/300 and signed by Greene in pencil at lower right.
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246690_0 
246691_0 246692_0 


Photographies - Divers photographes
Photographs - Various photographers


Lot 37: MARILYN MONROE AND JOHNNY HYDE PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white gelatin silver photograph featuring Marilyn Monroe dancing with talent agent Johnny Hyde, to whom she owed much of her success, presumably taken by Bruno Bernard. Numbered 9/350 in ink to the lower left.
16 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 332, “Film and Entertainment,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale Number 6343, December 17, 1993
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245080_0 


Lot 94: MARILYN MONROE EARLY SNAPSHOT
 A circa late 1940s black and white glossy photograph of Monroe with her Chihuahua. The photograph was taken by Richard C. Miller.
4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245260_0 


Lot 100: MARILYN MONROE MODELING PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white glossy photograph of photographer Richard C. Miller posing as he takes a photo of Monroe in hunting clothing holding a rifle during a 1946 photo session. The back of the photograph has pencil notation dating the photograph, "4/5/46."
3 3/4 by 4 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245270_0  


Lot 434: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY CECIL BEATON
 A vintage copy of Monroe's favorite image of herself by Cecil Beaton. As evidenced by receipts among Monroe's documents, she ordered reprints of this photograph to sign for people. This is one of her vintage copies of the image, ordered during her lifetime.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
245806_0 


Lot 663: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 20 photographs featuring or related to Marilyn Monroe, some vintage and some reproductions, collected by Frieda Hull.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246158_0  


Lot 664: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four slides of Marilyn Monroe from various points in her career: a costume test shot from Something's Got To Give ; on the set of Something’s Got To Give ; a double exposure from the Red Velvet session by Tom Kelley; and an early photo of Monroe by Richard C. Miller.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246159_0   


Lot 665: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large, glossy black and white publicity photograph of Marilyn Monroe in white dress, heels and gloves.
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246160_0  


Lot 793: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY LASZLO WILLINGER
 A large-scale Cibachrome color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Laszlo Willinger. Stamp-signed on verso.
34 1/2 by 30 1/2 inches, framed
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246340_0 


Lot 794: MARILYN MONROE HURRELL STAMPED PHOTOGRAPH
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe with a George Hurrell attribution statement on verso signed by Hurrell-endorsed authenticator Allan Rich.
14 by 12 1/2 inches, framed
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Allan Rich
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246341_0  


Lot 811: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD
 An original vintage photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1946. The photograph is titled “Mistletoe” and is part of the Discovery Series. Signed on verso “Bernard of Hollywood.” The photograph is accompanied by a copy of Monroe’s model release signed “Norma Jeane Dougherty” on July 24, 1946. This image was among the photographs that Bernard gave to Twentieth Century Fox.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246376_0 


Lot 812: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NEGATIVE
 A vintage black and white negative of Marilyn Monroe. The image was taken by Ed Cronenweth while Monroe did her hair and makeup during the time of production for Ladies of the Chorus (Columbia, 1948). Accompanied by a contemporary print of the negative.
5 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Ted Stampfer
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246377_0  246378_0   


Lot 821: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE TRANSPARENCY
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage color transparency of an image taken in 1951. The image shows Monroe in the gown she wore to the 23rd Academy Awards ceremony, where she presented the award for Best Sound Recording. The award went to All About Eve (20th Century, 1950).
5 by 4 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246388_0  


Lot 822: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ED CLARK TRANSPARENCY
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage color transparency of an image taken in 1950 by Ed Clark, a LIFE photographer.
5 by 4 inches
Estimate: $400 - $600
246389_0  


Lot 825: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1952. In the photograph, Monroe is wearing the hot pink dress she wore in her role as Rose Loomis in Niagara (20th Century, 1953). The photograph is numbered 15/90 and signed “From the estate of Bernard of Hollywood."
16 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500
246393_0  


Lot 826: MARILYN MONROE PHILLIPPE HALSMAN PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white image of Marilyn Monroe taken by Phillippe Halsman during a 1952 photo session for LIFE magazine. Numbered 81/250.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246394_0 


Lot 827: MARILYN MONROE HAROLD LLOYD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition poster photograph print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Harold Lloyd in 1952. The color print is numbered 25/250 at lower right. The photograph was taken by silent screen star turned photographer Harold Lloyd during a photoshoot at Monroe’s Los Angeles apartment with Philippe Halsman. Later in 1952, a photograph from Halsman’s session appeared on the cover of LIFE magazine. Printed on crystal archive paper from the original 35mm Kodachrome negative in 2005. Blind stamped in the lower right corner by the Harold Lloyd Trust.
20 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 204, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246395_0 


Lot 828: MARILYN MONROE HAROLD LLOYD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition poster photograph print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Harold Lloyd in 1952. The color print is numbered 25/250 at lower right. The full-length photograph of Monroe speaking to photographer Philippe Halsman was taken by silent screen star turned photographer, Harold Lloyd, during a photo shoot at Monroe’s Los Angeles apartment with Halsman. Later in 1952, a photograph from Halsman’s session appeared on the cover of LIFE Magazine. Printed on crystal archive paper from the original 35mm Kodachrome negative in 2005. Blind stamped in the lower right corner by the Harold Lloyd Trust.
20 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 206, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246396_0  


Lot 831: MARILYN MONROE AND JOHN FLOREA PHOTOGRAPH NEGATIVES
 A pair of vintage original negatives showing Marilyn Monroe with photographer John Florea. The first image was taken during a publicity photograph session for the film Monkey Business (20th Century, 1952). The second was taken while shooting publicity images for How To Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). The negatives were originally from the collection of John Florea.
6 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246399_0   


Lot 839: MARILYN MONROE JOHN FLOREA SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe stacking thousand-dollar bills next to photographer John Florea, likely from a series of promotional photos for the Monroe film How To Marry A Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). Signed on the verso by Florea with a copyright stamp.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246411_0 246412_0   


Lot 840: MARILYN MONROE AND OTHERS FRANK WORTH PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five black and white Frank Worth images, including two of Marilyn Monroe. All are blind stamped “Frank Worth Estate Limited Edition.” The first is an image of Monroe wearing a dress she made famous in the film How To Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). In the second image, Monroe is wearing the same dress and leaning against a car in the background, and Sammy Davis Jr. is in mid-leap, dancing in the foreground. The remaining photographs are portraits of Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor and James Dean.
Each, 12 by 17 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246416_0  246417_0 246415_0 

246413_0 246414_0 


Lot 857: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED AND INSCRIBED PORTRAIT
 A vintage print full-length black and white studio portrait shot by Bernard of Hollywood, signed and inscribed by Marilyn Monroe as she appeared in a floral corset with lace trim, fishnet stockings and high-heel shoes in a provocative pose. Inscription reads in full, “To Carole, It’s a pleasure to work with you/ Marilyn Monroe.
18 1/2 by 17 inches, overall; 9 1/2 by 7 1/2 inches, sight
PROVENANCE Lot 173, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, California, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246446_0   


Lot 866: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white matte photograph signed in green ink "Dear Inez, My love and deepest thanks, Marilyn."
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $15,000 - $20,000
246462_0  


Lot 867: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY CECIL BEATON
 A vintage black and white image of Marilyn Monroe taken by Cecil Beaton in 1956 at the Ambassador Hotel. Camera Press stamp on verso with additional typed label that reads in part, "Monroe by Beaton:/ THE ETERNAL MARILYN/ Sophisticated innocence.../ Please acknowledge: photograph by Cecil Beaton/ Camera Press London."
9 1/4 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246463_0  246464_0  


Lot 872: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe photograph and contact sheet prints circa 1956. The black and white image, which shows Monroe having her photograph taken, is stamped with Hans Knopf photographer's stamp on verso. With nine additional vintage contact sheet photographs assumed to have been taken at the same time. The contact sheet prints were all affixed to black paper at one time.
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
Estimate: $600 - $800
246472_0 246476_0 246477_0 
246475_0  246481_0 
246473_0 246478_0 246474_0 
246479_0 246480_0 


Lot 873: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage portrait publicity photograph from her personal collection.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246482_0  


Lot 874: MARILYN MONROE CECIL BEATON PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Cecil Beaton in 1956. The photograph, from Monroe's personal archive, is mounted to board and contained in a brown folder.
Photograph, 9 by 9 1/4 inches; 16 by 14 1/2 inches, overall
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246483_0  


Lot 878: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED AND INSCRIBED PHOTOGRAPH
 A framed photograph of Marilyn Monroe signed "To David, so you're still counting my money - what money? Marilyn Monroe."
20 1/2 by 17 1/2 inches, overall; 13 by 10 1/4 inches, sight
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246493_0  246494_0 


Lot 919: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe black and white publicity photograph with a notation in pencil on verso in an unknown hand "500 8x10's ordered 6/16/58 deliver and bill MM."
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246548_0 


Lot 972: MARILYN MONROE PORTRAIT IMAGES
A group of nine Marilyn Monroe portrait images from film studios for reference or publicity and from photoshoots, with photographers Eric Skipsey and Richard Avedon. Eight of the images are in black and white with one color image from the film Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960).
Most, 8 by 10 inches
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246622_0  


Lot 1009: MARILYN MONROE DOUGLAS KIRKLAND PORTFOLIO
 A limited edition portfolio of Marilyn Monroe photographs taken by Douglas Kirkland and published by the Govinda Gallery in Washington, D.C. Each of the six photographs is numbered 16/30 to the lower left and signed by Kirkland to the lower right. Housed in a blue cloth clamshell case with gilt-stamped morocco label.
19 3/4 by 16 1/2 inches, overall
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Allan Rich
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246677_0 246678_0 246679_0 
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246683_0 

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01 novembre 2016

Marilyn Monroe Auction - 11/2016 - docs papiers 1


Documents papiers - Vie Privée
Papers documents - Private Life


Lot 1: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN POSTCARD
 A Beverly Hills Hotel postcard in Marilyn Monroe's handwriting, sent to Ralph Roberts in May 1961. Monroe wrote, "Dear Raffe, See I did write! I have a surprise for you and I'm not pregnant either. XOXO Love, M." Accompanied by a copy of a letter from Roberts.
3½ by 5½ inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 334, “Film and Television Memorabilia,” Christie's East, New York, Sale number 7821, December 18, 1995
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

