14 novembre 2014

Property from the life and career of MM - 12/2014 - Docs


 Documents papiers


Lot 708: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTER REGARDING BOND
 A Marilyn Monroe received letter. The envelope is addressed to Marilyn Monroe at 1215 Lodi Place in Los Angeles from Opal M. Clark and postmarked July 22, 1948. A note to Monroe reads in full, “Here is your bond Norma – please sign the enclosed receipt + return to me. Hope all is well with you. With love – Opal.” At the time, Monroe was living at the Hollywood Studio Club, a residence for women in the film industry.
4 1/4 by 9 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $384 - Estimate: $150 - $300
juliens-mmauction2014-lot708


Lot 709: MARILYN MONROE EMPLOYMENT RECORDS
 A group of seven Marilyn Monroe employment documents from Twentieth Century-Fox Studios. The documents date from 1947 to 1949 and include two employment opening and four employment closing notices as well as one change of rate card. These cards represent Monroe’s first forays into film work. Notable are the cards filled out during her work on The Dangerous Years (20th Century, 1947), indicated on the opening and closing cards as being for a “Sol Wurtzel Prod.,” and a starting card dated August 27, 1949, for her role as Clara in the film A Ticket to Tomahawk (20th Century, 1950), indicating that Monroe flew to the filming location with a closing card from this film dated October 21, 1949, stating that filming was finished. One closing card indicates her first firing from Fox. Dated August 25, 1947, the card explains “Option Not Exercised” after only a year; the studio opted not to take Monroe under contract again at that time. Monroe changed her name from Norma Jeane to Marilyn Monroe when she got her contract with Fox in August 1946. Monroe’s salary during this period ranged from $125 to $200 per week.
4 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$2,560 - Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot709


 

Lot 718: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CHECK
 A Marilyn Monroe signed check dated September 15, 1957, check number 35, in the amount of $12.12 paid to the New York Telephone Company from a Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. account with Colonial Trust Company. The check information is typed and signed by Monroe in blue ink. Below her signature is her title with Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc., President.
3 by 8 1/4 inches
 Winning bid:$7,040 - Estimate: $2,500 - $3,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot718 


 Lot 720: MARILYN MONROE FILM SYNOPSIS FROM ARCHIVE
 A five-page screenplay synopsis for the unproduced film "Miss Nobody" written by Garson Kanin. The typed document heading reads “ Original Screenplay – 140pp.” and “Henry F. Greenberg/ May 5, 1950.” It is presumed Monroe was approached to participate in the production.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$192 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot720


 Lot 722: MARILYN MONROE TELEPHONE COMPANY DOCUMENTS
 A Marilyn Monroe telephone bill and other telephone company related documents. Items include an April 1951 telephone bill for $180.41 (when adjusting for inflation that is almost $1600 in the 2013 economy); a bill pay reminder; an itemized list of long-distance calls from the phone company (undated); a rate information card addressed to "M. Monroe," postmarked May 1961; and other telephone company related items.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$448 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot722 


 Lot 725: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM CARY GRANT
 A Cary Grant typed, signed letter to Marilyn Monroe. The undated letter, written on Grant's personal stationery, followed a recent trip by Grant and his wife to visit troops in Japan and Korea. The letter was accompanied by a gift Grant was asked by a soldier to take to Monroe. Grant also offers his assistance if Monroe should also go visit the troops in Asia. The pair worked together on the film Monkey Business (20th Century, 1952). A notation on verso is written in pencil in an unknown hand.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$3,840 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot725 


Lot 728: MARILYN MONROE EMPLOYMENT RECORDS
 A 22-piece collection of Marilyn Monroe’s earning records from 20th Century Fox. The quarterly records span from 1946 to 1953 beginning after Monroe’s first contract with Fox in August 1946. The weekly accounting of Monroe’s salary illustrates the actress’ rise in star power throughout her career at Fox. In 1953, 20th Century Fox released three Monroe films: How to Marry A Millionaire, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and Niagra. The records reflect two different employee numbers for Monroe, 63015 and 661616, most likely due to the break in her contract with Fox.
Each, 5 1/2 by 11 inches
 Winning bid:$6,250 - Estimate: $5,000 - $7,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot728


Lot 739: JANE RUSSELL HANDWRITTEN LETTER TO MARILYN MONROE
 A Jane Russell handwritten letter to Marilyn Monroe. The 10-page letter is written on onionskin paper. Russell starts the letter "Dear Little One" and signs it "Old Jane." In the letter, Russell addresses rumors of Monroe's divorce from Joe DiMaggio and encourages Monroe to rely on religion to help her through this rough period. She discusses Hollywood marriages, including her own, and gives her opinion on fellow actresses' marriages. In part, Russell writes, "I've never written such a letter - But I love you very dearly + I don't want you to be unhappy ever... ."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid: $3,200 - Estimate: $500 - $700
juliens-mmauction2014-lot739a juliens-mmauction2014-lot739b


 

Lot 747: MARILYN MONROE LETTER RECEIVED WHILE IN KOREA
 A typed letter sent to Marilyn Monroe by Major General Lionel McGarr. Dated February 16, 1954, McGarr thanked Monroe for her appearance, stating that she provided relaxation and a boost for morale. Monroe entertained troops in Korea February 16-19, 1954, while on her honeymoon with Joe DiMaggio. Accompanied by the original hand-delivered transmittal envelope typed “Miss Marilyn Monroe/ ‘Marilyn Monroe VIP Show'/ Korea.”
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $768 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot747 


Lot 748: MARILYN MONROE ENCLOSURE CARDS AND MESSAGES
 A group of Marilyn Monroe received floral enclosure cards and other personal cards from friends and family members, including Freddie Fields, “all the boys at M.C.A.," Patsy & Rose D’Amore, “Judy & Jay,” “Aunt Allis,” “Sydney,” Arthur O’Connell, Vernon Scott and others, with personal messages to Monroe. Accompanied by a note written in an unknown hand on Beverly Hills Hotel stationery regarding “M. McCarthy” and a typed message dated November 8, 1954, for Mrs. DiMaggio regarding a cousin. This note has a handwritten notation that reads “he is ??”.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 6 3/4 by 5 1/4 inches
Winning bid: $576 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot748 


Lot 749: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM SID ROSS
 A two-page handwritten letter from Sid Ross to Marilyn Monroe. Written on American Airlines stationery, postscript on a third page. The letter expresses Ross’ regret that Monroe couldn’t meet with him and goes on to offer her advice, including “Don’t be the baseball; be the bat.” Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope postmarked May 17, 1953. Ross wrote an article about Monroe in 1952, and his brother, photographer Ben Ross, had three sittings with Monroe in the early 1950s.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 1/4 by 7 1/4 inches
 Winning bid: $640 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot749 


Lot 750: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS FROM LOTTE GOSLAR
 A pair of letters received by Marilyn Monroe from her teacher and friend, mime Lotte Goslar. Both letters are from January 1954. One is a single-sided handwritten note. The other is handwritten on two-pages, double sided, in which Goslar congratulates Monroe on her marriage to Joe DiMaggio.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
Winning bid: $448 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot750 


 

Lot 752: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM JOE DiMAGGIO
 A Joe DiMaggio three-page handwritten letter to Marilyn Monroe postmarked October 9, 1954. DiMaggio dates the letter as "Saturday - a.m." and greets Marilyn "Dear Baby." The letter came to Marilyn on the heels of her October 6th announcement to the press that she and DiMaggio were divorcing. In the letter DiMaggio discusses watching the announcement. The letter reads in part, "Don't know what you're thoughts are about me, - but I can tell you I love you sincerely, - way deep in my heart, irregardless of anything." Accompanied by original transmittal envelope addressed to the house the couple shared in Beverly Hills, California.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$78,125 - Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot752


Lot 753: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM TOM NEAL
 A five-page handwritten letter to Marilyn Monroe from actor Tom Neal. Neal reminds Monroe where they had met previously and offers her support and encouragement during her divorce from Joe DiMaggio. Citing his time in the media spotlight due to his love triangle with Barbara Payton and Franchot Tone, Neal writes in part “Marriage is rough enough without taking on an added burden of marrying someone who doesn’t understand the film industry.” Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope postmarked October 1954.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$512 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot753


Lot 754: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM SAM SHAW
 A 16-page letter from Sam Shaw to Marilyn Monroe. Handwritten on small notebook paper. Shaw has labeled two pages “7.” He discusses an art opening that he went to and Monroe’s marriage to and divorce from Joe DiMaggio. Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope postmarked December 3, 1954.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
7 1/4 by 4 1/4 inches
 Winning bid:$1,562.50 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot754


Lot 755: MARILYN MONROE SEVEN YEAR ITCH TELEGRAM
 A Western Union telegram sent to Marilyn Monroe by Twentieth Century-Fox Studios dated December 23, 1954. The telegram summons Monroe to meet with Lew Schreiber regarding The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) on December 28, 1954.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$ 1,280 - Estimate: $400 - $600 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot755


Lot 758: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM SAM SHAW
 A three-page handwritten letter from Sam Shaw to Marilyn Monroe. The letter discusses a film Shaw has just seen and a postscript that continues on to the back of the third page discussing Monroe’s interest in collecting art. Below the postscript Shaw has drawn a caricature of Monroe with paintings in frames. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope postmarked December 8, 1954.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
12 1/2 by 8 inches
Winning bid: $1,125 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot758a juliens-mmauction2014-lot758b


Lot 759: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM SAM SHAW
 A 12-page handwritten letter from Sam Shaw to Marilyn Monroe. In the letter, Shaw offers his advice for dealing with the press and Monroe’s public image. On the back of the last page Shaw has drawn a caricature of his family with the text “We all love Marilyn/ the Shaws.” Reads in part “I found a shot of you that we both liked...I think this photo puts me in Milton’s class.” Shaw has included a newspaper clipping of Monroe dancing with Clark Gable. Accompanied by two envelopes, the first is stamped without postmark, the second is postmarked December 9, 1954.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
9 by 6 inches
Winning bid: $1,125 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot759a juliens-mmauction2014-lot759b
juliens-mmauction2014-lot759c 


Lot 760: MARILYN MONROE 1954 LETTER FROM SAM SHAW
 A one-page handwritten letter from photographer, artist and producer Sam Shaw to Marilyn Monroe. Shaw chastises Monroe for sending neither a hello nor a goodbye note to him and references Shaw giving Monroe’s address to Dame Edith Sitwell. With a drawing on reverse of a grave with a shovel and a tombstone that reads “Here lies his [drawing of a heart] and luve [sic] gone but no [sic] forgotten.” Accompanied by original transmittal envelope postmarked December 10, 1954.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
9 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$ 2,187.50 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot760a juliens-mmauction2014-lot760b


Lot 761: MARILYN MONROE 1954 LETTER FROM HER LAWYER
 A letter written to Marilyn Monroe from her lawyer, Lloyd Wright Jr. The two-page typed, signed letter, dated October 26, 1954, discusses contracts, endorsements, with references to ghostwriter Ben Hecht and a payment due to Alfred Hayes. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $500 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot761 


Lot 763: MARILYN MONROE CARD FROM MARLON BRANDO
 An enclosure card handwritten to Marilyn Monroe from Marlon Brando. The small card has an image of Asian-inspired scene of a boat in a body of water. Reads in full, “Happy birthday Marylin [sic] from Marlon.”
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 by 4 inches
 Winning bid: $1,920 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot763 


Lot 764: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS FROM HENRY ROSENFELD
A group of three letters from Henry Rosenfeld to Marilyn Monroe, undated, written on lined notepaper. One note addressed “darling” informs Monroe of a present that Rosenfeld purchased for her on the occasion of her birthday. He closes the note, “I want you to be happy above everything else in the world. Always and always, Henry.” Rosenfeld, a wealthy New York dress manufacturer, met Monroe in 1955. They became close, and at some point he proposed to Monroe. The proposal came to nothing, but the pair remained friends.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
and Lot 756, "Julien's Summer Sale," Julien's Auctions, Las Vegas, June 26, 2009
12 by 8 inches
Winning bid: $384 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot764a juliens-mmauction2014-lot764b 


Lot 767: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM CHERYL CRAWFORD
 A letter written to Marilyn Monroe by producer/director Cheryl Crawford. The letter is typed, signed and contains a handwritten postscript. In the letter, Crawford expresses a desire to work with Monroe on future productions. Typed on Crawford’s personal stationery and dated June 8, 1955. Earlier in the year, Crawford introduced Monroe to Lee Strasberg.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 1/2 by 7 1/2 inches
 Winning bid: $320 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot767


Lot 768: MARILYN MONROE 20TH CENTURY FOX CONTRACT DISPUTE LETTER
 A letter from Twentieth Century-Fox Executive Manager Lew Schreiber to Marilyn Monroe. The single-page typed, signed letter, dated December 16, 1954, is in regard to the disagreement between Monroe and the studio over her contract. In January 1955, Monroe formally announced the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid: $1,250 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot768 


Lot 769: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM HENRY GRUNWALD
A typed and signed letter to Marilyn Monroe from Henry Grunwald hand dated "Dec. 30., 1956." The letter reads in part, "It's not the story I had wanted to do on you, of course, but I think it did you justice... ." The letter was written when Grunwald was a senior editor at TIME magazine.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid: $896 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot769 


Lot 770: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED CORRESPONDENCE
 A group of three notes sent to Marilyn Monroe. The first is a handwritten note regarding a shooting schedule, In an unknown hand signed simply with a heart.The note reads in part, "RELAX - rest and go over the scenes we worked on last Saturday." Written on the back of a TIME magazine memo sheet. The second is a handwritten note believed to have been written by photographer Zinn Arthur to Milton Greene and Monroe. Reads in full, "Milt Thanks for Tryin'. Marilyn - You're a damn good actress and my hat goes off to you - Zinn (Sin)." The third appears to be a typed telegram inviting Monroe to an event at the Ambassador Hotel.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
4 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $320 - Estimate: $400 - $600 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot770


Lot 771: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM PAT NEWCOMB
 A two-page typed memo to Marilyn Monroe from Pat Newcomb. Typed on Arthur P. Jacobs Public Relations stationery and dated May 21, 1956. Newcomb wrote regarding the importance of personally reaching out to journalists who had written about Monroe. Handwritten note and sign-off from Newcomb.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $384 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot771a juliens-mmauction2014-lot771b 


Lot 773: MARILYN MONROE RIPPED CARD FROM AMY GREENE
 A handwritten card from Amy Greene to Marilyn Monroe that has been ripped in half. On the front of the card is printed “Mrs. Milton Greene.” Dated November 10, 1954, the card gives Greene’s good wishes for Monroe's recovery and an invitation to recuperate from her surgery with the Greenes. Accompanied by a note to “Sidney” on the front of the envelope, also ripped in half, with instructions to deliver the note to Marilyn.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Original size, 3 by 4 inches
Winning bid: $125 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot773a juliens-mmauction2014-lot773b 


