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30 juin 2018

Hollywood Property from the Osianama Archives - 03/2018 - Julien's Auction

Affiches de films


 Lot 80: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT POSTER
A French Grande poster for the 1960s re-release of the Marilyn Monroe film Certains L'Aiment Chaud! [Some Like it Hot] (Ashton, 1958).
Estimate: $800 - $1,200 | Winning Bid: $896
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Lot 81MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT POSTER
An Italian locandina poster for the Billy Wilder film A Qualcuno Piace Caldo [Some Like it Hot] (Ashton, 1959).
Estimate: $400 - $600 | Winning Bid: $576
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Lot 82: MARILYN MONROE SEVEN YEAR ITCH POSTER
An American three-sheet poster for the Marilyn Monroe film The Seven Year Itch (Charles K. Feldman, 1955).
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $3,840
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Lot 83: MARILYN MONROE SEVEN YEAR ITCH POSTER
An American window card poster for the Marilyn Monroe film The Seven Year Itch (Charles K. Feldman, 1955).
Estimate: $200 - $400 | Winning Bid: $562.50
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Lot 84: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP POSTER
An English Double Crown poster for the Marilyn Monroe film Bus Stop (20th Century Fox, 1956).
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $2,560
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Lot 86: MARILYN MONROE MISFITS POSTERS
An American one-sheet poster and a British quad poster for the Marilyn Monroe film The Misfits (Seven Arts, 1961).
Estimate: $500 - $700 | Winning Bid: $1,024
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Photographies diverses


Lot 85: MARILYN MONROE PRINT BY BERT STERN
A screenprint image of Marilyn Monroe from Bert Stern's iconic "Last Sitting" photo shoot. Signed by Stern in black ink lower right and numbered in black ink lower left "241/300."
Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000 | Winning Bid: $2,880
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Lot 87: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE PRINT
A screen print on paper of Marilyn Monroe removing her stockings. Signed in pencil lower right and numbered in pencil lower left 120/300.
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200 | Winning Bid: $1,600
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 Lot 88: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE PRINT
A silkscreen print by Milton Greene produced from a photograph taken of Marilyn Monroe in 1953 during the "Black Sitting" session. Signed in pencil lower right and numbered in pencil lower left 243/300.
Estimate: $800 - $1,200 | Winning Bid: $2,240
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Lot 89: MARILYN MONROE HUGH HEFNER SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
A large-format photographic print of Marilyn Monroe nude, created from an image taken by Tom Kelley in 1949. This is the iconic Marilyn pose published in the first issue of Playboy magazine. Numbered 291 of 300 to the lower left and signed by Playboy founder, Hugh Hefner, to the lower right.
Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 | Winning Bid: $4,480
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© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.


09 février 2018

Hollywood Auction 89 - 06/2017 - Profiles In History

Photographies
(diverses)


Lot 151: Marilyn Monroe (3) photographs
with secretarial autographs
and (1) unsigned vintage swimsuit still.
(ca. 1950s)
Collection of (3) vintage original gelatin silver double-weight matte 8 x 10 in. photographs all secretarially inscribed and signed in red ink on the image and in the borders, “Marilyn Monroe”. Also includes (1) vintage gelatin silver single-weight 8 x 10 in. cheesecake photograph of Monroe in a black lace swimsuit. 3-exhibiting even toning, minor edge wear and remain in very good to fine condition. 1-exhibits a repaired 1 in. tear to lower central border as well as edge creasing. In good condition.
Estimate: $300 - $500 / Winning bid: $1,400

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Lot 152: Marilyn Monroe rare signed photograph. (TCF, 1952)
Vintage original gelatin silver 8 x 10 in. double-weight matte photograph by Frank Powolny depicting Marilyn in repose. From the publicity campaign for Monkey Business. Inscribed and signed in blue ink in lower left of image to a crewmember, “To Jack, It’s a pleasure to know you, Marilyn Monroe”. Exhibiting light even toning, and minor handling. In fine condition.
Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000 / Winning bid: $12,500

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Lot 415: Marilyn Monroe (45+) photographs by Avedon, Greene, Florea, Willoughby, and others. (1940s-1960s/printed later)
Collection of (45+) gelatin silver and RC color double-weight and single weight glossy and matte production photographs and portraits ranging in size from 8 x 8 in. to 16 x 20 in. Including images with Cary Grant, William Holden, Montgomery Clift and others,glamour portraits, candid shots of cast and crew, scene stills and character portraits. Some retaining photographer inkstamps and notation on the verso. Exhibiting age, minor wear, some toning, minor soiling and handling. In overall vintage very good to fine condition.
Estimate: $400 - $600 / Winning bid: $4,250

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Lot 444: Movie Star News archive (1 million++) Hollywood and entertainment photographs.
Massive archive of (1 million++) primarily gelatin silver 8 x 10 in. single- and double-weight glossy and matte photographs, as well as RC prints, color photos, color glos stills, and color mini lobby cards. A New York City institution for over 70 years, Movie Star News began life in 1938 as a used bookstore owned by siblings Irving and Paula Klaw. The business struggled until one day Irving noticed customers surreptitiously tearing pictures out of movie magazines. Sensing an opportunity, the Klaws began selling used film publicity photos. Demand was so high that Irving reached out to studio publicity departments directly for additional stock, and discovered that promotional materials were routinely discarded after the run of a film. He was able to acquire as many original photos as he wanted for next to nothing, and often, studio negatives, from which he started producing his own prints. The Klaws stopped selling books and started a mail order photo business in addition to the storefront operation, effectively establishing Hollywood and entertainment photography as a field of collecting. Comprising Movie Star News store stock as well as vintage source material, the breadth and scope of this resulting archive is likely unparalleled anywhere, featuring material on nearly every important star and movie in the history of American film production, from pre-Hollywood silent film period through the Golden Age, New Hollywood, the blockbuster era, and beyond. Every category, genre, and subgenre is represented, including drama, comedy, action, adventure, romance, pre-code, crime, film noir, sci-fi, horror (Universal, Hammer, and more), war, western, pin-up, cheesecake, beefcake, exploitation, sexploitation, Blaxploitation, etc. Additionally featuring television, music, stage, and adult subjects, the archive contains a near-complete narrative of American pop culture throughout the 20th century. Today, it would be virtually impossible to build a collection of entertainment material this comprehensive from scratch and prohibitively expensive to create at this level of quality—the cost of photo paper alone would run well over $1,000,000. The archive consists of roughly 40% vintage original material, the remainder primarily composed of high quality Movie Star News gelatin silver dark room prints, many made from the original negatives that Klaw acquired directly from the studios. Including actresses and female entertainers: Paula Abdul, Julie Adams, Rene Adoree, Gracie Allen, June Allyson, Judith Anderson, Mary Andrewson, The Andrews Sisters, Ursula Andress, Julie Andrews, Even Arden, Jean Arthur, Mary Astor, Lauren Bacall, Carrol Baker, Josephine Baker, Lucille Ball, Anne Bancroft, Talullah Bankhead, Vilma Banky, Brigette Bardot, Theda Bara, Lynne Bari, Ethel Barrymore, Anne Baxter, Constance Bennett, Joan Bennett, Ingrid Bergman, Linda Blair, Joan Blondell, Ann Blythe, Jacqueline Bisset, Clara Bow, Alice Brady, Mary Brian, Fannie Brice, Louise Brooks, Virginia Bruce, Carol Burnett, Mary Carlisle, Madeleine Carroll, Irene Castle, Joan Caulfield, Helen Chandler, Carol Channing, Marguerite Chapman, Cyd Cherise, Claudette Colbert, Jeanne Crane, Joan Crawford, Fifi D’Orsay, Arlene Dahl, Lili Damita, Dorothy Dandridge, Bebe Daniels, Linda Darnell, Marion Davies, Bette Davis, Doris Day, Yvonne DeCarlo, Francis Dee, Sandra Dee, Gloria DeHaven, Olivia DeHavilland, Dolores Del Rio, Myrna Dell, Catherine Deneuve, Sandy Dennis, Bo Derek, Marlene Dietrch, Faith Domergue, Carol Donell, Billie Dove, Betsy Drake, Faye Dunaway, Irene Dunne, Deanna Durbin, Ann Dvorak, Jeanne Eagles, Barbara Eden, Anita Ekberg, Dale Evans, Francis Farmer, Alice Faye, Rhonda Fleming, Bridget Fonda, Jane Fonda, Joan Fontaine, Anne Francis, Kay Francis, Mona Freeman, Anette Funicello, Eva Gabor, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Greta Garbo, Ava Gardner, Judy Garland, Terri Garr, Greer Garson, Janet Gaynor, Lillian Gish, Paulette Goddard, Betty Grable, Gloria Grahame, Katharyn Grayson, Jane Greer, Virginia Grey Corinne Griffith, Melanie Griffith, Daryl Hannah, Ann Harding, Jean Harlow, June Havoc, Goldie Hawn, Helen Hayes, Susan Hayward, Rita Hayworth, Audrey Hepburn, Katharine Hepburn, Billie Holliday, Miriam Hopkins, Lena Horne, Ruth Hussey, Angelica Huston, Betty Hutton, Janet Jackson, Gloria Jean, Zita Johann, Olivia Newton John, Grace Jones, Jennifer Jones, Shirley Jones, Janis Joplin, Ruby Keeler, Grace Kelly, Deborah Kerr, Phyllis Kirk, Eartha Kitt, Laura La Plante, Veronica Lake, Hedy Lamarr, Dorothy Lamour, Elsa Lancaster, Carol Landis, Priscilla Lane, Francis Langford, Angela Lansbury, Piper Laurie, Lila Lee, Peggy Lee, Janet Leigh, Vivien Leigh, Joan Leslie, Gina Lollabrigida, Carole Lombard, Bessie Love, Myrna Loy, Ida Lupino, Jeanette MacDonald, Ali MacGraw, Shirley MacLane, Anna Magnani, Jayne Mansfield, Ann Margret, Marilyn Maxwell, Virginia Mayo, Dorothy McGuire, Fay McKenzie, Una Merkel, Ethel Merman, Vera Miles, Ann Miller, Liza Minnelli, Mary Miles Minter, Carmen Miranda, Marilyn Monroe, Maria Montez, Coleen Moore, Mae Murray, Pola Negri, Kim Novak, Maureen O’Hara, Maureen O’Sullivan, Merle Oberon, Anita Page, Gail Patrick, Mary Pickford, Eleanor Powell, Luise Rainer, Sally Rand, Vanessa Redgrave, Donna Reed, Lee Remick, Debbie Reynolds, Ann Richards, Ginger Rogers, Diana Ross, Lillian Roth, Gail Russell, Jane Russell, Rosalind Russell, Ann Rutherford, Winona Ryder, Lizabeth Scott, Norma Shearer, Ann Sheridan, Dinah Shore, Sylvia Sidney, Jean Simmons, Alexis Smith, Barbara Stanwyck, Meryl Streep, Barbra Streisand, Gloria Swanson, Elizabeth Taylor, Shirley Temple, Emma Thompson, Gene Tierney, Thelma Todd, Claire Trevor, Kathleen Turner, Lana Turner, Twiggy, Mamie Van Doren, Lupe Velez, Martha Vickers, Rachel Ward, Tuesday Weld, Mae West, Marie Windsor, Debra Winger, Shelley Winters, Jane Withers, Anna May Wong, Natalie Wood, Fay Wray, Teresa Wright, Jane Wyman, Loretta Young, and many, many more. Actors and male entertainers: Amos & Andy, Dana Andrews, Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle, Louis Armstrong, Desi Arnaz, Fred Astaire, Lex Barker, John Barrymore, Lionel Barrymore, The Beatles, Warren Beatty, Wallace Beery, Harry Belafonte, John Belushi, Jack Benny, Edgar Bergen, Charles Bickford, Humphrey Bogart, David Bowie, Charles Boyer, Marlon Brando, Charles Bronson, Mel Brooks, Yul Brynner, James Cagney, Eddie Cantor, Johnny Cash, John Cassavettes, Lon Chaney, Sr., Charlie Chaplin, Montgomery Clift, Nat King Cole, Ronald Colman, Sean Connery, Gary Cooper, Jackie Cooper, Ricardo Cortez, Joseph Cotten, Bing Crosby, Tony Curtis, Sammy Davis, Jr., The Dead End Kids, James Dean, Robert DeNiro, Walt Disney, Kirk Douglas, Clint Eastwood, Duke Ellington, Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. & Jr., Jose Ferrer, W.C. Fields, Errol Flynn, Henry Fonda, Glenn Ford, Harrison Ford, Clark Gable, John Garfield, James Garner, Richard Gere, Mel Gibson, Benny Goodman, Cary Grant, Alec Guinness, Gene Hackman, Tom Hanks, Rondo Hatton, Sterling Hayden, Charlton Heston, Alfred Hitchcock, Dustin Hoffman, William Holden, Bob Hope, Rock Hudson, Tab Hunter, William Hurt, The “James Bond” franchise, Van Johnson, Al Jolson, Boris Karloff, Buster Keaton, Gene Kelly, Alan Ladd, Burt Lancaster, Harry Langdon, Charles Laughton, Laurel & Hardy, Bruce Lee, Christopher Lee, Jack Lemon, Jerry Lewis, Harold Lloyd, Peter Lorre, Dean Martin, Lee Marvin, the Marx Brothers, James Mason, Victor Mature, Joel McCrea, Roddy McDowell, Steve McQueen, Ray Milland, Sal Mineo, Robert Mitchum, Robert Montgomery, Eddie Murphy, Bill Murray, Ricky Nelson, Paul Newman, Jack Nicholson, David Niven, Chuck Norris, Peter O’Toole, Warner Oland, Laurence Olivier, Al Pacino, Jack Palance, Gregory Peck, Tyrone Power, Elvis Presely, Vincent Price, John Wayne, Johnny Weissmuller, Orson Welles, Bruce Willis, and many, many more. Movies: The African Queen, All Quiet on the Western Front, American Graffiti, Anatomy of a Murder, Animal House, the Back to the Future franchise, Beau Geste, Bell, Book and Candle, The Big Heat, The Birds, The Blue Dahlia, Blue Velvet, Bonnie and Clyde, Born Yesterday, Brigadoon, Cabin in the Sky, Captain’s Courageous, Casablanca, the “James Bond” franchise, Cat People, the “Charlie Chan” franchise, Citizen Kane, Cover Girl, Dance, Fools, Dance, Dark Victory, Dead End, Dial M for Murder, Doctor Strangelove, Dracula, Duel in the Sun, Easy Rider, El Dorado, For Whom the Bell Tolls, Foreign Correspondent, Forsaking All Others, Frankenstein, From Here to Eternity, Full Metal Jacket, Funny Girl, Ghostbusters, Gigi, Gone With the Wind, Grand Illusion, The Grapes of Wrath, The Great Escape, Halloween, High Society, His Girl Friday, Holiday, The Horror of Dracula, Human Desire, Humoresque, I Wanted Wings, Imitation of Life, Inside Daisy Clover, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Jaws, Jezebel, The Killers, The King and I, The Lady Eve, The Lady Vanishes, Lifeboat, Macao, Marked Woman, The Most Dangerous Game, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Mrs. Miniver, Murder, My Sweet, My Darling Clementine, My Man Godfrey, Night of the Hunter, North by Northwest, Notorious, Passage to Marseilles, Paths of Glory, Persona, Picnic, Planet of the Apes, Porgy and Bess, The Postman Always Rings Twice, Prisoner of Zenda, Psycho, Quo Vadis, Random Harvest, Rear Window, Rebecca, Rio Bravo, Robocop, Rope, Sabotage, The Set-Up, Seven Samurai, She!, Showboat, Spellbound, Stagecoach, The Stranger, Sullivan’s Travels, Suspicion, the “Tarzan” franchise, Test Pilot, That Certain Woman, The Three Musketeers, To Catch a Thief, To Have and Have Not, Today We Live, Too Hot to Handle, The Untouchables, Valley of the Dolls, Vertigo, Vivacious Lady, Westside Story, White Christmas, Woman of the Year, The Women, Wuthering Heights, Young Mr. Lincoln, Zoo in Budapest, and many, many more. Includes duplicate images.Condition ranges widely, with the majority ranging from very good to very fine. The archive is housed in approx. (140) 4- and 5-drawer metal filing cabinets, measuring on average 22 x 28 x 53 in. This is a historic opportunity to own one of the most legendary and consequential collections of Hollywood and entertainment photographic material ever assembled. Interested bidders are strongly encouraged to preview the lot in person by appointment.
Estimate: $220,000 - $350,000 / Winning bid: ?