245009_0  245010_0  


Lot 17: MARILYN MONROE ARTHUR MILLER SIGNED MOCK-UP TITLE PAGE
 A mock-up title page from Arthur Miller's collected plays, The Viking Press, New York, 1957, with printed dedication reading "For Marilyn" and signed by Arthur Miller.
8 1/2 by 11 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE: Lot 358, “Film and Entertainment,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale number 6343, December 17, 1993
 Estimate: $250 - $350 

245037_0  245038_0  


Lot 33: MARILYN MONROE LEE STRASBERG EULOGY, FUNERAL GUEST LIST, AND REMBERENCE CARD
 Five typescript pages bound by a staple relating to the funeral service of Marilyn Monroe. The first page is titled "Service for Marilyn Monroe Wednesday, August 8, 1962, 1PM." The second and third pages detail Lee Strasberg's eulogy for Monroe. The fourth page is a list titled “Those invited to Attend.” The last page has a paragraph with a statement to Monroe's uninvited friends explaining the desire to keep the service private, credited to Berniece Miracle, Inez Melson and Joe DiMaggio. Together with an In Memory of Marilyn Monroe remembrance card from her funeral service at Westwood Memorial Park, dated "August 8th, 1962," and containing the 23rd Psalm and service details.
Largest, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 69, “Popular Culture: Film and Entertainment,” Christie's, London, South Kensington, Sale Number 5579, November 25, 2010
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

245075_0 245076_0 


Lot 78: MARILYN MONROE LETTER TO BOBBY MILLER MENTIONING ROBERT KENNEDY
 A typed, unsigned file copy of a four-page letter on two leaves, letter dated "Noon February 2" (1961), addressed to Arthur Miller's son, "Dear Bobbybones." She writes in response to Bobby's letter, "That pool table you told me about in that Danish hotel sounds great. Did I ever tell you that I can really play pool. I learned when I was about sixteen and it is something that you never forget." She also comments, "I am going to get that book you recommended; is it "Lord of the Flies" or "The Fleas"? I would love to read something really terrifying."
Most poignantly, Monroe tells Bobby about her new home, "Bobby, I have the best news: I have just completely bought my new house. ...It is an authentic little Mexican house, but it's got a gigantic swimming pool, and it looks just like Mexico. You would just love it. I have two guest rooms plus a large playroom, plus lots of patios, and a big Mexican wall goes all around the place with big high Mexican gates (that's to keep intruders out, in case anybody gets intrusive.) ...Anyway, I would love - for whichever vacation it can be arranged - if you and Janie wanted to - at least for part of vacation, even if it is just for a few days, or a week - you are welcome to stay as long as you wanted to. I will take care of your plane tickets and meet you at the airport. ..."
Monroe is also excited to share other news, "Oh, Bobby, guess what: I had dinner last night with the Attorney-General of the United States, Robert Kennedy, and I asked him what his department was going to do about Civil Rights and some other issues. He's very intelligent, and besides all that, he's got a terrific sense of humor. I think you would like him. Anyway, I had to go to this dinner last night as he was the guest of honor and when they asked him who he wanted to meet, he wanted to meet me. So, I went to the dinner and I sat next to him, and he isn't a bad dancer either." She continues telling Bobby about her conversation and pressing Kennedy to find out what he planned to do about civil rights and that he answered her questions and told her he would send her a letter with all of his plans. He asked her if she had been attending "some kind of meetings" she writes to Bobby, "I laughed and said 'no, but these are the kind of questions that the youth of America want answers to and want things done about.' Not that I'm so youthful, but I feel youthful. But he's an old 36 himself which astounded me because I'm 35. It was a pleasant evening, all in all."
She begins to close, "I haven't heard from her [Janie] since Christmas. I guess we are all a little sloppy about writing. However, I think we all know what we mean to each other, don't we. At least I know I love you kids and I want to be your friend and stay in touch. ...I love you and miss you, and, give my love to Janie."
8 1/2 by 11 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lee Strasberg
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000

245228_0 


Lot 79: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTER FROM JEAN KENNEDY SMITH
 A single sheet of stationery listing an address in Palm Beach, Florida, with autograph notation in blue ink on recto and version reading in full, "Dear Marilyn - Mother asked me to write and thank you for your sweet note to Daddy - He really enjoyed it and you were very cute to send it. / Understand that you and Bobby are the new item! We all think you should come with him when he comes back east! Again thanks for the note. / Love, Jean Smith." Jean Smith is one of nine children to Rose and Joseph Kennedy and sister to John F. Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy, Ted Kennedy, Eunice Kennedy Shriver and four other siblings.
7 3/4 by 5 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lee Strasberg
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000

245229_0  245230_0 


Lot 90: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTER FROM ANA LOWER
 A single-page letter written by Ana Lower to Monroe on recto and verso, dated October 10, 1944. Lower, "Aunt Ana," as Monroe called her, was actually Grace Goddard's aunt but was a mother figure for Monroe and by all accounts one of the most important figures in her life until Lower's death in 1948. This early letter reads in part, "My precious Girl, You are outward bound on a happy journey. May each moment of its joyous expectations be filled to the brim./ New places, faces and experiences await you. You will meet them all with your usual sweetness and loving courtesy./ When you see your sister you will truly both receive a blessing." The letter was written by Lower as a send-off to Monroe as she left Los Angeles, headed to Detroit to meet her half-sister, Berniece Miracle, for the first time face-to-face in 1944.
7 1/4 by 6 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

245252_0  245253_0 


Lot 91: MARILYN MONROE STAMP COLLECTION BOOK
 A three-hole stamp collection book with vinyl covers from Grimes-Stassforth Stationery Company in Los Angeles, consisting of 30 pages, 10 of which have stamps glued to them. Interestingly, many of the stamps in the book are used, accompanied by new and unused identical stamps. Stamps in the book range in years from 1935 to 1936, suggesting that Marilyn Monroe collected the stamps when she was between 9 and 10 years old. The final stamp entry in the booklet contains a handwritten annotation, “#1319 AP8,” presumably in Monroe’s hand.
11 1/4 by 9 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

245254_0 
245255_0 245256_0  


Lot 93: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTER FROM ANA LOWER
 A four-page letter on two leaves, written by Ana Lower to Monroe, dated "Monday 6:45 pm Oct 23, 1944." This early letter was written to Monroe while she was on her trip to Detroit to meet her half-sister for the first time in person. The letter reads in part, "How nice for you to have found such a lovely sister and family. I hope they will be out here too later on./ Love arranged this trip for you dear, and Love will bring Jimmie home at the right time. Now stop this nonesense [sic] about car sickness. God does not cease to be because you board a train, nor do you cease to be his perfect child because you take a car ride or a ship ride. You just forget to put your armour [sic] on."
6 3/4 by 5 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500

245259_0  


Lot 97: MARILYN MONROE GRACE GODDARD NOTES ON BEHAVIOR OF MARILYN MONROE'S MOTHER
 An undated single page of stationery from B & H Waterproofing Mfg. Co. letterhead containing notes in pencil, in Grace Goddard's hand. A parenthetical note at the bottom of the first page reads "(I wrote these things down as Gladys said them while she was staying with me) Grace Goddard." The notes were then presumably sent to Monroe as they were among her belongings at the time of her death. The list, numbered from 1 to 15, is essentially a portrait of someone suffering mental illness, including paranoid delusions: "2. She thinks she was sent to State Hospital because years ago she voted on a Socialist ballot at Hawthorne and was being punished for doing so."; "6. She is being punished because years ago she took a drink of liquor (during prohibition) and should have been sent to jail."; "7. Sleeps with her head at the foot of bed so as not to look at Marilyn's picture - they disturb her."; "10. After listening to a political speech, said she was needed in Russia to help them."; "11. Wishes she never had had a sexual experience so she could be more Christ like."; "15. Misplaces or losing her glasses, watch, gloves, or other possessions and either accuses someone of stealing them, or are to blame for her losing them." She also expresses sudden aversion to meat and fish, fear of Catholics, belief that she was a nurse working for the government while at "Agnew" mental hospital, and belief that nobody should listen to the radio because the people are drunk when they go on the air, among many other observances. This is a fascinating firsthand account of Monroe's mother directly from someone witnessing and documenting her behavior.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245264_0 245265_0 


Lot 98: MARILYN MONROE CARD FROM HER MOTHER
 A small greeting card featuring a charming representation of a lady wearing a feather hat and veil, constructed using a button. The autograph note in pencil reads in full, "Dear One; I am very grateful for all the kindness you've shown me and as a Loving Christian Scientist (my pencil broke) I hope our God will let me return some goodness to you with out doing myself any harm. For I know good is reflected in goodness, the same as Love is reflected in Love./ As a Christian Scientist I remain very truly your Mother." The undated note is in an unpostmarked envelope addressed to "Miss Norma Jeane Dougherty 6707 Odessa Ave., Van Nuy's Cal." with return address for her mother listed as "From - G. P. Eley 2713 Honolulu Ave. Verdugo City, Cal."
5 by 4 inches
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
245266_0 245267_0 


Lot 103: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTER ABOUT SECRETLY CARING FOR HER MOTHER
 A four-page autograph letter with postscript continuing onto the verso of first page, in pencil, in the hand of Grace Goddard, Monroe's one-time legal guardian. The letter dated August 25, 1953, reads in part, "I have been having a wild time over that bill for G - I phoned the secretary as you said ... I could tell by her answers that you had not confided in her about G - She said she didn’t have $600 left to pay that amount and wouldn’t anyway without specific instructions from you. I had to let the whole matter drop as I didn’t want to say anything. I just hoped and prayed you would get home. Sunday morning Miss O’Brien phoned and I was too sick to talk to her … I phoned her today ... and she said if they didn’t receive $600 within the next week they would be forced to turn G - over to the county, which would mean I would have to appear again and this time we couldn’t keep it from becoming public. Another $300 is due by or before the 11th of Sept. I’m so sorry you didn’t send me a check before you left and Doc could have handled it as we did before. The only reason I asked you to have some one else handle that account was because I expected to be in Texas for several months and Doc might be out of town. Now that I don’t need that operation and expect to be here I think it is best not to confide in any more people than you have to. I wish you would send me a check for $600 quick like and I’ll tend to it immediately. Such a burden for a delicate little girl like you to hear. If we had anywhere near that amount in the bank Doc would have sent the check anyway..."
The letter is accompanied by the original transmittal envelope and a pink carbon receipt for a $600 money transfer through the Canadian Pacific Railway Company addressed to Mrs. E.S. Goddard anddated August 27, 1953, with facsimile signature of Marilyn Monroe and a note in her hand saying "sorry difficulty hope you feel better." The form states Monroe's "Place" as the Banff Springs Hotel, where she and Joe DiMaggio stayed while she was filming River of No Return (20th Century Fox 1953) in Canada. The letter clearly shows that even Monroe's secretary was not told about Monroe's mother Gladys being re-admitted to a psychiatric care facility at this time and demonstrates that Monroe was able to keep it a secret with the help of close contacts like the Goddards. Grace Goddard passed away on September 28, 1953, just over a month after this letter was written.
8 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500