Lot 774: MARILYN MONROE LETTER AND CARD FROM JAMES HASPIEL
 A Marilyn Monroe received letter from superfan James Haspiel. The handwritten letter is dated June 9, 1956, and reads in part, “I hope you didn’t mind that wild ride back from the airport – it was wonderful seeing you again, + I guess we all got carried away… .” Accompanied by a “Good-Bye” card from “The Monroe Six” and original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $384 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot774a juliens-mmauction2014-lot774b


Lot 775: MARILYN MONROE BIRTHDAY AND GET WELL CARDS
 A group of seven greeting cards sent to Marilyn Monroe. The cards have birthday and get well messages. Birthday greetings: belated birthday card signed “Delosky” (undated); a belated birthday greeting from Dan Hanrahan, who has included his business card and a lengthy handwritten message (June 1961); and a birthday greeting from Betty Doktor (June 1961). Get well wishes from The Monroe Six (April 1956); Anne McDowell (April 1956); Mr. & Mrs. Henry Peterson (May 1961); and Frank Young (May 1961). Most accompanied by the original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 8 3/4 by 7 3/4 inches
Winning bid:$ 2,187.50 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot775


Lot 776: MARILYN MONROE LETTER AND CARD FROM DELOS SMITH JR.
 A double sided typed letter from Delos Smith Jr. to Marilyn Monroe. Smith wrote in reaction to a TIME magazine article and Delos own discussions with a TIME editor. Smith goes on to gossip about other Hollywood stars and praising Monroe’s appearance at The Actors Studio. Smith signed the letter “Happy Mothers Day, Delos.” Accompanied by a greeting card with a handwritten note from Smith. He signed the card “Bring that old Bus to a Stop and hurry home. Love Delos.” With original transmittal envelope postmarked May 6, 1956.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Larger, 9 by 6 inches
Winning bid: $256 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot776a juliens-mmauction2014-lot776b juliens-mmauction2014-lot776c


Lot 777: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM PAT NEWCOMB
 A typed, signed letter from Pat Newcomb to Marilyn Monroe; Milton Greene was cc’d. Dated April 24, 1956, the letter is in regard to an event for Nunnally Johnson. Typed on Arthur P. Jacobs Public Relations stationery, Newcomb references recent doctor’s orders have clamped down on Monroe’s social life in order to “complete the picture in good health.” The film Newcomb refers to was Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956), Monroe’s first film under new contract with 20th Century Fox and her newly formed company, Marilyn Monroe Productions.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $320 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot777


Lot 778: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTERS
 A group of three letters received by Marilyn Monroe. The first is a handwritten letter dated January 6, 1956, that reads in part, “I think it’s wonderful that you stood your ground and got your way.” Signed indistinctly. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope with a New York return address from “Rella.” The second is a greeting card from June Alpino with an invitation for Monroe to join her at the circus and a gift to give Monroe from a third party. Alpino has included a small black and white photograph of herself. The third is a five-page letter from “Jeanie” handwritten on Disneyland Hotel stationery. The letter mentions Jeanie and her husband Frank going to spring training and laments the fact that she hasn’t seen Monroe in more than a year. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope postmarked March 26, 1956.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $375 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot778a juliens-mmauction2014-lot778b
juliens-mmauction2014-lot778c juliens-mmauction2014-lot778d juliens-mmauction2014-lot778e 


 

Lot 779: MARILYN MONROE WESTERN COSTUME SHIPPING RECEIPTS
 A pair of shipping inventory receipts from Western Costume Company. Both are dated May 28, 1956, regarding the leasing of costume items to Marilyn Monroe Productions. Each notes that the statement should be sent to “Milton Green” [sic]. These items were most likely used in Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956), which began shooting in May.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $320 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot779 

 


Lot 783: MARILYN MONROE "THAT OLD BLACK MAGIC" DOCUMENTS
 A pair of papers with the typed lyrics of the song "That Old Black Magic," one on Chateau Marmont stationery with handwritten corrections and two smaller half sheets with the typed lyrics stapled together. Marilyn Monroe sang "That Old Black Magic" in the film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The documents are presumed to have been used to rehearse or during filming of the scene.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
Winning bid: $768 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot783 


Lot 784: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM PARADE PUBLICATIONS
 A typed, signed letter to Marilyn Monroe from Bob Jennings, a staff writer at Parade Publications Inc. Dated March 6, 1956, Jennings' letter refers to an article Jennings was writing about Korea that included Monroe. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope with numerous markings on the outside, including one that reads “important take care this afternoon!”
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$ 1,152 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot784 


Lot 785:  MARILYN MONROE PRESCRIPTION FROM LEE SEIGEL
 A Marilyn Monroe slip of paper with two prescriptions written by Fox studio physician Lee Seigel dated April 6, 1956. The prescriptions are for Diamox and Achenalin. Both appear to be prescribed for an eye issue.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$375 - Estimate: $200 - $300
juliens-mmauction2014-lot785 

 


Lot 786: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM HER ANALYST
  A handwritten letter from psychotherapist Margaret Herz Hohenberg to Marilyn Monroe on Hohenberg’s stationery and dated May 10, 1956. The letter concerns the accompanying account statement and a recent telephone session. Also present is the original transmittal envelope addressed to Monroe at Chateau Marmont. Monroe began to see Hohenberg in 1955 at the recommendation of Milton Greene.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot786


 

Lot 790: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN NOTES
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe handwritten notes. The first is pencil on lined legal paper that appears to be a Lee Strasberg quote; the page is titled “Lee S.” The second is written in pencil on a blank sheet of paper and reads “My Darling, my darling, my poppy.”
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 12 1/2 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$ 4,687.50 - Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot790 


Lot 791: MARILYN MONROE 1956 BIRTHDAY CARD FROM PETER LEONARDI
 A belated birthday card sent to Marilyn Monroe from Peter Leonardi. The card appears to be postmarked June 2, 1956. This would make it after Monroe’s break from Leonardi at a time when it was proposed Monroe had written in her journals that she was afraid of him and thought “… Peter wants to be a woman – and would like to be me – I think…” (see Fragments p. 96 and Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox by Lois Banner (p. 289-290).
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
5 by 5 inches
Winning bid: $128 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot791 


Lot 793: MARILYN MONROE SAHARA HOTEL DOCUMENTS
 A group of Marilyn Monroe Sahara Hotel documents. Dated 1956, the documents relate to Monroe’s stay at the Sahara Hotel in Phoenix, Arizona. Items include two telegrams sent to Monroe at the hotel, three hotel message slips, and a letter to Monroe written on Sahara Hotel stationery from Dr. S. Purple, with original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Sizes vary
 Winning bid: $896 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot793a juliens-mmauction2014-lot793b juliens-mmauction2014-lot793c  


Lot 794: MARILYN MONROE ARCHIVE DOCUMENTS
 A group of correspondence received by or regarding Marilyn Monroe, including a 1956, letter from Inez Melson to Florence Thomas; a March 10, 1956 letter from “Olive” to “Jean”; eight hotel telephone message slips from March and May 1956; several phone messages on scraps of paper; a handwritten note left for Monroe by Ted Harper; an invitation to The Original Wine House with handwritten note on verso from proprietor Bob Purvis; empty transmittal envelopes addressed to Monroe; and two newspaper clippings about Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 4 by 10 inches
Winning bid:$1,152 - Estimate: $300 - $500 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot794 

 


Lot 795: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED AND KEPT LETTERS
 A pair of letters received by Marilyn Monroe. The first is from Fred Libby written on Pan American World Airways stationery, addressed to Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Miller, dated July 6, 1956. Libby congratulates the pair on their recent wedding, and he says he hopes to meet Mr. Miller someday. The second letter is addressed to Monroe from a chiropractor named Jacob Kaufman. Kaufman had never met Monroe, but after hearing of her frequent illnesses, he felt compelled to write her with his advice. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope postmarked March 7, 1960.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
 Winning bid:$256 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot795a juliens-mmauction2014-lot795b 


Lot 796: MARILYN MONROE LOVE NOTE FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 A small note handwritten by Arthur Miller to Marilyn Monroe dated "Wed., April 4 - 1:12 p.m." The note reads in part, "I am deeply happy. And agonized that you're not in reach." Signed simply "A."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 by 5 inches
 Winning bid:$2,560 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot796 


Lot 798: MARILYN MONROE CARD FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller handwritten card to Marilyn Monroe dated "Christmas 1955." The front of the card is a cartoon of two despondent characters. Printed text reads, "No, I'm more depressed than you are." Under the text Miller has handwritten "You're not either." The salutation on the card reads "For Marilyn." It goes on to discuss the present that accompanied the card. Also present is the original envelope that reads simply "For Noodle."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$1,280 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot798a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot798b 


Lot 799: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller typed and handwritten love letter to Marilyn Monroe. In the letter Miller addresses Monroe as "Dearest Wife" although their wedding was a month away and his divorce not yet final. Miller has signed the letter "Art," and below his signature he has written, "Please - if I have ever made you cry, or made you one ounce sadder even for a second - forgive me. My perfect girl." Accompanied by original transmittal envelope dated April 30, 1956.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$6,875 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot799 


Lot 800: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 A typed, signed love letter from Arthur Miller to Marilyn Monroe dated April 26, 1956. The letter reads in part, "The publicity is beginning to break evidently. Winchell this morning says I call you long distance all the time...I just worry that Bob and Jane won't be getting any kind of shock out of all this that will make it harder when they meet you." The letter discusses other details of Miller's life at that time. Signed, "kiss you, Art." Miller enclosed a letter from friend Norman Rosten that reads in part, "What are your plans? We won't tell, but we're curious. Even Mary is curious. What's his rush for a divorce, she asked me last week? (As though this was brand new)." Rosten's letter also discusses the press and appears to refer to the pressure on Miller by the House Un-American Activities Committee. Also present is a London review of The Crucible and the original transmittal envelope to Monroe.  Please note that this lot comes with a single transmittal envelope.  Two were shown in the printed catalog.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$3,520 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot800 


Lot 801: ARTHUR MILLER LETTERS FROM HIS CHILDREN
 A pair of letters from Arthur Miller's children mailed by Miller to Marilyn Monroe. The first letter is a single page typed from Robert Miller and dated April 23, 1956. The second is a double-sided handwritten letter from Miller's daughter Jane. Both state they miss their father, thank him for gifts he recently gave them, and share the events of their recent days. Both also state they are sending him their footprint (not present). Jane and Robert are Miller's children with his first wife, Mary Grace Slattery. Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$100 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot801a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot801b 


Lot 802: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller two-page typed signed love letter to Marilyn Monroe dated May 9, 1956. The letter begins "Dearest, Best Person" and reads in part, "It is your suffering in the past that I respect and even bow down to. I see i often as a kind of trial to which you were cruelly put...You were placed in the jaws of this society without the protection of a family, a name, an identity; it is quite as though you were the pure victim...I do know how desperately you want to shake loose from all the dragging horrors of the past." Miller discusses his initial attraction to Monroe, his divorce, and his love for her. Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$5,312.50 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot802 


Lot 803: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller four-page typed and handwritten love letter to Marilyn Monroe dated April 29, 1956. The letter provides insight into Miller's feelings about Monroe just before their wedding. Reads in part" "But what can I do? I love you. When I love somebody I love them, I want them to be near me, to bear my children, to be my wife. You think I am so clean, so faultless, so incapable of untruth that in comparison you are defiled? I have sinned, Marilyn; I am no better than you in any way. I can hate every man you were ever with but I can't hate you." On the third page Miller has affixed a piece of petrified wood and signed the letter "Your lover, slave, friend, father, son, and Pest, Art." The fourth page, written later that same day, is additionally signed "Art." Accompanied by original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$7,040 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot803


Lot 804: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller two-page typed and handwritten love letter to Marilyn Monroe dated May 9, 1956. Miller begins the letter relaying frustration with his soon to be ex-wife Mary Grace Slattery and goes on to tell Monroe that he has disclosed their relationship to his parents and his concerns about his family and children. Miller also references the film "Viva Zapata" (20th Century, 1952), a film that Monroe wanted to work on but was denied by the studio. Miller enclosed sage in the letter and writes below his signature "A little sage brush for your pillow." He additionally asks, "And where is your footprint!!!" Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$4,160 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot804


Lot 806: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller three-page typed, signed love letter to Marilyn Monroe dated May 7, 1956. Miller discusses his upcoming divorce, tension between Monroe and Milton Greene, plans for Monroe to visit him in Reno, and their plan to introduce Monroe to Miller's children. Miller also discusses a recent argument the pair had: "I was separated from you, leaving you in a world of men lusting for you. I wanted you to be reminded that I am desirable...Nevertheless, it was still more alarming to you than it should have been -- your reaction was out of proportion... ." Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope addressed to Monroe at Hotel Chateau Marmont in Hollywood.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$4,160 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot806


Lot 807: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER FROM ARTHUR MILLER
 An Arthur Miller handwritten love letter dated May 11, 1956. Written on two lined pages. Salutation is to "Dearest Wife." Reads in part, "I am walking around in a daze of love...I wanted to buy a wedding ring but they don't have really nice ones here - I looked... ." Miller goes on to discuss an apartment he would like to rent, recent negative articles, and his love for her. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$12,160 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot807a juliens-mmauction2014-lot807b


Lot 808: MARILYN MONROE LOVE LETTER TO ARTHUR MILLER
 A Marilyn Monroe single-page handwritten letter to Arthur Miller, presumably unsent. In the undated letter Monroe is responding to an earlier letter she received from Miller. The letter reads in part, "...there was no choice to make - the same road was always before me. So when you speak of my nobility it really wasn't so noble... ." Accompanied by two sheets of blank paper found with this letter.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$43,750 - Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot808 


Lot 810: MARILYN MONROE PUBLICITY DOCUMENTS FOR THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL
 Marilyn Monroe’s copies of publicity reports for the film “The Sleeping Prince,” which was the working title of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). One document is titled “Projected Logistical Report/ Publicity” and contains 45 pages of information. The second is a 14-page document titled “Publicity and Promotion Budget for U.K.” Both cover pages list the people cc’d on the documents. Next to Monroe’s name is a check mark, indicating that these were her personal copies.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot810a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot810b 


Lot 811: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM PAT NEWCOMB
 A typed letter to Marilyn Monroe from Pat Newcomb. The letter is cc’d to Milton Greene, undated, typed on Newcomb’s stationery. Newcomb asks if Monroe can meet with a journalist who has flown in from London. She also mentions mailing Monroe her swimsuit and asks if she can bring her anything else.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
8 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$384 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot811 