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Lot 868: Marilyn Monroe (3) nude calendar first-release variation collection. (ca. 1940s)
Vintage original (3) iconic Tom Kelly’s legendary Golden Dreams nude calendar print, shot in 1949 when Marilyn was between studio contracts, and not published until at least 1952 for the following year. Including (1) 9 x 13 in. stapled print with advertising headboard present and 4-other prints of various models beneath Marilyn’s, (1) 8 x 9.5 in. print (presumed removed from a complete calendar) and (1) 12 x 16.5 in. print with creased headboard section. All in vintage very good to fine condition.
Estimate: $300 - $500 / Winning bid: $850

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Lot 872: Marilyn Monroe door panel poster. (ca. 1950s)
Vintage original rolled 62 x 21.5 in. panel door poster of Marilyn Monroe in a candy-striped bathing suit. Linen backed. Exhibiting light even fading and a slice to the upper 2 in. of the blank border, not affecting image. In vintage very good to fine condition.
Estimate: $600 - $800 / Winning bid: $3,250
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Lot 878: Marilyn Monroe unpublished behind the scenes color camera transparency from Niagara by Frank Worth.
(TCF, 1953) Vintage original 2.5 x 2.5 in. camera color transparency of Marilyn Monroe in costume as “Rose Loomis” in an unpublished image of the Hollywood icon posing in front of a helicopter behind the scenes of Niagara. Photographed by Frank Worth. In vintage fine condition.
Estimate: $200 - $300 / Winning bid: $350 

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Lot 879: Marilyn Monroe (3) contact sheet strips with 9-portraits by Milton Greene from his personal collection.
(ca. 1950s) Vintage original (9) gelatin silver single-weight glossy 2.5 x 2.25 in. photographs on 3-contact sheet prints measuring approx. 2.25 x 8 in. and with 3-frames per strip. Featuring outdoor portraits of Marilyn Monroe taken by her close friend and legendary photographer Milton Greene. Unevenly trimmed at top and bottom of strips. Exhibiting age, minor wear and some handling. From the personal collection of Milton Greene. In overall very good to fine condition.
Estimate: $300 - $500 / Winning bid: $600

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Lot 885: Marilyn Monroe (3) candid photographs with Tony Curtis, Milton Greene and others.
(ca. 1960s) Vintage original (3) gelatin silver single-weight photos including (1) 8 x 10 in. Marilyn with DJ Fred Robbins and Joe Bynes, (1) 8 x 10 in. Marilyn with Milton Greene and others at Jess Rand's 1954 birthday party and (1) 4.5 x 6.5 in. Marilyn with Tony Curtis and others. Exhibiting some edge chipping, age, handling. With some mounting residue, inkstamps and writing to verso. In vintage very good to fine condition.
Estimate: $300 - $500 / Winning bid: $300

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Lot 886: Marilyn Monroe (3) candid photographs with Sammy Davis Jr., Tony Curtis, Milton Greene and more.
(ca. 1960s) Vintage original (3) gelatin silver single-weight photos including (1) 4.5 x 6.5 in. Marilyn with Tony Curtis and Milton Greene wearing eye patches in solidarity with Sammy Davis Jr. who’d lost his eye in a car accident, (1) 8 x 10 in. Marilyn with Milton Greene and Sammy Davis Jr. at Jess Rand's 1954 birthday party and (1) 8 x 10 in. photo card of Marilyn with Sammy Davis Jr. and Eddie Fisher. Exhibiting some edge chipping, age, handling. With some mounting residue, inkstamps and writing to verso. In vintage good to fine condition.
Estimate: $300 - $500 / Winning bid: $300 

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Lot 888: Marilyn Monroe (10) mammoth prints signed by George Barris.
(ca. 1950s-1960s) Collection of (10) contemporary oversize posed and candid photographs of Monroe ranging in size from 17 x 22.25 in. to 21 x 28 in. Including (2) color images 1-of Monroe wearing a robe at the beach and 1-head shot and (8) black and white prints including 7-in and around a home and 1-at the beach. All signed in lower right of images, “George Barris” (Barris first signed in ballpoint over which he later signed in marking pen). Exhibiting minor wrinkling from handling. In generally fine condition.
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500 / Winning bid: $1,900
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Lot 889: Bert Stern signed Marilyn Monroe limited edition foil print.
(1962) Vintage original blue ink silkscreen on 40 x 40 in. silver foil limited edition print. The image is from Marilyn Monroe’s last photographic sitting in 1962. Signed by the photographer, “Bert Stern” in the lower right border and numbered, “99/100” in the lower left. Presented in the original fame. In vintage fine condition.
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000 / Winning bid: $2,000
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Films


Lot 876: Marilyn Monroe (2) window cards from How to Marry a Millionaire and Niagara. (TCF, 1953)
Vintage original (2) window cards for the Marilyn Monroe titles including (1) 14 x 22 in. card for How to Marry a Millionaire featuring Marilyn in swimsuit with Betty Hutton and Lauren Bacall. With playdate field filled in and some toning to edges and including (1) 14 x 22 in. card for Niagara featuring a sultry Monroe reclining and a photo image of she and Joseph Cotten. With blank playdate field, some clean pinholes to corners, and even toning. In generally very good to fine condition.
Estimate: $400 - $600 / Winning bid: $500
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Lot 877: Marilyn Monroe (41) negatives from Bus Stop. (TCF, 1956)
Vintage original (41) 5 x 4 in. black and white negatives with matching contact prints, including images from production with Monroe, Don Murray, Arthur O’Connell, Eileen Heckart and cast, behind the scenes shots, crowd scenes, and images of Monroe in her iconic green costume performing. Contained in original sleeves. Some contact prints with editorial grease pencil cropping for publication. In generally fine vintage condition.
Estimate: $600 - $800 / Winning bid: $7,000
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Lot 880: Marilyn Monroe rolled German A0 large size format poster for The Seven-Year Itch.
Marilyn Monroe rolled German A0 large size format poster for The Seven-Year Itch. (TCF, 1955/R-1960) Vintage original German A0 46 x 33 in. large size format poster by graphic artist, stamp illustrator and art educator Dorothea Fischer-Nosbisch for the re-release of the Billy Wilder, Marilyn Monroe comedy. Rolled. With vibrant color. In vintage fine condition.
Estimate: $300 - $500 / Winning bid: $750

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Lot 881: Marilyn Monroe (11) production photographs from The Seven Year Itch and How to Marry a Millionaire.
 (MGM, 1953/1955) Vintage original (11) gelatin silver single-weight glossy 8 x 10 in. production photographs featuring Marilyn Monroe and cast including (5) How to Marry a Millionaire and (6) The Seven Year Itch. All with studio slugs in lower borders. Exhibiting age, minor wear, some toning, creasing and handling. In overall vintage good to very good condition.
Estimate: $300 - $500 / Winning bid: $600
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Lot 882: Marilyn Monroe (5) photographs from The Seven-Year Itch and others.
(TCF, 1955) Vintage original gelatin silver single-weight production photographs ranging in size from 7.25 x 8 in. to 8 x 10 in. including (3) Seven-Year Itch with Marilyn and Tom Ewell mugging on a couch (1-with two-hole punches at the top border), (1) full-body swimsuit pose and (1) portrait in a jeweled satin gown near a car. All exhibit minor age and handling. In vintage fine condition.
Estimate: $200 - $300 / Winning bid: $650
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Lot 883: Marilyn Monroe lobby card for Dangerous Years, her first appearance in film publicity material.
(TCF, 1948) Vintage original color 11 x 14 in. lobby card for the first film in which Marilyn appeared in publicity material. Exhibiting pinholes, border restoration, and retouching to a vertical crease through the center of the card and a crease in the lower right image. Presents in vintage good to very good condition.
Estimate: $300 - $500 / Winning bid: $300
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Lot 884. Marilyn Monroe and Anne Baxter photograph behind the scenes on All About Eve by Frank Powolny.
(TCF, 1950) Vintage original gelatin silver 8 x 10 in. double-weight matte photograph. Retaining photographer’s inkstamp on the verso. Exceedingly rare early candid moment for Marilyn. In vintage very fine condition.
Estimate: $400 - $600 / Winning bid: $650
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Lot 890: Warner Bros. commemorative brass key to the studio. (ca. 1960s)
Consisting of a cast brass 11 x 4 in. presentation key to Warner Bros. Studios. The shield-shaped bow of the key features raised iconic “WB” letters synonymous with the studio. The key blade reads, in raised letters, “The Largest in the World” on one side and “Welcome to the Warner Bros Studio”, on the other. Keys like this one were presented to special guests, celebrities, and dignitaries visiting the studio. Exhibiting expected age, wear and patina. In vintage fine condition.
Estimate: $600 - $800 / Winning bid: $1,900  

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Documents papiers


lot 869: Marilyn Monroe’s (Norma Jeane Dougherty) first signed studio contract with Twentieth Century-Fox with original screen test request signed by Ben Lyon.
The contract is 17 pages (8.5 x 11 in.), entitled “Agreement Between Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation And Norma Jeane Dougherty – Artist August 24, 1946” typed on the heavy stock contract folder bound with two brass brads. The document is an agreement, “That the producer employs the artist, and the artist enters the employ of the producer, to render his services exclusively to the producer, in the capacities and for the purposes herein described, for a term of Six (6) Months, commencing on the 26th day of August, 1946… the producer shall pay to the artist, as his entire compensation hereunder, the sum of One Hundred and Twenty-Five Dollars ($125.00) per week during the term of said employment…” On page 16, the future Marilyn Monroe signed in black ink, “Norma Jeane Dougherty” and was co-signed by a studio executive an a notary public. The final page was signed by Norma Jeane’s foster mother, Grace McKee, granting approval of the agreement for the 20-year-old minor. Accompanying the contract is the 1-page inter-office document, dated July 25, 1946, signed by Twentieth Century Fox executive (and former actor) Ben Lyon, written to Mr. George Wasson, stating in part: “Will you please draw up an optional contract on Norma Jeane Dougherty. We agree to make a test of her and then within ten (10) days after she completes the test, we agree to advise her whether or not we intend to exercise the option: 6 months – 20 out of 26 weeks -- $150.00.” Ben Lyon was a successful actor starring in the 1930 film Hell’s Angels, the film that brought Jean Harlow to prominence. After having met the young Norma Jeane on July 17, 1946, Lyon stated that she was “Jean Harlow all over again!” With this document, he arranged for Norma Jeane’s screen test and her subsequent contract with the studio. Lyon later advised the starlet to change her screen name to “Marilyn Monroe”. Also included is a carbon copy studio memo to Ben Lyon from George Wasson, dated October 25, 1946, stating that “Today is the last day for us to notify Norma Jeane Dougherty in the event we desire her to have any dental work done.” Contract is in fine condition; both the Lyon and dental memos have paper loss from the two-hole binder. An historic assemblage marking the genesis of the silver screen’s greatest star.
Estimate: $8,000 - $12,000 / Winning bid: $35,500
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lot 870: Marilyn Monroe personally hand annotated script from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. (TCF, 1953)
Marilyn Monroe’s personally-used and annotated script from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. An incomplete script, being a block of revisions delivered by the production to Marilyn Monroe comprising 69 pages total (numbered 48 through 117, missing page 93) plus a pink title cover-sheet printed “26 November 1952, ‘Gentlemen Prefer Blondes’ (Revised Final Script…13 Nov. 1952),” plus “TO ALL SECRETARIES: Please place these ADDITIONAL PAGES at the back of your script of the above date. THIS IS IMPORTANT! Majority of the prompts for Marilyn’s character “Lorelei Lee” are circled variously in graphite and non-repro blue pencil, with approximately 22-pages annotated in various inks and pencil in Monroe’s hand with amendments and additions to the script and notes on how she proposes to deliver lines and portray Lorelei’s character, with several other pages showing line deletions and other demarcations. Highlights of notes include: pg. 56, when Lord Beekman finds Lorelei stuck in Malone’s porthole, next to Lorelei’s line “Oh yes--Tea with Lady Beekman. Why, she must of forgot. She didn’t show up,” with Monroe adding an alternative line, “Well, I just wanted to see the view. It’s better from here”; pg. 58, Monroe changes the line “Piggie, will you run down to my cabin and get my purse?” to “Maybe I should have that Sherry - will you get me some”; pg. 79, Monroe has written a note to herself in the margin “Feeling that feeds the words, know the lines, go over it inteligently [sic]”; pg. 92, also to herself, “sense the feeling with the body” plus several dialogue changes; pg. 94, again to herself, “grit my teeth and forget it must have my,” “all of feeling in my words,” and “build pull back, don’t stop mutual conflict between partners.” Also, the following page (95) although bearing no notations, features the scene for Monroe’s classic musical number “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend.” In generally very good condition, with expected handling wear, soiling, and creasing, and some small edge tears and damp-staining to cover page and a few internal margins throughout. Marilyn’s unique, revealing personal notations in this script reveal her private thought processes and fleeting self confidence. On set, she was haunted by her controlling acting coach Natasha Lytess, constantly striving for her approval and insisting on retakes even when director Howard Hawks had already approved. Co-star Jane Russell looked after Marilyn on set and was often one of the only people able to coax her out of her trailer during her bouts of self doubt. Despite her anxieties, it was the role of Lorelei Lee that first fabricated her ‘dumb blonde’ persona—a genius mixture of comedy and sexiness which Marilyn personified on screen, all the while taking her acting very seriously, as evidenced by her occasional heartfelt self-motivational notes in the margins. Monroe biographer Donald Spoto once said: “She put a twist on sexiness. It was not something wicked and shameful...it was something which was terribly funny. And Marilyn enjoyed it.” A remarkable and deeply personal artifact both from Marilyn’s aura imbued within it, and of Hollywood history in general.
Provenance: Christies, New York, June 22, 2006, Lot 160.
Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000 / Winning bid: $20,000
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Lot 871: Marilyn Monroe signed document relating to The Seven Year Itch. (TCF, 1955)
The 1-page document (8.5 x 11 in.), dated and notarized from the State of New York on December 31, 1955, states in part: “I, Marilyn Monroe of New York, New York… for valuable consideration to me in hand paid and the receipt whereof I hereby acknowledge, have and do hereby and herewith release and forever discharge Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation… of and from all manner of action and actions, cause and causes of action, claims, demands… that I have ever had… pertaining to the production, distribution, exploitation or other matters or things relating to a certain motion picture photoplay entitled THE SEVEN YEAR ITCH.” Signed “Marilyn Monroe” in black ink. Minor staple holes on left margin. Overall, in fine condition.
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000 / Winning bid: $3,750
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 Lot 873: (2) Marilyn Monroe signed documents and a block of (3) blank Marilyn Monroe checks.
A 1-page document (8.5 x 11 in.), undated, but retains “Received” stamp dated February 6, 1947. Sent by Marilyn to 20th Century-Fox Film Corporation to the attention of the legal department. In part: “This is to notify you that I am no longer being represented by the National Concert & Artists Corporation… I am now being represented by the Elsie Cukor Lipton Agency…[signed] Marilyn Monroe”. Contains clerical notes in both pencil and ink. Toning at lower half with tearing by two binder holes.
The second document is the second page of a two-page document (page one is missing), dated January 16, 1952 involving Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation and RKO Radio Pictures, Inc., pertaining to advertisement release for Marilyn Monroe in promoting “Jantzen Play Suites, Play Clothes and Swim Suits”. Signed “Marilyn Monroe” in blue ink, and co-signed by a Twentieth Century-Fox representative. Staple holes at top, pronounced wrinkling and a 3.75 x 1.25 in. portion clipped from the document.
Included with the documents is a block of (3) unused “Marilyn Monroe” printed checks from her City National Bank, Beverly Hills branch (checks numbered 1950 – 1952). Checks and attached stubs are in fine condition.
Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500 / Winning bid: $3,750
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Lot 874: Marilyn Monroe signed advertising release for House of Westmore Cosmetics.
The 1-page document (8.5 x 13.5 in.), dated July 3, 1952 from Los Angeles, California, states in part: “The undersigned, Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, a New York corporation, hereby gives and grants to House of Westmore, the non-exclusive right to utilize the name and likeness of Marilyn Monroe… Said name and/or likeness shall be used only by House of Westmore in connection with its product Cosmetics in the following manner: Newspapers, magazines, window and counter displays, point of sale material.” Signed “Marilyn Monroe” in black ink, and co-signed by representatives of Twentieth Century-Fox and House of Westmore. Minor paper loss from the binder at upper edge; minor chip at bottom edge not affecting signature.
Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000 / Winning bid: $4,250
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Lot 875: Studio letter warning Marilyn Monroe of her breach of contract for taking off shooting days to participate in President Kennedy’s Birthday Celebration. (1962)
Vintage original 2-page letter on Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation letterhead, dated May 16, 1962, addressed to Marilyn Monroe Productions, Inc. In part: “…the services of Miss Marilyn Monroe in the now current employment period commenced on March 6, 1962 in the motion picture tentatively entitled ‘Something’s Gotta Give’… Whereas said motion picture is now in the process of principal photography and is uncompleted… Miss Monroe has advised the executives of the undersigned corporation… that she intends to absent herself from Producer’s studio and from Los Angeles, California, at twelve noon, May 17, 1962, for the purpose of attending a social function being held outside of the State of California, and to continue said absence for the reminder of the said calendar week… Now, therefore, please be advised that said announced action on the part of Miss Monroe constitutes a refusal by her to render services… said action of Miss Monroe will result in serious loss and material damage to the undersigned corporation… [the studio may] be relieved of any of its obligations in respect to the photoplay in which Miss Monroe is now rendering…” Signed “Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation” by Frank H. Ferguson, its Assistant Secretary. Included with original registered mail transmittal envelope, postmarked May 16, 1962, with attached studio slip with stamp indicating return date of May 17, 1962 with notation that the letter was refused and returned. Before shooting had begun, Monroe received approval from producer Henry Weinstein for her to perform on May 19th for President Kennedy’s birthday celebration at Madison Square Garden. Despite the agreement, Marilyn’s protracted health issues had delayed production and studio brass ultimately decided to release her from the picture on June 8th.
Estimate: $400 - $600 / Winning bid: $3,750
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Lot 887: Let's Make Love 22-pages of original sheet music for the LP record release.
(TCF, 1960) Vintage original (22) pages of musical charts including (1) 5-page printed 9.5 x 13 in. Conductor score for, “Let’s Make Love” designated for “Marilyn Monroe and Frankie Vaughan”, (1) 4-page handwritten 10.75 x 13.25 in. score for, “Let’s Make Love”, (1) 6-page printed 9.5 x 13 in. Conductor score for, “You With the Crazy Eyes” designated for “Frankie Vaughan (Vocal)” and (1) 7-page handwritten 10.75 x 13.25 in. score for “You With the Crazy Eyes” score. All exhibit edge toning, handling, minor soiling and staining. In vintage very good condition.
Estimate: $300 - $500 / Winning bid: $325
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Accessoires