245276_0  


Lot 105: MARILYN MONROE ROCKHAVEN SANITARIUM RECEIPTS FOR THE CARE OF MARILYN MONROE'S MOTHER
A grouping of 42 receipts, ranging in date from October 1962 through April 1966, addressed to Inez C. Melson, for the care of Monroe’s mother, Gladys P. Eley, while she was staying at Rockhaven Sanitarium in Verdugo City, California. Included with the Rockhaven Sanitarium receipts are other invoices for products and services provided to Eley, including prescription medications, toothbrushes and toothpaste, repairs to her dentures, cash advances, and package deliveries sent to Gainsborough, Florida, for Eley's other daughter, Berniece Miracle. The April 27, 1966, invoice indicates that Eley’s account at Rockhaven was $7,355.90 in arrears.
 Estimate: $5,000 - $7,000

245278_0  245279_0   


Lot 159: MARILYN MONROE TYPED 1943 NOTES
 Six pages of typed thoughts and feelings from a very young Norma Jeane Dougherty expressing her thoughts on her marriage to James Dougherty as she confronts her fear that her husband has been unfaithful with his former girlfriend, Doris Ingram. She writes the letter after a night apart from Dougherty and examines her feelings with great depth of understanding and maturity, "[I]n the beginning I would/ never have stayed with him but for his love of classical/ music his intellect which made a pretense at being more/ then [sic] it was." She continues, "I was greatly/ attracted to him as one of the few young men I had no sexual repulsion for." She comments that despite steady modeling, "... to an outsider it might/ not be conceivable that I had taken my small insecurities/ and built them up into a nervous tension which although it/ had outlets was always present." After discovering that Dougherty "had spent the evening & most of the morning hours with the other woman ..." she says she "... now would/ like a chance at a third act - the unsuspecting male and/ the vengful [sic] female, but now I'm only fooling my-/ self if I do get my last act I will portray the heroine/ who bravely suffers tucking it all away to use as barage [sic]/ some now unknown man." Pages have been stored folded together and are brittle with some separation along crease lines of first page.
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 5-11. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
10 1/4 by 7 1/4
 Estimate: $8,000 - $10,000

245357_0 


Lot 160: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN POEM
 A single sheet of unlined paper with handwritten poem in pencil reading "Life -/ I am both of your directions/ Somehow remaining hanging downward/ the most/ but strong as a cobweb in the/ wind-I exist more with the cold glistening frost./ But my beaded rays have the colors I've/ seen in a painting-ah life they/ have cheated you."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 16-17. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
7 1/4 by 10 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000

245358_0 


Lot 161: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN NOTE
 A single page of lined paper from a Steno notebook with writing, in pencil, and with a fatalistic tone, reading in full, "Oh damn I wish that I were/ dead-absolutely nonexistent-/ gone away from here-from/ everywhere but how would I/ There is always bridges-the Brooklyn/ bridge/ But I love that bridge (everything is beautiful from there/ and the air is so clean) walking it seems/ peaceful even with all those/ cars going crazy underneath. So/ it would have to be some other bridge/ an ugly one and with no view-except/ I like in particular all bridges-there's some-/ thing about them and besides I've / never seen an ugly bridge."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 18-19. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
8 3/4 by 6 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000

245359_0  


Lot 162: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN POEM
 A single sheet of lined paper, folded at center. The page contains a verse in pencil reading "Stones on the walk/ every color there is/ I stare down at you/ like a horizon-/ the space-air is between us beckoning/ and I am many stories up/ my feet frightened/ as I grasp towards you."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 20-21. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
12 3/8 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $8,000 - $12,000

245360_0 


Lot 163: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN POEM
 A single sheet of lined paper with unevenly torn top edge and minor paper loss along bottom edge. The recto of page contains a poem written in pencil reading "Only parts of us will ever/ touch parts of others-/ one's own truth is just/ that really-one's own truth./ We can only share the/ part that is within another's knowing acceptable/ so one/ is for most part alone./ As it is meant to be in/ evidently in nature-at best perhaps it could make/ our understanding seek/ another's loneliness out."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 22-23. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
8 3/4 by 6 inches
 Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000

245361_0  


Lot 164: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN NOTE
 A single piece of lined notebook paper with notation in pencil showing Monroe's frustration with what must have been a relentless demand for her time and attention, reading in full, "I can't really stand Human/ Beings sometimes-I know/ they all have their problems/ as I have mine-but I'm really/ too tired for it. Trying to understand,/ making allowances, seeing certain things/ that just weary me."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 24-25. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
12 3/8 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000

245362_0   


Lot 165: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN POEM
 An envelope with rhyming poem written by Monroe in pencil on back making light of the fact that hospital gowns do not cover her "derriere." The envelope also contains a list of composers and musicians: "Beethoven/ Last 6-quartets/ Ravel-the Waltz/ Bartok-quartets of his."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 26-27. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
4 1/8 by 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

245363_0 245364_0 


Lot 166: MARILYN MONROE NOTE ON BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL STATIONERY
 A single page of hotel stationery note paper, folded down the center of the page. There are multiple marginal notes, but the main body of text reads like a poem and appears to be a mantra-like acting relaxation exercise reading in part, "Keep the balloon, and/ Dare not to worry/ Dare to/ let go - so loose/ They you pick up/ Stretch into your tone" and "Let go of my/ eyes -/ so relaxed/ only let/ my thought/ come through/ them without/ doing any/ thing to/ them."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 28-29. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
5 1/2 by 4 inches
 Estimate: $8,000 - $12,000

245365_0  


Lot 169: MARILYN MONROE EARLY CAREER PERSONAL JOURNAL
 A black "Record" book with 150 numbered and lined pages, dating to the late 1940s to early 1950s, with approximately 12 pages containing entries in Monroe's hand, including notes about Monroe’s 1948 trip to Salinas and Castroville in northern California and also a line referencing her 1951 film Love Nest. Monroe wrote on the first pages of the book, “Alone!!!!! I am alone – I am always alone no matter what.” The writings include class notes as well as deeply personal writings of her deepest insecurities, reading in part, "Fear of giving me the lines new, maybe won't be able to learn them, maybe I'll make mistakes, people will either think I'm no good, or laugh or belittle me or think I can't act."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 32-47. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
7 3/4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $20,000

245368_0 245369_0   


Lot 170: MARILYN MONROE PERSONAL JOURNAL
 A black "Record" book with 150 numbered and lined pages, the first page dated "Feb 18, 1953" with approximately 14 pages containing entries in Monroe's hand. The notes are very personal with Monroe ruminating about her life and experiences in her past that continue to affect her life, including these notes about the childhood influence of Ida Bolender that lingers into her adult life, reading in part, "Ida - I have still been obeying her - it's not only harmful for me to do so but unrealality [sic] because in my work - I don't want to obey her any longer."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 50-65. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
7 1/4 by 4 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $12,000 - $18,000

245370_0 245371_0   


Lot 171: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN PROSE
 A single sheet of hotel stationery from the Waldorf Astoria, New York, where Monroe stayed between April and September 1955, with multiple verses in pencil and ink on front and back of page. The primary verse on recto was written as Monroe observed Manhattan from her suite at the hotel, reading in part, "Sooooo many lights in the darkness/ making skeletons of buildings/ and life in the streets." A poem about trees that appears to begin in the upper left margin of recto and continues onto the lower right of verso reads in full, "Sad, sweet trees-/ I wish for you-rest/ but you must be wakeful/ You must suffer-/ to loose [sic] your dark golden/ when your covering of/ even dead leaves leave you/ strong and naked/ you must be-/ alive-when looking dead/ straight though bend/ with wind/ And bear the pain & the joy/ of newness on your limbs."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 70-73. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000

245372_0  245373_0 


Lot 172: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN DREAM NARRATIVE
 Two sheets of hotel stationery from the Waldorf Astoria, New York, where Monroe stayed between April and September 1955. The pages contain notes in pencil recounting a dream in which Lee Strasberg acts as surgeon and her analyst, Dr. Hohenberg, administers anesthesia, but they are disappointed when they "cut her open" to find nothing there. She concludes, "Strasberg's dreams & hopes for theater are fallen./ Dr. H's dreams and hopes for a permant phicatrcic [sic] cure/ is given up-Arthur is disappointed-let down +." Another note in the margin mentions a dream about a "horrible repulsive man" in an elevator that she wants to discuss with Dr. Hohenberg.
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 74-77. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000
245374_0  245375_0   


Lot 175: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN LETTER TO NORMAN ROSTEN
 A single sheet of hotel stationery from the Waldorf Astoria, New York, where Monroe stayed between April and September 1955. The page contains a letter written in multiple passes, first in pencil with added thoughts in ink, addressed to the Rostens' Brooklyn address. The cryptic letter contains a multitude of inside references and is quite difficult to follow but also sends her regards to Norman Rosten's wife Hedda, their daughter Patty and their pets Bam-Moo and Candy. Monroe also muses about the "Mr. Johnson Club," a reference to Rosten's play Mister Johnson.
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 84-85. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000

245379_0


Lot 177: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN POEM
 A single sheet of stationery from Parkside House, the English manor where Monroe and Arthur Miller stayed in Surrey while she filmed The Prince and the Showgirl in London in 1956. The page contains a poem in pencil on front of sheet, likely written about Miller while staying at Parkside, reading in part, "my love sleeps beside me-/ in the faint light-I see his manly jaw/ give way-and the mouth of his/ boyhood returns." The back of the sheet contains two mournful verses reading, "the pain of his longing when he looks/ at another=/ like an unfulfillment of the day/ he was born" as well as the line "And I in merciless pain/ and with his pain of Longing-/ when he looks at and loves another/ like an unfulfillment of the day/ he was born-/ we must endure/ I more sadly because I can feel no joy."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 106-109. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
7 by 5 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $15,000 - $20,000