Lot 813: MARILYN MONROE HANDWRITTEN NOTE TO VERA
 A Marilyn Monroe handwritten note to "Vera." Written in pencil on a tablet of unlined white paper. The note was presumably never sent. The note reads in part, "...I never had a friend before this - I mean one that was a girl..."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid:$3,520 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot813 


Lot 817: ARTHUR MILLER LETTERS FROM HIS CHILDREN
 A group of four letters, two drawings, and one postcard from two of Arthur Miller’s children, Bobby and Jane, to their father and Marilyn Monroe and one letter from Jane to their pets. Most addressed “To Daddy,” one to “MMM” from Bobby Miller. Those letters that are dated are from 1958 and 1959.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
and Partial Lot 816, "Julien's Summer Sale," Julien's Auctions, Las Vegas, June 26, 2009
Largest, 9 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$ 128  -  Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot817 


Lot 818: MARILYN MONROE SENT ARTHUR MILLER MANUSCRIPT
 An Arthur Miller typed manuscript sent to Marilyn Monroe. The seven-page draft of an article that Miller wrote for LIFE magazine is about his then wife and the series of photographs she took with Richard Avedon posing as five different actresses: Lillian Russell, Marlene Dietrich, Clara Bow, Jean Harlow and Theda Bara. The manuscript contains a number of handwritten corrections. The final article was rewritten and ultimately titled "My Wife Marilyn" and appeared alongside Avedon's photographs in the December 22, 1958, issue of LIFE magazine. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$ 6,250  -  Estimate: $5,000 - $7,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot818 


Lot 819: MARILYN MONROE STATEMENT AND WARNER BROTHERS TELEGRAM
 A telegram received by Marilyn Monroe from Warner Brothers, dated May 24, 1957. The two-page telegram is in regard to Monroe’s former business partner, Milton Greene, receiving a credit on the film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Accompanied by an undated typed statement by Monroe regarding the situation with Greene, condemning his leadership of Marilyn Monroe Productions and his attempt to receive an Executive Producer credit for this film.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
Winning bid: $384 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot819a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot819b 


Lot 820: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED LETTERS
 A pair of letters sent to Marilyn Monroe. The first is from Alex North, a neighbor in Connecticut; accompanied by transmittal envelope. The second is from Herb Martin and is written on the back of a copy of a newspaper article that mentions Martin. Both letters express a desire to see Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
Winning bid: $75 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot820a juliens-mmauction2014-lot820b juliens-mmauction2014-lot820c

 


Lot 825: LETTERS BY AND REGARDING MARILYN MONROE'S MOTHER
 A group of letters written by and regarding Marilyn Monroe's troubled mother, Gladys Eley (previously Monroe, Baker, and Mortenson). Group includes letters written by Eley while institutionalized at Rockhaven Sanitarium in Verdugo City (Montrose), California, circa late 1950s to early 1960s. Several of the letters are stamped but not postmarked, believed to have been saved from the mail by Inez Melson, who was appointed guardian of Eley. The letters reveal insight into Eley's schizophrenia. The handwritten letters are addressed to The President of the United States, Mother Church – The First Church of Christ Scientist, and a letter that was mailed to Melson from Eley. Also present is a letter from Bernice Miracle, Marilyn's sister, to Melson. Those that are dated are from the early 1960s.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
and Lot 131, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
Sizes vary
Winning bid:$6,400 - Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot825 


Lot 826: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED POSTCARDS
 Three Marilyn Monroe received postcards. The first, with an image of the Golden Gate Bridge, was sent to Monroe in Idaho in May 1956. Possibly sent by Peter Lawford, initialed indistinctly as “PL” or “RL.” The second, sent from “G,” is a postcard of La Promenade des Anglais in Nice. Sent to Monroe in May 1961. The card reads in part, “Hope your ‘Killer Kut’ is still in good shape," indicating that "G" stands for hairstylist George Masters. The third is a card sent in 1956 from Suzanne, who writes, “I hadn’t heard from you in 2 weeks so I played hookey.”
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 4 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$500 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot826a juliens-mmauction2014-lot826b


Lot 827: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM MAY REIS
 A handwritten letter from May Reis to Marilyn Monroe. The letter is written on Renvyle House Hotel stationery, dated May 10, 1961. Reis writes about her stay in Ireland and travels; signed simply “May.” Reis was Monroe’s personal secretary and friend. Accompanied by original transmittal envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 1/2 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$1,000 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot827 


Lot 828: MARILYN MONROE MEDICAL INVOICES
 A group of Marilyn Monroe medical invoices that includes invoices from Dr. D. Russell Anderson, Dr. Margaret Herz Hohenberg, dentist Paul Kniss, Dr. Edward J. Simons, and one from the offices of Dr. Myron Prinzmetal and Dr. Rexford Kennamer, among others; seven items total.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$ 437.50 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot828 


Lot 829: MARILYN MONROE FAN MAIL
 A group of more than 75 letters, photographs, religious tracts and postcards sent to Marilyn Monroe by her fans. The letters span from 1956 to 1961. The letters, mailed by Monroe's fans from around the world, offer advice, matchmaking, and get well wishes and make requests.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$4,062.50 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot829 juliens-mmauction2014-lot832b 


Lot 830: MARILYN MONROE SCRAPBOOK FROM FAN
 A scrapbook given to Marilyn Monroe by a dying fan. The 30-page book contains inspirational images and text, both handwritten and pasted in. Most of the entries are religious in nature. Accompanied by a letter from the fan.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
9 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$192 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot830 


Lot 831: MARILYN MONROE FAN MAIL
 A group of more than 100 letters, cards and postcards sent to Marilyn Monroe by her fans. The letters, which span from 1954 to 1962, were mailed from fans around the world, including a card in a mailing tube from Lyle & Scott LTD in Scotland that was signed by approximately 900 employees of the clothing manufacturer.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Sizes vary
 Winning bid:$3,200 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot831a juliens-mmauction2014-lot832b 


Lot 832: MARILYN MONROE FAN MAIL
 A group of approximately 90 letters sent to Marilyn Monroe by her fans. The majority of the letters were sent to Monroe posthumously in the second half of 1962. The letters were mailed from fans around the world.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest envelope, 7 by 4 inches
 Winning bid:$4,375 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot832a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot832b 


Lot 833: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED NOTE
 A Marilyn Monroe received typed note signed “Norm,” believed to be from Norman Rosten. The humorous undated note reads in part, “Thanks for your sweet darlin’ wire: it all helped carry me through the valley of the shadow...Did you ever think that some people just gotta stay alive?” Rosten goes on to mention recent reviews.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
4 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$ 512 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot833 


Lot 834: MARILYN MONROE POSTCARD FROM NORMAN ROSTEN
 A postcard to “Marilyn Miller” from Norman Rosten sent from Alaska. The image on the front of the card is of a nude Inuit woman in the snow. Signed simply “N,” postmarked January 26, 1959. Stamp has been cut away. Rosten wrote Marilyn: An Untold Story in 1973.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
5 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$256 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot834a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot834b 


Lot 835: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED CHECK TO HEDDA ROSTEN
 A Marilyn Monroe signed check from a Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. account with Colonial Trust Company in New York City. Numbered 240, dated February 5, 1960, and written to Hedda Rosten in the amount of $65.85. The typed check also details in the upper right corner taxes removed from the gross amount due Rosten of $75.00. Rosten and her husband, Norman, were friends of Monroe’s, and Hedda was also employed by Monroe as a private secretary. Endorsed by Hedda Rosten on verso.
3 1/8 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $5,120 - Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot835 


Lot 941: MARILYN MONROE NEW YORK POST RELATED DOCUMENTS
 A Marilyn Monroe received letter from the New York Post and a typescript copy of a New York Post article. The typed signed letter is from New York Post columnist Max Lerner, dated May 10, 1961, and written on New York Post stationery. The typescript is of an article written by New York Post gossip columnist Earl Wilson circa 1961. Titled “Marilyn’s not A-Marryin’ ” and is typed on three pages.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$192 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot941a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot941b


Lot 950: MARILYN MONROE POSTCARDS FROM PAT NEWCOMB
 A pair of postcards handwritten to Marilyn Monroe by Pat Newcomb and sent to Monroe’s address, 882 North Doheny Drive in Los Angeles. Both cards were mailed in 1961, one sent from New Delhi with an image of the Taj Mahal, the other from Hong Kong with an image of the city. The addressee on both cards is “Marge Stengel.”
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$320 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot950a juliens-mmauction2014-lot950b
juliens-mmauction2014-lot950c juliens-mmauction2014-lot950d


Lot 951: MARILYN MONROE TELEGRAM FROM PRODUCER ANN MARLOWE
 A telegram to Marilyn Monroe from producer Ann Marlowe again offering Monroe a part in the teleplay Rain . Monroe appears to have dictated a response to her secretary, who wrote in pencil, “I would only consider it if Lee Strasberg directed it.” Dated June 21, 1960.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
4 1/2 by 6 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$512 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot951


Lot 952: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS FROM MCA MANAGEMENT
 A group of three letters received by Marilyn Monroe from MCA Management Ltd. The first is dated May 17, 1955, and was sent to Monroe in New York. The second is dated May 3, 1961 and is accompanied by a confidential letter typed on 20th Century Fox stationery addressed to George Chasin regarding a role for Monroe in a film adaptation of the book Zuleika Dobson by Max Beerbohm. The third is from Chasin, dated May 2, 1961, regarding two screenplays delivered via messenger to Monroe’s bungalow at the Beverly Hills Hotel, where she was recovering from sinus trouble.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
9 by 6 1/4 inches
Winning bid:$192 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot952a juliens-mmauction2014-lot952b juliens-mmauction2014-lot952c
juliens-mmauction2014-lot952d 


Lot 953: MARILYN MONROE LETTER FROM 20TH CENTURY FOX
 A typed, signed letter from 20th Century Fox to Marilyn Monroe Productions. Dated March 4, 1959, the letter directs Monroe to appear at the studio on April 14, 1959, to begin work on "Time and Tide," later re-titled Wild River (20th Century, 1960). Monroe was ultimately replaced by Lee Remick.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$875 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot953


Lot 954: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS REGARDING FILM ROLES
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe received letters regarding potential film projects. The first is a three-page typed, signed letter from director Melvin Frank regarding Monroe starring in The Road to Hong Kong (UA, 1962). The undated letter, typed on Beverly Hills Hotel stationery, reads in part, “I wanted to thank you again for reading our script and tell you how curiously frustrated and bumbling I felt on the phone last night… .” Signed “Mel.” The second is a two-page handwritten letter from producer Harold Hecht. The letter is in regard to an unproduced film, "Lucy Crown" that Hecht would like Monroe to star in. Accompanied by original envelope.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 1/2 by 7 1/4 inches
Winning bid: $512 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot954a juliens-mmauction2014-lot954b 


Lot 955: MARILYN MONROE LETTERS FROM INDUSTRY INSIDERS
 A group of four letters sent to Marilyn Monroe by members of the entertainment industry. The first is a typed, signed letter from agent Freddie Fields dated May 20, 1961. It references a script that is no longer present. The second is a typed, signed letter from agent Johnny Maschio typed on Showcase Enterprises, Inc stationery and dated April 28, 1961. Maschio asks Monroe to contact him, emphasizing "It is very important." The third letter is a typed signed solicitation from casting director Owen McLean on Twentieth Century-Fox stationery. The fourth is a typed letter, written on Twentieth Century Fox stationery, is dated May 29, 1956 that appears to be signed "Harry." It reads "Marilyn: The post art turned out fine. Thanks for your gracious help."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot955a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot955b  juliens-mmauction2014-lot955c
juliens-mmauction2014-lot955d  juliens-mmauction2014-lot955e


Lot 956: MARILYN MONROE DOCTOR'S NOTES
 A pair of handwritten doctor’s notes left for Marilyn Monroe. The first is a single double-sided sheet signed indistinctly by a doctor. The message states that the doctor left two prescriptions for Monroe with Dr. Hohenberg and gives directions on how to use the medication. The second is a small single-sided note written in an unknown hand, also about medication and notes about a doctor.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
9 by 6 inches
Winning bid:$384 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot956


Lot 957: MARILYN MONROE NOTE WRITTEN ON L.A. INSTITUTE FOR PSYCHOANALYSIS NOTE PAPER
 A Marilyn Monroe retained note written on a small piece of paper from the Los Angeles Institute for Psychoanalysis. The note refers to a Dr. Walter Greenson. Written in an unknown hand.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
5 1/4 by 4 1/4 inches
Winning bid:$437.50 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot957 


Lot 958: MARILYN MONROE PRESCRIPTION CENTER RECEIPTS AND INVOICE
 Marilyn Monroe carbon copy receipts from The Prescription Center in Beverly Hills, California. Both are dated April 22, 1961, but with separate amounts. The second receipt bears Monroe’s signature on the carbon. One receipt is primarily for prescriptions, the other for makeup and personal care items. Accompanied by an invoice from The Prescription Center.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
6 by 4 inches
Winning bid:$2,240 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot958a juliens-mmauction2014-lot958b juliens-mmauction2014-lot958c


Lot 960: MARILYN MONROE LIST OF MEDICATIONS
 A typed sheet of instructions for Marilyn Monroe’s medications. The sheet is titled “Marilyn is to take Pills as follows.” It is undated and does not name, only describes the size of the medications.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
11 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $500 - $700
juliens-mmauction2014-lot960 


Lot 961: MARILYN MONROE TELEGRAMS FROM DOCTOR AND MILTON GREENE
 A pair of telegrams received by Marilyn Monroe. The first is an urgent message from Monroe’s doctor to call, May 19, dated 1956. The second is from one-time business partner Milton Greene delivered to Monroe while she was a patient at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital, dated November 12, 1954. Greene writes that he cannot wait to be with Monroe and that he has great news. Accompanied by two Western Union transmittal envelopes.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
5 3/4 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$1,024 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot961


Lot 962: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED TELEGRAMS
 A group of three telegrams sent by friends and colleagues to Marilyn Monroe. The first is from “May,” presumed to be May Reis, that offers Monroe get well wishes. The second is from Harold Mirisch. It reads “As long as we cannot talk to each other on the telephone how about you and I having dinner Monday night love = Harold Mirisch.” The third is from Nedda Logan sent to Monroe at the Chateau Marmont on May 17, 1956. Logan raves about Monroe’s performance in Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956) which her husband directed.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 5 3/4 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot962


Lot 963: MARILYN MONROE MEDIA TELEGRAMS
 A pair of telegrams regarding Marilyn Monroe. The first was sent to Monroe on November 23, 1954 from the Showmen’s Trade Review regarding Monroe being named Female Money Making Star for 1954. The second is a two page telegram from The Daily Mirror in London sent to Pat Newcomb with interview questions for Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 5 3/4 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$448 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot963