 Lot 1942: Loni Anderson vintage “MM” evening gloves gifted to her by Burt Reynolds as the personal property of Marilyn Monroe.
(ca. 1950s) Vintage original pair of elegant midnight blue synthetic silk evening gloves with stitched braid detail at back and stitched monogram, “MM” on underside of flared, slit cuffs. Retaining internal Hansen maker’s label, printed size 6. Gifted to Loni Anderson by Burt Reynolds who attributed them to Marilyn Monroe, an idol of Anderson’s. In vintage fine condition.
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500 / Winning bid: $9,500
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03 février 2018

26/08/1954, Tests Costumes et Maquillage pour The Seven Year Itch

Le 26 août 1954, Marilyn Monroe pose pour les 'tests' costumes et maquillage pour le film Sept ans de réflexion. Le costumier est William Travilla.
On August, 26, 1954, Marilyn Monroe poses for the costumes and makeup 'tests' for the movie The Seven Year Itch. The designer is William Travilla.

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1954-08-26-TSYI-test_makeup-mm-01 
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© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand. 

13/09/1954, Test Maquillage pour The Seven Year Itch

Le 13 septembre 1954, sur le tournage de Sept ans de réflexion, Marilyn Monroe pose pour un test maquillage.
On September, 13, 1954, on the set of The Seven Year Itch, Marilyn Monroe poses for a makeup test.

1954-09-13-TSYI-test_makeup-mm-01 


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand. 

02 février 2018

21/10/1954, Test Maquillage pour The Seven Year Itch

Le 21 octobre 1954, sur le tournage de Sept ans de réflexion, Marilyn Monroe pose pour un test maquillage.
On October, 21, 1954, on the set of The Seven Year Itch, Marilyn Monroe poses for a makeup test.

1954-10-21-TSYI-test_hair_makeup-mm-01-1 


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand. 


26/10/1954, Test Costume pour The Seven Year Itch

Le 26 octobre 1954, sur le tournage de Sept ans de réflexion, Marilyn Monroe pose pour un test costume (en nuisette en coton) pour l'une des scènes du film. Le costumier est William Travilla.
On October, 26, 1954, on the set of The Seven Year Itch, Marilyn Monroe poses for a costume test (in a coton nightie) for the movie's scene. The designer is William Travilla.

1954-10-26-test_costume-TSYI-mm-01-1 


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand.

23 février 2017

Saturday Evening Post, 1956/05/12

Saturday Evening Post
- The New Marilyn Monroe - Part 2

1956-05-12-saturday_evening_post-cover 

pays magazine: USA
paru le 12 mai 1956
article: 2ème partie "The New Marilyn Monroe"
en ligne sur saturdayeveningpost.com

1956-05-12-SEP 


Part Two: Here She Talks About Herself
By Pete Martin
Originally published on May 12, 1956
Marilyn explains how Freud helped cure her inferiority complex and tells why she posed for that famous nude calendar.

1956-05-12-saturday_evening_post-pic1 
The “new Marilyn” and Don Murray, male lead
in her next picture, Bus Stop. (Gene Lester, © SEPS)

“That nude calendar Marilyn Monroe posed for will probably be reprinted as long as we have men with twenty-twenty vision in this country,” Flack Jones told me. Jones had put in several years as a publicity worker at Marilyn Monroe’s Hollywood studio before opening his own public-relations office. “Curious thing about it,” Jones went on, “when that calendar first came out, it had no bigger sale than any other nude calendar.

“You may not know it, but there’s a steady sale for such calendars. You might think that there are too few places where you can hang them up to make them worthwhile. But there’re lots of places where they fit in very nicely — truckers’ havens, barbershops, bowling alleys, poolrooms, washrooms, garages, toolshops, taprooms, taverns — joints like that. The calendar people always publish a certain number of nude calendars along with standards like changing autumn leaves, Cape Cod fishermen bringing home their catch from a wintry sea, Old Baldy covered with snow. You’re not in the calendar business unless you have a selection of sexy calendars. The sale of the one for which Marilyn posed was satisfactory, but not outstanding. It only became a ‘hot number’ when the public became familiar with it.”

Billy Wilder, the Hollywood director who directed Marilyn in The Seven Year Itch, is witty, also pungent, pithy, and is not afraid to say what he thinks. “When you come right down to it,” Wilder told me, “that calendar is not repulsive. It’s quite lovely. Marilyn’s name was already pretty big when the calendar story broke. If it hadn’t been, nobody would have cared one way or the other. But when it became known that she had posed for it, I think that, if anything, it helped her popularity. It appealed to people who like to read about millionaires who started life selling newspapers on the corner of Forty-second and Fifth Avenue; then worked their way up. It was as if Marilyn had been working her way through college, for that pose took hours. Here was a girl who needed dough, and she made it by honest toil.”

“I was working on the Fox Western Avenue lot when this worried man from Fox came tearing in wringing his hands,” Marilyn told me recently. “He took me into my dressing room to talk about the horrible thing I’d done in posing for such a photograph. I could think of nothing else to say, so I said apologetically, ‘I thought the lighting the photographer used would disguise me.’ I thought that worried man would have a stroke when I told him that.

“What had happened was I was behind in my rent at the Hollywood Studio Club, where girls stay who hope to crash the movies. You’re only supposed to get one week behind in your rent at the club, but they must have felt sorry for me because they’d given me three warnings. A lot of photographers had asked me to pose in the nude, but I’d always said, ‘No.’ I was getting five dollars an hour for plain modeling, but the price for nude modeling was fifty an hour. So I called Tom Kelley, a photographer I knew, and said, ‘They’re kicking me out of here. How soon can we do it?’ He said, ‘We can do it tomorrow.’

“I didn’t even have to get dressed, so it didn’t take long. I mean it takes longer to get dressed than it does to get undressed. I’d asked Tom, ‘Please don’t have anyone else there except your wife, Natalie.’ He said, ‘O.K.’ He only made two poses. There was a shot of me sitting up and a shot of me lying down. I think the one of me lying down is the best.

“I’m saving a copy of that calendar for my grandchildren,” Marilyn went on, all bright-eyed. “There’s a place in Los Angeles which even reproduces it on bras and panties. But I’ve only autographed a few copies of it, mostly for sick people. On one I wrote, ‘This may not be my best angle,’ and on the other I wrote, ‘Do you like me better with long hair?”

I said to Marilyn that Roy Craft, who is one of the publicity men at Fox, had told me that he had worked with her for five years, and that in all that time he’d never heard her tell a lie. “That’s a mighty fine record for any community,” I said.

“It may be a fine record,” she admitted, “but it has also gotten me into trouble. Telling the truth, I mean. Then, when I get into trouble by being too direct and I try to pull back, people think I’m being coy. I’m supposed to have said that I dislike being interviewed by women reporters, but that it’s different with gentlemen of the press because we have a mutual appreciation of being male and female. I didn’t say I disliked women reporters. As dumb as I am, I wouldn’t be that dumb, although that in itself is kind of a mysterious remark because people don’t really know how dumb I am. But I really do prefer men reporters. They’re more stimulating.”

I asked Flack Jones in Hollywood, “When did this business of her making those wonderful Monroe cracks start?”

“You mean when somebody asked her what she wears in bed and she said, ‘Chanel Number Five’?” Jones asked. “You will find some who will tell you that her humor content seemed to pick up the moment she signed a contract with the studio, and that anybody in the department who had a smart crack lying around handy gave it to her. Actually, there were those who thought that more than the department was behind it. ‘Once you launch such a campaign,’ they said, ‘it stays launched. It’s like anyone who has a smart crack to unleash attributing it to a Georgie Jessel or to a Dorothy Parker or whoever is currently smart and funny.’ There was even a theory that the public contributed some of Marilyn’s cracks by writing or calling a columnist like Sidney Skolsky or Herb Stein, and giving him a gag, and he’d attribute it to Marilyn, and so on around town. But the majority of the thinking was that our publicity department gave her her best cracks.”

“Like what?” I asked.

“Like for instance. I’ll have to lead up to it; as you know, in this business you can be destroyed by one bad story — although that’s not as true as it used to be — and when the story broke that Marilyn had posed in the nude for a calendar and the studio decided that the best thing to do was to announce the facts immediately instead of trying to pretend they didn’t exist, we said that Marilyn was broke at the time and that she’d posed to pay her room rent, which was true. Then, to give it the light touch, when she was asked, ‘Didn’t you have anything on at all when you were posing for that picture?’ we were supposed to have told her to say, ‘I had the radio on.’”

Flack Jones paused for a long moment. “I’m sorry to disagree with the majority,” he said firmly, “but she makes up those cracks herself. Certainly that ‘Chanel Number Five’ was her own.”

When I told Marilyn about this, she smiled happily. “He’s right. It was my own,” she said. “The other one — the calendar crack — I made when I was up in Canada. A woman came up to me and asked, ‘You mean to say you didn’t have anything on when you had that calendar picture taken?’ I drew myself up and told her, ‘I did, too, have something on. I had the radio on.’”

“Give her a minute to think and Marilyn is the greatest little old ad-lib artist you ever saw,” Flack Jones had insisted. “She blows it in sweet and it comes out that way. One news magazine carried a whole column of her quotes I’d collected, and every one of them was her own. There’ve been times when I could have made face in this industry by claiming that I put some of those cracks into her mouth, but I didn’t do it. This girl makes her own quotables. She’ll duck a guy who wants to interview her as long as she can, but when she finally gets around to it, she concentrates on trying to give him what he wants — something intriguing, amusing and off-beat. She’s very bright at it.

“A writer was commissioned to write a story for her for a magazine,” Jones said. “The subject was to be what Marilyn eats and how she dresses. As I recall it, the title was to be ‘How I Keep My Figure,’ or maybe it was ‘How I Keep in Shape.’ The writer talked to Marilyn; then ghosted the article. He wrote it very much the way she’d told it to him, but he had to pad it out a little because he hadn’t had too much time with her. As a result, in one section of his article he had her saying that she didn’t like to get out in the sun and pick up a heavy tan because a heavy tan loused up her wardrobe by confusing the colors of her dresses and switching around what they did for her.

“The article read good to me, and took it over to Marilyn for her corrections and approval. Most of the stuff was the routine thing about diet, but when she came to the part about ‘I don’t like suntan because it confuses the coloring of my wardrobe,’ she scratched it out. I asked her, ‘What’s the matter?’

“‘That’s ridiculous,’ she said. ‘Having a suntan doesn’t have anything to do with my wardrobe.’ I said, ‘You’ve got to say something, Marilyn. After all, the guy’s article is pretty short as it is.’ She thought for a minute; then wrote, ‘I do not suntan because I like to feel blonde all over.’ I saw her write that with her own hot little pencil.

“The magazine which printed that story thought her addition so great that they picked it out and made it a subtitle. She’d managed to transpose an ordinary paragraph about wardrobe colors into a highly exciting, beautiful, sexy mental image. Some guys have said to me, ‘Why, that dumb little broad couldn’t have thought that up. You thought it up, Jones.’ I wish I could say, ‘Yeah, I did,’ but I didn’t. Feeling blonde all over is a state of mind,” he said musingly. “I should think it would be a wonderful state of mind if you’re a girl.

“One reason why she’s such a good interview,” Flack Jones went on, “is that she uses her head during such sessions. She tries to say something that’s amusing and quotable, and she usually does. When I worked with Marilyn I made it a practice to introduce her to a writer and go away and leave her alone, on the grounds that a couple of grown people don’t need a press agent tugging at their sleeves while they get acquainted. So if her interviews have been any good, it’s her doing.”

“One day she gave a tape interview and it was all strictly ad-lib,” he said. “I know, because I had a hard time setting it up. It was for a man who was doing one of those fifteen-minute radio interviews here in Hollywood, to be broadcast afterward across the country. We had a frantic time trying to get him the time with her, but finally he got his recorder plugged in, and the first question he pitched her was a curve. He wanted to know what she thought of the Stanislavsky school of dramatic art or whatever. Believe it or not, old Marilyn unloaded on him with a twelve-minute dissertation on Stanislavsky that rocked him back on his heels.”

“Does she believe in the Stanislavsky method?” I asked.

“She agreed with Stanislavsky on certain points,” Jones said. “And she disagreed on others, and she explained why. It was one of the most enlightening discussions on the subject I’ve ever heard. It came over the radio a couple of nights later, and everybody who listened said, ‘Oh, yeah? Some press agent wrote that interview for her.’ My answer to that was, ‘What press agent knows that much about Stanislavsky?’ I don’t.”