245386_0  245387_0


Lot 178: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN POEM
 A single sheet of stationery from Parkside House, the English manor where Monroe and Arthur Miller stayed in Surrey while she filmed The Prince and the Showgirl in London in 1956. The page contains a poem in pencil on front of sheet with multiple strikethroughs and edits, reading in part, "oh silence/ you stillness hurt my head -and / piece ears/ jars my head with the stillness/ of sounds unbearable -durable/ on the screen of pitch blackness."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 110-111. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
7 by 5 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000

245388_0 


Lot 179: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN POEM
 A single sheet of stationery from Parkside House, the English manor where Monroe and Arthur Miller stayed in Surrey while she filmed The Prince and the Showgirl in London in 1956. The page contains a poem in red and blue ink on front of sheet reading "To have your heart is/ the only completely happy proud thing (that ever belonged/ to me) I've ever possessed so" with alternate language suggestion in blue ink reading "thing that ever completely happen to me."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 112-113. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
7 by 5 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000

245389_0 


Lot 180: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN NOTE
 A single sheet of stationery from Parkside House, the English manor where Monroe and Arthur Miller stayed in Surrey while she filmed The Prince and The Showgirl in London in 1956. The note reads “I guess I have always been deeply terrified to really be someone's wife since I know from life one cannot love another, ever, really.” Monroe had just entered her third marriage and was on location with her new husband, Arthur Miller.
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 114-115. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
7 by 5 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $20,000

245390_0  


Lot 181: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN POEM
 A single sheet of stationery from Parkside House, the English manor where Monroe and Arthur Miller stayed in Surrey while she filmed The Prince and the Showgirl in London in 1956. The page contains a poem in pencil on front of sheet with multiple strikethroughs and edits, reading in part, "It is not to be for granted/ the old woman hides-/ from her glass-the one she polishes so it won't be dusty-/ daring sometimes/ to see her toothless gasp and if she perhaps very gently smiles/ she remembers-/ her pain."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 116-117. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
7 by 5 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000

245391_0  


Lot 182: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN POEM
 A single sheet of stationery from Parkside House, the English manor where Monroe and Arthur Miller stayed in Surrey while she filmed The Prince and the Showgirl in London in 1956. The page contains a mournful poem in pencil on front of sheet with multiple strikethroughs and edits, reading in full, "where his eyes rest with pleasure-I/ want to still be-but time has changed/ the hold of that glance./ Alas how will I cope when I am/ even less youthful-/ I seek joy but it is clothed/ with pain-/ take heart as in my youth/ sleep and rest my heavy head/ on his breast for still my love/ sleeps beside me."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 118-119. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
7 by 5 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $12,000 - $15,000

245392_0 


Lot 184: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN "ROXBURY NOTES"
 Three sheets of lined notebook paper torn from a spiral-bound book, each containing thoughts in pencil on recto. The notes portray a tired Monroe who has endured more than she could bear. Monroe was living in Roxbury, Connecticut, with husband Arthur Miller and was clearly disenchanted with domestic life in the country. She writes, "I've tried to imagine spring all winter-it's/ here and I still feel hopeless. I think I hate it here because there is no love here/ anymore. I regret the effort I desperately made here." She poetically writes of the mature trees on the property and then turns to self-deprecation, examining her appearance: "I see myself in the mirror now, brow furrowed-/ If I lean close I'll see-what I don't want to know-tension, sadness, disappointment, my eyes dulled, cheeks flushed with capillaries that look/ like rivers on a map -hair lying like snakes. The mouth makes me the saddes [sic]."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 125-131. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
12 1/4 by 7 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $15,000 - $20,000

245394_0  


Lot 185: MARILYN MONROE 1958 NOTEBOOK
 A red Livewire wide-ruled spiral-bound notebook, most likely dating to 1958. The notebook contains five meaningful pages of writing in both pen and pencil, all of which were published in the book Fragments . One additional page not shown in the book contains pencil notations of calorie counts for foods like "Wheat germ 1/2 c" and 1 cup of orange juice, eggs and skim milk. Two of the pages written in ink reference lines from Some Like It Hot while other pages reveal deeply personal thoughts and poems, including this page that reads in part, "Help Help/ Help/ I feel life coming closer/ when all I want/ is to die."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 134-145. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
11 1/8 by 8 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $12,000 - $15,000

245395_0  245396_0   


Lot 186: MARILYN MONROE NOTES OF FRUSTRATION
 Two pages of lined note paper torn from a notebook containing agonizing notes written by Monroe on the set of a film, likely in the privacy of her dressing room, dated simply "Aug 27." The two small pages reveal the tortured nature of Monroe's process and the enormous amount of pressure she felt, reading in part, "I almost threw up my whole lunch. I'm tired. I'm searching for a way to play this part I am depressed with my whole life since I first remember - How can I be such a gay young hopeful girl ... my concentration wavers most of the time ... I must try to work and work on my concentration."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 150-151. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
8 by 4 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $15,000 - $20,000

245397_0  245398_0   


Lot 187: MARILYN MONROE 1955 GUCCI ADDRESS BOOK
 A personalized brown leather, six-ring Gucci address book with custom stamped "M.M." on the front cover, belonging to Monroe circa 1955, with handwritten entries, many in Monroe’s hand. Contacts include Marlon Brando, "Mother Miller," Lee Strasberg, Maurine Stapleton, and Harold Clurman, among others. The book includes various handwritten entries and notes throughout. Of particular note is Monroe's handwritten list of very personal things she must make an effort to do, including "as often as possible to observe Strassberg's [sic.] other private classes"; "never miss my actors studio sessions"; "must make strong effort to work on current problems and phobias that out of my past has arisen," among other entries.
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 152-153. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
7 1/2 by 6 inches
 Estimate: $40,000 - $60,000

245399_0 245400_0 
245401_0 245402_0 245403_0  
245404_0  245405_0  


Lot 190: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN NOTE
An undated note on a single sheet of unlined paper, entirely in Monroe’s hand, reading “For life/ It is rather a determination not to be overwhelmed./ For work/ The truth can only be recalled, never invented."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 158-159. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
8 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $20,000

245409_0  


Lot 191: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN NOTES
 Two sheets of lined notebook paper with drafts of a birthday message, likely the same message referenced by Norman Rosten in his book Marilyn Among Friends . In the book, Rosten explains that Monroe often gave herself nicknames, and "One day, she signed a note with Noodle, Sam, Max, Clump, Sugar Finny, Pussy, and so on." Both pages contain a nearly verbatim list of names reading "Happy birthday and love (we all love you)/ Noodle/ Sam/ Max/ Clump/ Sugar Finny/ Pussy/ and all the rest of us-" The draft note also reads in part "[F]orgive me for being sentimental/ I'm so glad you were born/ and that I'm living at the/ same time as you."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Pages 160-163. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
8 3/4 by 6 inches
 Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000

245410_0  245411_0  


Lot 202: MARILYN MONROE DEEPLY PERSONAL LETTER TO PAULA STRASBERG
 A single page of lined yellow notebook paper, folded multiple times and addressed on the exterior of the folded page "To Paula/ Personal MM." The letter reads "Paula Dear,/ You asked me yesterday why-/ I felt somehow (I'm only conceiving of it this morning) that if I didn't have the control or the will to make myself do anything simple & do it right I would never be able to act or do anything - I know it sounds crazy - maybe it was even superstitious - I don't know - I don't know anything./ Something has happened I think to make me lose my confidence. I don't know what it is. All I know is I want to work./ Oh Paula I wish I knew why I am so anguished. I think maybe I'm crazy like all the other members of my family were, when I was sick I was sure I was. I'm so glad you are with me here!"
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters. Photocopy of this original letter on Page 190-191. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
12 1/4 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000

245424_0 
246708_0  


Lot 261: MARILYN MONROE NOTES IN STENO BOOK
 A spiral-bound stenographer notebook by Chase Press Stationers & Printers, who supplied Monroe with her custom stationery, containing four pages with notes in Monroe's hand. The first page reads "Tonight/ be there at 7:15 - Strassbergs [sic]" then "Later - Norman & Hedda - drums?" and "Tomorrow be ready at 12:30 (for lunch) John Houston [sic]/ 4:00 Norman's play reading." The second page has a list of phone calls to make. The other two pages contain single words: "Ruby" and "My."
9 1/4 by 6 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

245524_0 
245525_0  245526_0  245527_0  


Lot 266: ARTHUR MILLER HANDWRITTEN NOTE TO MARILYN MONROE
 A single piece of lined paper torn from a spiral-bound notebook, heavily stained, containing a note in Miller's hand for Monroe. The note reads "I am sitting here, Dearheart, and my heart is bursting with love. I try to figure when is the best date for a wedding, who should be there, where it should be. I want us to marry on my 41st birthday - October 17, 1956." The note was written early in their relationship before Monroe knew she would be in London for the filming of The Prince and the Showgirl, and before Miller knew he would be in London for the premiere of A View from the Bridge in October 1956. Despite Miller's wish to be married on his birthday, he would marry Monroe June 29, 1956, very soon after his Reno divorce from his first wife was finalized. Miller announced his intentions to marry Monroe during his testimony before The House Un-American Activities Committee, June 21, 1956, and they perhaps moved the date forward in an effort to help Miller obtain his passport to accompany his new wife to London.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500

245538_0 
245539_0 


Lot 314: MARILYN MONROE LETTER TO ROBERT MILLER AS HUGO THE DOG WITH PHOTOGRAPHS
 An unsigned file copy of a letter written by Monroe to "Bobby" Miller dated August 22, 1957. Monroe writes the letter entirely in the voice of Hugo, their pet Basset Hound. The letter opens, "It sure is lonesome around here! But first of all I will tell you I made a mistake and I am sorry, but I chewed up one of your baseballs. I didn't mean to. I thought it was a tennis ball and that it wouldn't make any difference but Daddy and Marilyn said that they would get you another one." It continues "Oh, I did something else that I should tell you about. I jumped up very high and knocked down the badminton set. Then I proceeded to chew up the net but I didn't wreck the rackets or the birds. I am sorry I did this Bob, but what is a dog going to do?" The letter is accompanied by three small black and white snapshots of Bobby with Hugo the dog.
Photos, 2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700