Lot 965: MARILYN MONROE FINANCIAL DOCUMENTS
 Marilyn Monroe financial documents relating to loans. A William Morris interoffice memo cover sheet on the first document is dated “2/13/51” with details of expenditures in 1949 and 1950. The second document concerns a $74,000 loan dated May 29, 1962, only three months before Monroe’s death. Five pages total.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
Largest, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$256 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot965a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot965e
juliens-mmauction2014-lot965b juliens-mmauction2014-lot965c juliens-mmauction2014-lot965d


Lot 966: MARILYN MONROE STATEMENT REGARDING GÉRARD PHILIPE
 A Marilyn Monroe statement regarding the death of actor Gérard Philipe. Handwritten in an unknown hand on the back of a Beverly Hills Hotel notecard in blue ink. Monroe laments that she never had the opportunity to work with the French actor. Marked in pencil “Statement, Radio 1 – Europe.” Philipe died in 1959 just shy of his 37th birthday.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$437.50 - Estimate: $100 - $200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot966a juliens-mmauction2014-lot966b


Lot 967: MARILYN MONROE RECEIVED INVITATIONS
 A group of three invitations sent to Marilyn Monroe. The first is a card believed to have accompanied flowers sent to Monroe at the Beverly Hills Hotel. The card invites Monroe and Pat (presumably Pat Newcomb) for a quiet evening free of "shop talk." Signed "Minerva (Nelli)." The second, written on Beverly Hills Hotel stationery, reads in part, "I just traveled 6000 miles to see you and find out how you are." It is signed "Henry." The third is written on a Beverly Hills Hotel card inviting Monroe to dine. Signed "Jack Halperin." All are accompanied by unpostmarked transmittal envelopes.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$192 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot967 


Lot 968: MARILYN MONROE CHECKS, INVOICES, BILLS AND RECEIPTS
 A group of Marilyn Monroe invoices, bills and two checks. The group includes a pair of checks from the Colonial Trust Company of New York, the first is blank except for the check number “21,” the other is dated April 14, 1956, and has been made out to Dr. C. Russell Anderson but is unsigned, written in an unknown hand; a Jurgensen’s Grocery Company invoice from April 1961 and promotional flyer, return envelope and original transmittal envelope; an invoice from Beverly Hills Music Company dated May 1961 for 28 LPs purchased by Monroe, with itemized slip, return envelopes and original transmittal envelope; an invoice from Au Petit Jean restaurant from April 1961, with original transmittal envelope; and insured postage receipts from the United States Post Office from 1956.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 5 3/4 by 11 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot968a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot968e 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot968b juliens-mmauction2014-lot968c juliens-mmauction2014-lot968d


Lot 969: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL TELEPHONE MESSAGES
 A group of 20 hotel telephone message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from May 1 to May 6, 1961, and include messages from George Chasin, Norman Brokaw, José Ferrer, Frank Rosenberg, Henry Rosenfeld, and George Masters, among others. Accompanied by four Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot969 


Lot 970: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL TELEPHONE MESSAGES
 A group of 20 hotel telephone message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from May 8 to May 15, 1961, and include messages from George Chasin, Jay Kanter, Mr. Gillerof (presumed to be Sydney Guilaroff), Henry Rosenfeld, Sidney Skolsky, and Julie [sic] Styne, among others. Accompanied by four Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$896 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot970 


Lot 971: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL TELEPHONE MESSAGES
 A group of 20 hotel telephone message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from May 8 to May 15, 1961, and include messages from George Chasin, Jay Kanter, Mr. Gillerof (presumed to be Sydney Guilaroff), Henry Rosenfeld, Sidney Skolsky, and Julie [sic] Styne, among others. Accompanied by four Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$896 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot971


Lot 972: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL TELEPHONE MESSAGES 
A group of 20 hotel telephone message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from May 15 to May 20, 1961, and include messages from George Chasin, Harold Mirisch, Sidney Cassipell, Melvin Frank,and Rupert Allan among others. Accompanied by three Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$1,024 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot972 


Lot 973: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL TELEPHONE MESSAGES
 A group of 20 hotel telephone message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from May 21 to June 1, 1961, and include messages from Agnes Flanagan, Donald Barry, Ben Gary, Minna Wallis, Ernie Kovak [sic], Ben Platt Jr. and Clifton Webb, among others. Accompanied by three Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot973 


Lot 974: MARILYN MONROE HOTEL TELEPHONE MESSAGES
 A group of 20 hotel telephone message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from June 1 to June 12, 1961, and include messages from Ted Jordan, Dr. Krohn, Harrison Carroll, George Chasin, Clifton Webb and Mr. Guilaroff (presumed to be Sydney Guilaroff), among others. Accompanied by three Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot974 


Lot 975: MARILYN MONROE GROUP OF HOTEL MESSAGES
 A group of 17 hotel telephone and package delivery message slips for Marilyn Monroe. Messages date from May to June 1961 and include messages from Norman Brokaw, Richard Conte, George Chasin, Bill Penzer, Miss Wallace (believed to refer to Minna Wallis), Ted Jordan and Harold Mirisch, among others. Thirteen of the messages are accompanied by or still affixed to Beverly Hills Hotel door hangers.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Winning bid: $640 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot975


 Lot 976: MARILYN MONROE GROUP OF NOTES, MESSAGES AND HANDWRITTEN PROSE
 A Beverly Hills Hotel note pad with a notation on the top page together with more than 30 loose pages from a similar note pad. The pages contain phone messages, including ones from George Chasin, Glenn Ford, Frank Sinatra, Josh Logan and Sandy Meisner; telephone numbers; notations; appointment reminders; and a single sheet with handwritten prose that has been crossed out but appears to be in Monroe’s hand. It reads, “All day long he stayed/ with me; and one sailed in perfect calmness… .”
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
5 1/2 by 4 inches
Winning bid:$14,080 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot976 


 Lot 977: MARILYN MONROE FINANCIAL DOCUMENTS
 A folder of Marilyn Monroe's financial documents relating to loans from City National Bank in Beverly Hills, California. The documents date from 1961 to 1962 and include file copies of typed letters from Monroe's lawyer Milton Rudin and of letters sent from Monroe's secretary as well as deposit receipts. Correspondence discusses transfers, deposits and financial arrangements made on behalf of Monroe. Folder has a typed label that reads “MARILYN MONROE 1961-1962/ CITY NATIONAL BANK OF BEVERLY HILLS.”
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
Largest, 11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Winning bid:$1,152 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot977 


 Lot 978: MARILYN MONROE CHASEN'S RESTAURANT DOCUMENTS
 A group of Marilyn Monroe documents relating to Chasen’s restaurant. The first is an invitation dated May 3, 1961, with a handwritten note that reads “Chasin,” which could refer to Monroe’s agent or that it came from him. Found with: Chasen's restaurant invoice and credit form from May 1962; a Chasen's card with Monroe’s typed name; and a telegram invitation for an event with French director Christian–Jacque.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 8 1/2 by 4 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$448 - Estimate: $100 - $200

juliens-mmauction2014-lot978a 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot978b juliens-mmauction2014-lot978c juliens-mmauction2014-lot978d 


 Lot 979: MARILYN MONROE CARD FROM DELOS SMITH JR.
 A handwritten card from Delos V. Smith Jr. to Marilyn Monroe. The card, with an image of a Native American man in front of a tipi, reads in full, “New Teepee?/ Enjoy Heapee!/ Little Peepee,” with original transmittal envelope postmarked April 1961. Envelope has additional writing and post office notations. Together with two envelopes addressed to Monroe from Smith.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
3 by 5 inches
Winning bid:$256 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot979 


 Lot 984: MARILYN MONROE REAL ESTATE DOCUMENT
 A Marilyn Monroe signed, typed purchase offer for Monroe's Los Angeles home on Helena Drive. This is the only home Monroe ever purchased. The document dated January 9, 1962, and contains a purchase price of $52,500. Monroe would die just eight months later.
15 by 9 1/4 inches
Winning bid:$ 17,500 - Estimate: $7,000 - $9,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot984a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot984b


 Lot 986: MARILYN MONROE RECEIPTS
 A pair of receipts from the Mart on Santa Monica Boulevard. One is dated July 31, 1962, for the purchase of a tapestry; the second, undated, is for the purchase of a table. Both are marked paid on August 1, 1962. Accompanied by a business card from the Mart. Monroe seems to have been actively decorating the house she had purchased only a few months earlier. Five days after visiting the Mart, Monroe passed away.
Each, 6 by 3 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$1,625 - Estimate: $1,300 - $1,600

juliens-mmauction2014-lot986 


 Lot 987: MARILYN MONROE AUTO INSURANCE DOCUMENT
A Marilyn Monroe automobile insurance document with effective date March 23, 1962, issued by Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company through Ebenstein and Company. The endorsement portion of the document states that Monroe is excluded as a driver under this policy. Five pages total.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
12 1/2 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $1,600  - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot987 juliens-mmauction2014-lot987a


Lot 989: MARILYN MONROE FUNERAL CARD
 An original card from the funeral of Marilyn Monroe on Wednesday, August 8, 1962, at the Westwood Village Mortuary in Los Angeles. The front of the card bears an image of the Bok Singing Tower. The inside reads in part, "In Memory of/ Marilyn Monroe/ Born June 1st, 1926/ Passed Away/ August 5th, 1962,” with the details of her funeral service. Facing page is printed with Psalm 23. Accompanied by a photocopy of an information packet about the services for Monroe that includes the eulogy given by Lee Strasberg, a list of invited guests, and a letter to those not invited to the service.
5 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
Winning bid: $2,560 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot989 juliens-mmauction2014-lot989a


24 mars 2014

1/07/1956 Cérémonie Juive Mariage Marilyn et Arthur

Durant la semaine précédente (du 24 au 29 juin 1956) passée à Roxbury dans la propriété de Arthur Miller, Marilyn Monroe a demandé à Augusta Miller, la mère d'Arthur, de lui apprendre des recettes de plats typiquement juifs.
Par ailleurs, Marilyn insiste pour que les Miller téléphonent à un rabbin de la branche réformée du judaïsme, Robert Goldburg, qui accepte de lui donner une brève instruction religieuse et de célébrer la cérémonie nuptiale.
During the previous week (24 to 29 June 1956) into Roxbury, at the home of Arthur Miller, Marilyn Monroe asked to Augusta Miller, Arthur's mother, to teach her recipes from typical Jewish meals.
Furthermore, Marilyn insists for that Miller phone to a rabbi of the reformed branch of Judaism, Robert Goldburg, who agrees to give her a brief religious instruction and to celebrate the wedding ceremony.

Le dimanche 1er juillet 1956, soit deux jours après la cérémonie civile du mariage, est célébré le mariage juif de Marilyn Monroe et Arthur Miller. C'est Marilyn qui avait insisté pour obtenir cette cérémonie religieuse. La cérémonie du mariage est gardée secrète jusqu'au dernier moment.
On Sunday 1st of July 1956, two days after the civil marriage ceremony, is celebrated the Jewish Wedding Ceremony of Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller. This is Marilyn who has insisted to obtain that religious ceremony. The wedding ceremony is kept secret until the last moment.


1956-07-01-Marilyn_Monroe_Certificate_of_Conversion_to_Judaism1Plus tôt dans la journée, Marilyn Monroe se convertie au judaïsme -pour ce mariage- dans la ville de Lewisboro, dans l'Etat de New York: elle promet au rabbin Robert Goldburg, que tous ses enfants seraient élevés dans la foi judaïque et prête serment: "Je déclare, en la présence de Dieu et des témoins assemblés ici, rechercher le compagnonnage d'Israël".
Parmi les témoins se trouvent Arthur Miller, Kermit Miller le frère d'Arthur, et Milton H. Greene. Le rabbin lui remet un certificat de conversion (cf document ci-contre).
Earlier that day, Marilyn Monroe is converted to Judaism -for this marriage- in the town of Lewisboro in the State of New York: she promises to Rabbi Robert Goldburg, that all her children would be raised in the Jewish faith and oath "I declare, in the presence of God and witnesses assembled here, to seek companionship of Israel."
Among the witnesses are Arthur Miller, Kermit Miller the Arthur's brother, and Milton H. Greene. The rabbi gives her a certificate of conversion (see document).


1956-07-01-Ketubah_JewishPrenuptialAgreementArthur Miller et Marilyn Monroe vont signer le Ketubah, un accord prénuptial traditionnellement juif, définissant les droits et les responsabilités de l'époux envers la mariée. Ce document (cf ci-contre), richement coloré, est imprimé sur deux oblongues de feuilles et on peut y lire: "Je suis à mon bien-aimé, et mon bien-aimé est à moi. Aucun homme sans femme, aucune femme sans homme, et ni sans Dieu". Ce certificat témoigne que Arthur Miller et Marilyn Monroe ont été unis dans le mariage dans la ville de Lewisboro, à  Westchester, le 1er Juillet 1956, 22 Tamouz 5716, conformément au rite d'Israël et en conformité avec les lois de l'État de New York. Signé par le Rabbin Robert E. Goldburg et par les témoins: le frère d'Arthur, Kermit Miller, ainsi que du professeur d'art dramatique de Marilyn, Lee Strasberg.
Arthur Miller and Marilyn Monroe’s ketubah, traditionally a special Jewish prenuptial agreement, outlining the rights and responsibilities of the groom in relation to the bride. This beautiful, richly colored document (see above) is printed on two oblong 8 ½ in. x 11 in. leaves and reads, “I am my beloved’s, and my beloved is mine. No man without woman; no woman without man; and neither without God". This Testimonial witnesses that Arthur Miller and Marilyn Monroe were united in marriage in the city of Lewisboro, Westchester on July 1, 1956, 22nd of Tammuz 5716, In accordance with the rite of Israel and in compliance with the laws of the State of New York. Signed by Rabbi Robert E. Goldburg and witnessed by Arthur’s brother, Kermit Miller, as well as Marilyn’s acting coach, Lee Strasberg.