In the course of my research, before interviewing Marilyn, I’d discovered that Billy Wilder agreed with Jones. “I think that she thinks up those funny things for herself,” he said. Wilder’s Austrian background gives his phrases an offbeat rhythm, but because of its very differentness, his way of talking picks up flavor and extra meaning.

“I think also that she says those funny things without realizing that they’re so funny,” Wilder said. “One very funny thing she said involves the fact that she has great difficulties in remembering her lines. Tremendous difficulties. I’ve heard of one director who wrote her lines on a blackboard and kept that blackboard just out of camera range. The odd thing is that if she has a long scene for which she has to remember a lot of words, she’s fine once she gets past the second word. If she gets over that one little hump, there’s no trouble. Then, too, if you start a scene and say, ‘Action!’ and hers is the first line, it takes her ten or fifteen seconds to gather herself. Nothing happens during those fifteen seconds. It seems a very long time.”

“How about an example of when she’s bogged down on a second word,” I asked.

“For instance, if she had to say, ‘Good morning, Mr. Sherman,”’ Wilder told me, “she couldn’t get out the word ‘morning.’ She’d say, ‘Good …’ and stick. Once she got ‘morning’ out, she’d be good for two pages of dialogue. It’s just that sometimes she trips over mental stumbling blocks at the beginning of a scene.

“Another director should be telling you this story, not me,” Wilder said. “This other director was directing her in a scene in a movie, and she couldn’t get the lines out. It was just muff, muff, muff, and take, take, take. Finally, after Take Thirty-two, he took her to one side, patted her on the head, and said, ‘Don’t worry, Marilyn, honey. It’ll be all right.’ She looked up into his face with those big wide eyes of hers and asked, ‘Worry about what?’ She seemed to have no idea that thirty-two takes is a lot of takes.”

When I sat down to talk to Marilyn, I said, “I’ve tried to trace those famous remarks attributed to you and find out who originated them.”

“They are mine,” Marilyn told me. “Take that Chanel Number Five one. Somebody was always asking me, ‘What do you sleep in, Marilyn? Do you sleep in P.J.’s? Do you sleep in a nightie? Do you sleep raw, Marilyn?’ It’s one of those questions which make you wonder how to answer them. Then I remembered that the truth is the easiest way out, so I said, ‘I sleep in Chanel Number Five,’ because I do. Or you take the columnist, Earl Wilson, when he asked me if I have a bedroom voice. I said, ‘I don’t talk in the bedroom, Earl.’ Then, thinking back over that remark, I thought maybe I ought to say something else to clarify it, so I added, ‘because I live alone.’”

The phone rang in her apartment, and she took a call from one of the hand-picked few to whom she’d given her privately listed number. While she talked I thought back upon a thing Flack Jones had said to me thoughtfully, “I’m no psychiatrist or psychologist, but I think that Marilyn has a tremendous inferiority complex. I think she’s scared to death all the time. I know she needs and requires attention and that she needs and requires somebody to tell her she’s doing well. And she’s extremely grateful for a pat on the back.”

“Name me a patter,” I said.

“For example,” he said, “when we put her under contract for the second time, her best friend and encourager was the agent, Johnny Hyde, who was then with the William Morris Agency, although he subsequently died of a heart attack. Johnny was a little guy, but he was Marilyn’s good friend, and, in spite of his lack of size, I think that she had a father fixation on him.

“I don’t want to get involved in the psychology of all this,” Flack Jones continued, “because it was a very complicated problem, of which I have only a layman’s view, but I honestly think that Marilyn’s the most complicated woman I’ve ever known. Her complexes are so complex that she has complexes about complexes. That, I think, is one reason why she’s always leaning on weird little people who attach themselves to her like remoras, and why she lets herself be guided by them. A remora is a sucker fish which attaches itself to a bigger fish and eats the dribblings which fall from the bigger fish’s mouth. After she became prominent, a lot of these little people latched onto Marilyn. They told her that Hollywood was a great, greedy ogre who was exploiting her and holding back her artistic progress.”

I said that the way I’d heard it, those hangers-on seemed to come and go, and that her trail was strewn with those from whom she had detached herself. I’d been told that the routine was for her to go down one day to the corner for the mail or a bottle of milk and not come back; not even wave good-by.

“But she has complete confidence in these little odd balls, both men and women, who latch onto her, while they’re latched,” Jones said. “I’m sure their basic appeal to her has always been in telling her that somebody is taking advantage of her, and in some cases they’ve been right. This has nothing to do with your story, but it does have something to do with my observation that she’s frightened and insecure, and she’ll listen to anybody who can get her ear.”

“Johnny Hyde was no remora,” I said.

“Johnny was a switch on the usual pattern,” Jones agreed. “He was devoted to her. He could and did do things for her. I happened to know that Johnny wanted to marry her and Marilyn wouldn’t do it. She told me, ‘I like him very much, but I don’t love him enough to marry him.’ A lot of girls would have married him, for Johnny was not only attractive, he was wealthy, and when he died Marilyn would have inherited scads of money, but while you may not believe it, she’s never cared about money as money. It’s only a symbol to her.”

“A symbol of what?” I asked.

“It’s my guess that to her it’s a symbol of success. By the same token I think that people have talked so much to her about not getting what she ought to get that a lack of large quantities of it has also become a symbol of oppression in her mind. If I sound contradictory, that’s the way it is.”

When Marilyn had completed her phone call, I put it up to her, “I guess you’ve heard it argued back and forth as to whether you are a complicated person or a very simple person, even a naive person,” I said. “Which do you think is right?”

“I think I’m a mixture of simplicity and complexes,” she told me. “But I’m beginning to understand myself now. I can face myself more, you might say. I’ve spent most of my life running away from myself.”

It didn’t sound very clear to me, but I pursued the subject further. “For example,” I asked, “do you have an inferiority complex? Are you beset by fears? Do you need someone to tell you that you’re doing well all the time?”

“I don’t feel as hopeless as I did,” she said. “I don’t know why it is. I’ve read a little of Freud and it might have to do with what he said. I think he was on the right track.” I gave up. I never found out what portions of Freud she referred to or what “right track” he was on.

“What happened in 1952, when the studio sent you to Atlantic City to be grand marshal of the annual beauty pageant?” I asked Marilyn instead. “Did you mind going?”

She smiled. “It was all right with me,” she said. “At the time I wanted to come to New York anyhow. There was somebody I wanted to see here. This was why it was hard for me to be on time leaving New York for Atlantic City for that date. I missed the train and the studio chartered a plane for me, but it didn’t set the studio back as much as they let on. They could afford it.”

Flack Jones had told me that story too. “They’d arranged a big reception for Marilyn at Atlantic City,” he said. “There was a band to meet her at the train, and the mayor was to be on hand. Marilyn and the flacks who were running interference for her were to arrive on a Pennsylvania Railroad train at a certain hour, but, as usual, Marilyn was late, and when they got to the Pennsylvania Station the train had pulled out. So there they were, in New York, with a band and the mayor waiting in Atlantic City. Charlie Einfeld, a Fox vice-president — and Charlie can operate mighty fast when he has to — got on the phone and chartered an air liner — the only one available for charter was a forty-six-seat job; it was an Eastern Air Lines plane as I recall it — and they all went screaming across town in a limousine headed for Idlewild.

“The studio’s magazine man in New York, Marilyn and a flack from out here on the Coast boarded the plane and took off for Atlantic City,” Flack Jones said. “Bob and the Coast flack were so embarrassed at missing the train, and the plane was such a costly substitute that they were sweating like pigs. On this big air liner there was a steward aboard — they’d shanghaied a steward in a hurry from some place to serve coffee — but all of this didn’t bother Marilyn at all. She tucked herself into a seat back in the tail section, hummed softly; then fell fast asleep and slept all the way. The other two sat up front with the steward, drinking quarts of coffee because that was what he was being paid to serve. They drank an awful lot of coffee.”

Flack Jones said that Marilyn and her outriders were met at the Atlantic City airport by a sheriff’s car and that they were only three minutes late for the reception for Marilyn on the boardwalk. There she was given an enormous bouquet of flowers, and she perched on the folded-down top of a convertible, to roll down the boardwalk with a press of people following her car.

“She sat up there like Lindbergh riding down Broadway on his return from Paris,” Flack Jones said. “The people and the cops and the beauty-carnival press agents followed behind like slaves tied to her chariot wheels. That is, she managed to move a little every once in a while when the crowd could be persuaded to back away. Then Marilyn would pitch a rose at the crowd and it would set them off again, and there’d be another riot. This sort of thing went on — with variations — for several days. It was frantic.

1956-05-12-SEP-pic1  “But,” Flack Jones explained, “there was one publicity thing which broke which wasn’t intended to break. It was typical of the way things happen to Marilyn without anybody devising them. When each potential Miss America from a different part of the country lined up to register, a photograph of Marilyn greet- ing her was taken. Those pictures were serviced back to the local papers and eventually a shot of Miss Colorado with Marilyn wound up in a Denver paper; and a shot of Miss California and Marilyn in the Los Angeles and San Francisco papers, and so forth.”

For a moment Flack Jones collected his thoughts in orderly array; then went on, “Pretty soon in came an Army public-information officer with four young ladies from the Pentagon. There was a WAF and a WAC and a lady Marine and a WAVE. The thought was that it would be nice to get a shot of Marilyn with ‘the four real Miss Americas’ who were serving their country, so they were lined up. It was to be just another of the routine, catalogue shots we’d taken all day long, but Marilyn was wearing a low-cut dress which showed quite a bit of cleavage — quite a bit of cleavage. That would have been all right, since the dress was designed for eye level, but one of the photographers climbed up on a chair to shoot the picture.”

The way Marilyn described this scene to me was this: “I had met the girls from each state and had shaken hands with them,” she said. “Then this Army man got the idea of aiming his camera down my neck while I posed with the service girls. It wasn’t my idea for the photographer to get up on a chair.”

“Nobody thought anything of it at the time,” Jones had told me, “and those around Marilyn went on with the business of their workaday world. In due course the United Press — among others — serviced that shot. Actually it was a pretty dull picture because, to the casual glance, it just showed five gals lined up looking at the camera.”

Jones said that when the shot of the four service women and Marilyn went out across the country by wirephoto, editors took one look at it and dropped it into the nearest wastebasket because they had had much better art from Atlantic City.

“That night the Army PIO officer drifted back to the improvised press headquarters set up for the Miss America contest,” Flack Jones said. “He took one look and sent out a wire ordering that the picture be stopped.”

“On what grounds?” I asked.

“On grounds that that photograph showed too much meat and potatoes, and before he’d left the Pentagon he’d been told not to have any cheesecake shots taken in connection with the girls in his charge. Obviously what was meant by those instructions was that he shouldn’t have those service girls sitting on the boardwalk railings showing their legs or assuming other undignified poses. There was nothing in that PIO officer’s instructions which gave him the right to censor Marilyn’s garb, but he ordered that picture killed anyhow.”

According to Jones, every editor who had junked that picture immediately reached down into his wastebasket, drew it out and gave it a big play. “In Los Angeles it ran seven columns,” he said, “and it got a featured position in the Herald Express and the New York Daily News. All the way across country it became a celebrated picture, and all because the Army had ‘killed’ it.”

He was silent for a moment; then he said, “Those who were with her told me afterward that it had been a murderous day, as any day is when you’re with Marilyn on a junket,” he went on. “The demands on her and on those with her are simply unbelievable. But finally she hit the sack about midnight because she had to get up the next day for other activities. The rest of her crowd had turned in too, when they got a call from the U.P. in New York, asking them for a statement from Marilyn about ‘that picture.’”

“‘What picture?’ our publicist-guardian asked, and it was then that they got the story. They hated to do it, but they rousted Marilyn out of bed. She thought it over for a while; then issued a statement apologizing for any possible reflection on the service girls, and making it plain that she hadn’t meant it that way. She ended with a genuine Monroeism. ‘I wasn’t aware of any objectionable décolletage on my part. I’d noticed people looking at me all day, but I thought they were looking at my grand marshal’s badge.’ This was widely quoted, and it had the effect of giving the whole thing a lighter touch. The point is this: a lot of things happen when Marilyn is around.” He shook his head. “Yes, sir,” he said. “A lot of things.

“Another example of the impact she packs: when she went back to New York on the Seven Year Itch location,” Jones went on. “All of a sudden New York was a whistle stop, with the folks all down to see the daily train come in. When Marilyn reached LaGuardia, everything stopped out there. One columnist said that the Russians could have buzzed the field at five hundred feet and nobody would have looked up. There has seldom been such a heavy concentration of newsreel cameramen anywhere. From then on in, during the ten days of her stay, one excitement followed another. She was on the front page of the Herald Tribune, with art, five days running, which I’m told set some sort of a local record.

“In the case of The Itch, there was a contractual restriction situation,” Flack Jones said. “The studio’s contract called for the picture’s release to be held up until after the Broadway run of the play. When Marilyn went back to New York for the location shots for Itch, the play version was still doing a fair business, but it was approaching the end of its long run. If you bought a seat, the house was only half full. Then Marilyn arrived in New York and shot off publicity sparks and suddenly The Itch had S.R.O. signs out again. The result was that it seemed it was never going to stop its stage run; so, after finishing the picture, Fox had to pay out an additional hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars to the owners of the stage property for the privilege of releasing their movie.

“Things reached a new high — and no joke intended,” Flack Jones went on, “when Billy Wilder shot the scene where her skirts were swept up around her shoulders by a draft from a subway ventilator grating. That really set the publicity afire again, and shortly after that The Itch location company blew town while they were ahead. The unit production manager had picked the Trans-Lux Theater on Lexington Avenue for the skirt-blowing scene. He’d been down there at two o’clock in the morning to case the spot; he’d reported happily, ‘The street was fully deserted,’ and he’d made a deal with the Trans-Lux people for getting the scene shot there because there was nobody on the street at that hour.

“It seemed certain that Billy Wilder would have all the room in the world to work, and he had left word that nobody was to know what location he’d selected, because he didn’t want crowds. But word leaked out. It was on radio and TV and in the papers, so instead of secrecy you might almost say that the public was being urged to be at Lexington Avenue on a given night to Marilyn’s skirts blow. Instead of having a nice, quiet side street in which to work, Wilder had all the people you can pack on a street. Finally the cops roped off the sidewalk on the opposite side to restrain the public, and they erected a barricade close to the movie camera. But that wasn’t good enough, and they had to call out a whole bunch of special cops.”

Flack Jones said that when Wilder was ready to shoot, there were 200 or 300 photographers, professional and amateur, swarming over the place. Then Marilyn made her entrance from inside the theater out onto the sidewalk, and when she appeared the hordes really got out of control and there was chaos. Finally Wilder announced that he’d enter into a gentleman’s agreement. If the press would retire behind the barricades, and if the real working photographers would help control the amateurs, he would shoot the scene of Marilyn and Tom Ewell standing over the subway grating; then he’d move the movie camera back and the amateur shutter hounds could pop away at Marilyn until they were satisfied.

“So the New York press took care of the amateurs and made them quit popping their flashbulbs,” Flack Jones said. “Wilder got the scene and the volunteer snapshooters got their pictures. Everybody was there. Winchell came over with DiMaggio, who showed a proper husbandly disapproval of the proceedings. I myself couldn’t see why Joe had any right to disapprove. After all, when he married the girl her figure was already highly publicized, and it seemed odd if he had suddenly decided that she should be seen only in Mother Hubbards.”

I asked Marilyn herself if she thought that Joe had disapproved of her skirts blowing around her shoulders in that scene. I said I had heard his reaction described in two ways: that he had been furious and that he had taken it calmly.

“One of those two is correct,” Marilyn said. “Maybe you can figure it out for yourself if you’ll give it a little thought.”

Something told me that, in her opinion, Joe had been very annoyed indeed. And while we were on the subject of Joe, it seemed a good time to find out about how things had been between them when they had been married, and the unbelievable scene which accompanied the breaking up of that marriage. “Not in his wildest dreams could a press agent imagine a series of events like that,” Flack Jones had told me.