245630_0  245631_0  


Lot 316: MARILYN MONROE LETTER TO JANE MILLER AS HUGO THE DOG WITH PHOTOGRAPHS
 An unsigned file copy of a letter written by Monroe to "Janie" Miller dated August 22, 1957. Monroe writes the letter entirely in the voice of Hugo, their pet Basset Hound. The letter opens, "How is my Mommie? Boy, was I glad to get your letter written only to me! Of course Daddy and Marilyn have been telling me things from your other letters and Bob's too, about what you have been doing at Camp and how much you are enjoying it and I don't want you to feel badly, but I have to tell you that I have missed you something awful." The letter continues with a confession: "I have been sleeping on your bed. It's because it is your bed. So far I don't think Daddy or Marilyn knows about it but every night after they close their door and they go to sleep I wait a little while and then I tiptoe upstairs and I sleep right on your bed. I think they are getting suspicious though because I heard Berniece (that's the new maid and you will like her) say, ‘I found the strangest footprints up on this bedspread.’ Of course, between you and me, they were mine." This charming letter is accompanied by two small black and white snapshots of Jane and Robert Miller with Hugo the dog.
Photos, 2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245633_0 


Lot 318: MARILYN MONROE LETTER TO HER STEPCHILDREN FROM THE CAT
 An unsigned file copy of a letter composed by Monroe in the voice of the family cat Sugar Finney, clumsily typed with misspellings reading in part, "I'm having fun driving old Rocky and that old grumpy maid of yours nuts. …Thers never a dull moment in this shack. ... Love, Sugar Feeny."
7 3/4 by 5 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245635_0  


 Lot 319: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH OF HUGO WITH INVOICES
 A group of four invoices from the Southdown Kennel in Roxbury, Connecticut addressed to Mr. Arthur Miller at 444 East 57th Street for boarding and care of Hugo the Basset Hound. Together with a small black and white snapshot of the dog.
Photo, 2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245636_0  


 Lot 320: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS TO BOBBY MILLER AT SUMMER CAMP
 Two single-page typed, unsigned file copies of letters dated July 16, 1958, and August 9, 1957, relating a number of amusing stories. The 1958 letter is typed on the back of a piece of stationery from the Hotel Bel-Air. In the first letter, Monroe tells Bobby Miller about Hugo the dog's escapades, taking things from the neighbors, and asks him to help her figure out what his sister Janie would like for her birthday. The 1958 letter tells him, "I haven't seen Jack Lemmon yet because he is still working on another picture. He has a very funny part in this picture. Also, he plays a friend of mine. I started to take ukulele lessons because I'm supposed to know how in the picture. I've got an idea: Maybe we can learn something together--you on the guitar and me on the ukulele--you know, charge people admission to hear us."
Monroe also tells him about her brief ownership of a Cocker Spaniel: "About two days ago someone gave me a Cocker Spaniel puppy 10 months old, completely house-broken. So I was going to call your Dad and ask him if it was okay to keep him--then I found out quite by accident that he bites--he didn't bite me but he bit a woman on the throat the day before, so I said 'thanks a lot but no thanks.' His name was 'Walter' and he was a golden-haired spaniel and just beautiful but he seemed just too 'schizo' --short for schizophrenic --you remember you explained what that meant."
Largest, 8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245637_0  


 Lot 321: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS TO JANE MILLER
 Two single-page typed, unsigned file copies of letters dated July 16, 1958, and August 9, 1957, relating a number of amusing stories. The 1958 letter is typed on the back of a piece of stationery from the Hotel Bel-Air and is addressed, "Dear Janie-bean." The letter, written as Monroe is preparing for Some Like It Hot , reads in part, "... [T]hanks for helping me into my white skirt. I almost didn't make it --but now that I'm busier I'll start losing weight -- you know where./ Along with ukulele lessons I have to take I'm learning three songs from the 1920 period. ... I don't know how my costumes in the picture will be yet. I'll let you know."
The second letter is written to Janie at summer camp and recounts a number of amusing stories about Hugo the Bassett Hound reading in part, "He got kicked by that donkey. Remember him? His nose swelled up with a big lump on top and it really wrecked his profile. I put an ice pack on it and it took several days for it to go down but the last time I saw him it was pretty well healed. Bernice is taking care of him and the house while I am at the hospital./ We are going home tomorrow and then I will write you by hand./ Listen, I had better stop now because I want to get off a note to Bobby today. Don't worry about me in the hospital. I am feeling much better now and I have the funniest Scotch nurse."
8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245638_0  


 Lot 322: MARILYN MONROE FORD THUNDERBIRD DOCUMENTS
 A Declaration of Ownership of Motor Vehicle card listing Marilyn Monroe Productions, Inc., address 444 East 57th Street, New York City, as the owner of a 1956 black Ford Thunderbird, engine #P6FH151382. The vehicle was purchased from Westport Motor Co. Inc. of Westport, Connecticut, on December 20, 1955. Together with a blank "Seller's Report of Sale of Unregistered Motor Vehicle" card and a letter dated January 7, 1960, regarding renewal of insurance for the vehicle with secretarial note regarding deadlines and the amount of payment.
Cards, 3 1/2 by 6 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245639_0 
245640_0  


 Lot 323: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTER RELATED TO HER 1956 FORD THUNDERBIRD
A letter from the City of New York Department of Finance, dated October 1, 1959, to Marilyn Monroe Productions, Inc., indicating the following: "[I]t appears that the 3% New York City Sales or Compensating Use Tax was due and payable on 6/20/57. If the tax due on this transaction has been paid by you, please submit evidence thereof. If it has not been paid, kindly remit the tax plus interest of 14%, with the enclosed form on or before 10/8/59.” Monroe, husband Arthur Miller, and business partner and friend Milton Greene were photographed riding in this Thunderbird on July 2, 1956, driving from New York City to Roxbury, Connecticut.
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245641_0  


 Lot 324: MARILYN MONROE DRIVER'S MANUAL
 An official Driver's Manual booklet from the State of Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles with interior date of August 1955, although it may have been issued anytime after this date until an updated manual was released. Together with a blank postcard addressed to the department meant to be filled out by applicant to request an appointment for a Connecticut driver test.
Booklet, 6 by 4 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245642_0  


 Lot 325: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED DRIVER'S LICENSE
 A State of Connecticut Motor Vehicles Operator's License dated October 24, 1957, and expiring June 30, 1958, listing "MM Miller of Tophet Road, Roxbury Connecticut, operator number 181034533. The license also lists Monroe's height as five feet and five inches with a date of birth of June 1, 1926, and is signed in blue pen "Marilyn Monroe Miller."
3 1/4 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000
245643_0  


 Lot 326: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED DRIVER'S LICENSE
 A State of Connecticut Motor Vehicles Operator's License dated July 8, 1958, and expiring June 30, 1960, listing "MM Miller of Tophet Road, Roxbury Connecticut, operator number 181034533. The license also lists Monroe's height as five feet and five inches with a date of birth of June 1, 1926, and is signed in blue pen "Marilyn Monroe Miller."
3 1/4 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000
245644_0  


Lot 373: MARILYN MONROE TO-DO LIST
 A small piece of lined notebook paper with notes in Monroe's hand, reading in part, "Call - Lee on Monday/ about private class" and "Monday - Luchon [sic.] interview 12:00 / Sleeping prince/ Elsa Maxwell" as well as a phone number for Dr. Kris. Lee is clearly a reference to acting coach Lee Strasberg.
3 1/2 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245715_0  245716_0 


Lot 380: MARILYN MONROE GLADSTONE HOTEL STATEMENT
 A statement in the name of Mr. and Mrs. A Miller, dated January 13, 1958, from Gladstone Hotel on East 52nd Street at Park Avenue with charges for a room January 13-17, 1958, as well as restaurant charges. Notations on the bill read "[F]or meeting held at suite with De Laurentis and MCA officials from time to time."
9 by 6 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245727_0  


Lot 411: MARILYN MONROE PERSONAL JOURNAL
 A black "Record" book with 150 numbered and lined pages, the first page dated "Feb 18, 1953" with approximately 14 pages containing entries in Monroe's hand. The notes are very personal with Monroe ruminating about her life and experiences in her past that continue to affect her life, including these notes about the childhood influence of Ida Bolender that lingers into her adult life, reading in part, "Ida - I have still been obeying her - it's not only harmful for me to do so but unrealality [sic] because in my work - I don't want to obey her any longer."
LITERATURE Monroe, Marilyn, and Bernard Comment. Fragments : Poems , Intimate Notes , Letters . Pages 50-65. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010. 1-237. Print.
7 1/4 by 4 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $12,000 - $18,000 
245762_0 245763_0   


Lot 431: MARILYN MONROE INSCRIBED RECORD FROM TRUMAN CAPOTE
 A copy of the LP Truman Capote Reading his A Christmas Memory from Breakfast at Tiffany's. "The United Artists album (1959), is inscribed in black ink on the cover in fine print "for Marilyn, with love from Truman, 1959."
12 1/4 by 12 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245797_0 245798_0 


Lot 433: LEE STRASBERG ADDRESS BOOK
 A cream leather six-ring binder of alphabetically indexed lined notebook pages containing hundreds of names, addresses and telephone numbers written in multiple hands. The book contains strikethroughs and check marks throughout, as the information was likely being transferred and updated into a new book by a secretary. The book dates to circa 1960 and contains the names of celebrities such as Shelley Winters, Marlon Brando, Eli Wallach, and Maureen Stapleton, among others. Of note is a page listing multiple numbers for “MM” as well as Marilyn Monroe’s New York City address. The book also has more administrative contacts.
9 1/8 by 8 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245801_0 
245802_0 245803_0 
245804_0 245805_0  


Lot 478: MARILYN MONROE NOTEBOOKS
 A small six-ring binder containing blank lined notebook pages in black covers by Vernon. Together with an Italian daily planner with a quantity of blank pages intact. Both books were used by Monroe, and some of the pages included in the book Fragments were removed from these notebooks.
Largest, 7 by 4 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245886_0     


Lot 484: DON FELD DRAWING FOR MARILYN MONROE
 A piece of heavy brown card stock with ink and acrylic picture of a girl holding flowers with greeting reading "The World's Happiest Birthday to you from Don Feld." Together with a small note that reads "M-/ I hope this finds you well and happy - My thoughts are with you now - love, Feld."
Largest, 8 1/2 by 6 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245893_0   


Lot 497: MARILYN MONROE AKC FORMS FOR MAF
 A single-page typed letter on Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. letterhead from Pearl Moskowitz to Monroe with original postmarked transmittal envelope addressed to Monroe at The Beverly Hills Hotel. The letter accompanied forms for Monroe's dog Maf to be registered under Monroe's name with the American Kennel Club signed on verso with a secretarial signature. Together with a postcard to have the dog licensed with the ASPCA in New York City. The AKC forms list Maf's breeder as Maria S. Gurdin of Van Nuys, California a whelping date of Jan. 16, 1961; and the Sire and Dam of the dog.
Largest, 10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245908_0 245909_0 245910_0  


Lot 499: MARILYN MONROE INVOICE FOR BOARDING MAF
 A single-page invoice from the Southdown Kennel in Roxbury, Connecticut, dated December 18, 1961, for "Miss M. Munroe" [sic] for boarding and housebreaking of Maf, Monroe's poodle. The charges include boarding between August 3 and December 14, 1961, at a rate of $75 per month for a total of $330, as well as brushings, shampoos, wormings, and transportation to airport for a total of $43 in additional charges.
7 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
 
Estimate: $200 - $300
245912_0
  


Lot 507: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL NOTEPADS
 Three notepads, one with a note in Monroe's hand from the Continental Hilton in Mexico with a phone number for Wally Cox and the Bel Air Sands. Together with a blank notepad from The Beverly Hills Hotel and the Beverly Wilshire Hotel.
Largest, 5 1/2 by 4 inches
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
245927_0 


Lot 534: MARILYN MONROE CORRESPONDENCE WITH GERMAN DIPLOMAT
 A single-page typed, unsigned file copy of a letter dated February 12, 1962, addressed to Mr. Volkmar von Fuehlsdorff in response to a gift card that accompanied Champagne. The note card reads "Dear Miss Monroe: It was such a pleasure to have you at the party the other day - since you liked the German Champagne, May I send you this with my kind personal regards/ Sincerely V. von F." Monroe's response reads "Dear Mr. von Fuehlsdorff: Thank you for your champagne. It arrived, I drank it, and I was gayer./ Thanks again./ My best,/ Marilyn Monroe."
Largest, 8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245969_0  


Lot 535: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM MAY REIS
 An autograph two-page letter on stationery from the Shelbourne Hotel, Dublin, dated April 22, 1961. The letter is accompanied by the original transmittal envelope postmarked April 22, 1961. The letter, written in red ink by Monroe's one- time secretary and assistant, May Reis, is a light travel note updating Monroe on her travels and stop in Dublin before heading to Paris.
8 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245970_0  


Lot 538: EXTRAORDINARILY AMUSING LETTER FROM ERNIE KOVACS TO MARILYN MONROE
 A single sheet of paper with blind embossed address at bottom of page containing typed, signed letter from Ernie Kovacs, undated in original transmittal envelope postmarked May 29, 1961. The envelope is addressed to Monroe at her Beverly Hills Hotel bungalow. The letter, addressed to "Marilyneleh," invites Monroe to a get together at his home on June 15, giving the dress code as "... slacks or if you want to be chic, just spray yourself with aluminum paint or something." He continues, "I'll try to find someone more mature than Carl Sandburg for you. ... if Frank is in town, will be asking him. ... don't be a miserable shit and say you can't come. ... Look as ugly as possible cause the neighbors talk if attractive women come into my study." He signs the letter in black pen "Ernie" and adds a note at the bottom: "If you don't have any aluminum paint, you could back into a mud pack and come as an adobe hut. ... we'll make it a costume party. … Kovacs." The letter is a perfect portrait of the iconic, quick-thinking, zany comedian who died tragically in an auto accident in January 1962.
8 1/2 by 7 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245973_0  


Lot 573: MARILYN MONROE PERSONAL NOTES
 Three pieces of paper torn from a telephone message pad with deeply personal musing in Monroe's hand in pencil reading in part, "In a way I feel better when I feel terrible because at leaast I'm feeling something" and "[D]epression - it starts to depress me when I feel that I have exposed my truest feelings to people - I am afraid that they see through me - my faults and the fact that I am really a phoney who needs and wants admiration and love (I do not want to be like this - to depend on this need - its almost" the thought continues onto another page "a form of being an ego maniack [sic] - I don't really like my self [sic]. ..." One of the pages has "Oct. 15" written, but no year is indicated.
5 1/4 by 4 inches
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246011_0  246012_0
  


Lot 574: MARILYN MONROE 1962 ADDRESS BOOK
 A red cardboard covered six-ring address book, front and back covers detached but present, belonging to Monroe circa 1962, with typed entries, including photographer Richard Avedon, Actors Studio, Henry Weinstein-the producer of Monroe’s final film Something’s Got To Give), Rupert Allan (Monroe’s publicist), Montgomery Clift, Henry Fonda, and Frank Sinatra, among many others. The book includes numerous entries and notes in Monroe’s hand throughout.
6 1/2 by 6 inches
 Estimate: $30,000 - $50,000
246013_0 246014_0 
246015_0 246016_0 246017_0 
246018_0 246019_0 246020_0  


Lot 600: MARILYN MONROE TYPED LETTER TO LEE AND PAULA STRASBERG
 A typed file copy letter dated June 1, 1962, beneath "5th Helena" addressed "Dear Lee and Paula:" and reading in part, "The most important thing in my life is my work, my work with you. The Actors Studio is my home. … I wonder if you realize what the work has meant to me. ... The studio is for the theatre and for life. Marlon and I are having talks and we hope to persuade you to come to California for awhile to do work with us. Thank you Lee for being my friend and my teacher. Thank you Paula, for being with me and really truly directing the good and right moments on film. ... When I think of home it is New York and the Actors Studio. That is where I can exist in the human race. Love, Marilyn."
8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246074_0  


Lot 602: MARILYN MONROE PERSONAL PROPERTY APPRAISAL
 A formal written appraisal of the contents of Monroe's home at 12305 Fifth Helena in Brentwood, California, prepared for Monroe's executor by John J. Donahue & Associates of Los Angeles. The 14-page typed report includes 12 pages of itemized listings in a room-by-room format assigning value to Monroe's personal property in the home totaling $3,176. The report gives a listing of the contents of the Living Room, Hall, Front Bedroom, Middle Bedroom, Study, Dining Room, Sun Room, Kitchen, Playroom, Exterior and Garage, and Clothing in addition to miscellaneous items.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246078_0 246079_0 246080_0  


Lot 603: MARILYN MONROE DOCUMENTS RELATED TO THE 1963 PURCHASE OF HER BRENTWOOD HOME
 A group of documents related to the 1963 purchase of Monroe’s Brentwood, California, home, located at 12305 Fifth Helena Drive. Included are the original “Bid for Purchase of Real and Personal Property as a Unit” signed by Gilbert M. Nunez and Betty J. Nunez, dated March 14, 1963, specifying a sale price of $87,500.00 and a deposit of $8,750.00, the original deposit receipt, and a typed memo to Mrs. Inez Melson, Monroe’s business manager, from Lavon Fitzgerald, who represented the Nunez family in the transaction, with a business card for Fitzgerald stapled to the memo.
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246081_0  


Lot 604: MARILYN MONROE 1963 NOTICE OF PROPERTY SALE FOR BRENTWOOD HOME
A group of documents related to the 1963 sale of Monroe’s Brentwood, California, home, located at 12305 Fifth Helena Drive, including a letter to Inez Melson, Monroe’s business manager, stating that the petition for confirmation of the sale of Monroe’s home was set for 9:15 a.m. on May 7, 1963, together with the actual court documents and the actual notice of sale of real and personal property as a unit at private sale, likely used to publicize the sale in newspapers. The legal documents specified that Monroe’s Hotpoint freezer-refrigerator, built-in dinette set, and all tacked-down carpeting and drapes presently on premises would be included in the transaction.
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246082_0 


Lot 789: MARILYN MONROE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
 A diploma issued to Norma Jean Baker from Ralph Waldo Emerson Junior High in Los Angeles, California, on June 27, 1941. The future Marilyn Monroe turned 15 in June 1941. The following June, Monroe married her first husband, Jim Dougherty.
6 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 324, "Books Auction," Sotheby Parke Bernet, Sale number 94, October 21, 1973
 Estimate: $40,000 - $60,000
246331_0   


Documents papiers - Mode & Beauté
Papers documents - Mode & Beauty


Lot 149 : MARILYN MONROE HAT RECEIPTS
Two invoices from Rex Inc. of Beverly Hills, the first dated January 5, 1960, lists a Black Velour Cloche and a White Velour Cloche each priced at $55. The second invoice is dated January 20, 1960, and lists a White Feather Toque priced at $85. Both invoices indicate that Miss Dorothy Blass purchased the hats in person and charged them to "Mrs. A. Miller" of The Beverly Hills Hotel.
7 by 8 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $150 - $250
245340_0  


Lot 154: MARILYN MONROE DIET PLAN
 A two-page, typed plan titled "Calorie Restricted Diet/ 1000 Calories/ 100 Grams Protein" prepared for Monroe by Dr. Leon Krohn. The pages are undated, but some of the approved foods and meal plans are in line with the notations found in Monroe's hand in the back of Lot 185, one of Monroe's notebooks from 1958. The diet put forth presents sound health advice even by today's standards, recommending the restriction of sugar, fats and carbohydrates to whole wheat and "one small white potato boiled baked or riced" as a substitution for one slice of bread.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245348_0  


Lot 219: MARILYN MONROE FUR STORAGE AND SERVICE RECEIPT AND AGREEMENT
A storage and service receipt and agreement from Maximilian Fur Company, Inc., addressed to Mrs. A. Miller, 444 East 57th Street, New York City, Apt. 13E, dated July 3, 1958, listing a ranch mink coat, a white ermine coat, and a black fox stole trimmed with silk, together with a typed note to Mrs. A. Miller on Maximilian letterhead recommending a clean and glaze for the ranch mink coat and a glaze for the black fox stole. Original business reply envelope from Maximilian Fur Company included. The ranch mink coat referenced is very likely the coat Joe DiMaggio gave to Monroe.
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245450_0  


Lot 220: MARILYN MONROE FUR APPRAISAL
 An appraisal document dated February 4, 1954, signed by Al Teitelbaum of Teitelbaum Furs for "Marilyn Monroe DiMaggio" listing a black mist mink coat valued at $10,000. This is the well-known mink coat gifted to Monroe by DiMaggio.
7 1/4 by 7 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245451_0  


Lot 225: MARILYN MONROE FUR STORAGE RECEIPTS
 Four pages of storage receipts from Maximilian Furs of New York City dated July 19, 1960, itemizing 17 items in storage, together with two corresponding "Temporary fur storage record" tickets and a letter detailing work to be done to repair two of the furs on the storage receipts.
Largest, 8 1/2 by 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245457_0  


Lot 226: MARILYN MONROE TEITELBAUM FUR DOCUMENTS
 A carbon copy of an invoice from Teitelbaum Furs for an oyster white beaver coat of Canadian origin, dated November 22, 1958, sold for $1,375 with facsimile customer signature of Arthur Miller. Together with an invitation to fashion show and letter from Al Teitelbaum to Mrs. Arthur Miller dated January 5, 1959.
Largest, 8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245458_0 


Lot 271: MARILYN MONROE ARTHUR MILLER SAKS FIFTH AVENUE RECEIPTS
A group of five receipts from Saks Fifth Avenue in New York City, addressed to Arthur Miller, together with a corresponding Saks Fifth Avenue invoice. All receipts are dated March 23, 1960, and specify Miller purchased trousers and an overcoat among other items. The invoice is dated April 17, 1960.
 Estimate: $150 - $250
245557_0  


Lot 297: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN AND SIGNED CHECK
 A blank counter check written entirely in Monroe's hand, in black ink, dated August 14, 1954, paid to Jax in the amount of $800. Monroe has listed her address as "508 N. Palm Dr." and her phone number as "CR62211."
3 3/8 by 8 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245612_0  


Lot 298: MARILYN MONROE JAX STORE RECEIPT
 A four-page itemized carbon copy receipt for $1,858.30 worth of clothing from Jax boutique with facsimile signature of Monroe. The receipt is dated simply "8-5" with no year given. Monroe's address is listed as "444 E. 57th St. NYC," but there are instructions on the last page to mail the items to "Mrs. Arthur Miller" at her Roxbury, Connecticut, residence.
6 by 4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245613_0  


Lot 305: MARILYN MONROE EVENING GLOVE ORDER
 A group of documents dated February 19, 1958, regarding the purchase of evening gloves from the John E. Fuchs Corporation in New York City. The documents include a typed signed letter from Kay Fuchs addressed to Mrs. Miller reading in part, "Kenneth Lane of Delman's asked us to send you the enclosed gloves. ... Enclosed find also a sample pair with our compliments of white satin glove." Together with a packing slip for the order listing a pair of 20-button white kid gloves for $165 and a pair of 10-button white kid gloves for $105, an invoice for the gloves, and a statement of account.
Largest, 8 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245620_0  


Lot 328: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CHECK WITH CORRESPONDING INVOICE
 A check signed by Monroe in blue ink, dated February 14, 1958, Valentine's Day, paid to the Profile Symmetry Salon in New York City in the amount of $58.50. The check is drawn on Monroe's Colonial Trust Company account. Together with the original invoice from the salon sent to Monroe at her 444 East 57th Street residence in New York City dated February 3rd for "9 Treatments (Jan. 7th - Jan. 30th, inc.)" in the amount of $58.50.
Invoice, 7 1/4 by 7 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $3,500 - $4,500
245648_0  


Lot 332: MARILYN MONROE STATEMENT AND INVOICES FROM ERNO LASZLO
 A statement, dated July 8, 1958, addressed to Monroe's secretary "Miss Mary [sic] Reis" presenting the total amount due for goods and services provided between June 1and July, 1958, $1,211.22. Together with 18 corresponding invoices detailing the products and services provided between these dates. The statement has a secretarial notation indicating that these charges were paid with check number 206 on July 31, 1958.
Largest, 8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245653_0  245654_0 


Lot 334: MARILYN MONROE SKINCARE REGIME
 Five sets of instructions, eight pages, from the Erno Laszlo Institute written out for Marilyn Monroe Miller, dated June 5, 6, 11, and 12, 1958, and July 3, 1958, outlining her constantly changing skincare regime in great detail. The instructions not only divide skincare into "Morning," "Evening 'if' dressing," and "Evening before retiring," but also there are instructions on what not to eat: "Not one piece of any kind of nuts, olives, chocolate, clams and oysters." There are also separate instructions for California and "Instructions for Makeup While Making Films."
8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245656_0 245657_0 245658_0 
245659_0 245660_0 245661_0 
245662_0 245663_0 245664_0 


Lot 337: MARILYN MONROE CHANEL No. 5 PERFUME RECEIPT
 A receipt from I. Magnin & Co. of Beverly Hills for a bottle of Chanel No. 5 perfume totaling $73.15 including tax and delivery through "Red Arrow Spec. Delivery" service. The perfume was billed to Marilyn Monroe Miller and signed for by "(D. Blass)" to be sent to Agnes Flannigan [sic], likely a Christmas present as the receipt is dated December 24, 1959. Flanagan was one of Monroe's hairdressers for many years, including for Bus Stop in 1956 and The Misfits in 1961, among many other occasions.
6 1/4 by 4 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245667_0  


Lot 338: MARILYN MONROE BEVERLY HILTON SALON RECEIPT
 A single piece of stationery from the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills with handwritten receipt for five hair treatments signed by "Miss Porter - Beauty Salon/ Beverly Hilton Salon."
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $100 - $150
245668_0 


Lot 339: MARILYN MONROE INVOICE FOR SPECIAL EVENT MAKEUP
 A single page of stationery from Marie Irvine of Long Island dated September 29, 1959, addressed to Marilyn Monroe at 444 East 57th Street for "Special make-up for photography" on September 22 and 27, 1958, for a total of $100. Monroe attended the premiere of An Evening with Ives Montand at the Henry Miller's Theatre in New York with Montgomery Clift on September 22, and she attended an American Friends of the Hebrew University award ceremony with her husband on September 27.
7 by 6 inches
 Estimate: $100 - $150
245669_0 


Lot 340: MARILYN MONROE ELIZABETH ARDEN RECEIPT
 A receipt dated July 1958 from the Arden Salon for eight pairs of black false lashes signed for by "Irvine," likely makeup artist Marie Irvine, for a total of $20.60.
8 by 5 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245670_0  


Lot 374: DESIGN SKETCH FOR MARILYN MONROE GOWN
 An unsigned pencil on paper sketch of a form-fitting mermaid gown. The sketch perfectly matches the silhouette and seam construction of the gown worn by Marilyn Monroe to the June 13, 1957, premier of The Prince and the Showgirl at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. The gown was made for Monroe by John Moore, who presented Monroe with options for the color of the dress including burgundy and Kelly Green, but Monroe chose beige silk satin.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245717_0 


Lot 375: DESIGN SKETCH FOR MARILYN MONROE GOWN
 An unsigned pencil on paper sketch of a form-fitting mermaid gown. The sketch perfectly matches the silhouette of the gown worn by Monroe to the June 13, 1957, premier of The Prince and the Showgirl at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. This sketch, most likely by designer John Moore, however introduces a much more elaborate set of swirled seam lines around the body. This is likely a variation presented to Monroe, who opted for the more simple and streamlined design that she wore to the premiere.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
245718_0  


Lot 379: MARILYN MONROE ROYAL COMMAND PERFORMANCE GLOVE DOCUMENTS
 A typed letter, dated July 14, 1957, signed by Kenneth C. Rouse of London and reading in part, "I am enclosing herewith a statement … for your information, regarding the making of a pair of gloves in gold lame for Miss Marilyn Monroe, to match her dress for the Royal Command show late last year." The letter elucidates the color and fabric of this dress captured almost exclusively on black and white film. Together with three account statements and four additional administrative letters regarding settlement of the account.
Largest, 8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245725_0  245726_0  


Lot 383: MARILYN MONROE BERGDORF GOODMAN RECEIPT
A receipt from Bergdorf Goodman dated June 28, 1960, addressed to Mrs. Arthur Miller, 444 E. 57th Street, New York. Items purchased were signed for by May Reis, Monroe’s secretary.
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245731_0 


Lot 384: MARILYN MONROE FASHION INVOICE
 Two invoice pages from Polly's at 480 Park Avenue in New York City listing a "Black wool dinner dress" for $290 and a "Natural baby lama [sic] wool coat" for $350. The salesperson has written extensive notes for "Mrs. Arthur Miller" reading in part, "This Christian Dior coat ought to be very good for you both here and in California" and "the shirred bottom can be cut off at a later period and you can have a regular hem put in and have a charming free flowing dress."
6 3/4 by 8 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $100 - $150
245732_0 


Lot 385: MARILYN MONROE COMMUNICATIONS FROM CHRISTIAN DIOR
 A series of messages from Simone Noir of Christian Dior in Paris to "Mrs. Miller," the first a letter dated March 7, 1958, reading in part, "I am very pleased to know that you will come to Paris in a few days. I certainly hope that we will have the pleasure of your visit at Christian Dior's, in spite of the heavy schedule. ... Naturally, we can show you models at your hotel. ..." The second is a telegram dated March 8, 1958, from Simone Noir saying that they are sending sketches and wish Monroe a pleasant stay in Paris. The third is a price list of the latest Dior designs, and the last is a telegram dated April 2, 1959, stating that they are happy Monroe is coming to Festival Cannes and they could make dresses for her arrival.
Largest, 8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245733_0  


Lot 386: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN AND SIGNED CHECK
 A check written entirely in Marilyn Monroe's hand, in black ink, dated July 14, 1952, and paid to Saks & Company, in the amount of $257.51. The check is drawn on Monroe's Bank of America account. Monroe lists her address as "Bel Air Hotel."
3 1/2 by 8 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
245734_0 


Lot 387: CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING LOST MARILYN MONROE GARMENTS
 A letter from fashion designer John Moore to May Reis dated February 3, 1960, saying he will find out what happened to two "beige and black broadcloth shirtwaist sheaths" that were according to Moore "made by two of my best girls here in my workroom. … " Moore promised to trace the shipment to find the outcome of where they went. Subsequent documents, including claim to insurance company, reveal that the garments were in fact destroyed when TWA flight 595, a cargo flight, crashed after takeoff from Chicago Midway Airport on November 24, 1959, killing three people on board and eight people on the ground. The documents valued the lost garments at $750.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245735_0 


Lot 389: MARILYN MONROE FERRAGAMO RECEIPT
 A handwritten receipt from the Ferragamo Shoe Salon at 424 Park Avenue in New York City dated July 3, 1958. The receipt lists Marilyn Monroe Miller at 444 East 57th Street with note that the shoes were sold "c/o Miss Reis," Monroe's secretary. Additional note at top of the page reads "Address where to send red shoes." The receipt lists six pairs of shoes, including the Felitia in white, black, beige, and red calf leather, as well as shoe trees, polish, and a pair of hose.
6 by 4 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245737_0 


Lot 392: MARILYN MONROE FERRAGAMO STATEMENT
 A handwritten balance statement on a page torn from a Beverly Hills Ferragamo Shoe Salon invoice pad dated April 1, 1960. The statement is in the name of Mrs. Arthur Miller at The Beverly Hills Hotel and has secretarial notation that the balance was paid on April 29, 1960.
6 by 4 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300

245740_0 


Lot 394: MARILYN MONROE FERRAGAMO CLIPPING AND LETTER
 A clipping from a 1959 issue of the New York Herald Tribune featuring an article titled, "Shoes by Ferragamo Designed for Comfort." Monroe, already a fan of the shoes, is not mentioned specifically in the article, although it does note that Ferragamo makes shoes for "innumerable top movie stars." Together with a letter from J. Hoffner of the Park Avenue Ferragamo Shoe Salon in New York City addressed "Dear Miss Monroe," dated September 3, 1958. The letter reads in part, "Since I know you like our spike heel opera pump very much; and since we have a great many more pair here than in our Beverly Hills store, I am writing to tell you the colors and materials I have in your size at the present time."
Largest, 8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500

245742_0 


 Lot 401: MARILYN MONROE ALIATA STATEMENT OF ACCOUNT
 A typed statement dated December 1, 1959, listing outstanding charges for purchases made on October 24 and November 25, 1959, including a pair of purple suede shoes, silver kid shoes, and a pair of beige calf shoes totaling $151.74. The statement has a secretarial notation indicating that the charges were paid with check number 209 on December 8, 1959.
5 1/2 by 8 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300

245751_0  


 Lot 402: MARILYN MONROE ALIATA SHOE RECEIPT
 A typed receipt, undated, listing a pair of "Multicolor Shoes" sold to Miss Marilyn Monroe at the Bel Air Hotel for a total of $51.50. Secretarial notation on the invoice indicates that the charges were paid with check number 306 on September 5, 1958.
5 1/2 by 8 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300

245752_0   


 Lot 403: MARILYN MONROE ALIATA SHOE RECEIPT 
A handwritten receipt from Aliata Inc. imported shoes in 43 East 57th Street New York dated January 22, 1959, sold to Mrs. Marilyn Monroe of 444 East 57th Street in New York. The receipt lists 10 pairs of designer shoes by the Italian maker, including beige calf shoes, red suede, black suede, ivory - multicolor among others for a total of $392.43 including tax. Additional note at bottom of receipt lists "Bag - Helena Arpels" for an additional $64.59.
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
  Estimate: $400 - $600
245753_0  245754_0
 


Lot 409: MARILYN MONROE DELMAN DOCUMENTS
 A typed letter, signed and dated June 23, 1959, from Rube Adler of Delman Inc. an exclusive New York boutique that carried Christian Dior shoes. The letter apologizes for charging Monroe for a pair of black calf pumps that were sent at the request of Kenneth Lane. Together with corresponding credit memo to correct the error, a credit invoice dated June 18, 1958, for a pair of shoes listed as "Debonair" for $18.75, and a statement dated March 25, 1958, for outstanding balance of $106.
Largest, 10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245760_0
 


Lot 443: MARILYN MONROE DANCE SHOES RECEIPT
 A receipt dated November 16, 1959, from Capezio shoes in Los Angeles listing four pairs of "#32 Black Medium" at a cost of $5 per pair, sold to "20 Century Fox" with additional notations and secretarial Marilyn Monroe signature. The receipt is for the shoes worn by Monroe as she began dance rehearsals for her film Let's Make Love that began filming in January 1960.
5 1/2 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245821_0  


Lot 455: MARILYN MONROE HANDBAG RECEIPT
 A store receipt from I. Magnin & Co. of Beverly Hills. The receipt is dated June 24, 1956, and is in the name of Mrs. Arthur Miller and Marilyn Monroe of 444 East 57th Street and signed by assistant Hazel Washington. The receipt lists two items bags on sale for $30 and $46.
6 1/4 by 4 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245856_0 


Lot 464: MARILYN MONROE JEWELRY INVOICE
 An invoice dated February 19, 1958, from Talmack, New York sold to Mrs. Arthur Miller. The invoice lists one pair of rhinestone earrings, $14.00.
8 1/2 by 8 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245866_0  


Lot 472: MARILYN MONROE JEWELRY INVOICE
 An invoice dated June 15, 1960, from Porflex Co. of Beverly Hills listing Monroe's housekeeper, Hazel Washington. The invoice is for a pair of 14k white gold earrings with diamonds, 14k bracelet, and 14k charm totaling $406.98.
6 1/2 by 8 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245875_0  


Lot 481: MARILYN MONROE I. MAGNIN & CO. STATEMENTS
 One complete and one partial original statement from I. Magnin & Company addressed to Mrs. Arthur Miller, 444 E. 57th Street, New York City. The partial statement indicates a payment of $28.97 was paid on May 2, 1960. The complete statement documents receipt of the May 2 payment, and indicates a total balance still due of $10.40.
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245890_0  


Lot 482: MARILYN MONROE CEIL CHAPMAN INVOICE
 A two-page invoice, in triplicate, listing 11 items purchased from Ceil Chapman February 10, 1958, totaling $817.75 plus $3.00 for messenger charges.
8 1/2 by 8 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245891_0  


Lot 485: MARILYN MONROE CUSTOM BRA RELATED DOCUMENTS
 A handwritten note dated September 23, 1960, from Augusta Bouvier of Hollywood, California, addressed "Dear Miss Monroe:" and reading "I completed these bras on my own time, it took me four days to alter them, so I am giving you a special price of seventy five dollars." Together with an unsigned file copy of a letter dated October 31, 1957, to Fifth Avenue Fashions, reading in part, "Will you kindly send me three bras the same make as I got from you before - I believe it was Carnival - size 38-C."
Largest, 8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245894_0 


Lot 495: MARILYN MONROE FERRAGAMO RECEIPTS
 A handwritten note and invoice on the back of a page and partial page torn from a Ferragamo Shoe Salon invoice pad, undated. The note reads "Dear Miss Reis, I have all 5 pairs and am sending them to you Air Mail. Enclosed is your bill. Thank you./ Sincerely yours, J. Hoffner/ P.S. We have shoe trees priced at $2.00 a pair such as I sold Miss Monroe previously. Would she like to have some?" The note is accompanied by an informally written invoice listing five pairs of Felitia shoes in beige and black calf, size 7 1/2 B, for a total of $199.75, and a more formal invoice for the same shoes dated February 3, 1960, with additional postage and packaging charges added for a new total of $203.50 billed to Monroe at The Beverly Hills Hotel.
Largest, 6 by 4 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245906_0 


Lot 556: MARILYN MONROE PERFUME RECEIPT
 An invoice from Floris of Jermyn Street in London dated December 14, 1959, listing Marilyn Monroe Miller of The Beverly Hills Hotel as the purchaser of six bottles of rose geranium toilet water for a total of $28.25.
8 by 8 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $100 - $150
245992_0   


Lot 960: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED RECEIPT
 A Marilyn Monroe signed Elizabeth Arden receipt. Monroe has signed the receipt in blue ballpoint ink over the salon’s handwritten itemization of services.
8 by 5 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246609_0 


 Lot 964: MARILYN MONROE SAKS FIFTH AVENUE RECEIPT
 A handwritten Saks Fifth Avenue receipt for Marilyn Monroe for six articles of clothing totaling $215.23. The receipt is dated "3-20."
6 1/4 by 4 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
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Lot 989: MARILYN MONROE SAKS FIFTH AVENUE RECEIPTS
 Two handwritten Saks Fifth Avenue receipts charged to Marilyn Monroe: the first is for two lashes totaling $8.32, signed by makeup artist and hairstylist George Masters; the second is for four pieces of clothing totaling $159.12 with a carbon copy of the receipt. Together with a payment stub from February 15, 1962, showing a balance due of $1,140.88.
Largest, 7 1/2 by 6 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246645_0 246646_0 

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08 juillet 2015

1946, San Fernando - Blue Book Model par Richard Whiteman

Norma Jeane pour l'agence de mannequin Blue Book en 1946
Photographies de Richard Whiteman

Norma Jeane for the Blue Book Modelling agency in 1946
Photographs by Richard Whiteman

1946-blue_book 


Dans la crique de Tujunga (à San Fernando, nord de Los Angeles)

in the Tujunga Creek (San Fernando, north of Los Angeles)

1946-LA-san_fernando-Tujunga-bluebook-010-1-by_richard_whiteman-1 
1946-LA-san_fernando-Tujunga-bluebook-011-1-by_richard_whiteman-1 
 1946-LA-san_fernando-Tujunga-bluebook-011-1-by_richard_whiteman-1a  1946-LA-san_fernando-Tujunga-bluebook-013-1-by_richard_whiteman-1a 
1946-LA-san_fernando-Tujunga-bluebook-013-1-by_richard_whiteman-1 
1946-LA-san_fernando-Tujunga-bluebook-012-1-by_richard_whiteman-1   1946-LA-san_fernando-Tujunga-bluebook-020-1-by_richard_whiteman-1 


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copyright text by GinieLand.