L'après-midi, les invités (amis et famille) attendent sur la terrasse en dalles de la propriété de l'agent littéraire de Miller, Kay Brown, une ancienne ferme, située à Waccabuc, près de Katonah, dans le Comté de Westchester, dans l'Etat de New York, pendant que les futurs mariés arrivent de Roxbury, où se trouve la propriété de Miller. Les invités sont au nombre de 25 (ou 30 selon les sources) et ne sont composés que d'amis très proches et de la famille de Miller: les enfants (Jane et Robert) et parents (Isadore et Augusta Miller) d'Arthur, son frère Kermit Miller, sa soeur Joan Copeland, son cousin Morty Miller et leurs conjoints respectifs, les Strasberg (Lee et Paula), les Greene (Milton et Amy, ainsi que Cecilia, la mère de Milton et Kitty Owen, la cuisinière des Greene), les Rosten (Norman et Hedda), mais aussi Jay Kanter (l'agent de Marilyn), le scénariste George Axelrod et le couturier John Moore. Il fait très chaud ce jour là, les hommes retirent leurs vestes et les femmes portent des petites robes d'été. De longues tables recouvertes de nappes blanches et des chaises pliantes sont installées dans le jardin, près de la baie vitrée de la maison. Comme à son habitude, Marilyn est en retard.
In the afternoon, the guests (friends and family) waiting on the flagstone terrace of the white home of literary agent of Miller, Kay Brown, a former farmhouse, located in Waccabuc, near Katonah, in Westchester County in the State of New York, while the bride and groom come from Roxbury, where there is the Miller's home. Guests are 25 (or 30 depending on the sources) and are composed of only close friends and Miller's family: children (Jane and Robert) and parents (Isadore and Augusta Miller) of Arthur, his brother Kermit Miller, his sister Joan Copeland, his cousin Morty Miller and their respective spouses, the Strasbergs (Lee and Paula) , the Greenes (Milton and Amy, and Cecilia, Milton's mother, and Kitty owen, cooker of the Greene), the Rostens (Norman and Hedda) and also Jay Kanter (Marilyn's publicist), the scriptwriter George Axelrod and the fashion designer John Moore. It is a heat day, so men remove their jackets and women wear little summer dresses. Long tables covered with white tablecloths and folding chairs are set in a large bay window. As usual, Marilyn is late.

 marilyn-monroe-MW-054 marilyn-monroe-MW-055 marilyn-monroe-MW-056
marilyn-monroe-MW-057 marilyn-monroe-MW-058 marilyn-monroe-MW-059
marilyn-monroe-MW-066  marilyn-monroe-MW-067 
marilyn-monroe-MW-068  marilyn-monroe-MW-065 
marilyn-monroe-MW-062 marilyn-monroe-MW-063 marilyn-monroe-MW-064
1956-07-01-wed-house-window  marilyn-monroe-MW-126  marilyn-monroe-MW-018 
1956-07-01-wed-guest-1 marilyn-monroe-MW-141 marilyn-monroe-MW-140 

> Paula Strasberg
marilyn-monroe-MW-219 

 > Amy Greene (à gauche
1956-07-01-wed-amy_greene_left

> Milton Greene
marilyn-monroe-MW-147 

> Milton Greene avec Cecilia (sa mère) et Kitty Owen (sa cuisinière)
marilyn-monroe-MW-011-a

> Jay Kanter et Milton Greene
marilyn-monroe-MW-017 


 1956-07-01-wed_miller-dressPuis Marilyn et Arthur arrivent: elle est vêtue d'un simple blue jean et se précipite dans une chambre à l'étage où la dame d'honneur, Hedda Rosten, l'aide à se changer avec la robe de mariée beige en mousseline de soie, signée des créateurs John Moore et Norman Norell, avec des fronces sur les manches et le corsage et une ceinture de satin sous le buste. Amy Greene a prêté son voile qu'elle a fait tremper dans du café une semaine auparavant, afin de renforcer l'aspect de douceur d'ombres beige du voile en auréole. (cf illustration de Michelle Shin ci-contre). Le costume qu'Arthur porte a été acheté par Milton et fourni par Jack Walker, un ami proche de Greene, qui a couru au magasin de mercerie pour hommes Mannie Walker. Miller le porte avec une cravate et a mis une fleur à sa boutonnière. Les autres dames d'honneur sont Judy Kantor et Amy Greene, qui a aidé Marilyn à se coiffer et se maquiller.

Then Marilyn and Arthur arrive: she is wearing a simple blue jeans and rushes into a room upstairs where matron of honor, Hedda Rosten, help her to change with the wedding chiffon beige dress, by the designers John Moore and Norman Norell, with ruching on the sleeves and bodice and a satin sash under the bust. Amy Greene has loaned her veil that she had soaked veil in coffee a week before, to enhance the appearance of smooth beige shadows of halo veil (see illustration below against Michelle Shin). The suit Arthur wears is actually purchased by Milton and provides by Jack Walker, dear friend of the Greene’s, who runs the Mannie Walker men’s haberdashery store. Miller wears a tie and put a flower in his buttonhole.
The other matrons of honor are Judy Kantor and Amy Greene, who helped Marilyn to make hair and makeup.

marilyn-monroe-MW-074-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-075-b 

Cependant, Marilyn semble perturbée depuis deux jours (en fait, depuis le mariage civil du vendredi): elle est nerveuse, anxieuse et se renferme sur elle-même, comme l'ont constaté Milton et Amy Greene. Milton avait d'ailleurs téléphoné à Irving Stein, l'avocat de Marilyn pour lui demander de "se tenir prêt en cas de difficulté de dernière minute". Pendant que Marilyn se prépare dans la chambre, Milton en profite pour discuter avec elle: "Je ne t'ai pas vu sourire de toute la journée. Tu es bien sûre de ce que tu fais ? (...) Tu veux vraiment de ce mariage ? Tu n'y es pas obligée, tu sais. Si tu veux tout arrêter, ce n'est pas compliqué", lui dit Milton. Des larmes commencent à couler sur le visage de Marilyn et Amy la réconforte en lui précisant: "On peut te mettre dans une voiture pour sortir doucement par la porte de derrière. Nous, on se débrouillera avec les invités. Le mariage civil pourrait certainement être annulé avant que le rituel religieux ne vint apporter sa solennité à l'union". Et Marilyn de répondre calmement: "Non, je crois que je ne veux pas me marier".
Milton sort de la chambre et s'apprête à renvoyer tout le monde, mais Marilyn le rappele: "Non, Milton ! On a invité tous ces gens, on ne peut pas faire ça, on ne peut pas les décevoir !"
D'après Amy, Marilyn avait vu un mauvais présage dans la mort accidentelle de la journaliste Maria Scherbatoff (le 29 juin, lors de la conférence de presse donnée avec Miller à Roxbury): "Mais elle savait aussi, présage ou pas, qu'elle commettait une terrible erreur en acceptant ce mariage". D'ailleurs, un autre ami de Marilyn confie: "Elle n'était pas sûre de l'aimer, mais elle n'était pas sûre non plus de ne pas l'aimer. Au cœur de sa confusion, cependant, était son sentiment qu'elle était dépassée avec cet homme. Son insécurité allait crescendo à cette époque. Elle ne pouvait pas s'empêcher de se demander ce que cet intellectuel voulait d'elle, et cela la rendait folle. Cherchait-il juste une femme trophée, comme Joe ? C'est ce qui se passait vraiment ici."

However, Marilyn seems disturbed for two days (in fact, since the civil marriage on Friday ): she is nervous, anxious and contains about herself, as noted by Milton and Amy Greene. Milton has also phoned to Irving Stein, Marilyn's lawyer, asking him to "be ready in case of trouble of last minute." While Marilyn prepares herself in the bedroom, Milton tooks the opportunity to discuss with her: "I have not seen you smile all the day. You're very sure of what you do ? ( ... ) Do you really want to this marriage ? You are not required on it, you know. If you want to stop everything, it's not complicated, " says Milton. Tears begin to flow on the face of Marilyn and Amy comforts her by saying "We can put you in a car to go out softly by the door behind the house. We will attend the guests. Civil marriage certainly could be canceled before the religious ritual come to bring solemnity to the union." And Marilyn answers calmly, "No, I think I don't want to marry." Milton leaves the room and is about to oust everyone but Marilyn recalls him: "No, Milton ! We have invited all these people, we can't do that, we can't let down them !"
According to Amy, Marilyn saw a bad omen in the car accidental of journalist Maria Scherbatoff whi diead (on June 29, just before the press conference with Miller in Roxbury): "But she also knew, omen or not, that she was making a terrible mistake by accepting this marriage." Moreover, another friend of Marilyn says:
"She wasn't sure that she loved him, but she wasn't sure she didn't. At the core of her confusion, though, was her sense that she was in over her head with this man. Her insecurity were running wild by this time. She couldn't help but Wonder what this intellectual wanted with her, and it was driving her crazy. Was he just looking for a trophy wife, as Joe had ? What was really going on here".


Pendant ce temps, le Rabbin Robert Goldberg et les invités patientent dans le living-room. Milton Greene accompagne Marilyn à la sortie de la chambre pour la mener au bras de Lee Strasberg, qui joue ainsi le rôle du père de substitution de la mariée en la menant à l'autel. La cérémonie, qui a lieu devant la cheminée de marbre du living-room, ne dure qu'à peine 10 minutes et se célèbre selon le rituel juif. Les époux boivent le vin rouge: Marilyn soulève son voile pour déposer ses lèvres sur la coupe. Elle prononce un "je le veux" d'une voix douce et tremblante. Ils s'échangent les alliances: au cours des deux jours précédents, Miller avait acheté un anneau d'or chez Cartier qui portait l'inscription: "A. à M., juin 1956. Maintenant Pour Toujours." Puis, Miller casse son verre en l'écrasant de ses pieds, en souvenir de la destruction de Jérusalem, et la foule s'écrie: "Mazel Tov!"
Meanwhile, Rabbi Robert Goldberg and guests wait in the living room. Milton Greene accompanies Marilyn from the bedroom and lead her to the arm of Lee Strasberg, who plays the role of a surrogate father to the bride, leading her to the altar. The ceremony, which takes place in front of the marble fireplace in the living-room, lasts just 10 minutes and is celebrated according to the Jewish ritual. The couple drink red wine: Marilyn raised her veil to submit her lips on the cup. She delivers an "I do " in a soft, tremulous voice. They shall exchange alliances: in the previous two days, Miller has bought a gold ring from Cartier's which bore the inscription: "A. to M., June 1956, Now For Ever." Then Miller crushes his glass under his feet, in remembrance of the destruction of Jerusalem, and the crowd cried "Mazel Tov!"

--- En attendant la mariée / Waiting for the bride ---

> Kermit Miller, Arthur Miller et Lee Strasberg
marilyn-monroe-MW-069  marilyn-monroe-MW-069-a 

 > Kitty Owen et Cecilia Greene
marilyn-monroe-MW-070

> Hedda Rosten, le Rabbin Goldberg et Arthur Miller
marilyn-monroe-MW-071-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-072-a  

--- La cérémonie / The ceremony ---
marilyn-monroe-MW-076-a  ph-greene-wedding-1956-06-29_c2  marilyn-monroe-MW-094-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-095  marilyn-monroe-MW-125  ph-greene-wedding-1956-06-29_c3 
ph-greene-wedding-1956-06-29_c  
marilyn-monroe-MW-077  marilyn-monroe-MW-078  marilyn-monroe-MW-079 
marilyn-monroe-MW-080  marilyn-monroe-MW-081  marilyn-monroe-MW-085 
marilyn-monroe-MW-082-1  marilyn-monroe-MW-082-1-b  marilyn-monroe-MW-082-2 
marilyn-monroe-MW-031-1  marilyn-monroe-MW-083  marilyn-monroe-MW-084 
marilyn-monroe-MW-004-b  marilyn-monroe-MW-006-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-050-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-051  marilyn-monroe-MW-051-b  marilyn-monroe-MW-053-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-086  marilyn-monroe-MW-087  marilyn-monroe-MW-088 
marilyn-monroe-MW-089  marilyn-monroe-MW-090 
marilyn-monroe-MW-092  marilyn-monroe-MW-093  marilyn-monroe-MW-093-b 
marilyn-monroe-MW-007-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-052  marilyn-monroe-MW-052-b 
marilyn-monroe-MW-073  marilyn-monroe-MW-073-b 
marilyn-monroe-MW-091  marilyn-monroe-MW-091-b  marilyn-monroe-MW-005-b  


Ensuite, le repas du mariage prend des airs bucoliques, avec l'organisation d'un lunch en plein air dans le jardin.
Au menu: homard, dinde et champagne, ainsi que la pièce montée (les Miller s'étaient adressés à huit pâtissiers avant d'en trouver un qui accepte de la confectionner en quelques heures). Marilyn et Arthur coupent ensemble les tranches, et s'embrassent sans retenue. Arthur Miller, habituellement stoïque, se montre très attentionnée et enchanté de sa nouvelle épouse; et Marilyn semble très heureuse. Depuis plusieurs mois, les proches de Miller ont observé une aisance physique qui l'avait complètement transformé. Norman Rosten dira: "Le conte de fées était devenu réalité. Le Prince était apparu, la Princesse était sauve." Marilyn écrira au dos d'une photographie du mariage: "Espoir, Espoir, Espoir."
Then, the wedding meal takes bucolic aspect, with the organization of a lunch outside, in the garden.
On the menu: lobster, turkey and champagne and the wedding cake (Millers had approached eight pastry before finding one who agrees to make it in a few hours). Marilyn and Arthur cut the slices together, and kiss each other without restraint. Arthur Miller, usually stoic, is very caring and delighted with his new wife, and Marilyn seems very happy. For several months, Miller's closest friends have observed a physical ease that has completely transformed him. Norman Rosten will say that "The fairy tale came true. The Prince appeared, the Princess was safe." Marilyn wrote on the back of the wedding photography "Hope, Hope, Hope."