When I brought the subject up, Marilyn said, “For a man and a wife to live intimately together is not an easy thing at best. If it’s not just exactly right in every way it’s practically impossible, but I’m still optimistic.” She sat there being optimistic. Then she said, with feeling, “However, I think TV sets should be taken out of the bedroom.”

“Did you and Joe have one in your bedroom?” I asked.

“No comment,” she said emphatically. “But everything I say to you I speak from experience. You can make what you want of that.”

She was quiet for a moment; then she said, “When I showed up in divorce court to get my divorce from Joe, there were mobs of people there asking me bunches of questions. And they asked, ‘Are you and Joe still friends?’ and I said, ‘Yes, but I still don’t know anything about baseball.’ And they all laughed. I don’t see what was so funny. I’d heard that he was a fine baseball player, but I’d never seen him play.”

“As I said, the final scenes of All-American Boy loses Snow White were unbelievable,” Flack Jones told me. “Joe and Marilyn rented a house on Palm Drive, in Beverly Hills, and we had a unique situation there with the embattled ex-lovebirds both cooped in the same cage. Marilyn was living on the second floor and Joe was camping on the first floor. When Joe walked out of that first floor, it was like the heart-tearing business of a pitcher taking the long walk from the mound to the dugout after being jerked from the game in a World Series.”


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15 janvier 2017

The Lost Footage of Marilyn Monroe

 logo_thenytimes   The Lost Footage of Marilyn Monroe
That film image of Ms. Monroe’s skirt rising high in a gust of air? It’s a reshoot of a discarded and more risqué scene seldom seen until now.

published in January 13, 2017
by HELENE STAPINSKIJAN
en ligne sur nytimes.com

thenytimes-01-15MARILYN2-superJumbo 
A still of Marilyn Monroe filming “The Seven Year Itch” on the Upper East Side from the found footage of Jules Schulback, a furrier and avid taker of home movies.
 Credit Jules Schulback, via Bonnie Siegler

It happened one night in the late summer of 1954.
Jules Schulback, a New York furrier and taker of home movies, heard that Marilyn Monroe would be on the Upper East Side of Manhattan filming scenes again for her new picture, “The Seven Year Itch.” Two days earlier, Mr. Schulback had taken footage of her with his 16-millimeter Bolex movie camera around the corner from his townhouse apartment.

So he grabbed the camera — the one usually used for family picnics and parades and the stuff of everyday life — and headed over to the subway grate in front of Wright’s Food shop, just down the street from the Trans-Lux movie theater on Lexington Avenue and 52nd Street.
Though it was around 1 a.m., a large crowd had already gathered, mostly newspaper photographers and curious men waiting to see Marilyn. The movie studio and the director, Billy Wilder, had counted on this, inviting the press and the public to drum up buzz for the new movie, which starred Ms. Monroe as “the Girl Upstairs,” who entices a middle-aged executive, played by Tom Ewell, while his wife is away with the kids for the summer.

thenytimes-02-15MARILYN1-master675 
Mr. Schulback captured Billy Wilder, the director of “The Seven Year Itch,”
with Ms. Monroe in the background in her famous dress,
accessorized by a white clutch and a red-and-white scarf.
Credit Jules Schulback, via Bonnie Siegler 

In the famous street scene, the two are leaving the movies as Ms. Monroe pauses over a grate to enjoy the breeze from the subway as it blows up her dress on a hot summer night. “Isn’t it delicious ?” she purrs. The breeze came from a large fan under the grate operated by the film’s special effects chief. The night — Sept. 15 — was actually quite chilly. But the stunt worked. It became known as “the shot seen around the world.”

But there was a dark subtext to the comedy. Gathered at that late hour were hundreds of gawkers, almost all men, who catcalled and yelled things like, “Higher! Higher !” as Ms. Monroe’s dress blew up over her head. For two hours, the men watched from surrounding buildings and from the street.

Unfortunately, one of them was her husband, Joe DiMaggio,” Mr. Wilder is quoted as saying in his biography, “Nobody’s Perfect.” “And he didn’t like what he saw, or what everyone else was seeing.
Mr. DiMaggio hadn’t planned on visiting the set that night, and was waiting for his wife at the St. Regis Hotel, where the couple were staying. But the columnist Walter Winchell had persuaded him to come along. Ms. Monroe was not happy her husband had shown up. But he was even more unhappy and angrily stormed off. Later that night the couple had a screaming fight in their room. The next morning, her hairdresser covered up Ms. Monroe’s bruises with makeup. Three weeks later, Ms. Monroe filed for divorce.

Mr. Wilder never used the Lexington Avenue footage and reshot the scene on a closed lot in Hollywood, though photographs of that night appeared everywhere. Except for some brief, grainy shots from a newsreel covering the divorce, footage from that night was never screened.
The footage immediately disappeared,” Mr. Wilder said in the biography. “But one day I’m sure some film scholar will dig it up.


A filmstrip discovered in a shopping bag filled with home movies offers a rare glimpse of
Marilyn Monroe in color in New York.
By JULES SCHULBACK, VIA BONNIE SIEGLER

The story of the night Marilyn Monroe’s white halter-top dress blew up was well known among Jules Schulback’s children, and even among his grandchildren. His granddaughter Bonnie Siegler said he bragged from time to time about his personal film shoot with Marilyn.
He was a real raconteur,” said Ms. Siegler, a graphic designer who runs her own company, Eight and a Half. “I didn’t know if the story was real.” But even though she had never seen it, she often told people that her grandfather had footage of Marilyn Monroe on the subway grate.

Ms. Siegler’s older sister, Rayna Dineen, said her grandfather, whom they called Opi (a German term of endearment), was rarely without his camera. “He would be filming everywhere, all the time.” There were reels of vacations, family picnics, birthday parties and bar mitzvahs. He had even filmed a 12-minute day in the life of his daughters, depicting them waking up, brushing their teeth and going to school.
But the Marilyn story was one of his favorite stories to tell,” Ms. Dineen said.
It was just one of dozens of amazing tales. Mr. Schulback had a long, technicolorful life, one so filled with drama that his Monroe story sometimes seemed like a footnote.

In 1938, Mr. Schulback had argued with his family in Germany that Adolf Hitler was much more dangerous than anyone thought. According to Ms. Siegler, his family believed that Hitler’s hate speech was simply rhetoric, and that he wouldn’t act on anything he was saying. Mr. Schulback, 25 at the time, urged them to pack their bags and leave Berlin with him. But they resisted, opting to wait and see how things developed, never imagining the horror that awaited them and millions of other European Jews.
Mr. Schulback was not taking any chances.

thenytimes-0315MARILYN5-blog427 Mr. Schulback was a furrier by trade. He chronicled his family and the odd serendipitous moment in his neighborhood — such as Marilyn Monroe on location — with his 16-millimeter Bolex movie camera.

In 1938, Jews immigrating to the United States needed a sponsor, someone to take financial responsibility for them. Mr. Schulback sold everything he had, bought an expensive suit, booked passage on the Queen Mary, reserved a room at the Plaza and headed to America to find a sponsor for him and his wife, Edith, and their daughter Helen, who was then a toddler.

He was like: ‘I’m your lost, rich relative. I won’t be a burden.’ But he had no money. He played it,” Ms. Siegler said. He secured a signature, then returned to collect his family, but was stopped trying to enter Nazi Germany by a suspicious border guard. Knowing the Germans were big fans of the 1934 Clark Gable hit, “It Happened One Night,” Mr. Schulback told the guard he was the distributor for Mr. Gable’s new movie. He claimed that if he couldn’t enter the country, neither would the film. “The guy was like, ‘Oh, we love Clark Gable,’ and waved him through,” Ms. Siegler said.

Mr. Schulback grabbed Edith and Helen, again imploring his other relatives to leave, and escaped back to the United States with a few suitcases, claiming to the Nazi immigration officers that his family was going on vacation. The date was Nov. 8, the day before Kristallnacht.

In Berlin, he had been a furrier, and his shop was destroyed that night. His remaining family — four sisters, parents and in-laws — would all perish in the Holocaust.
The United States was good to Mr. Schulback. He and his family lived a happy, successful life in New York, much of it preserved in his home movies.

As a child, Ms. Siegler loved going to her grandfather’s Upper East Side apartment not just because of his great stories and sense of humor, but also because he lived opposite the New York Doll Hospital. From his apartment window, she could see the buckets of doll eyes and doll arms. “It was really intense,” she said.

When Edith had a stroke in the 1970s, she was given only a few weeks to live. But Mr. Schulback, always a man of action, refused to let his wife die in the hospital and took her home. The couple moved into the ground-floor apartment of a building around the corner, and Mr. Schulback became her nurse. “Half her body was paralyzed, she couldn’t speak,” Ms. Siegler said. “But he loved her and took care of her for 26 years until she finally died.

After 35 years in that same apartment, Mr. Schulback — who had been president of the 61st Street Block Association — was forced to leave. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation had bought the townhouse where he lived and the one behind it and wanted to reconfigure the property. So Ms. Siegler and her husband, Jeff Scher, helped move her 92-year-old grandfather to a new place on the other side of Central Park.

thenytime-04-15MARILYN6-superJumbo 
Bonnie Siegler examines film of Ms. Monroe taken by Mr. Schulback,
who was her grandfather, over a light box in her studio.
Credit Ryan Christopher Jones for The New York Times
 

In 2004, in the arduous packing up of Mr. Schulback’s home, the couple came across a big stash of film. It was stored in a back room that the family called “Opi’s fur room,” where Mr. Schulback had once assembled garments from animal pelts for his business. “No one ever wanted to go back there,” Ms. Siegler said. “But when we went in, we found this plastic bag filled with just tons of film, home movies, bought movies and everything mixed together.

Ms. Siegler’s husband, an experimental filmmaker, couldn’t wait to screen the films. He was particularly interested in seeing whether Marilyn and the subway grate footage actually existed. “It was like this family myth,” Mr. Scher said. “So long rumored and never confirmed.”

The same was true for its source material. For decades, innuendo swirled around the Lexington Avenue shoot for “The Seven Year Itch.” Ms. Monroe and Mr. DiMaggio had married that January and had already had a bumpy ride, the Yankee Clipper enraged by her exhibitionism and by rumors of infidelity, according to Lois W. Banner, the author of the 2012 biography “Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox.”
She was having an affair with her musical director at the time, and everyone knew about it in the business,” said Dr. Banner, a professor emeritus of history and gender studies at the University of Southern California. So before he even arrived on set, there was tension. “DiMaggio,” Dr. Banner said, “was not happy with Marilyn.”

There are several theories as to why the footage from that night was never used. Some believe the Manhattan shoot was done purely as a publicity stunt, which was made even more sensational when Mr. DiMaggio showed up. Some biographers say the enthusiastic crowd was just too noisy, making the film unusable.
A third theory was that the footage was too risqué and Ms. Monroe wanted to shoot a more demure version, so as not to further infuriate her husband. There was even talk at the time that she wasn’t wearing any underwear. Mr. Wilder tried to put those rumors to rest in his biography. She had put on not just one, but two sets of underwear, he said.

 thenytimes-05-15MARILYN3-master675 
Before the billowing-skirt scene, Mr. Schulback filmed Ms. Monroe in a terry robe
greeting fans and members of the press on the stoop of 164 East 61st Street.

Credit Jules Schulback, via Bonnie Siegler

Dr. Banner said all three reasons quite likely played into the final decision to reshoot. “But the photographs of that night had gone viral by the time the film was being put together,” she said, “and played a great role in her fame.” The skirt-blowing scene used in the finished film is incredibly brief and tame. The image many people have of that moment comes from the press shots and publicity stills in New York, and not from the finished movie.

Back in the pelt room of Mr. Schulback’s apartment, Mr. Scher excitedly gathered up the old metal film canisters. None were labeled, Mr. Scher recalled. Some of the film was off the reel and sitting there like big balls of spaghetti, as if there had been a projector mishap years ago.
Later that night in his studio in the couple’s apartment on West 16th Street, Mr. Scher slowly and carefully wound the film, since some of it was very brittle and in danger of breaking. He did a few repairs and then began looking at it using a light box, spooling it from reel to reel by hand. There were about 50 rolls of 16-millimeter film and around 75 rolls of 8 millimeter.
There were the family outings and parades. The birthdays and bar mitzvahs.
And there, amid the mundane scenes of precious everyday life, was Marilyn Monroe, in crisp, colorful Kodachrome. “This stuff just popped out,” Mr. Scher said. “It was real! Preserved like the home movies are, too. Just these moments in time.”
Mr. Scher could clearly see the actress’s dress billowing up. “Like a parachute with a pair of legs attached,” he said. “It was startling. Like seeing a myth materialize.”
It was a shadow version of lost footage amid home movies of a family that almost certainly wouldn’t have existed had the Schulbacks stayed in Germany.

thenytimes-06-15MARILYN4-superJumbo-v2  
Ms. Siegler zeroing in to Ms. Monroe by using a photographer’s loupe.
The Schulback footage has been seldom seen since it was taken in 1954.
Credit Ryan Christopher Jones for The New York Times

Mr. Scher called out to his wife: “It’s really here!” They watched all 3 minutes 17 seconds in amazement.
There was something so magical about it,” Ms. Siegler said. “For years I didn’t know if it was real. I certainly didn’t believe it wholeheartedly. And there it was. It was like the end of the story.
The film starts with a spliced-in intertitle that reads “World Premiere,” Mr. Schulback’s little inside joke.

And then there is Marilyn Monroe, in a white terry robe, coming down the stoop of a white-shuttered building at 164 East 61st Street, between Lexington and Third Avenues. It was the earlier scene — before the subway grate footage — that Mr. Schulback had shot. Cameramen and press photographers are gathered outside as the actress smiles and waves.

Cut to Ms. Monroe in a second-floor window wearing a slip and blow-drying her hair. Mr. Ewell walks down the street and into the building. The film cuts inexplicably to 30 seconds of what must be a Shriners parade in Manhattan, then jumps to another intertitle, which reads “Our Baby.”

And suddenly, there is Ms. Monroe again, this time on the subway grate in that famously fluttering white dress, holding a matching white clutch in her right hand and a red-and-white-striped scarf in her left.

Mr. Schulback was incredibly close, filming right behind Mr. Wilder’s shoulder, stopping to wind his hand-held camera every 25 seconds. Now and then, a silhouette of the director’s arm intrudes into Mr. Schulback’s crystal-clear shot. At one point Mr. Wilder, in a fedora, passes across the frame. Ms. Monroe gets into position and yawns, while the cinematographer sets up the camera. Through a gap in the film crew, Mr. Schulback captures just her face, looking off to the left, serious and unsmiling.

thenytimes-07-15MONROE1-master675-v2 
 Another skirt-goes-wild still from the Schulback footage.
Credit Jules Schulback, via Bonnie Siegler

Then Mr. Ewell is there, chatting with Ms. Monroe, who pushes him into position. The dress flutters again, Ms. Monroe holds it down, bending slightly, smiling and talking to Mr. Ewell, but it flutters up some more and she laughs, her head thrown back. It blows up again, but she doesn’t push it down this time, and it flies up over her head, clearly revealing two pairs of underwear that, because of the bright lights, do not protect Ms. Monroe’s modesty quite as much as she might have liked.

Then, as suddenly as she appeared, Marilyn is gone, and the film reverts to home-movie mode: Edith Schulback walking on the grass at a family outing in the country. It’s like being shaken from some crazy dream, back to reality.
Interest in that moment in film history from more than 50 years ago endures. The new movie musical starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, “La La Land,” makes brief filmic reference to it in the opening number, with a young dancer’s yellow dress blowing up. And a Snickers commercial from the Super Bowl last year stars Willem Dafoe, Eugene Levy and a computer-generated Monroe on the famous set. “It’s that iconic image,” said Dr. Banner, the Monroe biographer. “People are still fascinated by the context in which it all happened.”