--- Dans la maison / In the house ---

> Kitty Owen (cuisinière des Greene) et Marilyn
marilyn-monroe-MW-033-b-with_kitty_owen-cuisiniere_greene  marilyn-monroe-MW-146 

> Lee Strasberg et Marilyn
marilyn-monroe-MW-142 marilyn-monroe-MW-143 marilyn-monroe-MW-144-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-142-b   marilyn-monroe-MW-145 

 --- Sur la terrasse / On the terrace ---

> Marilyn, Arthur et Joan Copeland (soeur d'Arthur) 
marilyn-monroe-MW-137-a-with_joan_miller_sister  marilyn-monroe-MW-138-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-139-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-138-b  marilyn-monroe-MW-138-c 

> Arthur, Marilyn et Kermit Miller (frère d'Arthur)
marilyn-monroe-MW-098-a-with_kermit_miller marilyn-monroe-MW-099-a marilyn-monroe-MW-100-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-012  marilyn-monroe-MW-123-b 
marilyn-monroe-MW-122-a-with_kermit_miller  marilyn-monroe-MW-123-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-124-a 

> Arthur, Marilyn et Cecilia (mère de Milton Greene)
marilyn-monroe-MW-013  marilyn-monroe-MW-014
marilyn-monroe-MW-013-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-008-with_cecilia_mother_milton_greene 
marilyn-monroe-MW-096  marilyn-monroe-MW-097-a 

> Paula et Lee Strasberg, Marilyn et Arthur
marilyn-monroe-MW-217-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-217-b 

> Marilyn et Arthur
marilyn-monroe-MW-127 marilyn-monroe-MW-129-a marilyn-monroe-MW-131-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-132-a marilyn-monroe-MW-133-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-134-a marilyn-monroe-MW-135-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-128-a marilyn-monroe-MW-130-a marilyn-monroe-MW-136-a 

 --- Le repas / The Lunch ---

marilyn-monroe-MW-220-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-173a  marilyn-monroe-MW-176a  marilyn-monroe-MW-177a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-102  marilyn-monroe-MW-103  marilyn-monroe-MW-158-b 
marilyn-monroe-MW-015  marilyn-monroe-MW-016  marilyn-monroe-MW-218 
marilyn-monroe-MW-101  marilyn-monroe-MW-216-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-148-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-171a  marilyn-monroe-MW-104  marilyn-monroe-MW-109 
marilyn-monroe-MW-105-1  marilyn-monroe-MW-105-2 
marilyn-monroe-MW-106-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-107  marilyn-monroe-MW-108-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-030-1  marilyn-monroe-MW-030-1-b  1956-wed-cap-lunch-1 
marilyn-monroe-MW-020  marilyn-monroe-MW-021-b 
marilyn-monroe-MW-022  marilyn-monroe-MW-019-b 
marilyn-monroe-MW-110 marilyn-monroe-MW-111 marilyn-monroe-MW-112
marilyn-monroe-MW-112-b marilyn-monroe-MW-112-c 
marilyn-monroe-MW-113  marilyn-monroe-MW-114 
marilyn-monroe-MW-114-2  marilyn-monroe-MW-115-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-116-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-117-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-118-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-119  marilyn-monroe-MW-119-b  marilyn-monroe-MW-120-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-121-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-121-b 
ph-greene-wedding-1956-06-29_b1 ph-greene-wedding-1956-06-29_b2 ph-greene-wedding-1956-06-29_b3 
ph-greene-wedding-1956-06-29_b 
marilyn-monroe-MW-028-1  marilyn-monroe-MW-028-1a  1956-wed-cap-lunch-2
marilyn-monroe-MW-023  marilyn-monroe-MW-023-c  marilyn-monroe-MW-023-b 

> La pièce montée
marilyn-monroe-MW-060  marilyn-monroe-MW-060-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-061 
marilyn-monroe-MW-027-a  marilyn-monroe-MW-027-b  marilyn-monroe-MW-156 
marilyn-monroe-MW-157  marilyn-monroe-MW-028-2  marilyn-monroe-MW-029a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-029a-b  marilyn-monroe-MW-029a-c 
ph-greene-wedding-1956-06-29_a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-032-1  marilyn-monroe-MW-032-1a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-032-1-a ph-greene-wedding-1956-06-29_a3 marilyn-monroe-MW-149-a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-150    marilyn-monroe-MW-150-b 
marilyn-monroe-MW-151  marilyn-monroe-MW-151-b  marilyn-monroe-MW-152 
marilyn-monroe-MW-213-b  marilyn-monroe-MW-030-2  marilyn-monroe-MW-030-2-b 
marilyn-monroe-MW-214  marilyn-monroe-MW-215-LeeStrasberg_NormanRosten_JayKanter_PaulaStrasberg_IsadoreMiller  marilyn-monroe-MW-215
marilyn-monroe-MW-154-b ph-greene-wedding-1956-06-29_a1 
marilyn-monroe-MW-031-2-b  ph-greene-wedding-1956-06-29_a2 
marilyn-monroe-MW-031-2  marilyn-monroe-MW-031-2-c  marilyn-monroe-MW-221 
marilyn-monroe-MW-159  marilyn-monroe-MW-160  marilyn-monroe-MW-172a 
marilyn-monroe-MW-174a  marilyn-monroe-MW-175a 


> captures

1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-01-1 1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-01-2 1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-01-3 
1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-02-1 1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-02-2 1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-02-3 
1956-wed_miller-cap01-1  1956-wed_miller-cap01-2  1956-wed_miller-cap01-3 
1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-03-1 1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-03-2 1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-03-3 
1956-wed_miller-cap02-1  1956-wed_miller-cap02-2  1956-wed_miller-cap02-3 
1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-04-1 1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-04-2 1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-04-3 
1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-04-4 1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-04-5 1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-04-6 
1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-05-1 1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-05-2 1956-07-01-jewish_wedding_ceremony_marilyn_arthur-cap_JT_2016-05-3 
1956-wed_miller-cap03-1  1956-wed_miller-cap03-2  1956-wed_miller-cap03-3 
1956-wed_miller-cap04-1  1956-wed_miller-cap04-2  1956-wed_miller-cap04-3 
1956-wed_miller-cap04-4  1956-wed_miller-cap04-5  1956-wed_miller-cap04-6 
1956-wed_miller-cap05-1  1956-wed_miller-cap05-2  1956-wed_miller-cap05-3 
1956-wed_miller-cap06-1  1956-wed_miller-cap06-2  1956-wed_miller-cap06-3 

> videos film footage
 


> photo de presse
1956-07-01-wed_miller-press-1 


.photographies de Milton H. Greene
.sources
:

Marilyn Monroe, biographie de Barbara Leaming
Les vies secrètes de Marilyn Monroe
, d'Anthony Summers
Marilyn Monroe, encyclopédie d'Adam Victor
Les trésors de Marilyn Monroe, de Jenna Glatzer
Marilyn Monroe et les caméras, Georges Belmont 
Life Remembering Marilyn
Marilyn in Fashion
de Nickens and Zeno


 © All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.  

Enregistrer

27 février 2014

21/06/1956 Conférence de presse Sutton Place

La déposition de Arthur Miller devant la commission des activités antiaméricaines a lieu le 21 juin 1956 à Washington et débute peu avant 10 heures. Miller s'y présente, vêtu d'un costume bleu marine, avec son avocat Joseph L. Rauh et fait face aux questions de Richard Arens, le représentant de l'HUAC (House Un-American Committee) et à Francis Walter, le Président de la cour; Miller affirme s'être inscrit à un cours de formation marxiste en 1939 mais dit ignorer avoir présenté une demande d'inscription au parti communiste. Il déclare alors qu'il n'avait jamais été communiste, mais il reconnaît avoir été associé par le passé avec un certain nombre de groupes communistes. Il déclare avoir été présent à cinq ou six réunions d'auteurs communistes à New York en 1947.
Mais il a toujours refusé de nommer les personnes qu'il avait rencontrées à des réunions communistes et déclare devant les parlementaires: "Je ne protège pas des communistes ni le parti communiste, j'essaie juste de me protéger moi-même (...) Je ne saurais attirer des ennuis à d'autres personnes en les nommant. C'étaient des écrivains, des poètes, autant que je sache; et la vie d'écrivain, malgré ce qu'il semble parfois, n'est pas facile. Je vous demande de ne pas me poser cette question. Je vous dirai tout ce que vous voulez sur moi. Je vais prendre la responsabilité pour tout ce que j'ai fait, mais je ne peux pas prendre la  responsabilité pour un autre être humain. (...) Je pense que cela serait une catastrophe et une calamité si le parti communiste dirigeait notre pays."
Il déclare aussi qu’il avait dénoncé la Commission quand elle enquêtait sur les « Dix d’Hollywood » (les scénaristes mis sur la liste noire à cause de leurs opinions politiques considérées dangereuses) ; qu’il s’était opposé à la loi Smith, laquelle considérait hors la loi quiconque prônait le renversement du gouvernement car pour Miller "la littérature ne peut exister: un homme doit pouvoir écrire une pièce ou un poème sur quelque sujet que ce soit."
Ses déclarations sont reproduites dans la presse et, pour le plus grand plaisir de Marilyn, il devient une sorte de modèle de lutte contre la censure et la répression.
Immédiatement, Francis Walter menace de citation à comparaître, mais il propose en alternative à Joseph Rauh d'abandonner les charges si Marilyn Monroe acceptait d’être photographiée en serrant la main à Walter; Miller rejete l'offre et dénonce une telle proposition.

Arthur Miller's testimony before the Committee on Un-American Activities helds on June 21, 1956 in Washington and begins shortly before 10:00 am. Miller presents, wearing a navy blue suit, with his attorney Joseph L. Rauh, and faced the questions from Richard Arens, the HUAC counsel (House Un-American Committee) and Francis Walter, the chairman; Miller says he enrolled in a course of training Marxist in 1939 but says to ignore have submitted an application for registration of the Communist Party. He testifies then that he had never been a Communist, but he acknowledges that he had been associated in the past with a number of Communist-front groups. He testifies he was present at five or six meetings of Communist authors in New York in 1947.
But Miller always refused to name the people he met at Communist's meetings and declare before parliamentarians: "
(...) I am not protecting the Communists or the Communist Party, I am trying to and I will protect my sense of myself. (...) I could not use the name of another person and bring trouble on him. There were writers, poets, as far as I could see, and the life of a writer, despite what is sometimes seems, is pretty tough. I wouldn't make it any tougher for anybody. I ask not to ask me that question. I will tell you anything about myself, as I have. I will take the responsability for everything I have ever done, but I cannot take responsability for another human being. (...) I think it would be a disaster and a calamity if the Communist Party ever took over this country".
He also says that he has denounced the Commission when they investigated against the "Hollywood Ten" (the writers put on the blacklist because of their political views considered dangerous), and that he was opposed against the Smith Act, which considered outlaws anyone advocating the overthrow of the government as to Miller "literature can not exist: a man must be able to write a play or a poem on any subject whatsoever"
His statements are reproduced in the press and, to the delight of Marilyn, he becomes a kind of model of struggle against censorship and repression.
Immediately, Francis Walter threats of subpoena, but he offers an alternative to Joseph Rauh to drop the charges if Marilyn Monroe agreed to be photographed shaking hands with Walter; Miller rejects the offer and denounces such a proposal.

> Arthur et son avocat Joseph L. Rauh
1956-06-21_am-washington-miller-1  1956-06-21_am-washington-miller-3  1956-06-21_am-washington-miller-2

A 12h30, pendant une pause, Arthur Miller, fumant une cigarette, répond aux questions des journalistes. Ils lui demandent pourquoi il désirait un passeport (qui lui avait été retiré) pour se rendre en Angleterre: "Mon objectif est double. D'abord, pour la mise en scène en Angleterre de ma pièce 'Vue du pont'; je veux participer aux discussions; puis cela me permettra d'être là-bas avec la femme qui sera alors mon épouse." Face à l'insistance des reporters, il finit par avouer vouloir épouser "sous peu" Marilyn Monroe, et que la cérémonie aura lieu soit à New York, soit dans le Connecticut où "j'ai mon refuge".
Arthur sera de retour à New York tard dans la soirée.
Un mois après cette audience, la Chambre des représentants accuse Miller de mépris envers le Congrès (risquant une condamnation d'un an de prison). Miller fait appel et sera acquitté deux ans plus tard.

At 12:30 pm, outside the caucus room, Arthur Miller, smoking a cigarette, answers to journalists who ask him why he wanted a passport (which was taken back to him) to go in England: "The objective is double. I have a production which is in the talking stage in England of 'A View from the Bridge', and I will be there with the woman who will then be my wife". At the insistence of reporters, he finally admitted wanting to marry Marilyn Monroe within a couple of days, and that the ceremony will occur either in New York or Connecticut where "I have a hideaway cabin".
Arthur returns to New York later in that evening.
One month after the audience, the House of Representatives accuses Miller of contempt for Congress (possibly to be condamned for one year in prison). Miller appeales and will be acquitted two years later.

 1956-miller-washington 

 > captures
1956-06-21_am-washington-miller-cap1  1956-06-21_am-washington-miller-cap2  1956-06-21_am-washington-miller-cap3 

> video

> photo de presse
1956-06-21_am-washington-miller-press1a  1956-06-21_am-washington-miller-press1b 


Marilyn Monroe souhaitait accompagner Miller à Washington, mais il lui a demandé de rester plutôt à New York; Marilyn l'attend alors dans son appartement de Sutton Place.
Les reporters vont assiéger l'immeuble de Marilyn dès le matin.
Marilyn Monroe wanted to accompany Miller to Washington, but he asked her to stay rather in New York; Marilyn then waits in her apartment in Sutton Place.
Reporters will besiege the building of Marilyn in the morning.

Quand les reporters croisent Marilyn, ils lui demandent de commenter la déposition d'Arthur Miller devant le Congrès mais elle préfère échapper à la question en répondant: "Je ne connais pas grand chose à la politique. Il va falloir que je lui (Miller) parle mais je pense qu'il est très fatigué." Deux ans plus tard, quand Miller sera acquitté, elle dira n'avoir jamais douté du résultat car "j'ai étudié Thomas Jefferson pendant des années et que, selon Thomas Jefferson, cette affaire devait se résoudre ainsi..."
Marilyn préfère jouer les ignorantes et les ingénues face à la presse, mais elle a toujours soutenu Miller et s'est initiée à la politique. Il semble que le fait que Marilyn ait soutenu Miller ait joué en la faveur de ce dernier. La presse le présente alors comme "l'amant persécuté du sex-symbol national". On dit même qu'elle l'aurait aidé dans les frais onéreux de dépenses pour sa défense.
Elle dira à l'écrivain anglais W.J. Weatherby en 1960: "Certains de ces salopards d'Hollywood voulaient que je laisse tomber Arthur, ils disaient que cette histoire allait ruiner ma carrière. Ce sont des trouillards, ils veulent que vous soyez comme eux."
When reporters meet Marilyn, they ask her to comment on the testimony of Arthur Miller before the Congress but she prefers to avoid the question, answering: "I do not know much about politics. I'm going to have him (Miller) talk but I think he is very tired." Two years later, when Miller will be discharged, she will say she never doubted about the results because " I studied Thomas Jefferson for years and, according to Thomas Jefferson, this case should be resolved as well ..."
Marilyn prefers to play an ignorant and naive person to the press , but she has always supported Miller and was learned politics. It seems that the fact Marilyn has supported Miller has played in his favor. The press then appears him as "the persecuted lover of the national sex symbol." It is even said that she would have helped him in the expensive costs of expenses for his defense.
She will tell to the English writer W.J. Weatherby in 1960 : "Some of those Hollywood bastards wanted me to drop Arthur, they said that this story would ruin my career. They are cowards, they want you to be like them. "


Quand à l'annonce de Miller d'un mariage imminent avec Marilyn, il existe différentes versions:
> Arthur Miller affirme dans son autobiographie que le mariage était prévu depuis longtemps avant sa comparution devant la commission. D'ailleurs, la veille, le 20 juin, le New York Post révélait le mariage imminent.
> L'autre version, qui est celle la plus reprise dans les biographies, est que Marilyn ignorait les projets de mariage et aurait appris la nouvelle en regardant la télévision. Elle aurait ainsi appelé, en étant quasiment affolée, Norman et Hedda Rosten qui vivent à Brooklyn: "Tu as appris ça ? Il a dit à tout le monde qu'il se mariait avec Marilyn Monroe. Avec moi ! C'est incroyable, il ne me l'a jamais vraiment demandé ! Il faut que tu viennes tout de suite. J'ai besoin d'être soutenue moralement. Je devrais même dire: au secours ! Je suis assiégée, bloquée dans mon appartement. Il y a des journalistes qui essaient de rentrer. Il y en a partout dans l'immeuble."
Les Rosten se sont demandés si Miller n'utilisait pas Marilyn pour se faire valoir, mais ils ne préfèrent pas révéler leur pensée à Marilyn, de peur de la peiner. D'ailleurs, même Rupert Allan, son attaché de presse, affirme que "Marilyn admira Miller à partir de ce jour, bien que sa façon d'annoncer le mariage l'ait perturbée... Je crois qu'il l'a utilisée."
Un ouvrier serait venu réparer la climatisation dans l'appartement de Marilyn et il semblerait qu'en bavardant avec lui, elle lui aurait confirmé qu'elle se marierait avec Miller. Il le répéta vite aux journalistes.
Miller va appeler Marilyn pour lui dire qu'il lui parlerait de tout ça de visu. Ensuite, c'est Hedda Hopper, une fervente anti-communiste et vipère d'Hollywood, qui l'appele de Los Angeles et Marilyn lui confirme la nouvelle: "Je suis très heureuse de mon imminent mariage. Je vais me marier entre maintenant et le 13 juillet. Je ne sais pas encore où ni la date exacte." Elle lui dit aussi avoir reçu un appel de Spyros Skouras, ce qui était faux, afin de faire croire que son union avec Miller était soutenue par les studios de la Fox.
Une conférence de presse est organisée l'après-midi dans le hall de l'immeuble et Marilyn répond ainsi aux questions des nombreux journalistes présents. Certaines réponses de Marilyn font rire l'assistance: une journaliste lui demande "Quand allez-vous avoir des enfants ?" et Marilyn de répondre: "Mais je ne suis pas encore mariée ma chère !"

About the announcement of Miller of an imminent marriage with Marilyn, there are different versions:
> First, Arthur Miller says in his autobiography that the wedding was planned long before his appearance before the commission. In fact, the day before, on June 20 , the New York Post has revealed the upcoming marriage.
>
The other version, which is the most repeated in biographies, is that Marilyn -
in tight beige toreador pants- didn't know the wedding plans and would heard the news in watching TV. She latter calls, being almost hysterical, Norman and Hedda Rosten in Brooklyn Heights: "Do you learn that ? He announced it before the whole world ! He told the whole world he was marrying Marilyn Monroe. Me ! Can you believe it ? That's unbelievable, he has never really asked me ! You have to come down right away, both of you. I need moral support. I mean, help ! I'm surrounded here, locked in my apartment. There are newspapermen trying to get in, crawling all over the place, in the foyer, in the halls. I told the elevator men to let you through."
The Rosten wondered if Miller did not use Marilyn to make him better before the commission, but they prefer to don't reveal their thoughts to Marilyn, for fear of pain her. Moreover, even Rupert Allan, the press secretary, says that "Marilyn admired Miller from this day, although his way of announcing the marriage was disturbed her... I think he used her. "
An air-conditioner repairman, who was working in Marilyn's eight-floor apartment, repeats to reporters that by chatting with Marilyn, she confirms that she would marry Miller.
Miller later calls to Marilyn to tell her that he would speak of that when he will come back. Then, that's Hedda Hopper, a fervent anti-communist and an Hollywood viper, who calls from Los Angeles and Marilyn to confirm the news: "I'm very happy about my forthcoming marriage. I'm marrying between now and July 13. I don't know where and I don't know the exact date."; she tells also to Hedda that she has received a call from Spyros Skouras, that was in fact wrong, in order to make believe that the union with Miller was supported by Fox studios.
A press conference is organised in the afternoon in the lobby of the building and
Marilyn answers to the questions from the many reporters. Some Marilyn's answers make fun the reporters: when a female journalist ask her "When are you going to have some children ?", Marilyn answers: "Well, I'm not married yet dear !"

> Conférence de presse improvisée dans le hall
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-010-1 
  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-012-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-014-1 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-013-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-011-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-013-1a 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-020-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-020-2 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-021-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-021-2  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-021-3 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-021-1a  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-021-2c  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-030-3b 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-030-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-030-2  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-030-3 
 1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-040-1a  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-040-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-041-2 
 1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-041-1a  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-041-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-041-1b 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-042-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-043-1a  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-043-1 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-043-2  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-043-3  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-044-1
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-044-2  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-045-1 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-046-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-047-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-047-1a 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-047-2  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-049-3a  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-050-1b 
  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-049-2  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-049-2b  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-049-2a 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-049-3  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-049-3b  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-048-1
 1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-049-4 1956-sutton 1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-049-5 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-050-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-050-1a  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-049-1 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-various-1 

> photo de Frank Mastro
1956-MONROE__MARILYN_-_1956_JUNE_21_FRANK_MASTRO_PIC_DURING_ART  1956-MONROE__MARILYN_-_1956_JUNE_21_FRANK_MASTRO_PIC_DURING_001 

> photos de presse 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-press-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-press-1a  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-press-2 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-press-3a  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-press-3b 


> captures
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-01  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-02  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-03 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-04  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-05  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-06 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-07  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-08  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-09 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-73  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-74  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-75 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-76  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-77  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-78 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-79  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-80  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-81 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-82  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-83  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-84 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-85  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-86  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-87 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-10  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-11  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-12 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-13  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-14  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-15 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-16  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-17  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-18 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-19-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-19-2  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-19-3 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-20-1  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-20-2  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-20-3 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-22  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-23  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-24 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-25  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-26  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-27 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-28  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-29  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-30 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-31  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-32  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-33 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-01  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-02  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-03 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-04  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-05  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-06 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-07  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-08  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-09 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-10  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-11  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-12 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-13  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-14  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-15 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-34  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-35  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-36 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-37  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-38  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-39 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-40  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-41  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-42 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-43  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-44  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-45 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-46  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-47  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-48 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-49  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-50  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-51 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-52  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-53  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-54 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-55  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-56  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-57 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-58  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-59  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-60 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-61  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-62  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-63 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-16  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-17  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-18 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-19  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-20  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap03-21 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-64  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-65  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-66 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-67  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-68  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-69 
1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-70  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-71  1956-06-21_pm-sutton_place-cap02-72   


> video 1

> video 2

> video 3


sources:
Marilyn Monroe, biographie de Barbara Leaming
Les vies secrètes de Marilyn Monroe
, d'Anthony Summers
Marilyn Monroe, encyclopédie d'Adam Victor
Les trésors de Marilyn Monroe, de Jenna Glatzer
Marilyn Monroe et les caméras, Georges Belmont
article du nytimes.com


 © All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.  

19 février 2014

Marilyn Monroe’s Long Island Affair

Marilyn Monroe’s Long Island Affair

By Spencer Rumsey
published on January 1, 2013

online
longislandpress.com

marilyn-monroe-long-island-photo-shoot 
Marilyn Monroe was already one of the most famous women in America when she posed for Eve Arnold, herself a pioneering photographer, at a Mt. Sinai playground and in a nearby marsh in 1955.  (Eve Arnold/Magnum Photos)

 When Marilyn Monroe came out to Fire Island in 1955 to spend the weekend with Lee and Paula Strasberg, who were mentoring her at their famed Actors Studio in Manhattan, she famously remarked, “What a lovely place this is—it’s got water all around it.”

But that wasn’t her first time on Long Island. In 1949 Monroe had visited the Town of Oyster Bay’s Tobay Beach with Andre de Dienes, a photographer friend who’d once been her lover in California when she was still using her real name, Norma Jeane, and struggling to get her footing in Hollywood as a model.

Then she was a budding starlet and she’d come east to promote the Marx Brothers’ forgettable last film, Love Happy, in which she tells Groucho that she needs his help because “some men are following me” and he lasciviously replies, “Really. I can’t imagine why.”

In de Dienes’ pin-up photograph, Monroe was 23 and full of promise. Her troubled childhood in orphanages and foster homes were long behind her. A bright future lay still ahead.

marilyn-monroe-pull-quote-new2By the summer of 1955 Monroe had become one of the most famous women in America. Her marriage to Joe DiMaggio, the Yankee Clipper, was over, and she’d left Hollywood in a contract fight with 20th Century Fox. Her studio bosses had wanted her to do The Girl in Pink Tights. She balked and formed Marilyn Monroe Productions in New York.

The image of her skirt billowing in the breeze from the Lexington Avenue subway—a still from the 1954 movie The Seven Year Itch—had become “the shot seen ’round the world.” Adding to the attraction was her 1953 appearance as the nude centerfold in the first issue of Playboy magazine, because the enterprising publisher Hugh Hefner had paid $500 for the rights to Tom Kelley’s nude photos that he’d taken of her in 1949, paying her $50 to pose on a swath of crushed red velvet.

The news that the Hollywood star had been fully exposed broke in 1952 when Kelley’s photos turned up in a calendar illustration. Monroe showed her genius for self-publicity—and earned even more money for 20th Century Fox—by owning up to it. In answer to reporters’ breathless queries about what she’d been wearing during the shoot, she said she only had on “the radio.”

At the Strasberg’s place on Ocean Beach, Monroe was sharing a bedroom with their teenage daughter Susan, who was about to appear on Broadway in The Diary of Anne Frank. There were “a lot of theater people” at that part of the island, Susan Strasberg recalled. “They were sophisticates, which meant they stared at Marilyn Monroe from a distance instead of staring up close.”

marilyn-monroe-long-island-playgroundOver the Labor Day weekend in 1955 Monroe was on the North Shore, staying at Norman and Hedda Rosten’s cottage in Port Jefferson. They were artistic college friends of Arthur Miller’s, who’d Monroe had been seeing since she moved to Manhattan even though they were both still married at the time. Late that September afternoon she left to do a photo shoot with famed photographer Eve Arnold, the second woman to join Magnum Photos, the world-renowned agency founded by Robert Capa and Henri Cartier-Bresson.

Arnold, who was then living in Miller Place, took Monroe to a playground in Mt. Sinai. Monroe brought along three bathing suits and a copy of James Joyce’s Ulysses, which she kept in her car.

She said she loved the sound of it and would read it aloud to herself to try to make sense of it,” Arnold recalled, “but she found it hard going.”

Monroe had performed Molly Bloom’s sensual soliloquy to much acclaim at a small workshop at the Actors Studio. While Arnold was changing film, Monroe got the book out to read.

So, of course, I photographed her,” Arnold explained. Soon it was 5 o’ clock, the golden hour, photographers say. “The timing for the marshes was just right,” Arnold wrote, “the light soft and shadowless and ranging from pale yellow through deep saffron.”

Monroe changed into a one-piece bathing suit with a leopard-skin print and waded in.

She was intrepid,” Arnold enthused later. “She stood in [it], sat in it, lay in it until the light started to go and I called a halt. She climbed out, covered in mud, but she was exhilarated—and giggling.” Later, Arnold would insist that Monroe told her “she had loved the day and kept repeating that these were the best circumstances under which she had ever worked.”

Marilyn-Monroe-photographs
An effervescent Marilyn Monroe manages to get a laugh out of her serious husband, Arthur Miller,
in this series of candid black and white photographs taken in July 1956 when they were the most curious couple in the country. (AP Photo/Julien’s Auctions)

Monroe’s career was nearing its apogee. In the summer of 1957 Monroe was married to Miller, who’d won a 1949 Pulitzer for his tragic play Death of a Salesman. They were living in a weather-worn farmhouse in Amagansett near the Rostens, who were renting a cottage in Springs. Also nearby was the abstract expressionist painter Willem de Kooning, who painted Monroe for his series Women. The image, which Monroe biographer Lois Banner likened to “a cross between a grinning child and a screaming fury,” did not appeal to Monroe’s playwright husband but she didn’t mind. The married couple was in a hopeful phase: He was writing in his studio near the main house and she was cooking and tending her garden. And she was pregnant.

But on Aug. 1, 1957 she cried out in pain. An ambulance rushed her to Manhattan where Monroe hoped that her own doctor could save her baby. He could not. Suffering from a painful uterine condition called endometriosis, she had an ectopic pregnancy, and it had to be terminated. She spent 10 days in the hospital, Miller by her side.

The loss was devastating. When the season was over, they moved back to Manhattan, he ensconced himself in a book-lined study at one end of the apartment struggling over a screenplay that would eventually become The Misfits while she was at the other end, strumming a ukulele and crooning, “I Wanna Be Loved By You.”

The next year they moved to a new house they had built in Connecticut, but they never could recreate the idyllic summer they’d shared on the South Fork. And Monroe’s happy times on Long Island faded into memory.

30 janvier 2014

1955 Marilyn et Norman Rosten

Marilyn Monroe et Norman Rosten - vers 1955
Marilyn Monroe and Norman Rosten - circa 1955

mm_et_norman_rosten-mag-Daily_News_NewYork-1962-08-11-saturday-p1 

Elle signe le livre d'or du White Barn Theatre, à Norwalk, Connecticut.
She signs the guestbook of the White Barn Theatre, in Norwalk, Connecticut.
1950s-mm 


 © All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand. 

Posté par ginieland à 20:01 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
Tags : ,


30 juin 2013

Mai 1957 Marilyn à Amagansett, Long Island 2

Photos privées de Marilyn Monroe en mai 1957,
à Amagansett, Long Island. Photographies de Sam Shaw.

Private photographs of Marilyn Monroe in 1957, May,
in Amagansett, Long Island; by Sam Shaw.

1957_05_amagansett_by_shaw_02_3 1957_05_amagansett_by_shaw_02_1 1957_05_amagansett_by_shaw_01_4
1957_05_amagansett_by_shaw_01_3  1957_05_amagansett_by_shaw_01_2
1957_05_amagansett_by_shaw_02_4 1957_05_amagansett_by_shaw_02_2 1957_05_amagansett_by_shaw_01_1

1957_05_amagansett_by_shaw_1


1957_05_amagansett_05 1957_05_amagansett_06


> A la plage / On the beach
1957_summer-by_shaw-private  1955_long_island_mm1 

- Avec Norman Rosten
1957_05_amagansett_01 1957_05_amagansett_02 

- Avec les enfants d'Arthur Miller, Jane et Robert
1957_05_amagansett_03 1957_05_amagansett_04


> Série de photographies prises par Marilyn Monroe
 
Les enfants d'Arthur et le chien Hugo
Snapshots taken by Marilyn herself
Arthur's children and the dog Hugo
1957s_amagansett_pic_by_mm_Millerfamilya
1957s_amagansett_pic_by_mm_Millerfamilyd_hugo_millers_children 1957s_amagansett_pic_by_mm_Millerfamilyb  1957s_amagansett_pic_by_mm_Millerfamilyc


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.