After screening the film with her husband, Ms. Siegler immediately told her grandfather that she had found the footage. “I was so excited about it — more for the reason that his story was true.” She shrugged. “But he never had any doubts.” Mr. Schulback moved in 2005 and died six months later.
Ms. Siegler and Mr. Scher made a print and screened it for about 100 people in 2004 at the upstate home of their friends Kurt Andersen and his wife, Anne Kreamer. The two couples had started a small film festival for neighbors and friends, hanging a sheet on the side of a barn and serving popcorn, ice pops and beer.

The people in the audience that summer night had no idea what they were in for.
That scene is one of the most iconic scenes in American cinema,” said Mr. Andersen, an author, radio host and a founder of Spy magazine. “So to have film of it actually being shot, it’s like watching the Zapruder film. It’s just extraordinary.
The crowd that evening sat in silence as Marilyn Monroe’s dress blew up on the side of the barn. “People were gob-smacked,” Mr. Andersen said. “They were like, ‘What did I just see ?’”

That was the only time anyone outside the family had seen the film. Until now.

Correction: January 13, 2017 
 An earlier version of this article misspelled the surname of the writer who screened the Marilyn Monroe home movie in his backyard. He is Kurt Andersen, not Anderson


 > video 1

> video 2 (plans en rapproché)

captures
1954-09-13-ny-tsyi-set-cap_by_jules_schulback-02-4 1954-09-13-ny-tsyi-set-cap_by_jules_schulback-01-3 1954-09-15-ny-tsyi-set-cap_by_jules_schulback-01-3 
> captures dans les articles du blog:
screen caps on the articles in the blog:
13/09/1954 Sur le tournage de The Seven Year Itch 15 - partie 2
13/09/1954 Sur le tournage de The Seven Year Itch 15 - partie 1
15/09/1954 NYC - Sur le tournage de The Seven Year Itch scène 11

09 novembre 2016

Marilyn Monroe Auction - 11/2016 - photos 3-carrière


Photographies - River of no Return
Photographs


Lot 207: MARILYN MONROE RIVER OF NO RETURN SNAPSHOTS
 Two vintage black and white snapshots from 1953 of Monroe during the production of River of No Return, one featuring Monroe posing with her stunt double.
5 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245432_0  


Lot 208: MARILYN MONROE PROMOTIONAL PIECES
 A promotional proof for the release of the song "I'm Gonna File My Claim" from the film The River of No Return, together with a mock-up of the LP label for the same release.
Largest, 11 3/4 by 5 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245433_0  245434_0 


Lot 648: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID AND CONTACT SHEET PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on the set of River of No Return (20th Century, 1954) in Canada, circa June 1953, appearing to have been cut from the original contact sheet, with seven of the photographs having writing consisting of "MM" together with a reference number. Monroe is shown with cast members from the film, including Robert Mitchum, going over musical numbers and on set preparing for filming. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246139_0 246140_0 247268_0 


Lot 649: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR RIVER OF NO RETURN
 A vintage archive of approximately 60 photos related to River of No Return (20th Century, 1954), including 45 movie stills and 15 publicity photographs.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246141_0 


Lot 855: MARILYN MONROE RIVER OF NO RETURN BEHIND-THE-SCENES PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe snapshot taken in Jasper National Park in Canada. The photograph, taken in 1953, shows Monroe with an unknown crew member on the set of River of No Return (20th Century, 1954). Notation in pencil on verso reads "Jasper National Park/ Jan -1956." 1956 may refer to the year the photograph was developed.
3 1/2 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 168, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246444_0 


Photographies - There's no Business
Photographs


Lot 51: THERE’S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS POSTER
 A rare original 1954 British quad poster for the Marilyn Monroe film There’s No Business Like Show Business (20th Century, 1954).
Framed, 33 1/2 by 43 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 190, “Vintage Film Posters,” Christie’s, London, Sale number 9689, September 19, 2003
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245126_0 


Lot 646: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS
 A vintage archive of approximately 50 photographs related to There's No Business Like Show Business (20th Century, 1954), including approximately 45 movie stills and five publicity photographs.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246136_0 


Lot 859: MARILYN MONROE THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS 3D SLIDES
 A pair of stereo viewer slides showing Marilyn Monroe in her role as Vicky Parker in the film There's No Business Like Show Business (20th Century, 1954). The stereo three-dimensional slides come from the collection of Ad Schaumer of Ad Schaumer, an Assistant Director active in Hollywood between 1928 and 1966. Each slide contains two pieces of film in a single mount.
Each, 1 5/8 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Ad Schaumer
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246453_0  


Lot 860: MARILYN MONROE HOLLYWOOD RELATED STEREO 3D SLIDES
 A collection of nine boxes of Stereo 3D slides from the collection of Ad Schaumer, an assistant director active in Hollywood between 1928 and 1966. The boxes are labeled in an unknown hand: "Dean Martin/ Monty Clift/ Brando/ Young Lions" from the production The Young Lions (20th Century, 1958); "France/ * Might be the young lions"; "Young Lions" and "Young Lions/ Desert Scenes"; "Voyage To The Bottom of the Sea," Schaumer worked on both the 1961 film and the television series; "Lost World" presumably from the The Lost World (20th Century, 1960); "Mantz" and "Show Biz" from the film There's No Business Like Show Business; "3 weeks/ in Balloon/ Lion - Monkey/ Sherwood/ Forest" referencing the production of Five Weeks in a Balloon (20th Century, 1962); "'3 Weeks in A Balloon'/ Irwin Allen Prod."; "5 Weeks In Balloon"; "Japan - S.F." that appears to contain one slide of Marlon Brando in the film Sayonara (Warner Bros., 1957); "Japan/ Inland Sea"; and one box labeled "Miscellaneous." Not all of the slides have been viewed. Each box contains up to 28 slides. Each slide has two pieces of film in a single mount. Accompanied by seven boxes of additional slides that appear to be personal and travel related.
Slides, 1 5/8 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Ad Schaumer
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246454_0


Photographies - The Seven Year Itch
Photographs


Lot 651: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE THE SEVEN YEAR ITCH PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 110 vintage photographs related to The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955), including 40 publicity photos, 60 movie stills, and 10 sheets of photo reproductions of various photographs taken on the set of the film, collected by Frieda Hull.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246144_0 


Lot 652: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original color photograph of Marilyn Monroe and co-star Tom Ewell on the set for The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955), filming the now famous skirt-blowing subway scene from the film, shot on September 15, 1954. Fans and photographers can also be seen in this photo. This photograph is likely never before seen.
4 3/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246145_0 


Lot 653: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe original color and black and white photographs, likely at the St. Regis Hotel in New York City on September 15, 1954, the same day she filmed the now famous subway skirt-blowing subway scene from The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). Monroe wears the iconic white halter dress costume from the film, together with what is likely the mink coat gifted to her by husband Joe DiMaggio. She holds the film's script in her left hand. This lot includes one color and one black and white photograph; the color photograph is likely never been seen.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246146_0 


Lot 654: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large, glossy black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe during the subway grate scene for The Seven Year Itch in New York City, 1955.
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246147_0 


Lot 655: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 10, possibly never before seen, color slides of Marilyn Monroe, some with co-star Tom Ewell, on the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) from the September 15, 1954, filming of the now famous skirt-blowing subway scene. Fans and photographers can also be seen in these images.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246148_0 


Lot 862: MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD SEVEN YEAR ITCH PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition candid color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1954. The photograph was taken on the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). Monroe seen is pictured standing with co-star Tom Ewell. The photograph is numbered 3/50 and signed by the estate of Bernard of Hollywood. This is the first time the photograph has been made available for sale.
20 by 24 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246456_0   


Lot 863: MARILYN MONROE CONTACT SHEETS
 A pair of vintage Marilyn Monroe contact sheets. The first is a black and white contact sheet from the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) with 25 frames showing Monroe and one frame of her co-star Tom Ewell. The second black and white contact sheet contains 15 frames, marked on verso "Credit Sam Shaw." Most of the images appear to have been taken at a 1957 photoshoot of Monroe with photographer Richard Avedon.
Each, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246457_0  246458_0   


Photographies & Film - Bus Stop
Photographs & Film


Lot 52: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP POSTER
 An original 1956 U.S. insert poster for the Marilyn Monroe film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956) with a Dutch film censor stamp to the upper right corner.
39 by 17 inches, framed
PROVENANCE Lot 192, “Vintage Film Posters,” Christie’s, London, Sale number 9689, September 19, 2003
 Estimate: $150 - $300
245127_0  


Lot 53: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP POSTER
An original 1956 British double-crown poster for the Marilyn Monroe film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956), illustrated by Tom William Chantrell.
31 by 21 inches, framed
PROVENANCE Lot 88, “Vintage Film Posters,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale Number 5424, September 17, 2008
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245128_0  


Lot 262: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP SNAPSHOTS
 Four vintage color photographs on Pavelle color print paper. The images feature Monroe in costume posing with Don Murray, her co-star in the film Bus Stop. Together with two 35mm contact prints cut from a larger contact sheet with red wax pencil X's, featuring images of Monroe from the film.
2 3/4 by 1 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245528_0  245529_0   


Lot 731: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 39 slides, from the original preview/trailer for Marilyn Monroe's film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956), together with the original "Mercury Jiffy Mask" box.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246245_0   


Lot 732: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS SOLD WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of seven black and white original photographs of Marilyn Monroe on the set in Phoenix, Arizona, during the filming of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Six of the images have handwritten annotations on verso, "MM sitting in stands waiting for filming to start"; "MM walking to stands to start working. Reminds me of her walk in 'Niagara'"; "MM with rodeo official"; "MM talking to director Josh Logan"; "Boy shaking hands with MM. He was also at the airport when she arrived. She picked him up and held him. When she saw him again, she remembered him from the airport"; and "Filming finished, MM and Milton H. Greene walk to her car. That evening she left Phoenix for Calif." All images are likely never before seen.
This item sold with copyright but is not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $5,000 - $6,000
246246_0 


Lot 734: MARILYN MONROE FILM TRAILER
 A reel of 35mm color film containing the film trailer for Marilyn Monroe's 1956 film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The reel is in a cardboard box with Frieda Hull's address and telephone number written on the outside in green marker.
4 1/2 by 4 1/2 by 1 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $50 - $75
246250_0  246251_0  246252_0  


Lot 735: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE BUS STOP PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE
 A vintage archive of approximately 180 photographs related to Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956), including approximately 150 movie stills and roughly 30 publicity photographs. Note: Several duplicate photographs are contained in this lot.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246253_0  


Lot 736: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP LOBBY CARD ARCHIVE
A collection of 18 lobby cards for Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956), one of which is signed by Eileen Heckart, Monroe's co-star in the film.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246254_0 


Lot 876: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of five vintage negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Marilyn Monroe and others on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 1 1/2 by 4 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246485_0  


Lot 877: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP PHOTOGRAPHS AND SIGNATURE
 A group of three small photo books containing 26 vintage black and white photographs taken on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Marilyn Monroe appears in eight of the photographs and has signed the back of one image. The photographs come from an extra who worked on the film during the scenes shot at the Arizona State Fairgrounds. These photographs are believed to be unpublished.
Photographs, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246486_0  246487_0 
246488_0 246489_0 
246490_0 246491_0 246492_0 


Lot 879: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of four vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe in a robe on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyrights to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
1 1/2 by 6 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246495_0 


Lot 880: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of four vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe, Don Murray, and others on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 1 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246496_0 


Lot 881: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of three vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe and others, including co-star Eileen Heckart, on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Each, 1 1/2 by 1 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246497_0  


Lot 882: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP STUDIO IMAGES
 A group of seven vintage studio images of Marilyn Monroe from the film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Includes three color publicity photographs stamped "Theatre Poster Exchange" on verso and four black and white studio images from the film, including one taken by Milton Greene.
Most, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246498_0 


Lot 883: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of three vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe and co-star Don Murray on set during filming in a bedroom. Murray has been quoted as saying that Monroe was nude under the sheets because she felt that was what her character would do. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 1 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500
246499_0  


Lot 884: MARILYN BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of five vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe and co-star Don Murray on set during filming in a bedroom. Murray has been quoted as saying that Monroe was nude under the sheets because she felt that was what her character would do. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arriving as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Each, 1 1/2 by 1 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500
246500_0   


Lot 885: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of five vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe and others on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
1 1/2 by 7 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246501_0  


Lot 886: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE NEGATIVE AND COPYRIGHT
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe negative produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe in costume as her character Chérie posing with the children of her co-star, Eileen Heckart. Accompanied by the copyright to the image.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246502_0 


Lot 887: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of five vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe and others on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 1 1/2 by 4 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246503_0 


Lot 888: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of four vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe and others on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arisiing as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 1 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246504_0  


Photographies - The Prince and the Showgirl
Photographs


Lot 372: MARILYN MONROE PROGRAM FROM THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL PREMIERE
 A program from the June 13, 1957, premiere of The Prince and the Showgirl at Radio City Music Hall with a benefit and gala champagne supper-dance held at the Waldorf Astoria afterwards. The gala benefited of the Free Milk Fund for Babies Inc.
12 by 9 inches
 Estimate: $700 - $900
245713_0  245714_0 


Lot 741: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS SIGNED BY LAURENCE OLIVIER
 A group of four vintage glossy black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier from the film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) as well as from press events for the film. Each of the images is signed in red wax pencil "Laurence Olivier."
8 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800 
246259_0  246262_0 
246260_0  246261_0 


Lot 744: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE
 A vintage archive of 73 photographs related to The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957), including 50 movie stills, 20 publicity photographs, and three original lobby cards, collected by Frieda Hull.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246265_0  


Lot 745: MARILYN MONROE THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL LOBBY CARD ARCHIVE
 A nearly complete lobby card collection for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). The series is missing card No. 9.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246266_0 


Lot 920: MARILYN MONROE NEGATIVES FROM THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL
 A group of 12 negatives relating to Marilyn Monroe and The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) including four images taken by Milton Greene, images taken at publicity events for the film, and images taken on set.
Largest, 10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246549_0 
246550_0 246551_0 246552_0  


Lot 923: MARILYN MONROE FILM PHOTOGRAPHS AND NEGATIVES
 A group of 9 vintage photographs and four negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced while on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) housed in glassine envelopes with markings. Some of the markings indicate areas on Monroe's person that should be retouched. The images were formerly housed in a folder marked on the cover "Kill" and on the interior "Not retouched to be app. by MM."
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246555_0 


Lot 924: MARILYN MONROE FILM PHOTOGRAPHS AND NEGATIVES
 A group of ten vintage photographs and six negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced while on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) housed in glassine envelopes with markings. Some of the markings indicate areas on Monroe’s person that should be retouched. The images were formerly housed in a folder marked on the cover “Kill” and on the interior “Not retouched to be app. by MM.”
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246556_0  


Lot 925: MARILYN MONROE FILM PHOTOGRAPHS AND NEGATIVES
 A group of 10 vintage photographs and negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced while on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) housed in glassine envelopes with markings. Some of the markings indicate areas on Monroe's person that should be retouched. The images were formerly housed in a folder marked "Kill" and are believed to have been rejected by Monroe. Note that not all photographs and negatives match.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246557_0  


Lot 926: MARILYN MONROE FILM PHOTOGRAPHS AND NEGATIVES
 A group of 10 vintage photographs produced while on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) housed in glassine envelopes with markings. Some of the markings indicate areas on Monroe's person that should be retouched. The images were formerly housed in a folder marked "Kill" and are believed to have been rejected by Monroe. Note that not all photographs and negatives match.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246558_0  


Lot 927: MARILYN MONROE FILM PHOTOGRAPHS AND NEGATIVES
 A group of 9 vintage photographs and negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced while on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) housed in glassine envelopes with markings. Some of the markings indicate areas on Monroe's person that should be retouched. The images were formerly housed in a folder marked "Kill" and are believed to have been rejected by Monroe. Note that not all photographs and negatives match.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246559_0  


Lot 928: MARILYN MONROE FILM PHOTOGRAPHS AND NEGATIVES
 A group of 9 vintage photographs and negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced while on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) housed in glassine envelopes with markings. Some of the markings indicate areas on Monroe's person that should be retouched. The images were formerly housed in a folder marked "Kill" and are believed to have been rejected by Monroe. Note that photographs and negatives may not match.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246560_0  


Lot 929: MARILYN MONROE COLOR TRANSPARENCIES
 A group of approximately 40 color transparencies taken on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Most of the images are of Marilyn Monroe and are in plastic sleeves. Some of the sleeves have been marked with red grease pencil. These transparencies were housed in an envelope that read "MM Color Rejects" and "Bad."
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246561_0  


Lot 930: MARILYN MONROE COLOR TRANSPARENCIES
 A group of approximately 30 color transparencies taken on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Most of the images are of Marilyn Monroe and are in plastic sleeves. Some of the sleeves have been marked with red grease pencil. These transparencies were housed in an envelope that read "MM Color Rejects" and "Bad."
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246562_0 


Lot 931: MARILYN MONROE COLOR TRANSPARENCIES
 A group of approximately 35 color transparencies taken on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Most of the images are of Marilyn Monroe and are in plastic sleeves. Some of the sleeves have been marked with black or red grease pencil. These transparencies were housed in an envelope that read "MM Color Rejects" and "Bad."
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246563_0 


Lot 932: MARILYN MONROE COLOR TRANSPARENCIES
 A group of approximately 30 color transparencies taken on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Most of the images are of Marilyn Monroe and are in plastic sleeves. Some of the sleeves have been marked with black or red grease pencil. These transparencies were housed in an envelope that read "MM Color Rejects" and "Bad."
5 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246564_0 


Lot 933: MARILYN MONROE COLOR TRANSPARENCIES
 A group of 27 color transparencies taken on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Most of the images are of Marilyn Monroe and are in plastic sleeves. Some of the sleeves have been marked with red grease pencil. Contained in an envelope that reads "MM Color Rejects" and "Bad."
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246565_0  246566_0 


Photographies - Some Like It Hot
Photographs


Lot 66: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT POSTER
 An original 1959 U.S. half-sheet style B poster for the Marilyn Monroe film Some Like It Hot (20th Century, 1956).
28 1/2 by 36 1/2 inches, framed
PROVENANCE Lot 90, “Vintage Film Posters,” Christie’s, South Kensington, Sale number 5424, September 17, 2008
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200 
245175_0 


Lot 421: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT ADVERTISEMENTS
 Three trade advertisement pieces promoting the film Some like It Hot saying "Hot Hit Ahead … Book it now for Easter!!" The ads also present some of the critical praise received during advance screenings of the film and present Monroe together with her co-stars Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis throughout.
12 3/8 by 18 5/8 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600 
245782_0  245783_0 
245784_0 


Lot 422: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT COVER PROOF
 A printer's proof of the front and back cover artwork for the paperback version of Some Like It Hot by Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond published by the New American Library.
7 1/2 by 9 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245785_0 


Lot 423: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT POSTER
 An in-store promotional poster for the original motion picture soundtrack of Some Like It Hot from United Artists, featuring an image of Monroe with co-stars Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis.
13 1/4 by 13 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245786_0 


Lot 424: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT POSTER
 An in-store promotional poster for the original motion picture soundtrack of Some Like It Hot from United Artists, featuring an image of Monroe's character playing the ukulele.
13 1/4 by 13 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245787_0 


Lot 425: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT CALENDAR
 A promotional poster created to promote the March 18, 1959, release date for Some Like It Hot. The calendar features four pages inside the staple-bound covers each featuring an image of Monroe from the film, one declaring March 18 as M-Day and the inside back cover featuring the poster artwork for the film.
11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245788_0  245789_0  


Photographies - Let's Make Love
Photographs


Lot 444: MARILYN MONROE LET'S MAKE LOVE PHOTOGRAPHS
 Five vintage black and white photographs of Monroe on the set of Let's Make Love . Three feature Monroe celebrating her birthday with director George Cukor and co-star Yves Montand, one features Monroe receiving a card from the cast and crew, and the last is a glossy print of Monroe's hair and makeup for the film.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245822_0  245823_0 
245824_0 245825_0 245826_0 


Lot 448: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS
 Three black and white photographs of Monroe with a young man on the set of Let's Make Love, 1960. The vintage matte finish prints are unmarked, but feature Monroe in one of her show-stopping gowns from the film.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245830_0 245831_0 245832_0  


Lot 449: MARILYN MONROE PROMOTIONAL POSTCARD
 A vintage promotional postcard for Monroe's film Let's Make Love, with facsimile message from Monroe on verso reading "Dear Friend - you will be seeing more of me soon in - 'Let's Make Love' Marilyn."
8 1/4 by 5 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $100 - $150
245833_0  245834_0  


Lot 450: MARILYN MONROE TRADE ADS
 Two stapled magazine ads, each slightly different four-page ads, as they ran in the August 23, 1960, issue of The Hollywood Reporter and the August 24, 1960 issue of Variety .
12 1/4 by 9 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245835_0 245836_0 245837_0 


Lot 768: MARILYN MONROE LET'S MAKE LOVE
 20th Century Fox, 1960 half-sheet film poster with heavy crease lines.
22 by 28 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $150
246292_0  246293_0  


Lot 973: MARILYN MONROE LET'S MAKE LOVE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of vintage black and white images of Marilyn Monroe on the set of Let’s Make Love (20th Century, 1960). Stamped on verso “Kindler Und Schiermeyer Verlag AG Archiv.”
Each, 9 1/2 by 12 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246623_0  246624_0 


Photographies - The Misfits
Photographs


Lot 67: MARILYN MONROE EVE ARNOLD SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A framed black and white portrait of Marilyn Monroe on the set of The Misfits (United Artists, 1961) taken by Eve Arnold. Printed at a later date and signed by the photographer.
Framed, 14 by 17 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

245176_0 


Lot 509: MARILYN MONROE CONTACT SHEETS FROM THE MISFITS
 22 frames of Monroe posing for wardrobe test photos for The Misfits, 1961.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

245931_0 


Lot 510: MARILYN MONROE CONTACT SHEETS FROM THE MISFITS
 Three vintage black and white contact sheets featuring 26 frames of Monroe sitting for hair and makeup test photos for The Misfits, 1961. One frame captures famed Hollywood hairstylist Sydney Guilaroff and an assistant fixing Monroe's hair.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

245932_0  


Photographies - Something's Got to Give
Photographs


Lot 579: MARILYN MONROE HAIR TEST PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five color snapshots of Monroe taken during preparation for the unfinished film Something's Got To Give, 1962.
4 1/2 by 3 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246032_0 


Lot 784: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS COLLECTED BY FRIEDA HULL
 A group of four reproduction color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on the set of her final film Something's Got To Give on or around May 7, 1962.
Largest, 4 3/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246326_0 


Lot 983: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE SOMETHING'S GOT TO GIVE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe vintage black and white photographs taken by Lawrence Schiller on the set of Something’s Got To Give in 1962. The images show Monroe seated at the side of a pool wearing only a nude bikini bottom. Both are stamped on verso “Times” and “Copyright Camera Press LTD.” with additional handwritten notations. Accompanied by a snipe providing information about the photographs and additionally crediting photographer William Read Woodfield.
Larger, 12 by 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246638_0  246639_0  


Photographies - Divers Films
Photographs - Various Movies


Lot 43: MARILYN MONROE NIAGARA POSTER
 An original 1953 U.S. linen-backed one-sheet poster for the Marilyn Monroe film Niagara (20th Century, 1953).
47 by 33 1/2 inches, framed
PROVENANCE Lot 84, “Vintage Film Posters,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale number 5424, September 17, 2008
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245095_0  


Lot 45: MARILYN MONROE INSCRIBED PHOTOGRAPH
A photograph of Marilyn Monroe with her arm around a man on a film set of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953) inscribed "To Paul/ I love you/ friend/ Marilyn Monroe."
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 57, “Rock & Roll and Entertainment Memorabilia,” Christie's, New York, Sale number 1438, December 17, 2004
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
245097_0  245098_0 


Lot 605: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR EARLY FILMS, 1947-1952
An archive of 168 movie stills and publicity photographs related to the early films in Monroe's career from 1947 to 1952, including Dangerous Years (two photographs), Ladies of the Chorus (17 photographs), Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay! (one photograph), Love Happy (four photographs), A Ticket to Tomahawk (14 photographs), All About Eve (six photographs), Right Cross (one photograph), The Asphalt Jungle (20 photographs), Love Nest (three photographs), Let's Make It Legal (10 photographs), Home Town Story (four photographs), As Young As You Feel (13 photographs), O. Henry's Full House (two photographs), Clash by Night (15 photographs), Monkey Business (30 photographs), and We're Not Married (26 photographs).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $400 - $600
246083_0 


Lot 608: MARILYN MONROE PRESS BOOKS
 A group of five exhibitor's campaign books for Monroe's films including As Young As You Feel, 1951; Let's Make It Legal, 1951; Niagara, 1953; Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1953; and The Misfits, 1961.
Largest, 18 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246089_0  246090_0  


Lot 610: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white publicity headshot of Marilyn Monroe taken for her film Clash By Night (RKO,1952). Signed in blue ink in lower right "Marilyn Monroe." Some creases and minor tears to edges.
8 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246092_0 


Lot 611: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY IMAGE ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 50 vintage black and white publicity images and publicity stills featuring Marilyn Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246093_0 


Lot 612: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY IMAGE ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 50 vintage black and white publicity images and publicity stills featuring Marilyn Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246094_0  


Lot 621: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK
 A vintage archive of approximately 45 photographs related to Don't Bother to Knock (20th Century, 1952), including 45 movie stills and five publicity photographs.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246104_0  


Lot 628: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR NIAGARA
 A vintage archive of approximately 20 photographs related to Niagara (20th Century, 1953), including movie stills and publicity photographs.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $50 - $100
246114_0  


Lot 637: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES
 A vintage archive of approximately 60 photographs related to Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953), including approximately 45 movie stills and roughly 15 publicity photographs. Note: Several duplicate photographs are contained in this lot.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246125_0 


Lot 641: MARILYN MONROE RELATED PROGRAMS
 A nine-page color souvenir program from the Marilyn Monroe 1953 film How To Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953), together with a program from the American Newspaper Publishers Association convention held at the Waldorf Astoria on April 26, 1955. The program features the menu for the evening as well as the entertainers slated to appear, including Monroe.
12 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $100 - $150
246131_0   


Lot 642: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR HOW TO MARRY A MILLIONAIRE
 A vintage archive of approximately 80 movie stills from How to Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246132_0  


Lot 723: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR LATER FILMS, 1959-1961
 An archive of 14 movie stills and publicity photographs related to the later films in Marilyn Monroe's career from 1959 to 1961, including Some Like It Hot (four photographs), Let's Make Love (eight photographs), and The Misfits (two photographs).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246232_0 


Lot 815: MARILYN MONROE STUDIO PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine Marilyn Monroe studio photographs. The black and white images include a publicity photograph from Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959); Monroe's famous subway grate photograph taken on the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) by Sam Shaw; an image of Monroe and Jane Russell from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953); an image of Monroe from River of No Return (20th Century, 1954); an image of Monroe from We're Not Married (20th Century, 1952); and an image from There's No Business Like Show Business (20th Century, 1954) along with three other studio publicity images.
Each, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246381_0 


Lot 982: MARILYN MONROE PUBLICITY AND PRESS PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight Marilyn Monroe photographs from The Misfits (Seven Arts, 1961) and Something's Got To Give ( 20th Century). Five of the images are studio publicity photographs. The three remaining images are from the pool scene Monroe shot for Something's Got To Give. One of these images is stamped "Approved by the Advertising Code Administration of New York." Another is stamped by United Press International Photo.
Most, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246637_0 


Lot 1005: MARILYN MONROE MARILYN PUBLICITY STILLS
 A group of three Marilyn Monroe studio publicity photographs from the documentary Marilyn (20th Century, 1963). The documentary was a compilation of clips from Monroe's career. The images are from three of Monroe's films.
Each, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246670_0 


Presse  & Autres
Press & Others


Lot 42: MARILYN MONROE COLLECTION OF VINTAGE MAGAZINES
 A collection of approximately 20 vintage magazines dating from 1952 to 1964, all featuring Marilyn Monroe on the cover. Some titles: Reg, Life, Cine Monde, Look, Jours De France, and Photoplay.
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245094_0 


Lot 73: MARILYN MONROE MAGAZINES
 A January 16, 1962, special issue of Look magazine featuring content about "The Next 25 Years" with predictions by John F. Kennedy, Dr. Martin Luther King and others. Together with a March 1961 issue of Esquire magazine featuring an eight-page cover article on Marilyn Monroe, Arthur Miller, John Huston and the film The Misfits. A full-page ad for this issue of Esquire, as it appeared in the February 24, 1961, copy of the New York Times, is also present, tucked inside the magazine. The ad used a quotation from the feature article that criticized Monroe for being too high maintenance and out of control.
Largest, 13 1/4 by 10 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lee Strasberg
 Estimate: $500 - $700 
245195_0 
245196_0 


Lot 102: MARILYN MONROE PIN-UPS MAGAZINE
 A copy of the 1953 special magazine printed by the Maco Magazine Corporation. The special edition cost 35 cents and featured fifteen pages of color and black and white images of Monroe, some rare images. Each image is accompanied by "facts" about Monroe, many of which are incorrect but they fit the studio's narrative of their star at this time, including the fact that she does not drink. The booklet also carries a three page spread of black and white images showing Monroe exercising and tells how she stays in shape.
11 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
245273_0 245274_0 245275_0 


Lot 247: MARILYN MONROE CUSTOM-BOUND ESQUIRE MAGAZINE
 A copy of the July 1953 issue of Esquire magazine, custom-bound in gilt green boards with Monroe's name on the lower right corner of cover. The issue featured a four-page article titled "The 'altogether girl" by Bennett Cerf featuring a number of images.
13 1/2 by 10 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245484_0  245485_0 
245487_0 245486_0 


Lot 419: MARILYN MONROE’S COLLECTION OF SOME LIKE IT HOT PRESS CLIPPINGS
 Original 1959 newspaper clippings from various newspapers across the country with reviews of Some Like It Hot and of Monroe’s performance, contained in the original file, labeled “Clippings/Some Like It Hot,” from Monroe’s filing cabinets. Some reviews outlined in red wax pencil.
 Estimate: $800 - $1,000
245777_0  


Lot 606: MARILYN MONROE SCRAPBOOK COLLECTION
 A group of seven three-ring binders, each containing approximately 100 pages of newspaper and magazine clippings as well as photographs and some ephemera items like the original booklet that held Frieda Hull's tickets to Marilyn Monroe's famous appearance astride a pink elephant at the circus in New York City on March 30, 1955. The books are an extraordinary archive of Monroe's public persona and career. The books appear to run through 1955.
11 1/2 by 9 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500
246084_0 
246085_0 246086_0 246087_0   


Lot 609: MARILYN MONROE RECORDS
 A group of 13 LPs and 45s, all featuring songs from Marilyn Monroe including: Some Like It Hot soundtrack LP and 45 rpm records; Gentlemen Prefer Blondes original cast album; two copies of Let's Make Love original soundtrack recording, one still sealed; Italian River of No Return 45 rpm record; 20th Century Fox Records 45 rpm River of No Return record; Gems from the archive of 20th Century Fox compilation album with "ready to frame" picture of Monroe; motion picture compilation soundtrack album; and four later compilation albums remembering Marilyn.
12 by 12 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246091_0 


Lot 622: 1950s MAGAZINES FEATURING MARILYN MONROE
 A group of 10 vintage magazines featuring Marilyn Monroe, including a special 1954 Marilyn magazine written by Sidney Skolsky, Movie World, Photoplay, Screen Stories, Rave, Hollywood Stars, Movie Mirror, Filmland and Screen Stars. Most date to 1956, together with one magazine from 1953.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246105_0 


Lot 623: MARILYN MONROE POSTCARD
 A vintage oversize postcard printed by Tichnor Bros. Inc. of Boston featuring an early 1950s pin-up image of Marilyn Monroe in a yellow bikini.
6 by 9 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $80 - $120
246106_0  246107_0 


Lot 624: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PIN-UP POSTER
 A life-size poster issued by Pin-ups of Boston, Massachusetts. The posters were advertised in the August 1953 issue of Popular Science magazine, where customers could order Marilyn Monroe in a red and white striped bikini or in a blue and white striped bikini for the bargain price of $2.00 per poster. This lot features Monroe in a red and white striped bikini. A small two-inch vertical tear is along the lower edge of this poster that is otherwise in excellent condition.
64 by 22 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246108_0 


Lot 625: MARILYN MONROE POCKET MAGAZINES AND PIN-UPS
A copy of That Girl Marilyn! by Jane Russell featuring 60 candid photographs and published by Affiliated Magazines Inc. and a copy of The Marilyn Monroe Story # 3 - A Candid Profile, 1955, from Screen Publications Inc. Together with 11 loose 1950s magazine covers torn from their respective magazines and two loose pin-up pages featuring Monroe.
Largest, 13 1/4 by 10 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $200 - $300 
246109_0 246110_0 246111_0 


Lot 785: 1960s AND 1970s MAGAZINES FEATURING MARILYN MONROE
 A group of 17 magazines: two from 1960, six from 1961, two from early 1962, and seven from the 1970s. Titles include Movie Mirror , TV Radio Album , Screen Stories , Hollywood Tattler , Modern Screen , Photoplay and other gossip magazines.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $400 - $600
246327_0 


Lot 786: MAGAZINES FEATURING MARILYN MONROE FROM 1962
 A group of six vintage magazines, among them TV and Movie Screen , Hush - Hush , Movie Mirror , and others, including a special French souvenir album put out by Cine magazine on August 8, 1962. The magazines date from between August and December 1962, paying tribute and speculating about the circumstances surrounding Marilyn Monroe's death.
Largest, 13 3/4 by 10 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246328_0   


Lot 787: MARILYN MONROE FOREIGN LANGUAGE MAGAZINES
 A group of thirteen magazines and newspapers featuring Marilyn Monroe on the cover including nine Italian titles, one Spanish, two French newspapers, and a Danish magazine all dating to August 1962 in reaction to Monroe's tragic death.
Largest, 23 3/4 by 17 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246329_0 


Lot 842: MARILYN MONROE ITEMS
 A group of assorted Marilyn Monroe items: a limited edition Playboy anniversary poster signed by Hugh Hefner and numbered 136/200; a hardcover copy of the Christie's Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe auction catalog from 1999; a giclée print of Monroe entertaining the troops, signed by Victoria Fuller and numbered 273/350; a "Golden Dreams" wall calendar from 1955; four prints of Monroe in a portfolio published by Special Editions Limited; a framed series of 10 magazine cover reproductions featuring Monroe; a 1992 Monroe calendar; five framed inkjet photographs of Monroe posing nude; a 1974 Playboy Marilyn Monroe date book; and a 1974 Playboy Marilyn Monroe calendar.
36 by 24 inches, largest
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246420_0  246421_0   


Lot 843: MARILYN MONROE PLAYBOY FIRST ISSUES SIGNED
 A collection of the first 14 issues of Playboy magazine, all cased and graded, including the first two issues of Playboy , volume 1 number 1 with Marilyn Monroe, and volume 2 number 2, both signed on the cover by Hugh Hefner. Also includes the Summer 1982 issue of Playboy's VIP magazine, cased and graded.
9 1/2 by 13 7/8 by 9 5/8 inches, overall
 Estimate: $5,000 - $7,000
246422_0 


Lot 844: MARILYN MONROE PREMIERE ISSUE OF PLAYBOY MAGAZINE
 A copy of the first issue of Playboy magazine that features Marilyn Monroe on the cover. Monroe also appears on the interior of the premiere issue in an article on pages 17 and 18 titled "What Makes Marilyn" and a color pin-up of Monroe taken by Tom Kelley during the 1949 Red Velvet session on page 19. Monroe is called "Sweetheart of the Month," which evolved into Playmate of the Month. No date appears on the cover because Hugh Hefner has stated that he didn't know if there would be a second issue. The magazine hit newsstands in December 1953 and sold for 50 cents. Accompanied by a copy of a magazine titled Marilyn Monroe Pin - Ups released by Maco Magazine Corporation in 1953.
11 by 8 1/2 inches, each
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246423_0 

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07 mai 2016

Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction 02/2016 -2


Photographies


Lot 89009A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, an enlarged snapshot depicting the star wearing a white evening gown and a white fur coat, signed in blue ballpoint ink in the lower right corner "To Jim / Love & Kisses / Marilyn Monroe;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs); included is a black and white photograph of Collins: an original print with a matte finish, depicting Collins as a teenager in 1955 standing at a typewriter that was set up outside of a shop on an NYC street, verso is stamped in part "Life Magazine / ...Photo by Michael Rouger / ... Apr 13 1955;" Collins remembers that this photograph of him actually ran in the magazine with a caption noting what he had just typed which was "Marilyn Monroe is a beautiful girl." (Please note the photograph of MM is heavily wrinkled on the lower margin and has a 1 1/2" tear in same area which somewhat affects her signature; the photograph of Collins is heavily wrinkled with two lower corners missing.)
10" x 8"  
More Information:
"Marilyn Monroe is a beautiful girl!" were the words I was typing when as a 17 year-old, this picture of me was shot by a photographer from LifeMagazine in 1955. The photo, which actually appeared in the magazine a couple of months later, launched my own collection of Marilyn Monroe photos taken overseveral years by me and fivefellow teenage fans who became known as "The Monroe 6." During Marilyn's time in New York, I and the others photographed herin various locations around the city. We would then run to the drugstore to get our snapshots developed in multiples so that all of us could have all the shots we had taken of her (thus the reason for the different shapes and sizes of the photos my collection). In the era before Google and GPS and TMZ and smartphones, we were alerted to Marilyn's appearancesand whereabouts by sources ranging fromVariety Magazinetoher Upper East Side hairdresser. Marilyn got to know the six of us well as we journeyed around the city with her and I remember her always being gracious and friendly. We wanted nothing from her except the opportunity to take her picture or to get her autograph - and often times she would sign on the very photographs we had just taken of her the day before. After Marilyn died, I put these photographs in a closet for many decades, though over the last few years, I have posted a few of them on the Internet for fans to see. I am now ready to let others have my original 1950s-era snapshots of the movie star I had the luck and pleasure to see many times up close and in the flesh - Miss Marilyn Monroe! And she did not disappoint - she was absolutely beautiful as all these photos clearly indicate. When you saw her in person, shewas THE movie star, no doubt about it!
James Collins
New York City, 2016  
lot89009-a  lot89009-b  lot89009-c 


Lot 89010A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, Circa 1955.
An original print with a matte finish, an enlarged snapshot showing the smiling star, signed in blue fountain pen ink on the right side "Love & Kisses / Marilyn Monroe;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs); also included with an identical photograph but not signed. (Please note the ink is slightly faded but still legible and there are a number of creases throughout which somewhat detract from the image.)
7" x 5" 
lot89010-a lot89010-b 


Lot 89011A Marilyn Monroe Signed Black and White Photograph, 1955.
An original print with a matte finish, depicting an enlarged snapshot of the star standing next to her business partner, Milton Greene, as the two attend the New York City premiere of the James Dean film, "East of Eden," on March 9, 1955, signed in brown fountain pen ink on the lower left side "Love & / Kisses / Marilyn Monroe;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note the ink is slightly faded but still legible and there are a number of creases throughout but they don't detract from the overall image.)
9 3/4" x 7 3/4" 
lot89011-a 


Lot 89012A Marilyn Monroe Signed Color Snapshot, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star outside the Gladstone Hotel in NYC (where she briefly lived) wearing a black gown, black gloves, and a white fur coat, signed in blue fountain pen ink in the lower center "Marilyn Monroe," verso has stamp reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending Mar. 12, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note the ink is noticeably smudged from the time when it was signed.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2"  
lot89012-a  lot89012-b 


Lot 89013A Marilyn Monroe Signed Color Snapshot, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star outside the Gladstone Hotel in NYC (where she briefly lived) wearing a black gown, black gloves, and a white fur coat, signed in blue fountain pen ink in the lower center "Marilyn Monroe," verso has stamp reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending Mar. 12, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note the ink is somewhat smudged from the time when it was signed.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89013-a  lot89013-b 


Lot 89014 -  
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star outside the Gladstone Hotel in NYC (where she briefly lived) wearing a black gown, black gloves, and a white fur coat, signed in blue fountain pen ink in the lower center right "Marilyn Monroe," verso has stamp reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending Mar. 12, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note the ink is somewhat smudged from the time when it was signed.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89014-a  lot89014-b 


Lot 89015 A Marilyn Monroe Signed Color Snapshot, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star inside the Gladstone Hotel in NYC (where she briefly lived) wearing a black gown, black gloves, and a white fur coat (with two men seen in the background), signed almost illegibly in blue fountain pen ink in the upper right "Marilyn Monroe," verso has stamp reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending Mar. 12, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note much of signature is invisible as the pen MM was using evidently ran out of ink.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89015-a  lot89015-b 


Lot 89016 -  A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Twenty-one total, all original prints with a glossy finish, depicting the star wearing a gold lamé gown, a black fur coat, and black gloves as she arrives with Milton Greene at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in NYC to attend a Friar's Club dinner on March 11, 1955 (which honored Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin), MM is seen either alone or among others (including Milton Berle), some snapshots are clear, others are out of focus, in three different sizes; though these images have been seen, these are the original snapshots developed and printed in 1955; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook.)
5" x 3 1/2"; 3" x 3"; 3 1/2" x 2 1/2"  
lot89016   


Lot 89017 -  A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, Circa 1955-1956.
Twenty-seven total, all original prints with a glossy finish, three different sizes, each a candid shot depicting the star as she was out and about in NYC, sometimes in casual wear, other times in cocktail attire, many showing her surrounded by others (including business partner Milton Greene, photographer Sam Shaw, and super-fans Jimmy Collins and James Haspiel, to name a few); from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and some have slight wrinkles but overall, all are still in very good condition.)
3 1/2" x 5"; 3 1/2" x 3 1/2"; 2 1/2" x 3 1/2"  
lot89017  


Lot 89018 - A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955-1956.
Twenty-two total, all original prints with a glossy finish, four different sizes, all showing the star in evening wear on about five different occasions (judging from her different dresses), many depict others with MM such as Joe DiMaggio, business partners Milton and Amy Greene, and fans; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and some are slightly wrinkled but overall, all are in very good condition.)
5" x 3 1/2"; 3 1/2" x 4 1/2"; 3 1/2" x 3 1/2"; 2 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89018 


 Lot 89019 -  A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955-1957.
Twenty-two total, all original prints with a glossy finish (except one), four different sizes, all depicting the star at various public events she attended including seven showing her with then-husband, Arthur Miller; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and some have evident wrinkling due to age.)
10" x 8" (one only); 5" x 3 1/2"; 3 1/2" x 3 1/2"; 3 1/2" x 2 1/4" 

lot89019  


Lot 89020 -  A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Twelve total, all original prints with a glossy finish, three different sizes (with four slightly trimmed from their original size), all depicting the star next to others (including her business partners, Milton and Amy Greene) as she wears a brocade evening gown and matching cape at the March 9, 1955 NYC premiere of the James Dean film, "East of Eden" ; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook.)
5" x 3 1/2"; 3" x 3"; 3 1/2" x 2 1/2" 
lot89020 


Lot 89021A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Ten total, all original prints with a glossy finish, all sequentially shot as Marilyn goes from a NYC street into a parking garage and then takes off in a car while wearing white pedal pushers, a polka-dotted shirt, white flats, and a white summer coat, five are stamped on the right side margin "Jun 55," super-fan James Haspiel appears in one (as do a few others); all originally housed in a mint green "Photo Book" from "Berkey / Photo Service;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note one photo is severely creased across MM's face.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" 
lot89021-a   lot89021-b 


Lot 89022 A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Seven total, all original prints with a glossy finish, each depicting the star wearing a lamé dress and a white fur coat as she sits in the lobby of The Hotel 14 in NYC while others surround her (including Milton Berle); from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs); Collins recalls that on this night he waited for MM and her group (which included her date, Milton Berle) to come out of the Copacabana night club which was located upstairs in the same building as The Hotel 14 at 14 East 60th Street in Manhattan -- his patience paid off when he was able to snap these great candid photos of the star as well as pose next to her in one (top row, center). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook.)
4 1/2" x 3 1/4" 
lot89022 


Lot 89023A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Eight total, two different sizes, all original prints with a glossy finish, depicting the star sitting in the lobby of the Gladstone Hotel (where she briefly lived) as she wears a black dress, black jacket, and black fishnet gloves, verso of all faintly stamped "Kodak / Velox / Paper;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2" and 3 1/2" x 2 1/2" 
lot89023 


Lot 89024A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Black and White Snapshots, 1955.
Eight total, all original prints with a glossy finish, three different sizes (two being trimmed from their original size), all depicting the star wearing a white cocktail dress and white fur as she and her date, Joe DiMaggio, attend the June 1, 1955 premiere of "The Seven Year Itch" (which was also MM's 29th birthday); most images are out of focus but still of interest as this is a now-historic event in film history; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and the largest one has a 1" tear on the center right side.)
6 1/2" x 5"; 3 1/2" x 5"; 3 1/2" x 2 1/2" 
lot89024  


Lot 89025A Marilyn Monroe Group of Rare Color Snapshots, Mid-1950s.
Thirty-eight total, all original prints with a glossy finish, seven different sizes, depicting the star at various times over a number of years, most are candid shots though many appear to have been taken by professional photographers due to their clarity, four have stamps on the verso reading in part "This is a / Kodacolor Print / ...Week Ending July 2, 1955;" from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when they were in a scrapbook and some are slightly wrinkled due to age.)
5" x 3 1/2" biggest; 2 3/4" x 1 3/4" smallest  
lot89025 


Lot 89026A Marilyn Monroe Rare Black and White Snapshot, 1955.
An original print with a glossy finish, depicting the star wearing her famous 'white dress' with a fur coat thrown over her shoulders and a script in her hand as she leaves the St. Regis hotel in New York City, getting ready to promote a film (likely "The Seven Year Itch"); though this image has been seen, this is the original snapshot developed and printed in 1955; from the personal collection of James Collins, one of the 'Monroe Six' -- the group of young kids who followed Marilyn around NYC so often that the star ended up knowing them all by name and allowing them special access to her (like letting them take countless pictures and giving them numerous autographs). (Please note there is black paper remnants on the back from when this was in a scrapbook and there are slight creases on the surface seen in raking light only.)
3 1/2" x 3 1/2"  
lot89026-a  lot89026-b 


Film Footage


Lot 89027A Marilyn Monroe Never-Before-Seen Piece of Color Film Footage from Korea, 1954.
Shot on 8mm, approximately 1 minute and 21 seconds long, footage shows MM walking outside with a soldier escort (as she wears pants and a bomber jacket) while dozens of other soldiers surround her (to take her photograph), then it shows her getting into a car, then it (briefly) shows her performing on stage (as she wears the purple spaghetti-strapped sequined dress); shot by the current owner's father when he was stationed in Korea, he had close access to the star during the walking sequences, but was farther away when she was on stage; the original 1954 film was on three separate reels as the soldier shot tons of footage that didn't include MM (it's of the Korean people, the landscape, and fellow American soldiers) but it has now been spliced together and put on one modern-day plastic reel; the three 1954-era metal reels are still included as is a DVD transfer so the footage can be viewed.
Plastic Reel: 7"; Metal Reels: 5" 
lot89027-b 
lot89027-a lot89027-c lot89027-d