30 novembre 2012

Profiles in History 15/12/2012: documents et objets

Profiles in History: Documents et Photos inédites aux enchères
profilesinhistory_catalogue_coverPartie 1/ Vente aux enchères organisée par Profiles in History. Le site de vente aux enchères ArtFact propose de nombreux lots aux enchères concernant Marilyn Monroe. On y retrouve des objets divers à l'effigie de la star (puzzle, tableaux...), des documents écrits (lettres, chèques, autographes signés par Marilyn), et des photographies, dont certaines totalement inédites; les lots sont présentés sur le site jusqu'au 29 novembre 2012 et la vente s'effectuera les 15 et 16 décembre 2012. Voici les lots sur les documents papiers et les divers objets:

> Documents écrits <

> Autographe (lot 119) 
"To Kirk, Best Luck Always, Marilyn Monroe
Le photographe Kirk Crivello a obtenu cette photo signée en rencontrant Marilyn au Mocambo nighclub de Hollywood en 1951.
lot119_H3882_L40408943

> Autographe (lot 417) 
"To Teddy, From all I hear you sound - nice! Marilyn Monroe"
lot417_H3257_L40281864  

> Lettre 2 pages de Marilyn à Norman Rosten (lot 189)
non datée (circa 1954-55)
 lot189_H3257_L40185531  mm_letter_to_rosten-waldorf2 

Marilyn Monroe écrit à son ami proche à propos de sa dépressione et son désir d'avoir un enfant (et seulement un garçon plutôt qu'une fille, tel un désir "freudien"):
Dear Norman, It feels a little funny to be writing the name Norman since my own name is Norma and it feels like I’m writing my own name almost, However--
First, thanks for letting Sam and me visit you and Hedda last Saturday.  It was nice.  I enjoyed meeting your wife - she seemed so warm to me. Thanks the most for your book of poetry--with which I spent all Sunday morning in bed with. It touched me - I use to think if I had ever had a child I would have wanted only a son, but after reading  - Songs for Patricia - I know I would have loved a little girl just as much but maybe the former feeling was only Freudian for something...anyway Frued [sic]
I use to write poetry sometimes but usually I was very depressed at those times and the few (about two) people said that it depressed them, in fact one cried but it was an old friend I’d known for years.  So anyway thanks. And my best to Hedda & Patricia and you--  Marilyn M.”

> Lettre 3 pages de DiMaggio à Marilyn (lot 292)
du 15 juillet 1952
lot292_H3257_L40183716 lot292_H3257_L40183717 

Dear Marilyn, I just got through talking with you--and I don’t know what else to say than I have already said. However, it bothers me (call it guilt or what have you) to think about what happened the day I left for New York. I definately [sic] am punishing myself. I have always felt that I’ve been able to ‘take’ it, but in this particular instance, I find myself rather cold. It annoys me no end to think that I have ‘bit’ your feelings: you of all people, would be the last one I’d hurt! It has never been my nature to do that to anyone, and I’m certainly not going to start now. I’d rather take an ‘airship’--bow out gracefully is what I mean--rather than give you any misieres [sic; i.e., plural of misery], and please don’t get the idea I am saying these things because I want things to change -on the contrary, I have among other things great respect for you. For the time that I know you--you have done nothing but good--for me and some of your acquaintances--you have done nothing but take the worse of things when other people are involved in rough spots, and in our mild mannered way, people have taken advantage of you. I know all these things about you, and a lot more. I guess I could also mention how much you try, in everything that you do. Especially when you were here and went shopping just to please me. So you see Marilyn, I appreciate you as a real, solid, human soul, with tremendous inner feelings.
What you have already read has been put mildly and very brief.
I am handing you the ‘deck’ of cards now--you schuffle [sic] them and deal; all I ask is you forgive me. Love Joe.

> Chèque de $138.25 à City Collector (lot 75)
du 14 octobre 1959
lot75_H3331_L39990712  

> Chèque de $14.25 à Colonial Trust Company (lot 76)
du 28 octobre 1960
lot76_H3331_L39990711 

> Autographe Dimaggio & Marilyn (lot 1240)
de 1954
"Best wishes, Joe DiMaggio" / "Love & Kisses, Marilyn Monroe
lot1240_H4129_L40420483 

> Photos d'école signée par Norma Jeane (lot 1241)
de 1941 Ralph Waldo Emerson Junior High School
"To a swell, nice & perfect girl[?], Norma Jeane Baker."
lot1241_H4129_L40420471 lot1241_H4129_L40420473 
lot1241_H4129_L40420475

> Script 'The Misfits' de Clark Gable (lot 329)
Gable a donné son scrpt à Arthur Rosson le dernier jour de tournage
lot329_H3257_L40281685
 lot329_H3257_L40281686


> Objets divers <

> Caméra 'Mitchell BNC #206' pour The Misfits (lot 418) 
(Seven Arts Prod., 1961)
This Mitchell BNC #206 was used as the principal first unit camera on Marilyn Monroe's final completed film The Misfits.

lot418_H3257_L40281871lot418_H3257_L40281877lot418_H3257_L40281876
lot418_H3257_L40281872
lot418_H3257_L40281873lot418_H3257_L40281874

16 août 2011

12/12/1955 Première de The Rose Tattoo

Le 12 décembre 1955, Marilyn Monroe se rend à la première du film de Daniel Mann The Rose Tattoo (La Rose Tatouée) à l'Astor Theatre de New York, avec dans les rôles principaux, Anna Magnani et Burt Lancaster, pourtant absents à cette première new-yorkaise. Marilyn, resplendissante dans une robe noire assortie de longs gants noirs et d'un fourreau blanc, portant de longues boucles d'oreilles, pose avec malice et glamour devant les photographes et les caméramen venus spécialement filmer l'arrivée des stars.

 >> L'arrivée de Marilyn
1955_12_12_astor_theater_01_arrive_020_1  1955_12_12_astor_theater_01_arrive_021_1  1955_12_12_astor_theater_01_arrive_022_1
1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_1_3 
1955_12_12_astor_theater_01_arrive_010_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_1_1
1955_12_12_astor_theater_01_arrive_010_1a 1955_12_12_astor_theater_01_arrive_030_2 1955_12_12_astor_theater_01_arrive_030_1
1955_12_12_astor_theater_01_arrive_040_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_01_arrive_040_1a 1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_1_2
1955_12_12_astor_theater_01_arrive_050_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_01_arrive_060_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_01_arrive_060_1a 1955 


> Photographie de Peter Haas
1955-by_PETER_HAAS_ROSE_TATTOO_PREMIER319 

> Photographie de Paul Slade
1955-rose_tatoo-166710962 

 >> video de l'arrivée de Marilyn

>> Captures
1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_010_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_011_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_012_1
1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_013_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_014_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_015_1
1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_016_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_017_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_018_1
1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_019_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_020_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_021_1
1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_022_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_023_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_cap_024_1


>> Dans le hall du cinéma
  1955_12_12_astor_theater_02_hall_010_1a 1955_12_12_astor_theater_02_hall_020_1
1955_rosetatoo 
1955_12_12_astor_theater_02_hall_010_1
1955_12_12_astor_theater_02_hall_050_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_02_hall_040_1 
1955_12_12_astor_theater_02_hall_060_1 
lot89018f  1955-rose_tatoo-fmf_mhg_rose_tattoo  


 1955-12-12-rose_tatoo-collection_frieda_hull-246219_0a 1955-12-12-rose_tatoo-collection_frieda_hull-246219_0c 1955-12-12-rose_tatoo-collection_frieda_hull-246219_0b 
1955-12-12-rose_tatoo-collection_frieda_hull-246219_0d  1955-12-12-rose_tatoo-collection_frieda_hull-246219_0e 
 1955-12-12-rose_tatoo-collection_frieda_hull-246219_0  1955-12-12-rose_tatoo-collection_frieda_hull-246220_0
- de la collection de Frieda Hull, une fan des Monroe Six
-from the personal collection of Frieda Hull, one of the 'Monroe Six'
 


Après la projection du film, les célébrités se rendent à une soirée tenue au Sheraton Astor Hotel, dans le but de récolter des fonds pour l'Actors Studio (100 000 dollars seront obtenus), lors d'un dîner et d'une soirée dansante où les reporters sont nombreux. Marilyn est escortée par Marlon Brando, avec qui elle vit alors une aventure amoureusement secrète à cette période. Parmi les invités, se trouvent Lee, Paula et Susan Strasberg, le couple Rosten, Arthur Jacobs, Jayne Mansfield et Arthur Miller, qui sera photographiée publiquement pour la première fois au côté de Marilyn.

>> Marilyn avec Marlon Brando
1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_010_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_011_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_020_1
1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_031_1 1955_rose_tatoo_mb_3 1955_rose_tatoo_mb_4
1955_rose_tatoo_mb_2 1955-actors 1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_030_1b  
1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_030_1 1955_rose_tatoo_mb_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_040_1
1955-rose_tatoo-z__57   1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_040_1a
1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_050_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_050_2 1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_mm_020_1a 
1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_060_1  1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_070_1a  1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_brando_070_1
1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_mm_010_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_mm_020_1 1955_12_12_astor_theater_03_mm_030_1 

 >> Marilyn et Marlon Brando en interview
1955_12_12_astor_theater_04_interview_040_1a  1955_12_12_astor_theater_04_interview_040_1
1955_rose2 
1955-rose-62 The Man Behind Marilyn aa  
1955_rose_tatoo_interv_1  1955_12_12_astor_theater_04_interview_010_1  
1955_12_12_astor_theater_04_interview_020_1  1955_12_12_astor_theater_04_interview_030_1 1955_rose_tatoo_interv_2
-photographie de Nate Cutler >>

1955-rose_tatoo-by_nate_cutler-473d4219d070b7c 
-photographie de Sid Caesar >>
1955-rose_tatoo-by_sid_caesar-4638

 >> Marilyn au dîner
1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_mm_010_1   1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_mm_010_1a 
  1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_mm_020_1 
1955-rose-62 The Man Behind Marilyn a  1955_rosetatoo_1 
1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_party_050_1  1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_party_051_1  1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_party_052_1  

 >> Marilyn avec l'écrivain Bill Denby et sa soeur Dorothy Denby
photographie de Max Peter Haas

MONROE__MARILYN_-_1955_DEC_13_ROSE_TATOO_PREMIERE_BIL_12132  MONROE__MARILYN_-_1955_DEC_13_ROSE_TATOO_PREMIERE_BIL_94954  

 >> Marilyn avec les Strasberg
1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_party_010_1a 
1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_party_010_1 

  >> Marilyn avec Susan Strasberg et Jayne Mansfield
1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_party_020_1  1955_rosetatoo 
1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_party_030_1 
lot1117-H3257-L78860433 1955_12_12_astor_theater_05_party_040_1 

> Helen Hayes et Joan Crawford
1955-rose_tatoo-Helen Hayes_ Joan Crawford 

  >> Marilyn danse dans les bras de Marlon Brando
1955_12_12_astor_theater_06_brando_010_1 
1955_12_12_astor_theater_06_brando_010_1a  1955_12_12_astor_theater_06_brando_020_1  


>> Photos de Milton H. Greene
1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_06  1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_18  1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_24
1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_01  1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_05  1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_21 
1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_23  1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_23a  1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_23b  H3257_L44538785 
1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_a  1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_b 
1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_20  1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_07  1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_02  1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_22
1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_19  1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_03   1955_12_12_by_mhg_marilyn_monroe_ACS_03a  H3257_L44538773
1955_rose_tatoo_by_greene_1 1955_rose_tatoo_by_greene_2 1955_rose_tatoo_by_greene_3 1955_rose_tatoo_by_greene_4
1955_rose_tatoo_by_greene_5 1955_rose_tatoo_by_greene_6 1955_rose_tatoo_by_greene_7 1955_rose_tatoo_by_greene_8 


>> Photos de Roy Schatt: Marilyn et Arthur Miller
1955_12_12_by_roy_schatt_with_miller_2 
1955_12_12_by_roy_schatt_with_miller_1  1955_12_12_by_roy_schatt_with_miller_1a  

>> Photo de Phil Stern 
1955_mm_by_phil_stern  

>> l'interview


 >> dans la presse
1955_12_12_astor_theater_mag_noiretblanc_1967  mag_italie_1994
 
1955-rose-Blondes At Bay b  1955-rose_tatoo-article


All photos are copyright and protected by their respective owners. 
copyright text by GinieLand.  

 

Enregistrer

04 février 2011

1957 Vacances à Long Island

Photos privées de Marilyn Monroe et Arthur Miller en mai 1957,
à Amagansett, Long Island, chez les Rosten.

Private photographs of Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller in 1957, May,
in Amagansett, Long Island, at Rosten's.

1957_long_island_010_1 1957_long_island_020_1 1957_long_island_1
1957_long_island_030_1
1957-05-MM_AM 1957_long_island_040_1
1950s-arnold-lot1114-H3257-L78860406  
1957_long_island_050_1
1957-05-MM_AM 

> Marilyn avec Stefan Lorant
1957-long_island-1 
1957-Marilyn_with_Stefan_Lorant 


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.

Enregistrer

02 février 2011

Août 1955 Vacances à Long Island

Marilyn Monroe en vacances chez les Rosten,
à Amagansett, East Hampton (Etat de New York) l'été 1955.
Marilyn Monroe in holiday at the Rosten's
in Amagansett, East Hampton (New York), in the summer of 1955.


> Marilyn joue au badminton avec Hedda, Norman et leur fille Patricia.
Marilyn plays badminton with Hedda, Norman and their daughter Patricia

1955-08-new_york-amagansett-with_hedda_norman_rosten-01-1 
1955-08-new_york-amagansett-with_hedda_norman_rosten-01-1a 1955-08-new_york-amagansett-with_hedda_norman_rosten-01-1b 1955-08-new_york-amagansett-with_hedda_norman_rosten-01-1c 
 1955_long_island_photo_3 1955_long_island_cap_1 1955_long_island_photo_1 
1955_long_island_photo_2 
1950s_mm_tree 

> Dedicace
autographe_large_323  

-captures-
1955-08-new_york-amagansett-with_hedda_norman_rosten-cap-1 1955-08-new_york-amagansett-with_hedda_norman_rosten-cap-2 1955-08-new_york-amagansett-with_hedda_norman_rosten-cap-3 
1955-08-new_york-amagansett-with_hedda_norman_rosten-cap-4 1955-08-new_york-amagansett-with_hedda_norman_rosten-cap-5 1955-08-new_york-amagansett-with_hedda_norman_rosten-cap-6 

 > video


> Marilyn tient la main de la petite Patricia Rosten et de Hedda Rosten
Marilyn holds the hand of the little Patricia Rosten and Hedda Rosten
1955_09_long_island_mm_with_hedda_rosten_01 1955_09_long_island_mm_with_hedda_rosten_02
 
1955_09_long_island_mm_with_patricia_rosten_1  


> Marilyn et Hedda Rosten
Marilyn with Hedda Rosten
1955_09_long_island_mm_with_hedda_rosten_03  


> Moments de détente à Long Island
Relaxing moments in Long Island

1955-09-long_island-rostens 
1955_sept_48824384 1955_sept_longisland_rosten_weekend The_Milwaukee_Sentinel_16_Dic_1956 


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer