23 février 2017

Saturday Evening Post, 1956/05/12

Saturday Evening Post
- The New Marilyn Monroe - Part 2

1956-05-12-saturday_evening_post-cover 

pays magazine: USA
paru le 12 mai 1956
article: 2ème partie "The New Marilyn Monroe"
en ligne sur saturdayeveningpost.com

1956-05-12-SEP 


Part Two: Here She Talks About Herself
By Pete Martin
Originally published on May 12, 1956
Marilyn explains how Freud helped cure her inferiority complex and tells why she posed for that famous nude calendar.

1956-05-12-saturday_evening_post-pic1 
The “new Marilyn” and Don Murray, male lead
in her next picture, Bus Stop. (Gene Lester, © SEPS)

“That nude calendar Marilyn Monroe posed for will probably be reprinted as long as we have men with twenty-twenty vision in this country,” Flack Jones told me. Jones had put in several years as a publicity worker at Marilyn Monroe’s Hollywood studio before opening his own public-relations office. “Curious thing about it,” Jones went on, “when that calendar first came out, it had no bigger sale than any other nude calendar.

“You may not know it, but there’s a steady sale for such calendars. You might think that there are too few places where you can hang them up to make them worthwhile. But there’re lots of places where they fit in very nicely — truckers’ havens, barbershops, bowling alleys, poolrooms, washrooms, garages, toolshops, taprooms, taverns — joints like that. The calendar people always publish a certain number of nude calendars along with standards like changing autumn leaves, Cape Cod fishermen bringing home their catch from a wintry sea, Old Baldy covered with snow. You’re not in the calendar business unless you have a selection of sexy calendars. The sale of the one for which Marilyn posed was satisfactory, but not outstanding. It only became a ‘hot number’ when the public became familiar with it.”

Billy Wilder, the Hollywood director who directed Marilyn in The Seven Year Itch, is witty, also pungent, pithy, and is not afraid to say what he thinks. “When you come right down to it,” Wilder told me, “that calendar is not repulsive. It’s quite lovely. Marilyn’s name was already pretty big when the calendar story broke. If it hadn’t been, nobody would have cared one way or the other. But when it became known that she had posed for it, I think that, if anything, it helped her popularity. It appealed to people who like to read about millionaires who started life selling newspapers on the corner of Forty-second and Fifth Avenue; then worked their way up. It was as if Marilyn had been working her way through college, for that pose took hours. Here was a girl who needed dough, and she made it by honest toil.”

“I was working on the Fox Western Avenue lot when this worried man from Fox came tearing in wringing his hands,” Marilyn told me recently. “He took me into my dressing room to talk about the horrible thing I’d done in posing for such a photograph. I could think of nothing else to say, so I said apologetically, ‘I thought the lighting the photographer used would disguise me.’ I thought that worried man would have a stroke when I told him that.

“What had happened was I was behind in my rent at the Hollywood Studio Club, where girls stay who hope to crash the movies. You’re only supposed to get one week behind in your rent at the club, but they must have felt sorry for me because they’d given me three warnings. A lot of photographers had asked me to pose in the nude, but I’d always said, ‘No.’ I was getting five dollars an hour for plain modeling, but the price for nude modeling was fifty an hour. So I called Tom Kelley, a photographer I knew, and said, ‘They’re kicking me out of here. How soon can we do it?’ He said, ‘We can do it tomorrow.’

“I didn’t even have to get dressed, so it didn’t take long. I mean it takes longer to get dressed than it does to get undressed. I’d asked Tom, ‘Please don’t have anyone else there except your wife, Natalie.’ He said, ‘O.K.’ He only made two poses. There was a shot of me sitting up and a shot of me lying down. I think the one of me lying down is the best.

“I’m saving a copy of that calendar for my grandchildren,” Marilyn went on, all bright-eyed. “There’s a place in Los Angeles which even reproduces it on bras and panties. But I’ve only autographed a few copies of it, mostly for sick people. On one I wrote, ‘This may not be my best angle,’ and on the other I wrote, ‘Do you like me better with long hair?”

I said to Marilyn that Roy Craft, who is one of the publicity men at Fox, had told me that he had worked with her for five years, and that in all that time he’d never heard her tell a lie. “That’s a mighty fine record for any community,” I said.

“It may be a fine record,” she admitted, “but it has also gotten me into trouble. Telling the truth, I mean. Then, when I get into trouble by being too direct and I try to pull back, people think I’m being coy. I’m supposed to have said that I dislike being interviewed by women reporters, but that it’s different with gentlemen of the press because we have a mutual appreciation of being male and female. I didn’t say I disliked women reporters. As dumb as I am, I wouldn’t be that dumb, although that in itself is kind of a mysterious remark because people don’t really know how dumb I am. But I really do prefer men reporters. They’re more stimulating.”

I asked Flack Jones in Hollywood, “When did this business of her making those wonderful Monroe cracks start?”

“You mean when somebody asked her what she wears in bed and she said, ‘Chanel Number Five’?” Jones asked. “You will find some who will tell you that her humor content seemed to pick up the moment she signed a contract with the studio, and that anybody in the department who had a smart crack lying around handy gave it to her. Actually, there were those who thought that more than the department was behind it. ‘Once you launch such a campaign,’ they said, ‘it stays launched. It’s like anyone who has a smart crack to unleash attributing it to a Georgie Jessel or to a Dorothy Parker or whoever is currently smart and funny.’ There was even a theory that the public contributed some of Marilyn’s cracks by writing or calling a columnist like Sidney Skolsky or Herb Stein, and giving him a gag, and he’d attribute it to Marilyn, and so on around town. But the majority of the thinking was that our publicity department gave her her best cracks.”

“Like what?” I asked.

“Like for instance. I’ll have to lead up to it; as you know, in this business you can be destroyed by one bad story — although that’s not as true as it used to be — and when the story broke that Marilyn had posed in the nude for a calendar and the studio decided that the best thing to do was to announce the facts immediately instead of trying to pretend they didn’t exist, we said that Marilyn was broke at the time and that she’d posed to pay her room rent, which was true. Then, to give it the light touch, when she was asked, ‘Didn’t you have anything on at all when you were posing for that picture?’ we were supposed to have told her to say, ‘I had the radio on.’”

Flack Jones paused for a long moment. “I’m sorry to disagree with the majority,” he said firmly, “but she makes up those cracks herself. Certainly that ‘Chanel Number Five’ was her own.”

When I told Marilyn about this, she smiled happily. “He’s right. It was my own,” she said. “The other one — the calendar crack — I made when I was up in Canada. A woman came up to me and asked, ‘You mean to say you didn’t have anything on when you had that calendar picture taken?’ I drew myself up and told her, ‘I did, too, have something on. I had the radio on.’”

“Give her a minute to think and Marilyn is the greatest little old ad-lib artist you ever saw,” Flack Jones had insisted. “She blows it in sweet and it comes out that way. One news magazine carried a whole column of her quotes I’d collected, and every one of them was her own. There’ve been times when I could have made face in this industry by claiming that I put some of those cracks into her mouth, but I didn’t do it. This girl makes her own quotables. She’ll duck a guy who wants to interview her as long as she can, but when she finally gets around to it, she concentrates on trying to give him what he wants — something intriguing, amusing and off-beat. She’s very bright at it.

“A writer was commissioned to write a story for her for a magazine,” Jones said. “The subject was to be what Marilyn eats and how she dresses. As I recall it, the title was to be ‘How I Keep My Figure,’ or maybe it was ‘How I Keep in Shape.’ The writer talked to Marilyn; then ghosted the article. He wrote it very much the way she’d told it to him, but he had to pad it out a little because he hadn’t had too much time with her. As a result, in one section of his article he had her saying that she didn’t like to get out in the sun and pick up a heavy tan because a heavy tan loused up her wardrobe by confusing the colors of her dresses and switching around what they did for her.

“The article read good to me, and took it over to Marilyn for her corrections and approval. Most of the stuff was the routine thing about diet, but when she came to the part about ‘I don’t like suntan because it confuses the coloring of my wardrobe,’ she scratched it out. I asked her, ‘What’s the matter?’

“‘That’s ridiculous,’ she said. ‘Having a suntan doesn’t have anything to do with my wardrobe.’ I said, ‘You’ve got to say something, Marilyn. After all, the guy’s article is pretty short as it is.’ She thought for a minute; then wrote, ‘I do not suntan because I like to feel blonde all over.’ I saw her write that with her own hot little pencil.

“The magazine which printed that story thought her addition so great that they picked it out and made it a subtitle. She’d managed to transpose an ordinary paragraph about wardrobe colors into a highly exciting, beautiful, sexy mental image. Some guys have said to me, ‘Why, that dumb little broad couldn’t have thought that up. You thought it up, Jones.’ I wish I could say, ‘Yeah, I did,’ but I didn’t. Feeling blonde all over is a state of mind,” he said musingly. “I should think it would be a wonderful state of mind if you’re a girl.

“One reason why she’s such a good interview,” Flack Jones went on, “is that she uses her head during such sessions. She tries to say something that’s amusing and quotable, and she usually does. When I worked with Marilyn I made it a practice to introduce her to a writer and go away and leave her alone, on the grounds that a couple of grown people don’t need a press agent tugging at their sleeves while they get acquainted. So if her interviews have been any good, it’s her doing.”

“One day she gave a tape interview and it was all strictly ad-lib,” he said. “I know, because I had a hard time setting it up. It was for a man who was doing one of those fifteen-minute radio interviews here in Hollywood, to be broadcast afterward across the country. We had a frantic time trying to get him the time with her, but finally he got his recorder plugged in, and the first question he pitched her was a curve. He wanted to know what she thought of the Stanislavsky school of dramatic art or whatever. Believe it or not, old Marilyn unloaded on him with a twelve-minute dissertation on Stanislavsky that rocked him back on his heels.”

“Does she believe in the Stanislavsky method?” I asked.

“She agreed with Stanislavsky on certain points,” Jones said. “And she disagreed on others, and she explained why. It was one of the most enlightening discussions on the subject I’ve ever heard. It came over the radio a couple of nights later, and everybody who listened said, ‘Oh, yeah? Some press agent wrote that interview for her.’ My answer to that was, ‘What press agent knows that much about Stanislavsky?’ I don’t.”

In the course of my research, before interviewing Marilyn, I’d discovered that Billy Wilder agreed with Jones. “I think that she thinks up those funny things for herself,” he said. Wilder’s Austrian background gives his phrases an offbeat rhythm, but because of its very differentness, his way of talking picks up flavor and extra meaning.

“I think also that she says those funny things without realizing that they’re so funny,” Wilder said. “One very funny thing she said involves the fact that she has great difficulties in remembering her lines. Tremendous difficulties. I’ve heard of one director who wrote her lines on a blackboard and kept that blackboard just out of camera range. The odd thing is that if she has a long scene for which she has to remember a lot of words, she’s fine once she gets past the second word. If she gets over that one little hump, there’s no trouble. Then, too, if you start a scene and say, ‘Action!’ and hers is the first line, it takes her ten or fifteen seconds to gather herself. Nothing happens during those fifteen seconds. It seems a very long time.”

“How about an example of when she’s bogged down on a second word,” I asked.

“For instance, if she had to say, ‘Good morning, Mr. Sherman,”’ Wilder told me, “she couldn’t get out the word ‘morning.’ She’d say, ‘Good …’ and stick. Once she got ‘morning’ out, she’d be good for two pages of dialogue. It’s just that sometimes she trips over mental stumbling blocks at the beginning of a scene.

“Another director should be telling you this story, not me,” Wilder said. “This other director was directing her in a scene in a movie, and she couldn’t get the lines out. It was just muff, muff, muff, and take, take, take. Finally, after Take Thirty-two, he took her to one side, patted her on the head, and said, ‘Don’t worry, Marilyn, honey. It’ll be all right.’ She looked up into his face with those big wide eyes of hers and asked, ‘Worry about what?’ She seemed to have no idea that thirty-two takes is a lot of takes.”

When I sat down to talk to Marilyn, I said, “I’ve tried to trace those famous remarks attributed to you and find out who originated them.”

“They are mine,” Marilyn told me. “Take that Chanel Number Five one. Somebody was always asking me, ‘What do you sleep in, Marilyn? Do you sleep in P.J.’s? Do you sleep in a nightie? Do you sleep raw, Marilyn?’ It’s one of those questions which make you wonder how to answer them. Then I remembered that the truth is the easiest way out, so I said, ‘I sleep in Chanel Number Five,’ because I do. Or you take the columnist, Earl Wilson, when he asked me if I have a bedroom voice. I said, ‘I don’t talk in the bedroom, Earl.’ Then, thinking back over that remark, I thought maybe I ought to say something else to clarify it, so I added, ‘because I live alone.’”

The phone rang in her apartment, and she took a call from one of the hand-picked few to whom she’d given her privately listed number. While she talked I thought back upon a thing Flack Jones had said to me thoughtfully, “I’m no psychiatrist or psychologist, but I think that Marilyn has a tremendous inferiority complex. I think she’s scared to death all the time. I know she needs and requires attention and that she needs and requires somebody to tell her she’s doing well. And she’s extremely grateful for a pat on the back.”

“Name me a patter,” I said.

“For example,” he said, “when we put her under contract for the second time, her best friend and encourager was the agent, Johnny Hyde, who was then with the William Morris Agency, although he subsequently died of a heart attack. Johnny was a little guy, but he was Marilyn’s good friend, and, in spite of his lack of size, I think that she had a father fixation on him.

“I don’t want to get involved in the psychology of all this,” Flack Jones continued, “because it was a very complicated problem, of which I have only a layman’s view, but I honestly think that Marilyn’s the most complicated woman I’ve ever known. Her complexes are so complex that she has complexes about complexes. That, I think, is one reason why she’s always leaning on weird little people who attach themselves to her like remoras, and why she lets herself be guided by them. A remora is a sucker fish which attaches itself to a bigger fish and eats the dribblings which fall from the bigger fish’s mouth. After she became prominent, a lot of these little people latched onto Marilyn. They told her that Hollywood was a great, greedy ogre who was exploiting her and holding back her artistic progress.”

I said that the way I’d heard it, those hangers-on seemed to come and go, and that her trail was strewn with those from whom she had detached herself. I’d been told that the routine was for her to go down one day to the corner for the mail or a bottle of milk and not come back; not even wave good-by.

“But she has complete confidence in these little odd balls, both men and women, who latch onto her, while they’re latched,” Jones said. “I’m sure their basic appeal to her has always been in telling her that somebody is taking advantage of her, and in some cases they’ve been right. This has nothing to do with your story, but it does have something to do with my observation that she’s frightened and insecure, and she’ll listen to anybody who can get her ear.”

“Johnny Hyde was no remora,” I said.

“Johnny was a switch on the usual pattern,” Jones agreed. “He was devoted to her. He could and did do things for her. I happened to know that Johnny wanted to marry her and Marilyn wouldn’t do it. She told me, ‘I like him very much, but I don’t love him enough to marry him.’ A lot of girls would have married him, for Johnny was not only attractive, he was wealthy, and when he died Marilyn would have inherited scads of money, but while you may not believe it, she’s never cared about money as money. It’s only a symbol to her.”

“A symbol of what?” I asked.

“It’s my guess that to her it’s a symbol of success. By the same token I think that people have talked so much to her about not getting what she ought to get that a lack of large quantities of it has also become a symbol of oppression in her mind. If I sound contradictory, that’s the way it is.”

When Marilyn had completed her phone call, I put it up to her, “I guess you’ve heard it argued back and forth as to whether you are a complicated person or a very simple person, even a naive person,” I said. “Which do you think is right?”

“I think I’m a mixture of simplicity and complexes,” she told me. “But I’m beginning to understand myself now. I can face myself more, you might say. I’ve spent most of my life running away from myself.”

It didn’t sound very clear to me, but I pursued the subject further. “For example,” I asked, “do you have an inferiority complex? Are you beset by fears? Do you need someone to tell you that you’re doing well all the time?”

“I don’t feel as hopeless as I did,” she said. “I don’t know why it is. I’ve read a little of Freud and it might have to do with what he said. I think he was on the right track.” I gave up. I never found out what portions of Freud she referred to or what “right track” he was on.

“What happened in 1952, when the studio sent you to Atlantic City to be grand marshal of the annual beauty pageant?” I asked Marilyn instead. “Did you mind going?”

She smiled. “It was all right with me,” she said. “At the time I wanted to come to New York anyhow. There was somebody I wanted to see here. This was why it was hard for me to be on time leaving New York for Atlantic City for that date. I missed the train and the studio chartered a plane for me, but it didn’t set the studio back as much as they let on. They could afford it.”

Flack Jones had told me that story too. “They’d arranged a big reception for Marilyn at Atlantic City,” he said. “There was a band to meet her at the train, and the mayor was to be on hand. Marilyn and the flacks who were running interference for her were to arrive on a Pennsylvania Railroad train at a certain hour, but, as usual, Marilyn was late, and when they got to the Pennsylvania Station the train had pulled out. So there they were, in New York, with a band and the mayor waiting in Atlantic City. Charlie Einfeld, a Fox vice-president — and Charlie can operate mighty fast when he has to — got on the phone and chartered an air liner — the only one available for charter was a forty-six-seat job; it was an Eastern Air Lines plane as I recall it — and they all went screaming across town in a limousine headed for Idlewild.

“The studio’s magazine man in New York, Marilyn and a flack from out here on the Coast boarded the plane and took off for Atlantic City,” Flack Jones said. “Bob and the Coast flack were so embarrassed at missing the train, and the plane was such a costly substitute that they were sweating like pigs. On this big air liner there was a steward aboard — they’d shanghaied a steward in a hurry from some place to serve coffee — but all of this didn’t bother Marilyn at all. She tucked herself into a seat back in the tail section, hummed softly; then fell fast asleep and slept all the way. The other two sat up front with the steward, drinking quarts of coffee because that was what he was being paid to serve. They drank an awful lot of coffee.”

Flack Jones said that Marilyn and her outriders were met at the Atlantic City airport by a sheriff’s car and that they were only three minutes late for the reception for Marilyn on the boardwalk. There she was given an enormous bouquet of flowers, and she perched on the folded-down top of a convertible, to roll down the boardwalk with a press of people following her car.

“She sat up there like Lindbergh riding down Broadway on his return from Paris,” Flack Jones said. “The people and the cops and the beauty-carnival press agents followed behind like slaves tied to her chariot wheels. That is, she managed to move a little every once in a while when the crowd could be persuaded to back away. Then Marilyn would pitch a rose at the crowd and it would set them off again, and there’d be another riot. This sort of thing went on — with variations — for several days. It was frantic.

1956-05-12-SEP-pic1  “But,” Flack Jones explained, “there was one publicity thing which broke which wasn’t intended to break. It was typical of the way things happen to Marilyn without anybody devising them. When each potential Miss America from a different part of the country lined up to register, a photograph of Marilyn greet- ing her was taken. Those pictures were serviced back to the local papers and eventually a shot of Miss Colorado with Marilyn wound up in a Denver paper; and a shot of Miss California and Marilyn in the Los Angeles and San Francisco papers, and so forth.”

For a moment Flack Jones collected his thoughts in orderly array; then went on, “Pretty soon in came an Army public-information officer with four young ladies from the Pentagon. There was a WAF and a WAC and a lady Marine and a WAVE. The thought was that it would be nice to get a shot of Marilyn with ‘the four real Miss Americas’ who were serving their country, so they were lined up. It was to be just another of the routine, catalogue shots we’d taken all day long, but Marilyn was wearing a low-cut dress which showed quite a bit of cleavage — quite a bit of cleavage. That would have been all right, since the dress was designed for eye level, but one of the photographers climbed up on a chair to shoot the picture.”

The way Marilyn described this scene to me was this: “I had met the girls from each state and had shaken hands with them,” she said. “Then this Army man got the idea of aiming his camera down my neck while I posed with the service girls. It wasn’t my idea for the photographer to get up on a chair.”

“Nobody thought anything of it at the time,” Jones had told me, “and those around Marilyn went on with the business of their workaday world. In due course the United Press — among others — serviced that shot. Actually it was a pretty dull picture because, to the casual glance, it just showed five gals lined up looking at the camera.”

Jones said that when the shot of the four service women and Marilyn went out across the country by wirephoto, editors took one look at it and dropped it into the nearest wastebasket because they had had much better art from Atlantic City.

“That night the Army PIO officer drifted back to the improvised press headquarters set up for the Miss America contest,” Flack Jones said. “He took one look and sent out a wire ordering that the picture be stopped.”

“On what grounds?” I asked.

“On grounds that that photograph showed too much meat and potatoes, and before he’d left the Pentagon he’d been told not to have any cheesecake shots taken in connection with the girls in his charge. Obviously what was meant by those instructions was that he shouldn’t have those service girls sitting on the boardwalk railings showing their legs or assuming other undignified poses. There was nothing in that PIO officer’s instructions which gave him the right to censor Marilyn’s garb, but he ordered that picture killed anyhow.”

According to Jones, every editor who had junked that picture immediately reached down into his wastebasket, drew it out and gave it a big play. “In Los Angeles it ran seven columns,” he said, “and it got a featured position in the Herald Express and the New York Daily News. All the way across country it became a celebrated picture, and all because the Army had ‘killed’ it.”

He was silent for a moment; then he said, “Those who were with her told me afterward that it had been a murderous day, as any day is when you’re with Marilyn on a junket,” he went on. “The demands on her and on those with her are simply unbelievable. But finally she hit the sack about midnight because she had to get up the next day for other activities. The rest of her crowd had turned in too, when they got a call from the U.P. in New York, asking them for a statement from Marilyn about ‘that picture.’”

“‘What picture?’ our publicist-guardian asked, and it was then that they got the story. They hated to do it, but they rousted Marilyn out of bed. She thought it over for a while; then issued a statement apologizing for any possible reflection on the service girls, and making it plain that she hadn’t meant it that way. She ended with a genuine Monroeism. ‘I wasn’t aware of any objectionable décolletage on my part. I’d noticed people looking at me all day, but I thought they were looking at my grand marshal’s badge.’ This was widely quoted, and it had the effect of giving the whole thing a lighter touch. The point is this: a lot of things happen when Marilyn is around.” He shook his head. “Yes, sir,” he said. “A lot of things.

“Another example of the impact she packs: when she went back to New York on the Seven Year Itch location,” Jones went on. “All of a sudden New York was a whistle stop, with the folks all down to see the daily train come in. When Marilyn reached LaGuardia, everything stopped out there. One columnist said that the Russians could have buzzed the field at five hundred feet and nobody would have looked up. There has seldom been such a heavy concentration of newsreel cameramen anywhere. From then on in, during the ten days of her stay, one excitement followed another. She was on the front page of the Herald Tribune, with art, five days running, which I’m told set some sort of a local record.

“In the case of The Itch, there was a contractual restriction situation,” Flack Jones said. “The studio’s contract called for the picture’s release to be held up until after the Broadway run of the play. When Marilyn went back to New York for the location shots for Itch, the play version was still doing a fair business, but it was approaching the end of its long run. If you bought a seat, the house was only half full. Then Marilyn arrived in New York and shot off publicity sparks and suddenly The Itch had S.R.O. signs out again. The result was that it seemed it was never going to stop its stage run; so, after finishing the picture, Fox had to pay out an additional hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars to the owners of the stage property for the privilege of releasing their movie.

“Things reached a new high — and no joke intended,” Flack Jones went on, “when Billy Wilder shot the scene where her skirts were swept up around her shoulders by a draft from a subway ventilator grating. That really set the publicity afire again, and shortly after that The Itch location company blew town while they were ahead. The unit production manager had picked the Trans-Lux Theater on Lexington Avenue for the skirt-blowing scene. He’d been down there at two o’clock in the morning to case the spot; he’d reported happily, ‘The street was fully deserted,’ and he’d made a deal with the Trans-Lux people for getting the scene shot there because there was nobody on the street at that hour.

“It seemed certain that Billy Wilder would have all the room in the world to work, and he had left word that nobody was to know what location he’d selected, because he didn’t want crowds. But word leaked out. It was on radio and TV and in the papers, so instead of secrecy you might almost say that the public was being urged to be at Lexington Avenue on a given night to Marilyn’s skirts blow. Instead of having a nice, quiet side street in which to work, Wilder had all the people you can pack on a street. Finally the cops roped off the sidewalk on the opposite side to restrain the public, and they erected a barricade close to the movie camera. But that wasn’t good enough, and they had to call out a whole bunch of special cops.”

Flack Jones said that when Wilder was ready to shoot, there were 200 or 300 photographers, professional and amateur, swarming over the place. Then Marilyn made her entrance from inside the theater out onto the sidewalk, and when she appeared the hordes really got out of control and there was chaos. Finally Wilder announced that he’d enter into a gentleman’s agreement. If the press would retire behind the barricades, and if the real working photographers would help control the amateurs, he would shoot the scene of Marilyn and Tom Ewell standing over the subway grating; then he’d move the movie camera back and the amateur shutter hounds could pop away at Marilyn until they were satisfied.

“So the New York press took care of the amateurs and made them quit popping their flashbulbs,” Flack Jones said. “Wilder got the scene and the volunteer snapshooters got their pictures. Everybody was there. Winchell came over with DiMaggio, who showed a proper husbandly disapproval of the proceedings. I myself couldn’t see why Joe had any right to disapprove. After all, when he married the girl her figure was already highly publicized, and it seemed odd if he had suddenly decided that she should be seen only in Mother Hubbards.”

I asked Marilyn herself if she thought that Joe had disapproved of her skirts blowing around her shoulders in that scene. I said I had heard his reaction described in two ways: that he had been furious and that he had taken it calmly.

“One of those two is correct,” Marilyn said. “Maybe you can figure it out for yourself if you’ll give it a little thought.”

Something told me that, in her opinion, Joe had been very annoyed indeed. And while we were on the subject of Joe, it seemed a good time to find out about how things had been between them when they had been married, and the unbelievable scene which accompanied the breaking up of that marriage. “Not in his wildest dreams could a press agent imagine a series of events like that,” Flack Jones had told me.

When I brought the subject up, Marilyn said, “For a man and a wife to live intimately together is not an easy thing at best. If it’s not just exactly right in every way it’s practically impossible, but I’m still optimistic.” She sat there being optimistic. Then she said, with feeling, “However, I think TV sets should be taken out of the bedroom.”

“Did you and Joe have one in your bedroom?” I asked.

“No comment,” she said emphatically. “But everything I say to you I speak from experience. You can make what you want of that.”

She was quiet for a moment; then she said, “When I showed up in divorce court to get my divorce from Joe, there were mobs of people there asking me bunches of questions. And they asked, ‘Are you and Joe still friends?’ and I said, ‘Yes, but I still don’t know anything about baseball.’ And they all laughed. I don’t see what was so funny. I’d heard that he was a fine baseball player, but I’d never seen him play.”

“As I said, the final scenes of All-American Boy loses Snow White were unbelievable,” Flack Jones told me. “Joe and Marilyn rented a house on Palm Drive, in Beverly Hills, and we had a unique situation there with the embattled ex-lovebirds both cooped in the same cage. Marilyn was living on the second floor and Joe was camping on the first floor. When Joe walked out of that first floor, it was like the heart-tearing business of a pitcher taking the long walk from the mound to the dugout after being jerked from the game in a World Series.”


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Marilyn Monroe Auction - 11/2016 - photos 2 -photographies


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Photographs - Family, Childhood & Teens


Lot 18: MARILYN MONROE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH
 An original snapshot of Gladys Baker and Marion Otis Monroe, Marilyn Monroe's mother and uncle, with a handwritten note on the photo indicating they were aged 8 and 10 at the time the photo was taken.
3 3/4 by 2 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 81, “Fine Manuscripts,” Christie's Los Angeles, Sale 9814, September 20, 2001
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245039_0  


Lot 19: MARILYN MONROE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH
 An original snapshot of Gladys Baker, Marilyn Monroe's mother, with a handwritten note on the photo indicating Baker was 13 at the time the photo was taken.
3 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 81, “Fine Manuscripts,” Christie's Los Angeles, Sale 9814, September 20, 2001
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245040_0  


Lot 85: MARILYN MONROE BABY PICTURE
 A vintage black and white photograph of Monroe as an infant printed on heavy photo paper stock. Verso of image has note in the hand of Grace Goddard reading "Marilyn Monroe age 6 ms."
5 7/8 by 3 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245241_0 245242_0  


Lot 86: MARILYN MONROE BABY PICTURE
 A vintage black and white photograph printed as a postcard. The image features Monroe as a toddler posing with floral dress and matching bonnet. Verso has note in the hand of Grace Goddard reading "Marilyn Monroe age 2 yrs." Coffee mug ring stain to image.
5 3/8 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245243_0  245244_0  


Lot 87: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A hand tinted vintage photograph of Monroe at the age of five. The vintage photograph has writing on the back in the hand of Grace Goddard, her legal guardian, reading "Marilyn Monroe age 5yrs." Additional writing on verso in another hand has instructions for the tinting of the photograph listing that her dress should be pink with light hair and blue eyes.
5 3/4 by 3 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800
245245_0  245246_0  


Lot 88: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Monroe at the age of five with Lester Bolender. A note on verso in the hand of Grace Goddard reads "Marilyn Monroe age 5 yo." An earlier notation has been erased beneath that read "Norma Jeane and Lester."
4 1/2 by 2 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245247_0 
245248_0 


Lot 89: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPHS
 Two vintage black and white photographs featuring a young Monroe, one showing Monroe with Lester Bolender. Monroe's first foster home placement was with the Bolenders, and she and Lester became known as the twins. Each photograph has notes on verso in the hand of Grace Goddard reading "Marilyn Monroe age 4yrs." One of the images had previous writing reading "Lester Bolender and Norma Jeane Baker" that has been erased and written over.
4 1/2 by 2 7/8 inches 
245249_0 
245250_0  245251_0  


Lot 92: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A small frame with Art Deco style matte containing a vintage oval portrait of a woman circa 1900 based upon hairstyle. This image could possibly be of a young Ana Lower, whom Marilyn Monroe referred to as Aunt Ana, an important mother figure in her life. Lower was born Edith Ana Atchinson in Los Angeles in 1880. Behind this image in the same frame were found two small black and white portraits of Monroe's first husband, Jim Dougherty, in his Merchant Marine uniform.
Frame, 6 1/8 by 4 1/8 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245257_0 245258_0  


Lot 790: MARILYN MONROE HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOK
 A 1942 Chieftain yearbook that includes Marilyn Monroe. Monroe's picture is on page 48 under the name Norma Baker. Monroe attended University High School in Los Angeles as a tenth grader until February, when she dropped out to marry Jim Dougherty. This yearbook belonged to Barbara Abston, also a tenth grade student. The book has numerous inscriptions to Abston.
9 by 12 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246332_0  246333_0  


Lot 791: MARILYN MONROE 1941 SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPH
 A 1941 Ralph Waldo Emerson Junior High School class photograph. The original vintage panoramic photograph is inscribed by a number of students on verso. Some inscriptions read "To Norma." The front of the photograph is marked "Belongs to Norma Jeane Baker." Monroe can be seen in the photograph in the seventh row from the bottom, and the 15th person from the right. Housed in a frame with a reproduction of the photograph at top and the reverse of the photograph at bottom. The frame is double-sided with a glazed window in the back to show the front of the photograph.
24 3/4 by 32 3/4 inches, framed
 Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000
246334_0 246335_0 246336_0 
246337_0  


Lot 792: MARILYN MONROE HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOK
 A Chieftain 1942 yearbook from University High School in Los Angeles. Norma Jeane Baker, soon to become Marilyn Monroe, attended University High School in Los Angeles for half of the year as a 10th grade student. Her picture appears on page 48. In February 1942, at age 16, Monroe dropped out of University High School to marry Jim Dougherty.
12 by 9 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246338_0  246339_0 


Photographies & Snapshots - en public
Photographs & Snapshots - Public Appearances


Lot 77: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS SOLD WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of five color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 19, 1962, at the birthday gala for President John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Three of these images show Monroe singing "Happy Birthday" on stage and are likely the only known color photos taken of Monreo during this performance. From the collection of Frieda Hull.
This item sold with copyright but not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $5,000 - $6,000
245222_0  245223_0  245224_0 
245225_0 245226_0 245227_0 


Lot 299: MARILYN MONROE SNAPSHOT
 A single color photograph on glossy Kodak Pavelle paper of Monroe as she appeared to kick the first ball at Ebbets Field in New York, May 12, 1957, for a match between the American Soccer League and a team from Israel.
3 1/4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245614_0  


Lot 420: MARILYN MONROE FILM PREMIERE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four vintage black and white glossy photographs of Monroe and Arthur Miller at the New York City premiere of her film Some Like It Hot on March 28, 1959.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245778_0  245781_0 
245779_0  245780_0  


Lot 531: MARILYN MONROE SNAPSHOTS
 Three black and white photographs of Monroe likely taken by a fan on the streets of New York City in the late 1950s.
4 3/4 by 3 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245966_0  


Lot 607: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on October 25, 1951, when she attended the Hollywood Foreign Correspondents Association dinner at the Mocambo club in Los Angeles.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246088_0  


Lot 614: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED SNAPSHOT
 A black and white snapshot of Marilyn Monroe in front of the Sherry Netherland Hotel in New York City, 1952. The image is signed in blue ballpoint pen "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246097_0   


Lot 615: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on April 4, 1952, as she attended a publicity event held at the Owl Drug Store in Los Angeles. The event was sponsored by Life magazine, and Monroe was there to sign copies of the magazines with her on the cover. Four of the photographs have writing on the back referencing the event, likely in Frieda Hull's own hand. Some of the photographs are never before seen.
Largest, 4 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246098_0  247261_0 


Lot 616: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original photo of Monroe taken on January 26, 1952, at the Henrietta Awards ceremony held at Club Del Mar in Santa Monica, CA.  Marilyn won the "Henrietta Award for Best Young box Office Personality," given by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246099_0 


Lot 617: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on June 3, 1952, at a Look magazine awards party held at the Beverly Hills Hotel. One image from this lot is likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400 
246100_0 


Lot 618: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on August 3, 1952, at a party thrown in her honor at the home of big band leader Ray Anthony in Sherman Oaks, California. This lot contains eight black and white and two color images, some likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246101_0  247262_0  


Lot 619: MARILYN MONROE REPRODUCTION PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of two reproduction black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on June 26, 1952, as she appeared in court to testify as part of a lawsuit against an entity using her name and likeness to sell pornographic photographs.
Largest, 3 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246102_0  


Lot 620: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on October 3, 1952, at a party sponsored by Photoplay magazine.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246103_0 


Lot 629: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe original black and white photographs, circa 1953, at an unknown event. Both are likely never before seen images.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246115_0  


Lot 630: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 9, 1953, at the Photoplay magazine awards ceremony where she received the award for Fastest Rising Star of 1953. Two of the photos have "Beverly Hills Hotel" written on verso. Some images in this lot are possibly never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246116_0 247263_0 247264_0  


Lot 631: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 13, 1953, when she was at a birthday party for Walter Winchell at Ciro’s restaurant in Los Angeles. Two photographs show Monroe with Jane Russell, and two show her with Betty Grable. Reverse of one black and white image is stamped "Photo by Darlene Hammond/ 1416 Belfast Drive/ Hollywood 46, Calif./ CR. 10747." This lot contains two color and two black and white images.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246117_0 


Lot 632: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 18 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on July 10, 1953, at a gala arranged by Danny Thomas to benefit St. Jude Hospital. The fundraiser, which was held at the Hollywood Bowl, also included appearances by Jane Russell, Robert Mitchum, and Danny Kaye. Thomas, Mitchum, and Kaye are photographed with Monroe in this set of photographs. This lot includes 17 black and white images and one color image. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246118_0  246119_0 
246120_0  247265_0 


Lot 634: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe original color and black and white photographs, circa 1953, taken at an unknown event. Both are likely never before seen.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246122_0 


Lot 636: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 13 color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, some reproductions, taken on December 19, 1953, when she appeared at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles to receive the Miss Press Club Award. This lot contains five color and eight black and white photographs. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246124_0  247266_0 


Lot 638: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe from March 9, 1954, when she appeared at the Beverly Hills Hotel to receive the Photoplay magazine award for The Most Popular Actress of 1953 due to her roles in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953) and How To Marry A Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). This lot contains two color photographs and one black and white photograph.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $500
246126_0  


Lot 639: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe with Jane Russell taken on June 26, 1953, at Grauman's Chinese Theatre as Monroe and Russell memorialized their autographs, shoe prints, and handprints in wet cement. Nine photographs are stamped on verso "Photo by Darlene Hammond/ 1416 Belfast Drive/ Hollywood 46, Calif./ CR. 10747."
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246127_0  246128_0   


Lot 640: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, one together with Jane Russell, taken on June 26, 1953, in conjunction with a Grauman's Chinese Theatre event where Monroe and Russell memorialized their autographs, shoe prints, and handprints in wet cement.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246129_0  246130_0 


Lot 647: MARILYN MONROE THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS SCREENING PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe, Gracie Allen, Jack Benny, Joan Collins, and Bing Crosby, among many other stars, attending a special screening of There’s No Business Like Show Business at 20th Century Fox studios in 1954.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246137_0  246138_0  


Lot 657: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original black and white photographs taken on June 1, 1955, at the premiere of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). Seven of the photographs show Marilyn Monroe with her date for the evening, husband Joe DiMaggio. Two photographs show the theater marquee with large cutout images of Monroe in the now famous skirt- blowing scene from the film. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 7 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246150_0 
246151_0  246152_0 


Lot 667: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe alone and with guests, taken on January 7, 1955, at an event announcing the launch of Marilyn Monroe Productions, a joint venture with friend and photographer Milton Greene. This lot contains three color and seven black and white photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246162_0 247271_0 247272_0 


Lot 669: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A pair of color slides of Marilyn Monroe from March 11, 1955, at the Friars Club Testimonial Dinner.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246164_0


Lot 670: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 24 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 11, 1955, at the Friars Club Testimonial Dinner. Monroe is pictured surrounded by fans signing autographs and talking to James Haspiel. Several photographs show her with friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene. This lot contains 22 black and white photographs and two color photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246165_0  246167_0  246168_0 
246166_0  247273_0 


Lot 676: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 24, 1955, when she attended the play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof with Milton and Amy Greene. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246174_0 


Lot 686: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 19 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken at the East of Eden premiere on March 9, 1955, at the Astor Theatre in New York City. Monroe was an official usherette at the event. Some images show friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene and his wife, Amy Greene. Some images are never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246185_0 247276_0  


Lot 687: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe wearing a white brocade gown with matching jacket and white evening gloves as she attended the New York City premiere of East of Eden starring James Dean on March 9, 1955. The photograph is signed in blue ballpoint pen "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246186_0 


Lot 691: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe in costume taken on March 30, 1955, for her appearance on opening night at the Ringling Bros. Circus at Madison Square Garden, which was a benefit produced by Mike Todd for the Arthritis and Rheumatism Foundation.
Largest, 7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246191_0 246192_0 


Lot 692: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PRESS AND PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPHS
 An archive of nine vintage press and publicity photographs featuring Marilyn Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246193_0  


Lot 693: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large, glossy black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe during her famous appearance on March 31, 1955, when she rode a Barnum & Bailey elephant painted pink as part of the Mike Todd memorial event to benefit victims of arthritis.
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246194_0   


Lot 703: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 20 slides of Marilyn Monroe, from the collection of Frieda Hull. Some are never before seen images, from August 6, 1955, as she was at the airport in New York City preparing to fly to Bement, Illinois. Together with an original "Automatic Slide Changer" storage box, owned by Hull.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246207_0   


Lot 704: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 11 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on August 6, 1955, when she was at the airport in New York City preparing to fly to Bement, Illinois. One of the photographs is an original press photograph from the United Press Association. This lot contains six black and white and five color photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 9 by 6 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200
246208_0 246209_0 247279_0 
247278_0 


Lot 706: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe wearing a white brocade gown with matching jacket and white evening gloves as she attended the New York City premiere of East of Eden starring James Dean on March 9, 1955. The photograph is signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246211_0 


Lot 711: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED SNAPSHOT
 A color snapshot of Marilyn Monroe posing in the backseat of a car circa early 1950s. The image is signed in blue ink “Marilyn Monroe.” The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the “Monroe Six, a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
3 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246218_0 


Lot 712: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken the evening of December 12, 1955, when she attended the premiere of The Rose Tattoo. This lot contains two color and three black and white photographs.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246219_0  


Lot 713: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of three slides of Marilyn Monroe from evening of December 12, 1955, when she attended the premiere of The Rose Tattoo.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246220_0 


Lot 714: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on December 18, 1955, at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel following her attendance at the premiere of Baby Doll. Two of the images show Monroe with husband Arthur Miller. Research indicates that this may be the only documented occasion where Monroe parted her hair on the right. Her regular part was always on the left.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246221_0 


Lot 718: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 wearing a white gown and white fur, signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246225_0 


Lot 719: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 8, 1956, when she attended the premiere of Middle of the Night in New York City. This lot contains seven black and white photographs and one color photograph. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246226_0 246227_0 247282_0 


Lot 720: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
A pair of original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, taken on June 11, 1956. Monroe and Miller were outside her Sutton Place apartment. Miller's divorce from Mary Slattery had just been granted.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246228_0 


Lot 721: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, taken at a press conference in front of Monroe's Sutton Place apartment on June 22, 1956. Miller was in the throes of defending himself against accusations of communist activities. Monroe transitioned the focus of the press conference away from Miller toward their impending marriage, their plans to travel to England for their honeymoon, and the filming of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246229_0 


Lot 722: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 14 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, taken on June 29, 1956. Monroe and Miller were married in a civil ceremony later that day. The photographs also show Milton Greene and Miller's parents, Isidore and Augusta. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246230_0 246231_0 247283_0 


Lot 724: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original candid color photograph of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, taken on January 7, 1957, following their return from their honeymoon in Jamaica.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246233_0 


Lot 726: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe as she boarded a plane for Hollywood at Idlewild Airport in New York on February 25, 1956. The image is signed in blue ballpoint pen over a photographer's arm, "To Frieda Love & Kisses," and below along the line of the white railing, "Marilyn Monroe." In the photograph Frieda Hull is pictured with her camera, which is lot 697 in this auction.
8 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246235_0 


Lot 728: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 20 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe that document her 1956 travels to and from Los Angeles to film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Several of the photographs show Monroe walking across the tarmac to a plane among a sea of fans and photographers, then posing for photographs at the top of the stairs leading to the plane. One photograph shows the crowd on hand at the airport to see Monroe. This lot includes eight color and 11 black and white photographs, many that have never been seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246242_0 247284_0 


Lot 729: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 18 slides of Marilyn Monroe from the collection of Frieda Hull, documenting Monroe’s travels to and from Los Angeles to film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956) in 1956. Several slides show Monroe posing for photographs at the top of the stairs leading to the plane. Together with an original "Automatic Slide Changer" storage box, owned by Frieda Hull. Many of the slides have never been seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246243_0 


Lot 730: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 19 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 25, 1956, when she held a press conference at Los Angeles Airport. Monroe had flown to Los Angeles to work on Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246244_0 247285_0


Lot 737: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large matte black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the Plaza Hotel in New York City during a 1956 press conference for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246255_0 


Lot 738: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe signing autographs for fans on February 8, 1956, when she attended the premiere of Middle of the Night in New York City.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246256_0   


Lot 739: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from July 13, 1956, as she and husband Arthur Miller departed New York City for England to film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246257_0   


Lot 740: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original candid black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on July 13, 1956, as she and husband Arthur Miller departed New York City for England to film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
3 1/2 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246258_0 


Lot 742: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 11 slides of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, from May 13, 1959, at the Italian Consulate on Park Avenue in New York City, where she attended a ceremony to receive the David di Donatello Award, the equivalent of the Academy Award, for her work in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200
246263_0  


Lot 743: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY IMAGE ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 30 vintage black and white publicity images related to Marilyn Monroe and The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). The photographs show Monroe at various press conferences, publicity events, and the premiere of the film.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246264_0  


Lot 746: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller taken on May 13, 1959, as she arrived at the Italian Consulate on Park Avenue in New York City to receive the David di Donatello Award, the equivalent of the Academy Award, for her work in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246267_0  


Lot 747: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A pair of color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from February 26, 1959, as Monroe was on her way to the French Film Institute to receive the Crystal Star Award, the French equivalent of the Academy Award, for her performance in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300

246268_0  


Lot 748: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 26, 1959, when she was on her way to the French Film Institute to receive the Crystal Star Award, the French equivalent of the Academy Award, for her performance in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Monroe is seen in the photographs with members of the "Monroe Six," including Frieda Hull, Eileen Collins, Gloria Milone, and Edith Pitts. Three photographs show Monroe with James Haspiel. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246269_0 


Lot 749: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS SOLD WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of 15 photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1957, likely taken at a New York City showing of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). These photographs show Monroe with husband Arthur Miller at what appears to be a movie theater as a poster for the film can be seen on the theater lobby wall. Monroe is shown in the back of a cab signing autographs for fans, walking to the theater, and inside the lobby of the theater. This lot contains 12 color and three black and white photographs that are believed to be never before seen images.
This item sold with copyright but is not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $8,000 - $9,000
246270_0 246271_0 247287_0 


Lot 750: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, from January 7, 1957, following their return from their honeymoon in Jamaica.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246272_0 


Lot 751: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from November 18, 1957, when she and husband Arthur Miller attended Conversation Piece, a play in which Miller's sister Joan Copeland appeared.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246273_0   


Lot 752: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on November 18, 1957, when she and husband Arthur Miller attended Conversation Piece, a play in which Miller's sister Joan Copeland appeared. James Haspiel appears in two images, "Monroe Six" member Gloria Malone in another. Some images in this lot are never before seen. This lot contains four black and white and three color photographs.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246274_0  247288_0 


Lot 755: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original never before seen original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 30, 1958, as she exited her apartment at 444 East 57th Street in New York City. Just three days prior, Monroe was photographed by Richard Avedon for Life magazine.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246277_0 


Lot 756: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four never before seen original color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from May 30, 1958, as she exited her apartment at 444 East 57th Street in New York City. Just three days prior, Monroe was photographed by Richard Avedon for Life magazine.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246278_0   


Lot 753: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original candid color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 12, 1957, at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. Monroe was on hand to make the ceremonial first kick at a soccer match between the USA and Israel. It's reported that she sprained two of her toes while kicking the ball, yet she stayed until the end of the match to award the trophy to Israel, the winning team by a score of 6-4.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246275_0 


Lot 754: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of eight color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from May 12, 1957, at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. Monroe was on hand to make the ceremonial first kick at a soccer match between the USA and Israel. It's reported that she sprained two of her toes while kicking the ball, yet she stayed until the end of the match to award the trophy to Israel, the winning team by a score of 6-4.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900

246276_0 


Lot 757: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four slides of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, from their departure from New York for Los Angeles for her to film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246279_0   


Lot 758: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller as they departed New York for Los Angeles for her to film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). This lot contains five color and three black and white photographs, some never before seen.
Largest, 5 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246280_0  


Lot 759: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 15 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 29, 1959. These images are believed to have been taken following the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) as Monroe and husband Arthur Miller traveled from the theater to the home of Lee and Paula Strasberg for a party they were throwing for Monroe. Many images are never before seen. This lot contains eight black & white and seven color photographs.
Largest, 6 3/4 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246281_0  246282_0 
246283_0  247289_0  


Lot 760: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 11 slides of Marilyn Monroe, from March 29, 1959. These images are believed to have been taken following the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) as Monroe and husband Arthur Miller traveled from the theater to the home of Lee and Paula Strasberg for a party they were throwing for Monroe. Many images are never before seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200
246284_0   


Lot 761: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from September 18, 1959, as she left her apartment at 444 East 57th Street. She was leaving to fly to Los Angeles to attend a gala in honor of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev held by Twentieth Century Fox Studios.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246285_0   


Lot 762: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller taken on September 18, 1959, when the couple left their apartment at 444 East 57th Street. Miller was escorting his wife to the airport, where she would fly to Los Angeles to attend a gala in honor of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev held by Twentieth Century Fox Studios. Because this was an event in honor of a Communist leader, Miller didn't attend the gala as it wouldn't have been appropriate considering his appearance before the House Committee on Un-American Activities about his political leanings in June 1956.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246286_0 


Lot 763: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on September 27, 1959, at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel, where Monroe and husband Arthur Miller were attending the American Friends of The Hebrew University Awards Banquet, where Miller was honored for Distinguished Achievement in the Dramatic Arts. All the photographs in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400 
246287_0 


Lot 764: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, likely reproductions, taken on September 21, 1959, at Henry Miller's Theatre on Broadway in New York City, where Monroe was attending An Evening with Yves Montand, accompanied by friend and co-star Montgomery Clift. All four photographs reference Terri Arden on the reverse.
Largest, 6 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246288_0 


Lot 765: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of three color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from November 2, 1959, when she and husband Arthur Miller departed New York City for Los Angeles to film Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960). Of note, one slide in particular shows Monroe sitting in the back of a car holding a bird in a birdcage, likely Butch, the Millers' pet parakeet.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246289_0   


Lot 766: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original candid color photograph of Marilyn Monroe, likely taken on April 16, 1960, as she attended Josephine Baker's show at the Hollywood Hartford Theatre, accompanied by Yves Montand.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246290_0


Lot 767: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original candid color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, likely taken on June 1, 1960, her 34th birthday. The cast and crew of Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960) celebrated her birthday earlier that day. That evening, Monroe attended a party in her honor held by press agent Rupert Allan at his Beverly Hills home. In these photographs, Monroe wears the same clothing worn on the set earlier in the day.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246291_0 


Lot 773: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original Marilyn Monroe black and white photographs, one of her with Clark Gable, believed to have been taken on July 24, 1960, at an event held for the cast and crew of The Misfits (United Artists, 1961) at the Mapes Hotel in Reno, Nevada. This was Monroe's final completed film.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246308_0 


Lot 779: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe surrounded by fans and security, from March 14, 1961. Monroe was attending a benefit for the Lee Strasberg Actors Studio held at the Roseland Dance Hall in New York City.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246321_0  


Lot 780: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 14, 1961. Monroe was attending a benefit for the Lee Strasberg Actors Studio held at the Roseland Dance Hall in New York City.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246322_0 


Lot 835: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original photograph of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1950, with the words "Bel Air Hotel for Red Book Awards Party" written on verso. Likely never before seen.
3 3/4 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246404_0 


Lot 838: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE TRANSPARENCY
 A vintage color transparency of Marilyn Monroe with Herman Hover, owner of Ciro’s nightclub, circa 1953.
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246410_0 


Lot 846: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL SLIDES AND PHOTOGRAPHS WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of four color transparency slides and two color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Sgt. Marvin Stamness in Korea when Monroe entertained troops there in 1954. Copyright of the images has been applied for. Once copyright is granted, it will be transferred to the winning bidder. Stamness was with the 189th Field Artillery 45th Division of the United States Army and served in the Korean War. At that time, he was from Barrett, Minnesota.
While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Photographs, 2 1/8 by 3 1/8 inches; Slides, 2 by 2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246426_0  246427_0  


Lot 861: MARILYN MONROE SEVEN YEAR ITCH PREMIERE TRANSPARENCY
 A vintage color transparency of Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio at the premiere of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955).
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246455_0  


Lot 894: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage partial contact sheet of images of Marilyn Monroe and others. The black and white contact sheet includes nine images, six of which show Monroe taken by Milton Greene at the 1955 announcement of the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc.
5 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $400 
246512_0 


Lot 895: MARILYN MONROE MMP ANNOUNCEMENT CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white partial contact sheet of images of Marilyn Monroe taken by Milton Greene at the 1955 announcement of the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. The sheet contains 10 frames, with numbering below each image.
3 1/2 by 10 inches
 Estimate:  $200 - $400
246513_0  


Lot 896: MARILYN MONROE MMP ANNOUNCEMENT CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white contact sheet of images taken at the 1955 announcement of the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. Marlene Dietrich appears in many of the photographs along with Monroe and Milton Greene, among others. The sheet has 27 frames with grease pencil markings in red.
7 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

246514_0 


Lot 901: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage Milton Greene contact sheet of 34 black and white images taken at the Sheraton Astor Hotel in December 1955. Two of the images are of Marilyn Monroe.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246523_0 
246702_0 


Lot 903: MARILYN MONROE MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three vintage Marilyn Monroe media photographs. Each is stamped by a media outlet or includes a snipe. Two images are of Monroe with husband Arthur Miller. One image is of Monroe with Jack Warner and Milton Greene from a press conference announcing the production of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Accompanied by one contemporary print of Monroe at a party for the film Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960).
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $600
246525_0 


Lot 917: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 12 black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe with husband Arthur Miller. Each photograph is dated in the margin "Jul 56" and marked "Pitts" on verso in an unknown hand.
5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,200 - $1,400
246546_0  


Lot 934: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe.
Largest, 5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246567_0  


Lot 935: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 11 vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe attending various events.
Largest, 5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246568_0 


Lot 936: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe attending various events.
5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246569_0 


Lot 937: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five candid vintage black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe at an event.
4 3/4 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246570_0 


Lot 938: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Lois Weber on the street in New York City taken by photographer Hans Knopf. PIX Incorporated stamp on verso. A New York Post snipe is attached with a paperclip dating the photograph to February 22, 1956, and stating the pair were leaving Monroe’s apartment for lunch with Elsa Maxwell.
9 1/2 by 13 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246571_0  246572_0 


Lot 939: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Lois Weber on the street in New York City taken by photographer Hans Knopf. PIX Incorporated stamp on verso. A New York Post snipe is attached with a paperclip, dating the photograph to February 22, 1956, and stating the pair were leaving the Ambassador Hotel for a cocktail party.
10 3/4 by 11 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246573_0 246574_0 


Lot 940: MARILYN MONROE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Lois Weber on the street in New York City taken by photographer Hans Knopf. PIX Incorporated stamp on verso. A New York Post snipe is attached with a paperclip dating the photograph to February 22, 1956, and stating the pair were walking to the studio of Cecil Beaton.
14 by 10 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246575_0 246703_0 


Lot 944: MARILYN MONROE CONTACT SHEET
 A contact sheet containing 10 vintage black and white candid images of Marilyn Monroe and one additional photograph from the set of an unknown production. The photographs were taken by Lois Weber.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246587_0  


Lot 945: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of vintage candid black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe beside a plane.
5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246588_0 


Lot 946: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED KREINER PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner in 1959. The photograph shows Monroe during an interview in her hotel living room at the Ambassador East Hotel in Chicago, Illinois. Monroe was in Chicago to promote the film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer's and other stamps on verso.
9 1/2 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246589_0  


Lot 947: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED KREINER PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner in 1959 while Monroe was in Chicago to promote the film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer’s stamp on verso with additional stamp that reads “Kindler Und Schiermeyer Verlag AG Archiv.”
13 1/2 by 10 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246590_0 


Lot 948: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED KREINER PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner circa 1959. Photographer's stamp and other notations on verso.
14 by 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246591_0  


Lot 949: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER PHOTOGRAPH BY MANFRED KREINER
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller at the New York City premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) taken by Manfred Kreiner. Photographer's stamp on verso along with information about the photograph in an unknown hand, written with pencil in German.
10 1/2 by 13 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246592_0 


Lot 950: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller black and white vintage original photograph. Taken by Paul Schumach at the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer's stamp on verso.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246593_0 
246594_0 


Lot 971: MARILYN MONROE MONROE, MONTAND AND CUKOR SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe, Yves Montand, and George Cukor signed black and white photograph. The image was taken at a party for the film Let’s Make Love (20th Century ,1960) in which Monroe and Montand starred and Cukor directed. The photograph is inscribed “To Herbert Stern from his first director with every good wish George Cukor,” “For Herbert Love & Kisses Marilyn Monroe,” and “Pour Herbert Stern amical souvenir Y Montand 60.”
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $8,000 - $10,000
246621_0  


Lot 976: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN GLOBE CEREMONY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the 1962 Golden Globes award ceremony taken by Gene Daniels. Monroe won the award for Female World Film Favorite. Photographer's stamp on verso with additional “Revue” stamp and notation.
9 by 13 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246628_0  


Lot 977: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN GLOBE CEREMONY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the 1962 Golden Globes award ceremony taken by Gene Daniels. Monroe won the award for Female World Film Favorite. Photographer's stamp on verso with additional “Revue” stamp and notation.
13 1/2 by 9 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246629_0 


Photographies - Joseph Jasgur
Photograph
s


 Lot 796: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 with infrared film. Gelatin silver print. Printed by the artist. Artist’s copyright sticker on mount verso.
13 1/4 by 10 inches, mounted
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246343_0  


Lot 797: MARILYN MONROE COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of six color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by photographer Joseph Jasgur. The images are of Monroe alone, and one image shows her with other models at Zuma Beach in 1946.
Each, 11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246344_0 246345_0 246346_0 
246347_0 246348_0 246349_0  


Lot 798: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 Two black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 at Zuma Beach, California. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Each with photographer’s stamp on verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246350_0 


Lot 799: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVE
 A Joseph Jasgur black and white negative of Marilyn Monroe produced in 1946. Accompanied by a photograph of the image, printed 2000–2001. Signed in ink lower right.
Negative, 2 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches; Photograph, 14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246351_0  246352_0 


Lot 800: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 Six Joseph Jasgur black and white negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced in 1946. Accompanied by a photograph of a cropping of the image, printed 2000–2001. Library of Congress number VA 308-684. The winning bidder is responsible for transfer of copyright.
One Negative, 2 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches; Five Negatives, 5 by 4 inches; Photograph, 14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246353_0  246354_0   


Lot 801: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 A sepia toned photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Toned gelatin silver print. Printed by the artist.
20 by 16 inches, mounted
 Estimate: $400 - $600 
246355_0 


Lot 802: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 Two black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. One is a cropped portrait from the full image. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the artist. Each with the artist’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246356_0  246357_0 


Lot 803: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVE AND COPYRIGHT
 A Marilyn Monroe negative of an image taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946, accompanied by copyright. The black and white negative shows Monroe on the beach with Tom Burton.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arriving as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
5 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 986, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Beverly Hills, April 11, 2014
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246358_0 


Lot 804: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Each with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246359_0 


Lot 805: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Each with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246360_0  


Lot 806: MARILYN MONROE BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by photographer Joseph Jasgur. Jasgur photographed Monroe in 1946 when she was still known as Norma Jeane Dougherty and was a model with the Blue Book Model Agency.
Largest, 11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246361_0 246363_0 246364_0 
246362_0 
246365_0 246366_0 246367_0 
246368_0 246369_0 


Lot 807: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Two with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246370_0  


Lot 808: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 Three black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 using infrared film. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Two with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246371_0 246372_0 246373_0  


Lot 809: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver print. Printed by the artist. Artist’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches, mounted
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246374_0  


Lot 810: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of three Joseph Jasgur black and white negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced in 1946. Copyright to this image will be transferred to the winning bidder.
While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
5 by 4 inches, each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246375_0 
247292_0 247293_0 


Photographies - André De Dienes
Photograph
s


Lot 795: MARILYN MONROE LIMITED EDITION ANDRE DE DIENES PRINT
A Marilyn Monroe black and white photograph taken by Andre De Dienes in 1945, printed in a limited edition, gelatin print made from the original transparency, numbered 29/50. This print is stamped, signed, and hand numbered by the estate of Andre De Dienes and stamped and hand numbered by OneWest Publishing.
19 1/2 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246342_0  


Lot 813: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white gelatin silver print montage photograph of Marilyn Monroe. Taken in 1949 by Andre de Dienes, printed circa 1960. Hand stamped on verso.
16 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Andre de Dienes
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246700_0 


Lot 814: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white gelatin silver print montage photograph of Marilyn Monroe by Andre de Dienes. Notations on the front of the photograph read "7/7 1949 A.D." in black ink.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Andre de Dienes
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246701_0  


Lot 850: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin vintage print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. The photograph is hand printed circa 1958 on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer on verso.
19 1/2 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246434_0  


Lot 851: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin vintage print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. The photograph is hand printed circa 1958 on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer on verso.
20 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246435_0  


Lot 852: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ANDRE de DIENES PHOTOGRAPH
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Silver gelatin print, printed circa 1955. Signed at lower right, photographer's stamp on verso.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 420, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Beverly Hills, March 31, 2012
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246436_0 246437_0   


Lot 853: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ANDRE de DIENES PHOTOGRAPH
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Silver gelatin print, printed circa 1955. Signed at lower right, photographer's stamp on verso.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 421, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Beverly Hills, March 31, 2012
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246438_0  246439_0   


Lot 865: MARILYN MONROE INSCRIBED MAGAZINE PAGE
 A black and white page of an unknown magazine inscribed to child star Linda Bennett. Inscription reads "To Linda, I saw you in the Seven Little Foys - Great Marilyn Monroe."
17 1/2 by 14 inches, framed; 7 1/4 by 6 3/4 inches, sight
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246461_0  


Photos Tom Kelley & Calendriers 'Golden Dreams'
Tom Kelley's Photos & Calendars 'Golden Dreams'


Lot 35: MARILYN MONROE UNCUT TIN TRAY
 A circa 1950s uncut tin tray, illustrated with two nude photographs of Marilyn Monroe, "Golden Dreams" and "A New Wrinkle" both taken during a photo session with Tom Kelley in 1949.
Framed, 26 1/2 by 36 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 110, “Film & Entertainment,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale number 9771, December 16, 2003
 Estimate: $200 - $400

245078_0  


Lot 817: MARILYN MONROE RED VELVET SESSION PHOTOGRAPHS
A group of four color Marilyn Monroe photographs from the Red Velvet session with Tom Kelley in 1949. The group of contemporary prints includes an interesting composite image of Monroe and other less often seen images from the session. Mackie was given the photographs by a fan who knew that he had worked on Monroe’s costumes and that he was a fan of Monroe's. Printed circa 2004.
15 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Bob Mackie
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000

246384_0 


Lot 818: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH FROM THE REMASTERED RED VELVET COLLECTION
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe from the 1949 Red Velvet session with Tom Kelley. The limited edition print is part of the “Remastered Red Velvet Collection” issued by the estate of Tom Kelley in 2004. The image is numbered 2/500 and is signed by Tom Kelley Jr. in the lower right corner. The image is referred to as pose number 7.
27 3/4 by 23 1/2, framed
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246385_0  247296_0  


Lot 819: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NUDE PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe “New Wrinkle” photograph from her 1949 photo session with Tom Kelley. The black and white print is affixed to foam core board. The absence of optical brighteners in the print indicates that this print was made prior to 1953.
Photograph, 10 by 8 1/4 inches; 15 1/4 by 13 1/2 inches, overall
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246386_0 

 


Lot 36: MARILYN MONROE CALENDAR
 A U.S. calendar from 1952, featuring a color print of nude Marilyn Monroe photographed by Tom Kelley.
Matted, 30 by 21 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 64, “Film & Entertainment Memorabilia,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale number 5238, December 19, 2007
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245079_0  


Lot 310: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN DREAMS CALENDAR
 A calendar from Connors Bar & Grill New York City, 1958, all months intact. Paper loss to lower edge, tape residue along top edge.
15 1/2 by 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245625_0  


Lot 626: 1955 MARILYN MONROE CALENDAR
 A four-page calendar with spiral-bound top edge featuring images of Marilyn Monroe taken by Tom Kelley in the late 1940s. The calendar features a modesty cover with added lace overprint to cover Monroe and three pin-up images of Monroe in cowboy boots, all over triple month pages. Together with original envelope advertising the calendar as "The Most Talked of Calendar in the World" for 50 cents.
12 1/4 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246112_0 


Lot 833: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN DREAMS 1952 CALENDAR
 A 1952 Marilyn Monroe “Golden Dreams” calendar. This is an early version of Monroe’s famously posed calendar and does not have her name printed on the calendar itself. A note attached to the lower portion of the calendar does identify the model as Monroe, reading in part, “This Champion Calendar was posed by Marilyn Monroe. ...Since that time she has received much publicity in the daily newspapers and national magazines and has been [sic] starred in two movies.” The calendar advertises San Fernando Valley Motor. Housed in a frame.
37 by 19 inches, framed
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246402_0 


Photographies - Bert Stern
Photographs


Lot 984: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERT STERN
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe lying in bed, signed by Bert Stern. The photograph is contained in an orange portfolio.
23 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

246640_0  


Lot 985: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERT STERN
 A color photograph of a nude Marilyn Monroe holding a striped scarf, signed by Bert Stern.
23 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000

246641_0   


Lot 986: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERT STERN
 A Marilyn Monroe color photograph taken by Bert Stern in 1962 during "The Last Sitting." Numbered 188/250 and signed by Stern in the lower right. A Martin Lawrence Galleries label attached to backing of the framed photograph is typed with the title "Last Sitting: Not Bad For 36."
27 1/2 by 26 1/4 inches, framed
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

246642_0 


Lot 1006: MARILYN MONROE BERT STERN SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white digital print photograph of Marilyn Monroe resting her chin on her hand, inscribed and dated in black marker to the upper left "For Bill/ 3-3-08" and signed and dated in red grease pen to the lower right "Bert Stern/ 2008" with Stern's copyright stamp on the verso.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246671_0 


Photographies - George Barris
Photographs


Lot 996: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe talking on the telephone signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso.
7 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $400

246654_0 246655_0 


Lot 997: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe talking on the telephone signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246656_0 246657_0 247317_0  


Lot 998: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe dressed in orange signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246658_0 246659_0 247318_0   


Lot 999: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe leaning against a cinder block wall signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246660_0 246661_0 247319_0   


Lot 1000: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe standing in the surf signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
10 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246662_0 246663_0 247320_0 


Lot 1001: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe in a bikini signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246664_0 246665_0  247321_0 


Lot 1002: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe standing in the surf signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246666_0  246667_0 


Lot 1003: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY GEORGE BARRIS
 A photographic print of Marilyn Monroe, limited edition numbered 21/50, taken in 1962 by George Barris. Silver gelatin print, printed on double-weight fiber paper under the guidance and approval of George Barris by OneWest Publishing. Signed by the photographer and stamped by OneWest Publishing.
20 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

246668_0 


Photographies - Milton H Greene
Photographs


Lot 257: MARILYN MONROE OUTTAKE PHOTOGRAPH
A black and white test print on archival paper of Monroe during the Mandolin Sitting with photographer Milton Greene. The image is stamped on verso "Reproduction Forbidden" with additional pencil notations documenting the exposure settings for the print.
7 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245520_0 


Lot 890: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white partial contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe and Milton Greene. The sheet, which consists of two partial contact sheets stapled together, contains 17 images of Monroe.
4 1/2 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246508_0  


Lot 891: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage partial black and white contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe. The Milton Greene contact sheet includes 12 images of Monroe in a black cocktail dress.
3 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246509_0 


Lot 892: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE CONTACT SHEET
A  vintage partial black and white contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe. The Milton Greene contact sheet includes 10 frames with images of Monroe and others. The images were taken by Milton Greene at the 21 Club in New York in 1954. Monroe can be seen talking to the restaurant owner, Robert Kriendler.
4 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246510_0 


Lot 893: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white partial contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe and Milton Greene. The sheet includes 10 images of Monroe. Most of the images were likely taken by Greene circa 1955.
3 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246511_0  


Lot 909: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE PRINTS
 A group of four vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe, Laurence Olivier, Arthur Miller and others taken by Milton Greene circa 1956 during the preparation for and filming of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246535_0  


Lot 910: MARILYN MONROE MONROE, OLIVIER AND RATTIGAN CONTACT SHEET IMAGES
 A group of four vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe with Laurence Olivier and Terence Rattigan taken by Milton Greene. The photographs were taken during a 1956 publicity photo session for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Two of the images show Monroe with Olivier, who co-starred with Monroe and directed the film. One image is of Monroe and Olivier with Rattigan, author of the play on which the film was based and of the screenplay for the film, and one image is of Olivier and Rattigan. Notations on verso.
Each, 2 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246536_0  


Lot 911: MARILYN MONROE MONROE, OLIVIER AND RATTIGAN CONTACT SHEET IMAGES
 A group of four vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe with Laurence Olivier and Terence Rattigan taken by Milton Greene. The photographs were taken during a 1956 publicity photo session for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Three of the images show Monroe with Olivier, who co-starred with Monroe and directed the film. One image is of Monroe and Olivier with Rattigan, author of the play on which the film was based and of the screenplay for the film. Notations on verso.
Each, 2 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246537_0 


Lot 913: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE PRINTS
 A group of six vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe, Laurence Olivier, Arthur Miller, Vivien Leigh and others taken by Milton Greene circa 1956 during the preparation for and filming of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246539_0  246540_0   


Lot 921: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY MILTON GREENE
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier taken by Milton Greene in 1956. Photographer's stamp on verso.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246553_0  


Lot 922: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY MILTON GREENE
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe, Terence Rattigan and Laurence Olivier taken by Milton Greene in 1956. Photographer's stamp on verso.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246554_0 


Lot 1010: MARILYN MONROE PRINT BY MILTON GREENE
 A large-scale silkscreen print of Marilyn Monroe removing her stockings. Marked "A/P" [Artist's Proof] to the lower left and signed to the lower right by photographer Milton H. Greene.
46 by 35 1/2 inches, framed
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Allan Rich
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246684_0 
246685_0  246686_0  


Lot 1011: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE SILKSCREEN PRINT
 A limited edition silkscreen print of a Milton Greene photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken during the "Black Sitting" photo session in New York in 1956. Numbered 218/300 and signed by Greene at lower right.
35 by 46 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246687_0 
246688_0  246689_0  


Lot 1012: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE SILKSCREEN PRINT
 A silkscreen print of a Milton Greene photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken during the "Black Sitting" photo session in New York in 1956. Numbered 44/300 and signed by Greene in pencil at lower right.
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246690_0 
246691_0 246692_0 


Photographies - Divers photographes
Photographs - Various photographers


Lot 37: MARILYN MONROE AND JOHNNY HYDE PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white gelatin silver photograph featuring Marilyn Monroe dancing with talent agent Johnny Hyde, to whom she owed much of her success, presumably taken by Bruno Bernard. Numbered 9/350 in ink to the lower left.
16 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 332, “Film and Entertainment,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale Number 6343, December 17, 1993
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245080_0 


Lot 94: MARILYN MONROE EARLY SNAPSHOT
 A circa late 1940s black and white glossy photograph of Monroe with her Chihuahua. The photograph was taken by Richard C. Miller.
4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245260_0 


Lot 100: MARILYN MONROE MODELING PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white glossy photograph of photographer Richard C. Miller posing as he takes a photo of Monroe in hunting clothing holding a rifle during a 1946 photo session. The back of the photograph has pencil notation dating the photograph, "4/5/46."
3 3/4 by 4 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245270_0  


Lot 434: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY CECIL BEATON
 A vintage copy of Monroe's favorite image of herself by Cecil Beaton. As evidenced by receipts among Monroe's documents, she ordered reprints of this photograph to sign for people. This is one of her vintage copies of the image, ordered during her lifetime.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
245806_0 


Lot 663: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 20 photographs featuring or related to Marilyn Monroe, some vintage and some reproductions, collected by Frieda Hull.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246158_0  


Lot 664: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four slides of Marilyn Monroe from various points in her career: a costume test shot from Something's Got To Give ; on the set of Something’s Got To Give ; a double exposure from the Red Velvet session by Tom Kelley; and an early photo of Monroe by Richard C. Miller.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246159_0   


Lot 665: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large, glossy black and white publicity photograph of Marilyn Monroe in white dress, heels and gloves.
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246160_0  


Lot 793: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY LASZLO WILLINGER
 A large-scale Cibachrome color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Laszlo Willinger. Stamp-signed on verso.
34 1/2 by 30 1/2 inches, framed
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246340_0 


Lot 794: MARILYN MONROE HURRELL STAMPED PHOTOGRAPH
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe with a George Hurrell attribution statement on verso signed by Hurrell-endorsed authenticator Allan Rich.
14 by 12 1/2 inches, framed
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Allan Rich
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246341_0  


Lot 811: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD
 An original vintage photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1946. The photograph is titled “Mistletoe” and is part of the Discovery Series. Signed on verso “Bernard of Hollywood.” The photograph is accompanied by a copy of Monroe’s model release signed “Norma Jeane Dougherty” on July 24, 1946. This image was among the photographs that Bernard gave to Twentieth Century Fox.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246376_0 


Lot 812: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NEGATIVE
 A vintage black and white negative of Marilyn Monroe. The image was taken by Ed Cronenweth while Monroe did her hair and makeup during the time of production for Ladies of the Chorus (Columbia, 1948). Accompanied by a contemporary print of the negative.
5 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Ted Stampfer
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246377_0  246378_0   


Lot 821: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE TRANSPARENCY
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage color transparency of an image taken in 1951. The image shows Monroe in the gown she wore to the 23rd Academy Awards ceremony, where she presented the award for Best Sound Recording. The award went to All About Eve (20th Century, 1950).
5 by 4 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246388_0  


Lot 822: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ED CLARK TRANSPARENCY
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage color transparency of an image taken in 1950 by Ed Clark, a LIFE photographer.
5 by 4 inches
Estimate: $400 - $600
246389_0  


Lot 825: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1952. In the photograph, Monroe is wearing the hot pink dress she wore in her role as Rose Loomis in Niagara (20th Century, 1953). The photograph is numbered 15/90 and signed “From the estate of Bernard of Hollywood."
16 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500
246393_0  


Lot 826: MARILYN MONROE PHILLIPPE HALSMAN PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white image of Marilyn Monroe taken by Phillippe Halsman during a 1952 photo session for LIFE magazine. Numbered 81/250.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246394_0 


Lot 827: MARILYN MONROE HAROLD LLOYD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition poster photograph print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Harold Lloyd in 1952. The color print is numbered 25/250 at lower right. The photograph was taken by silent screen star turned photographer Harold Lloyd during a photoshoot at Monroe’s Los Angeles apartment with Philippe Halsman. Later in 1952, a photograph from Halsman’s session appeared on the cover of LIFE magazine. Printed on crystal archive paper from the original 35mm Kodachrome negative in 2005. Blind stamped in the lower right corner by the Harold Lloyd Trust.
20 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 204, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246395_0 


Lot 828: MARILYN MONROE HAROLD LLOYD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition poster photograph print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Harold Lloyd in 1952. The color print is numbered 25/250 at lower right. The full-length photograph of Monroe speaking to photographer Philippe Halsman was taken by silent screen star turned photographer, Harold Lloyd, during a photo shoot at Monroe’s Los Angeles apartment with Halsman. Later in 1952, a photograph from Halsman’s session appeared on the cover of LIFE Magazine. Printed on crystal archive paper from the original 35mm Kodachrome negative in 2005. Blind stamped in the lower right corner by the Harold Lloyd Trust.
20 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 206, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246396_0  


Lot 831: MARILYN MONROE AND JOHN FLOREA PHOTOGRAPH NEGATIVES
 A pair of vintage original negatives showing Marilyn Monroe with photographer John Florea. The first image was taken during a publicity photograph session for the film Monkey Business (20th Century, 1952). The second was taken while shooting publicity images for How To Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). The negatives were originally from the collection of John Florea.
6 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246399_0   


Lot 839: MARILYN MONROE JOHN FLOREA SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe stacking thousand-dollar bills next to photographer John Florea, likely from a series of promotional photos for the Monroe film How To Marry A Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). Signed on the verso by Florea with a copyright stamp.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
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Lot 840: MARILYN MONROE AND OTHERS FRANK WORTH PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five black and white Frank Worth images, including two of Marilyn Monroe. All are blind stamped “Frank Worth Estate Limited Edition.” The first is an image of Monroe wearing a dress she made famous in the film How To Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). In the second image, Monroe is wearing the same dress and leaning against a car in the background, and Sammy Davis Jr. is in mid-leap, dancing in the foreground. The remaining photographs are portraits of Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor and James Dean.
Each, 12 by 17 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
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246413_0 246414_0 


Lot 857: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED AND INSCRIBED PORTRAIT
 A vintage print full-length black and white studio portrait shot by Bernard of Hollywood, signed and inscribed by Marilyn Monroe as she appeared in a floral corset with lace trim, fishnet stockings and high-heel shoes in a provocative pose. Inscription reads in full, “To Carole, It’s a pleasure to work with you/ Marilyn Monroe.
18 1/2 by 17 inches, overall; 9 1/2 by 7 1/2 inches, sight
PROVENANCE Lot 173, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, California, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246446_0   


Lot 866: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white matte photograph signed in green ink "Dear Inez, My love and deepest thanks, Marilyn."
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $15,000 - $20,000
246462_0  


Lot 867: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY CECIL BEATON
 A vintage black and white image of Marilyn Monroe taken by Cecil Beaton in 1956 at the Ambassador Hotel. Camera Press stamp on verso with additional typed label that reads in part, "Monroe by Beaton:/ THE ETERNAL MARILYN/ Sophisticated innocence.../ Please acknowledge: photograph by Cecil Beaton/ Camera Press London."
9 1/4 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246463_0  246464_0  


Lot 872: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe photograph and contact sheet prints circa 1956. The black and white image, which shows Monroe having her photograph taken, is stamped with Hans Knopf photographer's stamp on verso. With nine additional vintage contact sheet photographs assumed to have been taken at the same time. The contact sheet prints were all affixed to black paper at one time.
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
Estimate: $600 - $800
246472_0 246476_0 246477_0 
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Lot 873: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage portrait publicity photograph from her personal collection.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246482_0  


Lot 874: MARILYN MONROE CECIL BEATON PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Cecil Beaton in 1956. The photograph, from Monroe's personal archive, is mounted to board and contained in a brown folder.
Photograph, 9 by 9 1/4 inches; 16 by 14 1/2 inches, overall
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246483_0  


Lot 878: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED AND INSCRIBED PHOTOGRAPH
 A framed photograph of Marilyn Monroe signed "To David, so you're still counting my money - what money? Marilyn Monroe."
20 1/2 by 17 1/2 inches, overall; 13 by 10 1/4 inches, sight
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246493_0  246494_0 


Lot 919: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe black and white publicity photograph with a notation in pencil on verso in an unknown hand "500 8x10's ordered 6/16/58 deliver and bill MM."
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246548_0 


Lot 972: MARILYN MONROE PORTRAIT IMAGES
A group of nine Marilyn Monroe portrait images from film studios for reference or publicity and from photoshoots, with photographers Eric Skipsey and Richard Avedon. Eight of the images are in black and white with one color image from the film Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960).
Most, 8 by 10 inches
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246622_0  


Lot 1009: MARILYN MONROE DOUGLAS KIRKLAND PORTFOLIO
 A limited edition portfolio of Marilyn Monroe photographs taken by Douglas Kirkland and published by the Govinda Gallery in Washington, D.C. Each of the six photographs is numbered 16/30 to the lower left and signed by Kirkland to the lower right. Housed in a blue cloth clamshell case with gilt-stamped morocco label.
19 3/4 by 16 1/2 inches, overall
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Allan Rich
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246677_0 246678_0 246679_0 
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Marilyn Monroe Auction - 11/2016 - photos 3-carrière


Photographies - River of no Return
Photographs


Lot 207: MARILYN MONROE RIVER OF NO RETURN SNAPSHOTS
 Two vintage black and white snapshots from 1953 of Monroe during the production of River of No Return, one featuring Monroe posing with her stunt double.
5 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245432_0  


Lot 208: MARILYN MONROE PROMOTIONAL PIECES
 A promotional proof for the release of the song "I'm Gonna File My Claim" from the film The River of No Return, together with a mock-up of the LP label for the same release.
Largest, 11 3/4 by 5 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $300
245433_0  245434_0 


Lot 648: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID AND CONTACT SHEET PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on the set of River of No Return (20th Century, 1954) in Canada, circa June 1953, appearing to have been cut from the original contact sheet, with seven of the photographs having writing consisting of "MM" together with a reference number. Monroe is shown with cast members from the film, including Robert Mitchum, going over musical numbers and on set preparing for filming. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246139_0 246140_0 247268_0 


Lot 649: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR RIVER OF NO RETURN
 A vintage archive of approximately 60 photos related to River of No Return (20th Century, 1954), including 45 movie stills and 15 publicity photographs.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246141_0 


Lot 855: MARILYN MONROE RIVER OF NO RETURN BEHIND-THE-SCENES PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe snapshot taken in Jasper National Park in Canada. The photograph, taken in 1953, shows Monroe with an unknown crew member on the set of River of No Return (20th Century, 1954). Notation in pencil on verso reads "Jasper National Park/ Jan -1956." 1956 may refer to the year the photograph was developed.
3 1/2 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 168, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246444_0 


Photographies - There's no Business
Photographs


Lot 51: THERE’S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS POSTER
 A rare original 1954 British quad poster for the Marilyn Monroe film There’s No Business Like Show Business (20th Century, 1954).
Framed, 33 1/2 by 43 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 190, “Vintage Film Posters,” Christie’s, London, Sale number 9689, September 19, 2003
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245126_0 


Lot 646: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS
 A vintage archive of approximately 50 photographs related to There's No Business Like Show Business (20th Century, 1954), including approximately 45 movie stills and five publicity photographs.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246136_0 


Lot 859: MARILYN MONROE THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS 3D SLIDES
 A pair of stereo viewer slides showing Marilyn Monroe in her role as Vicky Parker in the film There's No Business Like Show Business (20th Century, 1954). The stereo three-dimensional slides come from the collection of Ad Schaumer of Ad Schaumer, an Assistant Director active in Hollywood between 1928 and 1966. Each slide contains two pieces of film in a single mount.
Each, 1 5/8 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Ad Schaumer
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246453_0  


Lot 860: MARILYN MONROE HOLLYWOOD RELATED STEREO 3D SLIDES
 A collection of nine boxes of Stereo 3D slides from the collection of Ad Schaumer, an assistant director active in Hollywood between 1928 and 1966. The boxes are labeled in an unknown hand: "Dean Martin/ Monty Clift/ Brando/ Young Lions" from the production The Young Lions (20th Century, 1958); "France/ * Might be the young lions"; "Young Lions" and "Young Lions/ Desert Scenes"; "Voyage To The Bottom of the Sea," Schaumer worked on both the 1961 film and the television series; "Lost World" presumably from the The Lost World (20th Century, 1960); "Mantz" and "Show Biz" from the film There's No Business Like Show Business; "3 weeks/ in Balloon/ Lion - Monkey/ Sherwood/ Forest" referencing the production of Five Weeks in a Balloon (20th Century, 1962); "'3 Weeks in A Balloon'/ Irwin Allen Prod."; "5 Weeks In Balloon"; "Japan - S.F." that appears to contain one slide of Marlon Brando in the film Sayonara (Warner Bros., 1957); "Japan/ Inland Sea"; and one box labeled "Miscellaneous." Not all of the slides have been viewed. Each box contains up to 28 slides. Each slide has two pieces of film in a single mount. Accompanied by seven boxes of additional slides that appear to be personal and travel related.
Slides, 1 5/8 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Ad Schaumer
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246454_0


Photographies - The Seven Year Itch
Photographs


Lot 651: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE THE SEVEN YEAR ITCH PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 110 vintage photographs related to The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955), including 40 publicity photos, 60 movie stills, and 10 sheets of photo reproductions of various photographs taken on the set of the film, collected by Frieda Hull.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246144_0 


Lot 652: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original color photograph of Marilyn Monroe and co-star Tom Ewell on the set for The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955), filming the now famous skirt-blowing subway scene from the film, shot on September 15, 1954. Fans and photographers can also be seen in this photo. This photograph is likely never before seen.
4 3/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246145_0 


Lot 653: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe original color and black and white photographs, likely at the St. Regis Hotel in New York City on September 15, 1954, the same day she filmed the now famous subway skirt-blowing subway scene from The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). Monroe wears the iconic white halter dress costume from the film, together with what is likely the mink coat gifted to her by husband Joe DiMaggio. She holds the film's script in her left hand. This lot includes one color and one black and white photograph; the color photograph is likely never been seen.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246146_0 


Lot 654: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large, glossy black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe during the subway grate scene for The Seven Year Itch in New York City, 1955.
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246147_0 


Lot 655: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 10, possibly never before seen, color slides of Marilyn Monroe, some with co-star Tom Ewell, on the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) from the September 15, 1954, filming of the now famous skirt-blowing subway scene. Fans and photographers can also be seen in these images.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246148_0 


Lot 862: MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD SEVEN YEAR ITCH PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition candid color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1954. The photograph was taken on the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). Monroe seen is pictured standing with co-star Tom Ewell. The photograph is numbered 3/50 and signed by the estate of Bernard of Hollywood. This is the first time the photograph has been made available for sale.
20 by 24 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246456_0   


Lot 863: MARILYN MONROE CONTACT SHEETS
 A pair of vintage Marilyn Monroe contact sheets. The first is a black and white contact sheet from the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) with 25 frames showing Monroe and one frame of her co-star Tom Ewell. The second black and white contact sheet contains 15 frames, marked on verso "Credit Sam Shaw." Most of the images appear to have been taken at a 1957 photoshoot of Monroe with photographer Richard Avedon.
Each, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
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Photographies & Film - Bus Stop
Photographs & Film


Lot 52: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP POSTER
 An original 1956 U.S. insert poster for the Marilyn Monroe film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956) with a Dutch film censor stamp to the upper right corner.
39 by 17 inches, framed
PROVENANCE Lot 192, “Vintage Film Posters,” Christie’s, London, Sale number 9689, September 19, 2003
 Estimate: $150 - $300
245127_0  


Lot 53: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP POSTER
An original 1956 British double-crown poster for the Marilyn Monroe film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956), illustrated by Tom William Chantrell.
31 by 21 inches, framed
PROVENANCE Lot 88, “Vintage Film Posters,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale Number 5424, September 17, 2008
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245128_0  


Lot 262: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP SNAPSHOTS
 Four vintage color photographs on Pavelle color print paper. The images feature Monroe in costume posing with Don Murray, her co-star in the film Bus Stop. Together with two 35mm contact prints cut from a larger contact sheet with red wax pencil X's, featuring images of Monroe from the film.
2 3/4 by 1 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
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Lot 731: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 39 slides, from the original preview/trailer for Marilyn Monroe's film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956), together with the original "Mercury Jiffy Mask" box.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246245_0   


Lot 732: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS SOLD WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of seven black and white original photographs of Marilyn Monroe on the set in Phoenix, Arizona, during the filming of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Six of the images have handwritten annotations on verso, "MM sitting in stands waiting for filming to start"; "MM walking to stands to start working. Reminds me of her walk in 'Niagara'"; "MM with rodeo official"; "MM talking to director Josh Logan"; "Boy shaking hands with MM. He was also at the airport when she arrived. She picked him up and held him. When she saw him again, she remembered him from the airport"; and "Filming finished, MM and Milton H. Greene walk to her car. That evening she left Phoenix for Calif." All images are likely never before seen.
This item sold with copyright but is not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $5,000 - $6,000
246246_0 


Lot 734: MARILYN MONROE FILM TRAILER
 A reel of 35mm color film containing the film trailer for Marilyn Monroe's 1956 film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The reel is in a cardboard box with Frieda Hull's address and telephone number written on the outside in green marker.
4 1/2 by 4 1/2 by 1 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $50 - $75
246250_0  246251_0  246252_0  


Lot 735: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE BUS STOP PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE
 A vintage archive of approximately 180 photographs related to Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956), including approximately 150 movie stills and roughly 30 publicity photographs. Note: Several duplicate photographs are contained in this lot.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246253_0  


Lot 736: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP LOBBY CARD ARCHIVE
A collection of 18 lobby cards for Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956), one of which is signed by Eileen Heckart, Monroe's co-star in the film.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246254_0 


Lot 876: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of five vintage negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Marilyn Monroe and others on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 1 1/2 by 4 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246485_0  


Lot 877: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP PHOTOGRAPHS AND SIGNATURE
 A group of three small photo books containing 26 vintage black and white photographs taken on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Marilyn Monroe appears in eight of the photographs and has signed the back of one image. The photographs come from an extra who worked on the film during the scenes shot at the Arizona State Fairgrounds. These photographs are believed to be unpublished.
Photographs, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
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246488_0 246489_0 
246490_0 246491_0 246492_0 


Lot 879: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of four vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe in a robe on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyrights to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
1 1/2 by 6 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246495_0 


Lot 880: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of four vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe, Don Murray, and others on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 1 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246496_0 


Lot 881: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of three vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe and others, including co-star Eileen Heckart, on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Each, 1 1/2 by 1 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246497_0  


Lot 882: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP STUDIO IMAGES
 A group of seven vintage studio images of Marilyn Monroe from the film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Includes three color publicity photographs stamped "Theatre Poster Exchange" on verso and four black and white studio images from the film, including one taken by Milton Greene.
Most, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246498_0 


Lot 883: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of three vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe and co-star Don Murray on set during filming in a bedroom. Murray has been quoted as saying that Monroe was nude under the sheets because she felt that was what her character would do. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 1 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500
246499_0  


Lot 884: MARILYN BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of five vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe and co-star Don Murray on set during filming in a bedroom. Murray has been quoted as saying that Monroe was nude under the sheets because she felt that was what her character would do. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arriving as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Each, 1 1/2 by 1 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500
246500_0   


Lot 885: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of five vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe and others on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
1 1/2 by 7 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246501_0  


Lot 886: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE NEGATIVE AND COPYRIGHT
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe negative produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe in costume as her character Chérie posing with the children of her co-star, Eileen Heckart. Accompanied by the copyright to the image.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246502_0 


Lot 887: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of five vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe and others on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 1 1/2 by 4 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246503_0 


Lot 888: MARILYN MONROE BUS STOP NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of four vintage Marilyn Monroe negatives produced by Milton Greene while on the set of Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). The black and white images show Monroe and others on set during filming. Accompanied by the copyright to the images.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arisiing as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 1 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246504_0  


Photographies - The Prince and the Showgirl
Photographs


Lot 372: MARILYN MONROE PROGRAM FROM THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL PREMIERE
 A program from the June 13, 1957, premiere of The Prince and the Showgirl at Radio City Music Hall with a benefit and gala champagne supper-dance held at the Waldorf Astoria afterwards. The gala benefited of the Free Milk Fund for Babies Inc.
12 by 9 inches
 Estimate: $700 - $900
245713_0  245714_0 


Lot 741: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS SIGNED BY LAURENCE OLIVIER
 A group of four vintage glossy black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier from the film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) as well as from press events for the film. Each of the images is signed in red wax pencil "Laurence Olivier."
8 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800 
246259_0  246262_0 
246260_0  246261_0 


Lot 744: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE
 A vintage archive of 73 photographs related to The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957), including 50 movie stills, 20 publicity photographs, and three original lobby cards, collected by Frieda Hull.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246265_0  


Lot 745: MARILYN MONROE THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL LOBBY CARD ARCHIVE
 A nearly complete lobby card collection for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). The series is missing card No. 9.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246266_0 


Lot 920: MARILYN MONROE NEGATIVES FROM THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL
 A group of 12 negatives relating to Marilyn Monroe and The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) including four images taken by Milton Greene, images taken at publicity events for the film, and images taken on set.
Largest, 10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246549_0 
246550_0 246551_0 246552_0  


Lot 923: MARILYN MONROE FILM PHOTOGRAPHS AND NEGATIVES
 A group of 9 vintage photographs and four negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced while on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) housed in glassine envelopes with markings. Some of the markings indicate areas on Monroe's person that should be retouched. The images were formerly housed in a folder marked on the cover "Kill" and on the interior "Not retouched to be app. by MM."
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246555_0 


Lot 924: MARILYN MONROE FILM PHOTOGRAPHS AND NEGATIVES
 A group of ten vintage photographs and six negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced while on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) housed in glassine envelopes with markings. Some of the markings indicate areas on Monroe’s person that should be retouched. The images were formerly housed in a folder marked on the cover “Kill” and on the interior “Not retouched to be app. by MM.”
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246556_0  


Lot 925: MARILYN MONROE FILM PHOTOGRAPHS AND NEGATIVES
 A group of 10 vintage photographs and negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced while on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) housed in glassine envelopes with markings. Some of the markings indicate areas on Monroe's person that should be retouched. The images were formerly housed in a folder marked "Kill" and are believed to have been rejected by Monroe. Note that not all photographs and negatives match.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246557_0  


Lot 926: MARILYN MONROE FILM PHOTOGRAPHS AND NEGATIVES
 A group of 10 vintage photographs produced while on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) housed in glassine envelopes with markings. Some of the markings indicate areas on Monroe's person that should be retouched. The images were formerly housed in a folder marked "Kill" and are believed to have been rejected by Monroe. Note that not all photographs and negatives match.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246558_0  


Lot 927: MARILYN MONROE FILM PHOTOGRAPHS AND NEGATIVES
 A group of 9 vintage photographs and negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced while on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) housed in glassine envelopes with markings. Some of the markings indicate areas on Monroe's person that should be retouched. The images were formerly housed in a folder marked "Kill" and are believed to have been rejected by Monroe. Note that not all photographs and negatives match.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246559_0  


Lot 928: MARILYN MONROE FILM PHOTOGRAPHS AND NEGATIVES
 A group of 9 vintage photographs and negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced while on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) housed in glassine envelopes with markings. Some of the markings indicate areas on Monroe's person that should be retouched. The images were formerly housed in a folder marked "Kill" and are believed to have been rejected by Monroe. Note that photographs and negatives may not match.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246560_0  


Lot 929: MARILYN MONROE COLOR TRANSPARENCIES
 A group of approximately 40 color transparencies taken on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Most of the images are of Marilyn Monroe and are in plastic sleeves. Some of the sleeves have been marked with red grease pencil. These transparencies were housed in an envelope that read "MM Color Rejects" and "Bad."
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246561_0  


Lot 930: MARILYN MONROE COLOR TRANSPARENCIES
 A group of approximately 30 color transparencies taken on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Most of the images are of Marilyn Monroe and are in plastic sleeves. Some of the sleeves have been marked with red grease pencil. These transparencies were housed in an envelope that read "MM Color Rejects" and "Bad."
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246562_0 


Lot 931: MARILYN MONROE COLOR TRANSPARENCIES
 A group of approximately 35 color transparencies taken on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Most of the images are of Marilyn Monroe and are in plastic sleeves. Some of the sleeves have been marked with black or red grease pencil. These transparencies were housed in an envelope that read "MM Color Rejects" and "Bad."
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246563_0 


Lot 932: MARILYN MONROE COLOR TRANSPARENCIES
 A group of approximately 30 color transparencies taken on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Most of the images are of Marilyn Monroe and are in plastic sleeves. Some of the sleeves have been marked with black or red grease pencil. These transparencies were housed in an envelope that read "MM Color Rejects" and "Bad."
5 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246564_0 


Lot 933: MARILYN MONROE COLOR TRANSPARENCIES
 A group of 27 color transparencies taken on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Most of the images are of Marilyn Monroe and are in plastic sleeves. Some of the sleeves have been marked with red grease pencil. Contained in an envelope that reads "MM Color Rejects" and "Bad."
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246565_0  246566_0 


Photographies - Some Like It Hot
Photographs


Lot 66: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT POSTER
 An original 1959 U.S. half-sheet style B poster for the Marilyn Monroe film Some Like It Hot (20th Century, 1956).
28 1/2 by 36 1/2 inches, framed
PROVENANCE Lot 90, “Vintage Film Posters,” Christie’s, South Kensington, Sale number 5424, September 17, 2008
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200 
245175_0 


Lot 421: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT ADVERTISEMENTS
 Three trade advertisement pieces promoting the film Some like It Hot saying "Hot Hit Ahead … Book it now for Easter!!" The ads also present some of the critical praise received during advance screenings of the film and present Monroe together with her co-stars Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis throughout.
12 3/8 by 18 5/8 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600 
245782_0  245783_0 
245784_0 


Lot 422: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT COVER PROOF
 A printer's proof of the front and back cover artwork for the paperback version of Some Like It Hot by Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond published by the New American Library.
7 1/2 by 9 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245785_0 


Lot 423: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT POSTER
 An in-store promotional poster for the original motion picture soundtrack of Some Like It Hot from United Artists, featuring an image of Monroe with co-stars Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis.
13 1/4 by 13 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245786_0 


Lot 424: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT POSTER
 An in-store promotional poster for the original motion picture soundtrack of Some Like It Hot from United Artists, featuring an image of Monroe's character playing the ukulele.
13 1/4 by 13 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245787_0 


Lot 425: MARILYN MONROE SOME LIKE IT HOT CALENDAR
 A promotional poster created to promote the March 18, 1959, release date for Some Like It Hot. The calendar features four pages inside the staple-bound covers each featuring an image of Monroe from the film, one declaring March 18 as M-Day and the inside back cover featuring the poster artwork for the film.
11 by 8 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245788_0  245789_0  


Photographies - Let's Make Love
Photographs


Lot 444: MARILYN MONROE LET'S MAKE LOVE PHOTOGRAPHS
 Five vintage black and white photographs of Monroe on the set of Let's Make Love . Three feature Monroe celebrating her birthday with director George Cukor and co-star Yves Montand, one features Monroe receiving a card from the cast and crew, and the last is a glossy print of Monroe's hair and makeup for the film.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245822_0  245823_0 
245824_0 245825_0 245826_0 


Lot 448: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS
 Three black and white photographs of Monroe with a young man on the set of Let's Make Love, 1960. The vintage matte finish prints are unmarked, but feature Monroe in one of her show-stopping gowns from the film.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245830_0 245831_0 245832_0  


Lot 449: MARILYN MONROE PROMOTIONAL POSTCARD
 A vintage promotional postcard for Monroe's film Let's Make Love, with facsimile message from Monroe on verso reading "Dear Friend - you will be seeing more of me soon in - 'Let's Make Love' Marilyn."
8 1/4 by 5 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $100 - $150
245833_0  245834_0  


Lot 450: MARILYN MONROE TRADE ADS
 Two stapled magazine ads, each slightly different four-page ads, as they ran in the August 23, 1960, issue of The Hollywood Reporter and the August 24, 1960 issue of Variety .
12 1/4 by 9 1/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245835_0 245836_0 245837_0 


Lot 768: MARILYN MONROE LET'S MAKE LOVE
 20th Century Fox, 1960 half-sheet film poster with heavy crease lines.
22 by 28 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $150
246292_0  246293_0  


Lot 973: MARILYN MONROE LET'S MAKE LOVE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of vintage black and white images of Marilyn Monroe on the set of Let’s Make Love (20th Century, 1960). Stamped on verso “Kindler Und Schiermeyer Verlag AG Archiv.”
Each, 9 1/2 by 12 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246623_0  246624_0 


Photographies - The Misfits
Photographs


Lot 67: MARILYN MONROE EVE ARNOLD SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A framed black and white portrait of Marilyn Monroe on the set of The Misfits (United Artists, 1961) taken by Eve Arnold. Printed at a later date and signed by the photographer.
Framed, 14 by 17 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

245176_0 


Lot 509: MARILYN MONROE CONTACT SHEETS FROM THE MISFITS
 22 frames of Monroe posing for wardrobe test photos for The Misfits, 1961.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

245931_0 


Lot 510: MARILYN MONROE CONTACT SHEETS FROM THE MISFITS
 Three vintage black and white contact sheets featuring 26 frames of Monroe sitting for hair and makeup test photos for The Misfits, 1961. One frame captures famed Hollywood hairstylist Sydney Guilaroff and an assistant fixing Monroe's hair.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

245932_0  


Photographies - Something's Got to Give
Photographs


Lot 579: MARILYN MONROE HAIR TEST PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five color snapshots of Monroe taken during preparation for the unfinished film Something's Got To Give, 1962.
4 1/2 by 3 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246032_0 


Lot 784: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS COLLECTED BY FRIEDA HULL
 A group of four reproduction color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on the set of her final film Something's Got To Give on or around May 7, 1962.
Largest, 4 3/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246326_0 


Lot 983: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE SOMETHING'S GOT TO GIVE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe vintage black and white photographs taken by Lawrence Schiller on the set of Something’s Got To Give in 1962. The images show Monroe seated at the side of a pool wearing only a nude bikini bottom. Both are stamped on verso “Times” and “Copyright Camera Press LTD.” with additional handwritten notations. Accompanied by a snipe providing information about the photographs and additionally crediting photographer William Read Woodfield.
Larger, 12 by 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246638_0  246639_0  


Photographies - Divers Films
Photographs - Various Movies


Lot 43: MARILYN MONROE NIAGARA POSTER
 An original 1953 U.S. linen-backed one-sheet poster for the Marilyn Monroe film Niagara (20th Century, 1953).
47 by 33 1/2 inches, framed
PROVENANCE Lot 84, “Vintage Film Posters,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale number 5424, September 17, 2008
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245095_0  


Lot 45: MARILYN MONROE INSCRIBED PHOTOGRAPH
A photograph of Marilyn Monroe with her arm around a man on a film set of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953) inscribed "To Paul/ I love you/ friend/ Marilyn Monroe."
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 57, “Rock & Roll and Entertainment Memorabilia,” Christie's, New York, Sale number 1438, December 17, 2004
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
245097_0  245098_0 


Lot 605: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR EARLY FILMS, 1947-1952
An archive of 168 movie stills and publicity photographs related to the early films in Monroe's career from 1947 to 1952, including Dangerous Years (two photographs), Ladies of the Chorus (17 photographs), Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay! (one photograph), Love Happy (four photographs), A Ticket to Tomahawk (14 photographs), All About Eve (six photographs), Right Cross (one photograph), The Asphalt Jungle (20 photographs), Love Nest (three photographs), Let's Make It Legal (10 photographs), Home Town Story (four photographs), As Young As You Feel (13 photographs), O. Henry's Full House (two photographs), Clash by Night (15 photographs), Monkey Business (30 photographs), and We're Not Married (26 photographs).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $400 - $600
246083_0 


Lot 608: MARILYN MONROE PRESS BOOKS
 A group of five exhibitor's campaign books for Monroe's films including As Young As You Feel, 1951; Let's Make It Legal, 1951; Niagara, 1953; Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1953; and The Misfits, 1961.
Largest, 18 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246089_0  246090_0  


Lot 610: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white publicity headshot of Marilyn Monroe taken for her film Clash By Night (RKO,1952). Signed in blue ink in lower right "Marilyn Monroe." Some creases and minor tears to edges.
8 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246092_0 


Lot 611: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY IMAGE ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 50 vintage black and white publicity images and publicity stills featuring Marilyn Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246093_0 


Lot 612: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY IMAGE ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 50 vintage black and white publicity images and publicity stills featuring Marilyn Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246094_0  


Lot 621: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK
 A vintage archive of approximately 45 photographs related to Don't Bother to Knock (20th Century, 1952), including 45 movie stills and five publicity photographs.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246104_0  


Lot 628: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR NIAGARA
 A vintage archive of approximately 20 photographs related to Niagara (20th Century, 1953), including movie stills and publicity photographs.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $50 - $100
246114_0  


Lot 637: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES
 A vintage archive of approximately 60 photographs related to Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953), including approximately 45 movie stills and roughly 15 publicity photographs. Note: Several duplicate photographs are contained in this lot.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246125_0 


Lot 641: MARILYN MONROE RELATED PROGRAMS
 A nine-page color souvenir program from the Marilyn Monroe 1953 film How To Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953), together with a program from the American Newspaper Publishers Association convention held at the Waldorf Astoria on April 26, 1955. The program features the menu for the evening as well as the entertainers slated to appear, including Monroe.
12 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $100 - $150
246131_0   


Lot 642: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR HOW TO MARRY A MILLIONAIRE
 A vintage archive of approximately 80 movie stills from How to Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246132_0  


Lot 723: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE FOR LATER FILMS, 1959-1961
 An archive of 14 movie stills and publicity photographs related to the later films in Marilyn Monroe's career from 1959 to 1961, including Some Like It Hot (four photographs), Let's Make Love (eight photographs), and The Misfits (two photographs).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246232_0 


Lot 815: MARILYN MONROE STUDIO PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine Marilyn Monroe studio photographs. The black and white images include a publicity photograph from Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959); Monroe's famous subway grate photograph taken on the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) by Sam Shaw; an image of Monroe and Jane Russell from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953); an image of Monroe from River of No Return (20th Century, 1954); an image of Monroe from We're Not Married (20th Century, 1952); and an image from There's No Business Like Show Business (20th Century, 1954) along with three other studio publicity images.
Each, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246381_0 


Lot 982: MARILYN MONROE PUBLICITY AND PRESS PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight Marilyn Monroe photographs from The Misfits (Seven Arts, 1961) and Something's Got To Give ( 20th Century). Five of the images are studio publicity photographs. The three remaining images are from the pool scene Monroe shot for Something's Got To Give. One of these images is stamped "Approved by the Advertising Code Administration of New York." Another is stamped by United Press International Photo.
Most, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246637_0 


Lot 1005: MARILYN MONROE MARILYN PUBLICITY STILLS
 A group of three Marilyn Monroe studio publicity photographs from the documentary Marilyn (20th Century, 1963). The documentary was a compilation of clips from Monroe's career. The images are from three of Monroe's films.
Each, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246670_0 


Presse  & Autres
Press & Others


Lot 42: MARILYN MONROE COLLECTION OF VINTAGE MAGAZINES
 A collection of approximately 20 vintage magazines dating from 1952 to 1964, all featuring Marilyn Monroe on the cover. Some titles: Reg, Life, Cine Monde, Look, Jours De France, and Photoplay.
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245094_0 


Lot 73: MARILYN MONROE MAGAZINES
 A January 16, 1962, special issue of Look magazine featuring content about "The Next 25 Years" with predictions by John F. Kennedy, Dr. Martin Luther King and others. Together with a March 1961 issue of Esquire magazine featuring an eight-page cover article on Marilyn Monroe, Arthur Miller, John Huston and the film The Misfits. A full-page ad for this issue of Esquire, as it appeared in the February 24, 1961, copy of the New York Times, is also present, tucked inside the magazine. The ad used a quotation from the feature article that criticized Monroe for being too high maintenance and out of control.
Largest, 13 1/4 by 10 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lee Strasberg
 Estimate: $500 - $700 
245195_0 
245196_0 


Lot 102: MARILYN MONROE PIN-UPS MAGAZINE
 A copy of the 1953 special magazine printed by the Maco Magazine Corporation. The special edition cost 35 cents and featured fifteen pages of color and black and white images of Monroe, some rare images. Each image is accompanied by "facts" about Monroe, many of which are incorrect but they fit the studio's narrative of their star at this time, including the fact that she does not drink. The booklet also carries a three page spread of black and white images showing Monroe exercising and tells how she stays in shape.
11 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
245273_0 245274_0 245275_0 


Lot 247: MARILYN MONROE CUSTOM-BOUND ESQUIRE MAGAZINE
 A copy of the July 1953 issue of Esquire magazine, custom-bound in gilt green boards with Monroe's name on the lower right corner of cover. The issue featured a four-page article titled "The 'altogether girl" by Bennett Cerf featuring a number of images.
13 1/2 by 10 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
245484_0  245485_0 
245487_0 245486_0 


Lot 419: MARILYN MONROE’S COLLECTION OF SOME LIKE IT HOT PRESS CLIPPINGS
 Original 1959 newspaper clippings from various newspapers across the country with reviews of Some Like It Hot and of Monroe’s performance, contained in the original file, labeled “Clippings/Some Like It Hot,” from Monroe’s filing cabinets. Some reviews outlined in red wax pencil.
 Estimate: $800 - $1,000
245777_0  


Lot 606: MARILYN MONROE SCRAPBOOK COLLECTION
 A group of seven three-ring binders, each containing approximately 100 pages of newspaper and magazine clippings as well as photographs and some ephemera items like the original booklet that held Frieda Hull's tickets to Marilyn Monroe's famous appearance astride a pink elephant at the circus in New York City on March 30, 1955. The books are an extraordinary archive of Monroe's public persona and career. The books appear to run through 1955.
11 1/2 by 9 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500
246084_0 
246085_0 246086_0 246087_0   


Lot 609: MARILYN MONROE RECORDS
 A group of 13 LPs and 45s, all featuring songs from Marilyn Monroe including: Some Like It Hot soundtrack LP and 45 rpm records; Gentlemen Prefer Blondes original cast album; two copies of Let's Make Love original soundtrack recording, one still sealed; Italian River of No Return 45 rpm record; 20th Century Fox Records 45 rpm River of No Return record; Gems from the archive of 20th Century Fox compilation album with "ready to frame" picture of Monroe; motion picture compilation soundtrack album; and four later compilation albums remembering Marilyn.
12 by 12 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246091_0 


Lot 622: 1950s MAGAZINES FEATURING MARILYN MONROE
 A group of 10 vintage magazines featuring Marilyn Monroe, including a special 1954 Marilyn magazine written by Sidney Skolsky, Movie World, Photoplay, Screen Stories, Rave, Hollywood Stars, Movie Mirror, Filmland and Screen Stars. Most date to 1956, together with one magazine from 1953.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246105_0 


Lot 623: MARILYN MONROE POSTCARD
 A vintage oversize postcard printed by Tichnor Bros. Inc. of Boston featuring an early 1950s pin-up image of Marilyn Monroe in a yellow bikini.
6 by 9 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $80 - $120
246106_0  246107_0 


Lot 624: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PIN-UP POSTER
 A life-size poster issued by Pin-ups of Boston, Massachusetts. The posters were advertised in the August 1953 issue of Popular Science magazine, where customers could order Marilyn Monroe in a red and white striped bikini or in a blue and white striped bikini for the bargain price of $2.00 per poster. This lot features Monroe in a red and white striped bikini. A small two-inch vertical tear is along the lower edge of this poster that is otherwise in excellent condition.
64 by 22 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246108_0 


Lot 625: MARILYN MONROE POCKET MAGAZINES AND PIN-UPS
A copy of That Girl Marilyn! by Jane Russell featuring 60 candid photographs and published by Affiliated Magazines Inc. and a copy of The Marilyn Monroe Story # 3 - A Candid Profile, 1955, from Screen Publications Inc. Together with 11 loose 1950s magazine covers torn from their respective magazines and two loose pin-up pages featuring Monroe.
Largest, 13 1/4 by 10 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $200 - $300 
246109_0 246110_0 246111_0 


Lot 785: 1960s AND 1970s MAGAZINES FEATURING MARILYN MONROE
 A group of 17 magazines: two from 1960, six from 1961, two from early 1962, and seven from the 1970s. Titles include Movie Mirror , TV Radio Album , Screen Stories , Hollywood Tattler , Modern Screen , Photoplay and other gossip magazines.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
Estimate: $400 - $600
246327_0 


Lot 786: MAGAZINES FEATURING MARILYN MONROE FROM 1962
 A group of six vintage magazines, among them TV and Movie Screen , Hush - Hush , Movie Mirror , and others, including a special French souvenir album put out by Cine magazine on August 8, 1962. The magazines date from between August and December 1962, paying tribute and speculating about the circumstances surrounding Marilyn Monroe's death.
Largest, 13 3/4 by 10 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246328_0   


Lot 787: MARILYN MONROE FOREIGN LANGUAGE MAGAZINES
 A group of thirteen magazines and newspapers featuring Marilyn Monroe on the cover including nine Italian titles, one Spanish, two French newspapers, and a Danish magazine all dating to August 1962 in reaction to Monroe's tragic death.
Largest, 23 3/4 by 17 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246329_0 


Lot 842: MARILYN MONROE ITEMS
 A group of assorted Marilyn Monroe items: a limited edition Playboy anniversary poster signed by Hugh Hefner and numbered 136/200; a hardcover copy of the Christie's Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe auction catalog from 1999; a giclée print of Monroe entertaining the troops, signed by Victoria Fuller and numbered 273/350; a "Golden Dreams" wall calendar from 1955; four prints of Monroe in a portfolio published by Special Editions Limited; a framed series of 10 magazine cover reproductions featuring Monroe; a 1992 Monroe calendar; five framed inkjet photographs of Monroe posing nude; a 1974 Playboy Marilyn Monroe date book; and a 1974 Playboy Marilyn Monroe calendar.
36 by 24 inches, largest
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246420_0  246421_0   


Lot 843: MARILYN MONROE PLAYBOY FIRST ISSUES SIGNED
 A collection of the first 14 issues of Playboy magazine, all cased and graded, including the first two issues of Playboy , volume 1 number 1 with Marilyn Monroe, and volume 2 number 2, both signed on the cover by Hugh Hefner. Also includes the Summer 1982 issue of Playboy's VIP magazine, cased and graded.
9 1/2 by 13 7/8 by 9 5/8 inches, overall
 Estimate: $5,000 - $7,000
246422_0 


Lot 844: MARILYN MONROE PREMIERE ISSUE OF PLAYBOY MAGAZINE
 A copy of the first issue of Playboy magazine that features Marilyn Monroe on the cover. Monroe also appears on the interior of the premiere issue in an article on pages 17 and 18 titled "What Makes Marilyn" and a color pin-up of Monroe taken by Tom Kelley during the 1949 Red Velvet session on page 19. Monroe is called "Sweetheart of the Month," which evolved into Playmate of the Month. No date appears on the cover because Hugh Hefner has stated that he didn't know if there would be a second issue. The magazine hit newsstands in December 1953 and sold for 50 cents. Accompanied by a copy of a magazine titled Marilyn Monroe Pin - Ups released by Maco Magazine Corporation in 1953.
11 by 8 1/2 inches, each
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246423_0 

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29 décembre 2015

Icons & Idols Feat Joan Collins 12/2015 - Photos


 Andre De Dienes


Lot 478  MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1945. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$512 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot478-220406_0 


Lot 479 MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1946. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer on verso.
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$896 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot479-220407_0 


Lot 480  MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1949. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
17 by 16 inches
 Winning bid:$750 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot480-220408_0  


Lot 481  MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1949. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
20 by 16 inches
 Winning bid:$384 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot481-220409_0 


Lot 482  MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1949. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer on verso. Additionally handwritten on verso is "17/67 given to [illegible] Shirley de Dienes 11-18-86."
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$384 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot482-220410_0  


Lot 483  MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1949. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso. Additionally inscribed on verso "25/67 given to Chad Lewis Shirley de Dienes 11-18-86."
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$384 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot483-220411_0 


Lot 484 MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1949. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
20 by 16 inches
 Winning bid:$576 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot484-220412_0  


Lot 485 MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$1,024 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot485-220413_0 


Lot 486 MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$1,024 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot486-220414_0 


Lot 487 MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
20 by 16 inches
 Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot487-220415_0 


 Bruno Bernard


Lot 502  MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition color photograph of Marilyn Monroe titled “Valentine Heart” taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1946. Numbered 16/90 and signed by The Estate of Bruno Bernard in the lower margin.
20 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
unsold - Estimate: $3,000 - $4,000
lot502-220447_0 


Lot 503  MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition color photograph of Marilyn Monroe titled “Sailor Girl” taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1946. Numbered 16/90 and signed by The Estate of Bruno Bernard in the lower margin.
20 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
unsold - Estimate: $3,000 - $4,000
lot503-220448_0 


Lot 504  MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition color photograph of Marilyn Monroe titled “My Girl Friday” taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1946. Numbered 16/90 and signed by The Estate of Bruno Bernard in the lower margin.
20 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 unsold - Estimate: $3,000 - $4,000
lot504-220449_0 


Lot 505  MARILYN MONROE BRUNO BERNARD SIGNED ORIGINAL VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 An original vintage black and white pin-up photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1946. Signed on verso “Bernard of Hollywood.”
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 unsold - Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000
lot505-220450_0 


Lot 510  MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe titled “Poolside” taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1949. Numbered 16/90 and signed by The Estate of Bruno Bernard in the lower margin.
20 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Winning bid:$4,062.50 - Estimate: $3,000 - $4,000
lot510-220455_0 


Lot 511  MARILYN MONROE BRUNO BERNARD SIGNED ORIGINAL VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
  An original vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe signing autographs taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1954. Signed on verso “Bernard of Hollywood.”
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
unsold - Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000
lot511-220456_0 


Lot 512  MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe wearing a costume dress from her film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953) taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1953. Numbered 16/90 and signed by The Estate of Bruno Bernard in the lower margin.
20 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 unsold - Estimate: $3,000 - $4,000
lot512-220457_0 


Lot 513  MARILYN MONROE BRUNO BERNARD SIGNED ORIGINAL VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 An original vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe on the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1954. Signed on verso "Bernard of Hollywood" and contained in a brown Bernard of Hollywood folder.
14 by 11 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Winning bid:$12,500 - Estimate: $10,000 - $20,000
lot513-220458_0 


Lot 514  MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition color photograph of Marilyn Monroe wearing the famous white dress from her film The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1954. Numbered 16/50 and signed by The Estate of Bruno Bernard in the lower margin.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 unsold - Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
lot514-220459_0 


 George Barris


Lot 537 MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS PHOTOGRAPHS
A pair of black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by George Barris. Each photograph is signed by Barris. One of the photographs is stamped “© 1987 George Barris/ Marilyn Monroe/ Weston Editions LTD./ All Rights Reserved,” and both photographs are stamped “The Private Collection of Kim Goodwin.”
Winning bid:$448 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot537-220508_0  lot537-220509_0 


Lot 538  MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS PHOTOGRAPH
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by George Barris in the summer of 1962. Signed by the photographer at lower right and stamped “The Kim Goodwin Collection” on verso.
Winning bid:$250 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
lot538-220510_0 


Lot 539  MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS LAST PHOTOGRAPHS PORTFOLIO
 A folder containing eight color prints of George Barris’ photographs of Marilyn Monroe. White folder reads on the cover “Marilyn Monroe/ 25th/ The Last Photos.” Interior left of folder reads “Limited Edition/ Original Photographs by/ George Barris.” Interior right of folder reads “As seen in/ ‘Marilyn’ Norma Jeane/ text by Gloria Steinem.” Accompanied by a card that gives the edition number as 74/99. Each photograph is signed by Barris and stamped on verso “Copyright 1987/ Marilyn Monroe/ Weston Editions LTD.” The photographs are additionally stamped “The Private Collection of Kim Goodwin.”
Photographs, 10 by 8 inches; Folder, 10 1/2 by 9 inches
 Winning bid:$2,240 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot539-220511_0 
lot539-220512_0 lot539-220513_0 
lot539-220514_0 lot539-220515_0 lot539-220516_0 
lot539-220517_0 lot539-220518_0 lot539-220519_0 


Photos Diverses


Lot 19  JOAN COLLINS TWO FRAMED POSTERS
 The first, titled "Marilyn Monroe as Jean Harlow," is from a series of photographs photographer Richard Avedon produced with Marilyn Monroe, signed by Avedon. Other photographs from the series show Monroe dressed as actresses Lillian Russell, Marlene Dietrich, Theda Bara, and Clara Bow. The second, an Erte exhibition poster from 1972.
Larger, 32 by 24 1/4 inches
Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $200 - $300
lot19-219124_0  lot19-219125_0 


Lot 488 MARILYN MONROE ARCHIVE OF PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 An archive of photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. The photographs were taken of a 19-year-old Norma Jeane Dougherty, before she was Marilyn Monroe. Taken in Los Angeles for Blue Book Modeling Agency, these photographs comprise one of Monroe’s first modeling portfolios. It was this portfolio she presented to Ben Lyon, the casting director at 20th Century Fox who signed her to the studio and shortly after changed her name. Jasgur’s images of Norma Jeane Dougherty mark the beginning of her career and offer us a unique glimpse of Marilyn Monroe, before she was Marilyn.
All prints in this lot are from these early photoshoots and are directly from the estate of Joseph Jasgur. Included in the archive are approximately 400 color and black and white later prints, size 11 by 14 inches; approximately 120 black and white gelatin silver prints, size 8 by 10 inches; approximately 10 black and white gelatin silver prints, size 11 by 14 inches; some oversize prints, contact prints, and a wooden camera tripod used by Jasgur. Some prints are signed or stamped by the photographer, others are not. Print dates vary. Condition varies.
Sizes vary
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
Winning bid:$8,320 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot488-220416_0 


Lot 489  MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVE AND COPYRIGHT
 One Joseph Jasgur black and white negative of Marilyn Monroe taken in 1946. Copyrights to this image will be transferred to the winning bidder.
5 by 4 inches
Winning bid:$1,280 - Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
lot489-220417_0  lot489-220418_0  


Lot 490  MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 Two Joseph Jasgur black and white negatives of Marilyn Monroe taken in 1946. Copyrights to this image will be transferred to the winning bidder. Accompanied by a photograph of the image, printed 2000-2001.
Negatives, 5 by 4 inches; Photograph, 14 by 11 inches
 Winning bid:$384 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot490-220420_0  lot490-220421_0 


Lot 491  MARILYN MONROE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH
 An original vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe circa 1946, with her half sister Berniece Baker Miracle, her mother Gladys, and her niece Mona Rae. Originally from the collection of Eleanor Goddard.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 84, "Julien's Autumn Sale," Julien's, Las Vegas, October 29, 2005
Winning bid:$875 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot491-220422_0  lot491-220423_0 


Lot 492  MARILYN MONROE INSCRIBED JIM DOUGHERTY PHOTOGRAPH
 A pair of original vintage photographs of Marilyn Monroe's first husband, Jim Dougherty. The first is a passport style portrait, and the second shows Dougherty sleeping on the beach and is inscribed on the back in Monroe's hand "(zzz.....zzz) Jimmie sound asleep." Originally from the collection of Eleanor Goddard.
Larger, 3 3/4 by 4 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 80, "Julien's Autumn Sale," Julien's, Las Vegas, October 29, 2005
Winning bid:$750 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot492-220424_0  lot492-220425_0 


Lot 496  MARILYN MONROE TOM KELLEY SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A large-format nude photograph of Marilyn Monroe printed from an image taken by Tom Kelley in 1949 during his famous photoshoot with Monroe. Numbered 146 of 300 to the lower left and signed by Tom Kelley to the lower right. Includes certificate of authenticity from Mirage Editions.
44 by 36 inches, framed
PROVENANCE From the Collection of James Heeren
 Winning bid:$1,562.50 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot496a lot496-220431_0 lot496-220432_0 


Lot 497 MARILYN MONROE HUGH HEFNER SIGNED EARL MORAN PHOTOGRAPH
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe posing topless, originally taken by pin-up artist Earl Moran. Numbered 1 of 75 and signed by Playboy founder Hugh Hefner to the lower left. Embossed with the Playboy Legacy Collection logo to the lower right.
 Winning bid:$6,400 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot497-220433_0  
lot497-224723_0  


Lot 498  MARILYN MONROE EARL MORAN PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe posing topless, originally taken by pin-up artist Earl Moran. Numbered 5 of 75 to the lower left and embossed with the Playboy Legacy Collection logo to the lower right. Housed in a cloth-bound clamshell box with gilt titling and includes a Playboy certificate of authenticity.
24 by 20 inches
Winning bid:$2,187.50 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot498-220434_0 lot498-220435_0 lot498-220436_0  


Lot 499  MARILYN MONROE HUGH HEFNER SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A large-format nude photograph of Marilyn Monroe printed from an image taken by Tom Kelley in 1949. This is the iconic Marilyn pose used in the first issue of Playboy magazine. Numbered 171 of 300 to the lower left and signed by Playboy founder Hugh Hefner to the lower right. Includes certificate of authenticity from Light Signatures.
42 by 34 inches, framed
 Winning bid:$2,187.50 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot499-220437_0 lot499-220438_0 


Lot 500  MARILYN MONROE FRANK WORTH PHOTOGRAPH
 A large-format gelatin silver photograph of Marilyn Monroe posing in her dress from the film How to Marry a Millionaire (20th Century Fox, 1953) printed from a negative created by Frank Worth. Numbered 9 of 95 to the lower left and embossed by the Frank Worth Estate. Includes cloth-bound clamshell box with gilt-stamped titling and a certificate of authenticity from the Frank Worth Estate.
25 3/4 by 21 3/4 by 1 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Collection of James Heeren
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
lot500-220439_0  lot500-220440_0  
lot500-220441_0  lot500-220442_0 


Lot 517  MARILYN MONROE EARL LEAF CONTACT SHEET
 A contact sheet containing eight vintage black and white images of Marilyn Monroe taken by Earl Leaf. They were taken at the home of talent agent Johnny Hyde, where Monroe occasionally lived, on May 17, 1950. The images are attached to a sheet of cardstock with numerous notations, including the date the photographs were taken and Monroe’s name; stamped at the bottom left with the photographer's stamp.
EXHIBITED Etherton Gallery, Tucson, Arizona, "Marilyn Monroe Collection," Number 46
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$2,187.50 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
lot517-220464_0 


Lot 519  MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL 1954 SLIDES
 A group of 12 original vintage color slides showing Marilyn Monroe entertaining members of the United States military in Korea in 1954. Accompanied by a printed mage of each slide and two additional slides showing other performers that do not include Monroe.
This item sold with copyright but is not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given .
2 by 2 inches, each
PROVENANCE Lot 135, "Entertainment Memorabilia," Christie's, New York, Sale number 8525, July 19, 2001
Winning bid:$2,240 - Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
lot519-220466_0  lot519-220467_0 


Lot 520 MARILYN MONROE 1954 NEGATIVES
 A pair of black and white negatives of Marilyn Monroe taken in 1954 while the actress was entertaining troops in Korea on a break from her honeymoon with Joe DiMaggio.
This item is sold with copyright but is not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Strip of negatives, 4 1/2 by 1 3/8 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 
lot520-220469_0  lot520-220470_0  lot520-220471_0 
lot520-220472_0 


Lot 523  MARILYN MONROE EVE ARNOLD PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Eve Arnold. The image shows Monroe in a one-piece leopard print swimsuit lying in a marsh, taken circa 1955. The photograph is affixed to a board. Some handwritten markings on verso and stamped “The Kim Goodwin Collection.”
15 1/2 by 19 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot523-220477_0 


Lot 524  MARILYN MONROE AND MARLON BRANDO DIGITAL PRINTS
 A group of eight digital prints of Marilyn Monroe and Marlon Brando taken by Milton Greene in November 1955. The photographs were used to publicize a performance of The Rose Tattoo to benefit The Actors Studio. A paper label is affixed to the back of each image from the Milton H. Greene Collection.
Each, 19 by 13 inches
Winning bid:$1,920 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot524-220478_0 lot524-220479_0 lot524-220480_0 
lot524-220481_0 lot524-220482_0 
lot524-220483_0 lot524-220484_0 lot524-220485_0 


Lot 526  MARILYN MONROE CECIL BEATON PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Cecil Beaton in 1956. The photograph, from Monroe's personal archive, is mounted to board and contained in a brown folder.
Photograph, 9 by 9 1/4 inches; 16 by 14 1/2 inches, overall
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$2,187.50 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot526-220488_0 


Lot 527  MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage portrait publicity photograph from her personal collection.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$576 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot527-220489_0 


Lot 528  MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller black and white vintage original photograph. Taken by Paul Schumach at the premiere of Some Like It Hot (USA, 1959). Photographer stamp on verso.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$896 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot528-220490_0 


Lot 530 MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine vintage candid snapshots of Marilyn Monroe. Eight images are in color and one is black and white. Three of the images show Monroe and husband Arthur Miller at the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Eight of the nine images were sold together as a lot in a previous Christie's auction.
Largest, 5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 15, "Entertainment Memorabilia," Christie's, New York, Sale number 8609, November 19, 2001
 Winning bid:$1,250 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot530-220493_0 


Lot 540 MARILYN MONROE DOUGLAS KIRKLAND PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Douglas Kirkland on November 17, 1961, on assignment for Look magazine. Signed by Kirkland and numbered 17/49 at lower right.
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$1,920 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot540-220520_0 
lot540-220521_0 


Lot 541  MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE SILKSCREEN PRINT
A limited edition silkscreen print of a Milton Greene photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken during the "Black Sitting" photo session in New York in 1956. Numbered 85/300 and signed by Greene at lower right.
 Winning bid:$750 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot541-220522_0  
lot541-220523_0  lot541-220524_0  


Lot 542  MARILYN MONROE BILL RAY PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the May 19, 1962, birthday celebration of President John F. Kennedy, taken by Bill Ray. The photograph is inscribed at the lower margin “To Kim, With Best Wishes, Bill Ray 1982.” Stamped “Kim Goodwin” on verso.
 Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot542-220525_0 

22 novembre 2015

How Norma Jeane, filing cabinet model, became Marilyn Monroe

logo-newyorkpost

 How Norma Jeane, filing cabinet model, became Marilyn Monroe
Published on November, 21, 2015
By Michelle Morgan and Astrid Franse
online
nypost.com

NYP-01-042
Marilyn Monroe is seen in an airline advertisement through Blue Book Models.

One day, while shopping for vintage items for their shop, Bennies Fifties in the Netherlands, Astrid and Ben Franse bought a box of old Marilyn Monroe memorabilia from a dealer in Los Angeles. They didn’t know what they really had: a treasure trove. In the box were letters and never-before-seen photos from Miss Emmeline Snively, who had run the Blue Book Modeling Agency — the agent who had signed a young Norma Jeane Dougherty. In the new book “Before Marilyn,” Astrid Franse and co-author Michelle Morgan reveal for the first time this archive and how Snively helped turn Norma Jeane into Marilyn Monroe.

In early August 1945, a photographer friend took Norma Jeane Dougherty from her home in West Los Angeles to be introduced to Miss Emmeline Snively, owner of the Blue Book Modeling Agency.

NYP-02-monroe_1  Norma Jeane was married, bored — and beautiful. Raised an orphan, she wed at 16 to escape a series of foster homes. But her husband shipped off with the Merchant Marines, and she worked an exhausting shift at the local defense plant.

Her face was her escape. She was noticed by propaganda photographers in the factory and after the war went looking for a job at Blue Book.

Snively, who had seen every kind of girl the profession had to offer, did not think there was anything too out-of-the-ordinary about the girl standing in her office at the Ambassador Hotel. She noted in her file: “Norma Jeane had been brought to the hotel by photographer Potter Hueth, wearing a simple white dress and armed with her modeling portfolio, which offered no more than a few choice snaps . . . You wouldn’t necessarily wear a white dress to a modeling job, and it was as clean and white and ironed and shining as she was.
Norma Jean, then 19, was staring at the magazine covers and publicity photos gracing the walls.

Those are the prettiest girls I’ve ever seen,” she muttered, almost to herself, before turning to Miss Snively. “Do you think I could ever get my picture on a magazine cover ?
Snively looked her up and down. “Of course,” she smiled. “You’re a natural.”

Wiggle and quiver

NYP-03-063  
Marilyn poses alongside another Blue Books Models girl.

Snively noted her statistics on an agency card: “Size 12, height 5.6, 36 bust, 24 waist, 34 hips. Blue eyes, perfect teeth and blonde, curly hair.” “Actually,” she later wrote, “her hair was dirty blonde. California blonde which means that it’s dark in the winter and light in the summer. I recall that it curled very close to her head, which was quite unmanageable. I knew at once it would have to be bleached and worked on.

NYP-04-064 It cost $100 for a three-month modeling course, to teach her presentation, grooming and coordination — or how to sell yourself to the public. Snively noted that Norma Jeane was wonderful when it came to learning techniques such as makeup, hand positions and body posture, but she had concerns over other aspects. One problem was the way she walked, which went against everything a fashion model was trained to do. In short, she wiggled.

When Marilyn walks, her knees lock,” Snively wrote. “She’s double-jointed in the knees, so she can’t relax and that is why her hips seem to sway when she walks into a room. Her walk is a result of that locking action every time she takes a step. This she turned into an asset.
As Marilyn would later explain: “When you walk, always think UP in front and DOWN in back.”

Another “problem” was her smile, which the agency (and several magazine editors) felt made her nose look too long. This was easily rectified, as Snively later recalled. “She smiled too high, that’s what was wrong, and it made deep lines around her nose. We taught her how to bring her smile down and show her lowers.

This resulted in the famous lip quiver that would often be seen in Marilyn’s film roles.

Conventional model

NYP-05-6117403-1 Norma Jeane’s first official assignment was as a hostess at an industry show being held at the Pan Pacific Auditorium. Described as “America’s annual tribute to the working man,” the Industry on Parade exhibition began on Labor Day weekend, 1945, with a motorcade traveling through downtown Los Angeles.

She found herself on a stand taken by Holga Steel Company, talking to visitors, giving out leaflets and showcasing one of the company’s items — a steel filing cabinet.

Described as “absolutely terrified” by Snively, Norma Jean traveled to the Pan Pacific Auditorium day after day. When she returned to the agency, Norma Jeane handed over all her earnings. “She gave me the whole $90,” Snively wrote. “Took nothing out for car fare or meals or clothes or anything. ‘This,’ she said, ‘will take care of most of my tuition.’ I knew at once she was a fair and honest and very fine girl, and I decided to get her as much work as I possibly could.

Norma Jeane appeared in ads for Douglas Airlines and some magazine shoots. But when photographer Raphael Wolff hired her for a shampoo advertisement, it let Snively do what Norma Jeane had always resisted — change her hair.

NYP-06-gettyimages-73996028Look darling,” Snively told her, “if you really intend to go places in this business, you’ve just got to bleach and straighten your hair because now your face is a little too round and a hair job will lengthen it.
Norma Jeane acquiesced, and Snively was thrilled with the results.

She emerged a truly golden girl . . . From this point she went into her bathing-suit stage, and the demand for her was simply terrific. She averaged, I should say, $150 a week, and men began talking about getting her into the motion-picture game.

One photographer paid to fix one bad front tooth. Another suggested Norma Jeane “eat more hamburgers.” But they didn’t need to teach her how to look sexy; she was a natural.

Later, Marilyn Monroe would reminisce about how most of the photos used of her were for “men’s” magazines.
I was in See four or five months in a row,” she said. “Each time they changed my name. One month I was Norma Jeane Dougherty; the second month I was Jean Norman.

Snively hustled to promote her. When Howard Hughes, who was recovering from a plane crash, called to ask who the girl was on the cover of Laff magazine, Snively promptly called columnist Hedda Hopper, who picked up the item and gave Norma Jeane her first coast-to-coast publicity.

The nude bomb

NYP-07-gettyimages-149910560 
Marilyn in 1947, as a newly signed 20th Century-Fox contract
girl–though the studio eventually dropped her.

In July 1946, Norma Jeane got a screen test at 20th Century Fox, where she was signed to a starlet’s contract for a salary and training in the studio workshops.

Executive Ben Lyon took an interest, choosing the name Marilyn for her. “When he asked her if there was a last name she particularly liked, she said yes — her grandmother’s name had been Monroe,” the studio’s archives read.
Mmmmarilyn Mmmmonroe, yes I like the way that sounds,” Marilyn said.

But Fox eventually dropped her, as did Columbia, after only a few background roles. By May 1949, she had returned to convention modeling, showing off antiques at the Pan Pacific Auditorium.

Marilyn was broke. One day, a man called to offer money and other luxuries in exchange for certain favors.
For a dizzy moment, I had visions of being able to pay my rent,” she later recalled, “but as he went on giving the details of what I would be expected to do, my visions vanished. He was brutally frank, and all I could think of to say was that he shouldn’t talk that way over a public telephone. I didn’t realize how silly that sounded until I hung up, and then I started to laugh.

NYP-08-new1 At the time of the call, she was late with her rent at the Hollywood Studio Club and threatened with eviction. Something had to be done.
She called photographer Tom Kelley, who had used her in the past for a beer ad. He had asked her several times to pose nude and she always refused, but this time her home was on the line and she felt she may not have much choice. Marilyn did have a particular requirement — she would only take her clothes off for him if accompanied by his wife, Natalie.

In May 1949, she posed nude on a blanket of red velvet. “I decided I’d be safer with [Kelley] than with some rich old guy who might catch me in a weak moment when I was hungry and didn’t have enough to buy a square meal,” Marilyn explained. “Kelley told me he’d camouflage my face, but it turned out everybody recognized me.

When later asked what it felt like to be photographed in such a way, she answered, “It was drafty.

Kelley later told biographer Maurice Zolotow that he paid Marilyn $50 for her services and then sold the rights to a calendar maker for $500. It would be years before the calendar maker’s secretary realized who the girl was. “He made a fortune on it,” Kelley said. “Sold close to 8,000,000 calendars.

Marilyn got some promising film roles in a Marx Brothers movie (“Love Happy”) and “The Asphalt Jungle.” But like the Kim Kardashian of her day, it was the nude photographs surfacing in 1952 that made her a star. Instead of destroying her career, as the studio thought it would, the scandal won the actress much sympathy after she announced that the reason she had posed in the first place was because without the money she would have been evicted.

In the next year, she would make “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” and “How to Marry a Millionaire.” The transformation from Norma Jeane to Marilyn was complete.

How to make it…

NYP-09-twooo 
Marilyn with Miss Emmeline Snively
on the set of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” in 1954.

Marilyn was famous, but her insecurity never went away. In 1954, Snively learned Marilyn was making “There’s No Business Like Show Business.” She called the studio to see if Marilyn would pose for some publicity photos for Blue Book Models. Marilyn quickly agreed.

The pictures taken on the set that day show Marilyn in costume to perform a song and dance number called “Heat Wave.” The actress wasn’t a huge fan of the song, and her new husband, baseball star Joe DiMaggio, wasn’t an admirer of the outfit, considering it too revealing for his wife to wear. However, neither seemed to bother Snively, and photos show there is no doubt that Marilyn enjoyed meeting up with her old mentor once again.

Snively later recalled having a private word with Marilyn off set.
She didn’t feel she was a qualified actress, [but] how could she have felt any different ?” Snively later wrote. “She’d signed her first contract before she had her first acting lesson.
God I wanted to cry for her then. This can be the loneliest town in the world, and it’s even lonelier for you if you’re on top of the heap.

Excerpted from “Before Marilyn: The Blue Book Modeling Years” by Astrid Franse and Michelle Morgan. Out now from St. Martin’s Press.


05 septembre 2015

Hollywood Auction 74 - 09-10/2015 - Various


 Documents papiers


(Day 2) Lot 1147. Marilyn signs an early contract for the Charlie McCarthy show with a morality clause after nude photo debacle threatened to derail her fledgling career.
Document Signed, “Marilyn Monroe” and additionally, “MM” (ten times), four pages, 8.5 x 11 in. (with two 8.5 x 2 in. slips attached to pages three and four), Los Angeles, October 7, 1952, countersigned “Edgar Bergen,” who also adds his initials, “EB” ten times (each below Monroe’s). The contract concerns Monroe’s radio appearance on The Charlie McCarthy Show, recorded on October 18, 1952. A morality rider, attached to page four, addresses Monroe’s legendary sex appeal, in which she agreed Bergen could cancel the appearance, “… if I conducted or do conduct myself without due regard to public conventions and morals or have done or do anything which will tend to disgrace me in society or bring me into pubic disrepute, contempt, scorn or ridicule, or that will tend to schock [sic], insult or offend the community or public morals or decency or prejudice agency or sponsor or the entertainment industry in general …” This rider was especially important in light of the recent controversy over her nude photographs that had surfaced earlier in the year and threatened to derail her fledgling career. The same rider also evokes the “red scare” sentiment of the time. Not only did Monroe agree not to offend any moral sensibility during the program, she also agreed that her appearance could be terminated in the event she was “… held in contempt by any Congressional committee or other governmental body and any refusal to testify before any such committee or governmental body, whether for legally justifiable reasons or otherwise.” The language refers to the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), which had become infamous after it began investigating Hollywood in 1947. Monroe’s appearance with Charlie McCarthy was an enormous hit. During the program, the pair announced their engagement, much to the consternation of Edgar Bergen who “admitted that losing Charlie would be like having his pocket picked.” McCarthy, for his part, assured listeners that he would allow Ms. Monroe to continue her screen career. “Certainly I’m gonna let her work. I love the girl. I don’t want to interfere with her career—or her income.” Exhibiting file holes at top, stapled at left, very light soiling. In vintage fine condition.
Estimate: $12,000 - $15,000
lot1147-H3257-L78857191 lot1147-H3257-L78857197 lot1147-H3257-L78857202 
lot1147-H3257-L78857207  lot1147-H3257-L78857212 


(Day 2) Lot 1148. Marilyn Monroe’s personally hand-annotated original shooting script from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. (TCF, 1953)
Marilyn Monroe’s personally-used and annotated script from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. An incomplete script, being a block of revisions delivered by the production to Marilyn Monroe comprising 69 pages total (numbered 48 through 117, missing page 93) plus a pink title cover-sheet printed “26 November 1952, ‘Gentlemen Prefer Blondes’ (Revised Final Script…13 Nov. 1952),” plus “TO ALL SECRETARIES: Please place these ADDITIONAL PAGES at the back of your script of the above date. THIS IS IMPORTANT! Majority of the prompts for Marilyn’s character “Lorelei Lee” are circled variously in graphite and non-repro blue pencil, with approximately 22 pages annotated in various inks and pencil in Monroe’s hand with amendments and additions to the script and notes on how she proposes to deliver lines and portray Lorelei’s character, with several other pages showing line deletions and other demarcations. Highlights of notes include: pg. 56, when Lord Beekman finds Lorelei stuck in Malone’s porthole, next to Lorelei’s line “Oh yes--Tea with Lady Beekman. Why, she must of forgot. She didn’t show up,” with Monroe adding an alternative line, “Well, I just wanted to see the view. It’s better from here”; pg. 58, Monroe changes the line “Piggie, will you run down to my cabin and get my purse?” to “Maybe I should have that Sherry - will you get me some”; pg. 79, Monroe has written a note to herself in the margin “Feeling that feeds the words, know the lines, go over it inteligently [sic]”; pg. 92, also to herself, “sense the feeling with the body” plus several dialogue changes; pg. 94, again to herself, “grit my teeth and forget it must have my,” “all of feeling in my words,” and “build pull back, don’t stop mutual conflict between partners.” Also, the following page (95) although bearing no notations, features the scene for Monroe’s classic musical number “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend.” In generally very good condition, with expected handling wear, soiling, and creasing, and some small edge tears and damp-staining to cover page and a few internal margins throughout. Marilyn’s unique, revealing personal notations in this script reveal her private thought processes and fleeting self confidence. On set, she was haunted by her controlling acting coach Natasha Lytess, constantly striving for her approval and insisting on retakes even when director Howard Hawks had already approved. Co-star Jane Russell looked after Marilyn on set and was often one of the only people able to coax her out of her trailer during her bouts of self doubt. Despite her anxieties, it was the role of Lorelei Lee that first fabricated her ‘dumb blonde’ persona—a genius mixture of comedy and sexiness which Marilyn personified on screen, all the while taking her acting very seriously, as evidenced by her occasional heartfelt self-motivational notes in the margins. Monroe biographer Donald Spoto once said: “She put a twist on sexiness. It was not something wicked and shameful...it was something which was terribly funny. And Marilyn enjoyed it.” A remarkable and deeply personal artifact both from Marilyn’s aura imbued within it, and of Hollywood history in general. Provenance: Christies, New York, June 22, 2006, Lot 160.
Estimate: $30,000 - $50,000
lot1148-H3257-L78856684 lot1148-H3257-L78856687 lot1148-H3257-L78856691 
lot1148-H3257-L78856693 lot1148-H3257-L78856696 lot1148-H3257-L78856697 
lot1148-H3257-L78856700  lot1148-H3257-L78856702 


(Day 2) Lot 1150. Marilyn Monroe historic signed RCA recording contract from the year of the release of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. (1953)
Vintage 4-page 8.25 x 11 in. contract signed in blue ink, “Marilyn Monroe on onion skin paper leaf, between Monroe and RCA with mention of Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, dated October 8, 1953. Among Hollywood historians, it’s generally agreed that 1953 marked Marilyn Monroe’s ascent to legend. Though she’d inked a seven-year deal with Twentieth Century-Fox previously, she didn’t achieve super stardom until the 1953 release of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. That mid-summer release, with its box office acclaim, served as the momentum for her signing this singing recording contract with RCA. There’s no mention in the agreement about Monroe’s compensation except her cut of resultant royalties. Monroe was obliged to record not fewer that “16 sides,” or single tunes on two sides of a record album. Text of the contract makes frequent reference to Twentieth Century-Fox. At the conclusion on page 4, the signatures of the principals appear, “Emanuel Sacks” for RCA, “Joseph Schenck”, Executive Director of Twentieth Century-Fox, and of course, “Marilyn Monroe”. Monroe is assumed to have faithfully fulfilled this contract – to include tunes from her two ensuing films, River of No Return and There’s No Business Like Show Business. Retaining 2-hole punch at upper boarder, white tape at the upper margins, and staple holes in the lower left and in the upper left corners. In vintage fine condition.
Estimate: $8,000 - $10,000
lot1150-H3257-L78855384  lot1150-H3257-L78855390  
lot1150-H3257-L78855395  loT1150-H3257-L78855398 


(Day 2) Lot 1192. Pat Newcomb handwritten letter giving support to Marilyn Monroe during her pending divorce from Arthur Miller. 1-page, Quarto, on “In Flight – American Airlines” letterhead stationery, dated December 31, 1960, written “Personal” at the lower left corner. As Marilyn’s personal friend and publicist, she writes to support Marilyn as her marriage to playwright Arthur Miller was coming to an end. Newcomb pens, in part: “Dear Marilyn,…I hope you will take good care of yourself. I know and understand what you are going through – but you will make it! Just take it ‘nice ‘n easy’. It will all work out – because you want it to and you have the capacity to make it work! Start with the nurse this week and please call me anytime during the night or day that you feel like talking…This week will be a rough one – but it’s worth it and very important for you. Thank you so very very much again for the wonderful ‘lifetime gift.’ I adore it!!! I can only give you one ‘lifetime gift’ – and that’s my friendship – which you know you already have! Love, Pat. See you on the 19th.” At the time this letter was written, Marilyn was on the verge of a nervous breakdown. She had separated from Arthur Miller in October, and their divorce was announced to the press on November 11th. Newcomb’s closing phrase in this letter, “See you on the 19th”, is a direct reference to the divorce proceedings that had already been scheduled. The divorce was finalized on January 24, 1961. Accompanied with original transmittal envelope. In fine condition. Estimate: $800 - $1,200
lot1192-H3257-L78855552 
lot1192-H3257-L78855553  lot1192-H3257-L78855556 


(Day 2) Lot 1193. Arthur Miller passionate love letter in which he bears his soul to his new love and future wife, Marilyn Monroe. Miller, Arthur [to Marilyn Monroe]. Incredible Five Page Typed Letter Signed, “Art”, Quarto, five pages, dated May 17, 1956, and written to “Dear Heart; My Own Wife; My Very Own Gramercy 5; Sweetheart:” Miller writes (in part):
I am enclosing a letter I got today from the first woman I ever knew in my life. My mother. Now maybe you will understand where I learned to write and to feel.
I know I am liable to get very sentimental and maudlin about this, but today is one of the most revelatory days of my life. I could write many pages even a volume, about what this letter brings to my mind. I think that had I died without ever receiving it, I should never have known some unbelievably simple but important things.
You see, Poo, I often try to tell you that you mean things to me beyond your body, beyond your spirit, beyond anything you can know about yourself, and it is hard for another person to understand what she –or he—really signifies to one who lovers her. I will try to tell you a few of the things you mean to me, and which became absolutely clear to me when I got this letter today. (I got it today, Thursday, by the way, because I was in Reno for my passport business, and picked up my mail at the post office.)
First let me say what I feared. They are very conventional people. That doesn’t mean they’re stiff—far from it. But they believe in family virtues, in wives being wives and husbands being husbands. They are not especially scandalized by infidelity, but neither do they forget that the big happiness is family happiness. Above all, they know how to love their children, and truly, if I ever needed anything they would die to get it for me. At the same time, my father could take advantage of me and my brother, if we let him, but he would do that as a father’s privilege; which sounds strange, but when he was a young man it wasn’t until he was twenty five or so that his father let him keep his own paycheck. Everything went into the family pot. It was the European way. So I rebelled in many ways against both of them and for many of the usual reasons, but the time came when I began to write successfully, when once again we were friends. I had established my independence from them; they understood it, and we created the necessary adult distance between ourselves, my parents and I, and yet a friendship of grown people, more or less…
Now I receive this letter. (All the above thoughts came as a result of receiving it.) I sat in the public square outside the post office in Reno reading it and my whole life suddenly seemed so marvelously magical. I had saved it! Darling, I had done the right, the necessary, the gloriously living thing at last! For suddenly I saw many questions answered, and many weights lifting off my heart.
It is not that I would hesitate to marry you if they disapproved. Truly, sweetheart, that was not it. It was that somewhere inside me I wanted their love to flow toward both of us because it would give me strength, and you too. It is not that they are my judges, but the first sources of my identity and my love. I know now that I could enjoy seeing my mother. She becomes a pest after too long with her, but that’s another thing. And it is not her, so much—not her corporeal, real being, but what she represents that I can now hold up instead of trampling on it. It is my own sexuality, do you see? I come to her with you, and to my father, and in effect I say—I am a lover. Look, I say, look at my sweet, beautiful, sexy wife. I can see my father’s pleasure at the sight of you—if only because he loves clothes, having been in that business all his life, and he will go mad seeing how you wear them! And if it will only be possible—I can see us with Bob and Jane and all of us joined with one another in joy. I see blue, clear air for the first time in my life when I think of myself and my wife and my children in the house of my parents…
Every time I had trouble with Mary, the worst threat she thought she could make was to go to my parents and tell them I had been unfaithful…She simply cannot conceive that my mother will accept you and my marriage, with you because you are a sexual being, and therefore I am, and parents are by their nature, in her mind, the punishers of sexuality not its helpers and allies…
Wife, Dear, Dear Woman—I have been thinking crazy thoughts. For instance, a wedding with maybe fifty people. Maybe in Roxbury, maybe somewhere else in a big house. And Bob and Jane there. And just a little bit of ceremony. Not fancy, but maybe my old friend Reverend Melish, a courageous and wonderful fighter for fine causes; or a Rabbi of similar background—I know one. Or maybe just somebody who can marry people. I want to dress up, and I want you dressed up; I want all my past looking on, even back to Moses. I want the kids to see us married, and to feel the seriousness and honorableness of our marriage, so that nothing Mary can say to them will ever make them believe we have sneaked away to do this, or that I have hidden myself and what I wanted to do. And I want this for their sakes as much as for my own pride and my joy; so that they will see their Grandma and Grandpa full of happiness—and crying too, of course. (Isn’t it strange?—I didn’t have my parents to my first marriage, which was in Cleveland. It could have been arranged, but I felt better not to have them there. That time I felt untrue, you see? This time I feel true, and if the world wanted to come I would embrace them all.)
Do you see why I say I am proud of you? You have given me back my soul, Darling. And thank god I knew it always; always and always since the hour we met, I knew there was something in you that I must have or die. And the revolution it implied for me was so much more than uprooting my household, my life; facing my own damning curse for depriving the children of my—as I thought of it then, and so on. The revolution was of another sort. It meant that I must face myself and who and what I am. It meant that I must put down those fearfully protective arms of reticence and blushing and all that stupidity, and put my arms around the one I loved and face the startling, incredible, simply glorious fact, that I am a tender man and not the fierce idiot I have tried—and failed—to become. How could you have known that, Darling? How I bless you that you knew it! I am near tears this minute at the miracle you are to me. How happy I will make you! What beautiful children I will give you! Oh, I will watch over you, and pest you, and worry about you.
I feel something today that marks it, like an anniversary, or more truly, my real day of birth. I have reached a kind of manhood I never really knew before. I tell you dear, I am afraid of nothing in this world. The soul of my talent is coming up in me as it has been these past six months, but now I feel it like bread in my hands, like a taste in my mouth. Because I am touching its source and not turning away from it anymore. Believe in me, Darling—I am certain enough of myself to tell you that. And worry nothing about yourself. You are beyond all danger with me because I love you like life itself. Truly, you are my life now.
Your husband, Art
[in Miller’s hand]
Some more ----------------
PS…If we got married before you had to leave, I could then come and live openly with you and we could maybe tour around on your free time and have some fun. The problem is the lack of time before you have to leave. I’ll be back from Michigan on the 17th. The kids, by our agreement, have to be back with Mary by the 22nd, in order to have a week’s time—(a little less)—to prepare for camp, shopping, etc. Assuming I have a divorce by June 1 or a few days after—as in now planned—we would either have to do it between June 1 and June 15th; or between June 17th and July 7th…The whole problem is to juggle the time I have with them, and the time you’ll be around to attend the ceremony. Don’t worry about it, though. I’m just warning you, however,--you’ll be the most kissed bride in history when my family is there. I’ll have to fight the bastards off. I’m going to put up a sign, “ONE KISS TO A RELATIVE!” (Don’t worry, there won’t be that many.)
How I love you. My heart aches when I think of you being so tired. But you’ll perk up here right off, dear wife. OH, AM I GOING TO MAKE LOVE TO YOU, BEGINNING WITH THE SOLES OF THE FEET AND GOING DUE NORTH, UNTIL SLU-U-U-SH!—RIGHT INTO GRAMERCY PARK!
The World’s Luckiest Man Since Adam Art
Arthur Miller was introduced to Marilyn Monroe by Elia Kazan in 1951. After the introduction, they had a brief affair to which Miller admitted to his wife, college sweetheart, Mary Slattery. Miller and Monroe were married on June 29, 1956, only days after he divorced Slattery. In this fascinating and revealing letter, Miller chronicles his deteriorating marriage and divulges deeply personal family issues. In this incredible letter, Miller lays bear issues which mirror some of the central themes his characters wrestled with in his dramas: personal and social responsibility, moral conviction, betrayal and the issues of guilt and hope.
Moderate toning, otherwise vintage very good to fine condition. Provenance: From the estate of Marilyn Monroe’s NYC attendant Mrs. Fanny Harris. With original transmittal envelope of this letter addressed to Mrs. Harris with TLS on Marilyn Monroe Productions letterhead signed by Mrs. Fanny Harris releasing Monroe of any salary claims or demands.
Estimate: $25,000 - $35,000
lot1193-H3257-L78855548 


(Day 2) Lot 1194: The Misfits autograph book with cast signatures including Marilyn Monroe and others. (United Artists, 1961)
Vintage board and paper bound 40+ page 5.5 x 4 in. young girl’s autograph book. The commercially made book contains the clipped and affixed autographs of cast members of The Misfits. Including Marilyn Monroe, (2) Montgomery Clift, Arthur Miller, Eli Wallach, stuntman Chuck Roberson, (2) John Huston, and 1-unidentified. Interspersed throughout the book are charming youthful entries from schoolmates and teachers. The irregularly clipped signatures by celebrities are in pen, with one of the 2 Montgomery Clift signatures on a page torn from another autograph book and folded in quarters. Exhibiting signs of age and handling. Overall in vintage very good condition.
Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
lot1194-H3257-L78855560  lot1194-H3257-L78855563  lot1194-H3257-L78855566 
lot1194-H3257-L78855570  lot1194-H3257-L78855574 


(Day 2) Lot 1202: Marilyn Monroe Something’s Got To Give final-draft script for her uncompleted last film. (TCF, 1962)
Vintage 143-page March 29, 1962 final-draft incomplete (as issued) “planning” script for the uncompleted project from which Marilyn was fired, partly owing to her “dereliction of duty” by leaving production to fly to New York for JFK’s birthday celebration. Bound in studio labeled cover and period brads, printed entirely on green revision paper, and marked with [illegible] cast or crew member’s name. Preface page boldly states “THIS SCRIPT SHOULD BE TREATED AS CONFIDENTIAL AND REMAIN IN THE POSSESSION OF THE PERSON TO WHOM IT HAS BEEN ISSUED.” Minor handling to cover extremities; interior remains in vintage very fine condition.
Estimate: $600 - $800
lot1202-H3257-L78860147  lot1202-H3257-L78860150  lot1202-H3257-L78860154 
lot1202-H3257-L78860157  


 Objets Divers


(Day 2) Lot 990. Lucille Ball as “Marilyn Monroe” mink cuffs from I Love Lucy. (DesiLu Prod., 1951-1957)
Vintage original pink mink fur sleeve cuffs worn by Lucille Ball when she dresses up as “Marilyn Monroe” in Season 4: Episode 5, “Ricky’s Movie Offer” of I Love Lucy. The slip-on cuffs are lined with cotton mesh netting and crème-colored cloth. The fur remains full and supple. Highly visible in the glamorous ensemble seen in the episode. In vintage very good to fine condition.
Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
lot990-H3257-L78857495  lot990-H3257-L78857497  lot990-H3257-L78857499  


(Day 2) Lot 1112. Marilyn Monroe lobby card for her first film appearance Dangerous Years. (TCF, 1948)
Vintage 11 x 14 in. portrait lobby card with the earliest appearance of Marilyn Monroe on any known movie paper. Glowing image of a fresh-faced young Marilyn as a diner waitress. Tiny trace of handling, in vintage fine to very fine condition.
Estimate: $400 - $600
lot1112-H3257-L78860384  


(Day 2) Lot 1122. Marilyn Monroe vintage original “Golden Dreams” nude calendar earliest sample variant. (circa 1952)
Vintage 12 x 16.5 in. color chromo-litho calendar-salesman’s sample “Golden Dreams” of Marilyn Monroe, being the earliest known variation of the infamous Tom Kelly nude photo sessions. All known subsequent variations of the Tom Kelly/Marilyn nudes list her name with the alternating titles (“Golden Dreams” or “A New Wrinkle”), and only a handful of examples prior to her name addition are known to survive. Virtually unhandled, in vintage very fine condition.
Estimate: $300 - $500
lot1122-H3257-L78854962 


(Day 2) Lot 1123. Marilyn Monroe vintage original censored calendar artwork variant. (circa 1952)
Vintage 9.75 x 16.5 in. calendar-salesman’s sample artwork interpretation of Tom Kelly’s “Golden Dreams” Marilyn Monroe pose, with screened-over bra and lace panties for conservative communities. Artwork is in the style of Earl Moran or Zoe Mozert, but is uncredited here. Just a trace of handling and corner creasing, in vintage very good to fine condition.
Estimate: $200 - $300
lot1123-H3257-L78854963 


(Day 2) Lot 1124. Marilyn Monroe in revealing halter-top oversize vintage original salesman’s sample pin-up calendar. (circa 1952)
Vintage 12 x 16.5 in. color chromo-litho calendar-salesman’s sample of Marilyn Monroe, being an exceptionally rare variation in revealing halter-bra and open-sided skirt, with printing that illuminates Marilyn’s blonde hair, blue eyes, and crimson lips. Virtually unhandled, in vintage fine condition.
Estimate: $200 - $300
lot1124-H3257-L78854965 


(Day 2) Lot 1127. Marilyn Monroe lobby card #5 for The Fireball with exceptional early image in revealing sweater. (TCF, 1950)
Vintage 11 x 14 in. lobby card of Marilyn Monroe with Mickey Rooney in their Roller Derby epic. Young fresh Marilyn was asked to provide her own personal wardrobe on some of her earliest films, and this lovely form-fitting sweater makes a few appearances on her exceptional frame at this point in history. Tiny marginal tear, otherwise in vintage fine condition.
Estimate: $200 - $300
lot1127-H3257-L78856718 


(Day 2) Lot 1130. Marilyn Monroe calendar. (1952)
Vintage original 16 x 34 in. color chromo-litho calendar with complete date-pad depicting an interpretation of Tom Kelly’s “Golden Dreams” Marilyn Monroe pose, with screened-over bra and lace panties for conservative communities. Entitled here “The Lure of Lace, Posed by Marilyn Monroe In The Nude, With Lace Overprint”. Just a trace of marginal wear and slight internal creasing, in vintage very good to fine condition.
Estimate: $400 - $600
lot1130-H3257-L78856266 


(Day 2) Lot 1137. Some Like It Hot Italian one-panel poster. (United Artists, 1959/ ca. 1970)
Italian 39 x 55 in. one-panel poster for the Billy Wilder and Marilyn Monroe comedy. Featuring Monroe and co-stars Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis. Folded as issued. Overall vivid color in vintage, very good to fine condition.
Estimate: $200 - $300
lot1137-H3257-L78856268 


(Day 2) Lot 1149. Travilla historic vintage original costume sketch of Marilyn Monroe’s iconic pink satin dress for the “Diamonds are a Girls Best Friend” number in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. (TCF, 1953)
Vintage 15 x 20 in. pencil, gouache and India ink sketch on double artist’s board of one of the most memorable and timeless gowns in film history, the pink satin strapless evening gown with matching opera gloves and poof derriere bow worn by Marilyn Monroe as “Lorelei” for the “Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend” number in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. William Travilla’s sketch also includes copious jewelry to highlight the “Diamonds” element of the title. Signed by Travilla just below the figure, with his notation at upper right “Marilyn Monroe ‘Gentlemen Prefer Blondes’ ‘Diamonds are a girl’s best friend’ #17”. A long clean diagonal surface-slice which bisected horizontally just below her knees has been archivally filled and retouched making it virtually undetectable, and the restorer also cleaned and enhanced the notations including light airbrushing to blank background, while leaving the sketch itself virtually untouched. One of the most spectacular original artifacts not only from the legacy of Marilyn Monroe, but from the entire artistic span of the silver screen. In vintage very good to fine condition.
Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000
lot1149-H3257-L78857288 
lot1149-H3257-L78857291  lot1149-H3257-L78857294  lot1149-H3257-L78857297


(Day 2) Lot 1153. Marilyn Monroe screen-used water pitcher from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. (TCF, 1953)
Vintage “R.Wallace” silver-plate 3-pint water pitcher 8 x 8.5 x 4.5 in., screen-used by Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell. Prominently handled by the lovely ladies when they entrap Elliott Reid in their cabin and pour water from this pitcher all over his pants in order to get them off him expeditiously. Engraved on side as an original artifact “U.S.N.” with Navy anchor and rope symbol, plus engraved on bottom by Fox properties dept. “32-2-21422 20th-C-Fox”. In vintage screen-used fine condition.
Estimate: $200 - $300
lot1153-H3257-L78858635  lot1153-H3257-L78858638 


(Day 2) Lot 1154. Marilyn Monroe 1-sheet poster for How To Marry a Millionaire. (TCF, 1953)
Vintage U.S. 27 x 41 in. poster for one of the very first wide-format Cinemascope films. An overt attempt to liven up the film-going experience against the onslaught of TV. Pleasing artwork of the three “golddiggers” Marilyn Monroe, Lauren Bacall, and Betty Grable. A curious footnote here is that TCF had been grooming Marilyn specifically to replace Grable, who had been their #1 stable star over the prior decade. Japan-paper backed without retouching to folds, consequently in vintage very good condition.
Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
lot1154-H3257-L78858474 


(Day 2) Lot 1156. Marilyn Monroe screen-used table from How to Marry a Millionaire. (TCF, 1953)
Vintage metal and acrylic table 29 x 18 in. screen-used by Marilyn Monroe, Lauren Bacall, and Betty Grable. Most prominently viewed (with its matching twin, not offered here) as all three girls meet to compare “millionaire date” notes in the powder room of the swanky restaurant where they have their first official dates. A period copy/translation of famous designer Andre Arbus’s late art-deco tables “Paire de Gueridons”. Painted silver over its original gold/bronze color for re-purposing in Young Frankenstein (TCF, 1974) in which it is quite prominently viewed (once again with its now-absent twin) at end of film in Madeline Kahn’s bedroom. Beneath the silver paint is barely visible the property dept.’s “20th-C-Fox-32-1-22278”. In vintage screen-used very good condition.
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
lot1156-H3257-L78858560 
lot1156-H3257-L78858563 lot1156-H3257-L78858564 lot1156-H3257-L78858567  


(Day 2) Lot 1157. Marilyn Monroe screen-used (3) table lamp bases from How to Marry a Millionaire. (TCF, 1953)
Vintage (3) glass with metal fixture 10 x 4.25 in. table-lamp bases, screen-used by Marilyn Monroe, Lauren Bacall, and Betty Grable. Most prominently viewed at each table of the swanky restaurant as all three girls have their first official dates, Marilyn with Alex D’Arcy, Betty with Fred Clark, and Lauren with William Powell. Etched in base by the Fox property dept. “20th-C-Fox-32-1-25416” followed variously by “V”, “F,” and “N”. Each retains what appears to be its original wiring and lamp-socket, though circuitry not tested. In vintage screen-used fine condition.
Estimate: $400 - $600
lot1157-H3257-L78858531  lot1157-H3257-L78858532 
lot1157-H3257-L78858534  lot1157-H3257-L78858536  


(Day 2) Lot 1170. The Seven Year Itch 3-sheet poster. (TCF, 1955)
Vintage 41 x 78.5 in. U.S. 3-sheet poster. Arguably the best poster for Marilyn Monroe’s most popular film, as it comes closest to a life-size depiction of the iconic subway skirt-blowing scene, one of the most famous in all Hollywood history. Linen-backed with older simple retouching to folds and creases; would benefit greatly from a fresh restoration, though is certainly presentable as is. In vintage good to very good condition.
Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
lot1170-H3257-L78855674 


(Day 2) Lot 1175. Marilyn Monroe screen-used Lamp from Richard Sherman’s apartment in The Seven Year Itch. (TCF, 1955)
Vintage carved wood with metal fixture 31 x 7.25 in. table-lamp base, screen-used by Marilyn Monroe and Tom Ewell. Carved as a classical Roman male bust, it is most prominently viewed (with its female counterpart, not offered here) in Tom Ewell “Richard Sherman’s” apartment, which is where nearly the entire course of action between Marilyn and Ewell takes place. Etched in rear of base by the Fox property dept. “20th-C-Fox-8-36588” then later on bottom of base for the 1971 Sotheby’s sale, “TCF 1200”. Retains what appears to be its original wiring and lamp-socket, though circuitry not tested. In vintage screen-used fine condition.
Estimate: $200 - $300 
lot1175-H3257-L78855594  lot1175-H3257-L78855597 
lot1175-H3257-L78855599  lot1175-H3257-L78855600  


(Day 2) Lot 1176. The Seven Year Itch German A1 poster. (TCF, 1955/ R-1966)
Vintage original 23 x 32 in. German A-1 one-sheet poster for the Marilyn Monroe comedy. Featuring the central image of Monroe done in colorful pop-art style after Andy Warhol. Folded as issued. Exhibiting minor corner bumping and wrinkling from storage. In overall, very good condition.
Estimate: $300 - $500
lot1176-H3257-L78855592 


(Day 2) Lot 1177. Marilyn Monroe uncommonly scarce vintage original “Topless Cowgirl” pin-up calendar. (1948/1955)
Vintage 8.25 x 12.25 in. 4-page chromo-litho spiral-bound cheesecake pinup calendar of Marilyn Monroe in (3) highly suggestive topless cowgirl poses, plus the familiar Tom Kelly “Golden Dreams” nude pose with lace overlay. The cowgirl poses are variously titled “Southern Exposure” (a rear-view), “Caught Short” (arms wrapped round her chest) and “Coming Out On Top”. An extraordinarily scarce artifact from Marilyn’s naughty history, especially being intact with all four pages (each of which displays three months of 1955). Two spiral loops broken with a trace of wear at perforations, otherwise in vintage fine to very fine condition.
Estimate: $600 - $800
lot1177-H3257-L78855583  lot1177-H3257-L78855586 
lot1177-H3257-L78855588  lot1177-H3257-L78855591 


(Day 2) Lot 1181. Marilyn Monroe Bus Stop 1-sheet poster. (TCF, 1956)
Vintage original U.S. 27 x 41 in. 1-sheet poster. Linen-backed, in vintage very fine condition.
Estimate: $400 - $600
lot1181-H3257-L78859646  


(Day 2) Lot 1184. Bus Stop French grande 1-sheet poster. (TCF, 1956/R-1980s)
French 47 x 63 in. grande-format poster for the circa 1980s reissue poster for the Marilyn Monroe classic drama. Folded as issued. Minor, nearly undetectable age. Vivid colors. In overall very fine condition.
Estimate: $200 - $300
Lot1184-H3257-L78859621 


(Day 2) Lot 1186. The Prince and the Showgirl vintage original painting of Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier by Francis R. Flint. (Warner Bros., 1957)
Vintage 20 x 30 in. oil or acrylic on canvas painting of Marilyn Monroe joining Laurence Olivier. Executed at the time of the film’s production by Francis Russell Flint, the son of famed illustrator Russell Flint, who is a respected and collected artist in his own right. Acquired from the artist’s estate, and retains his pencil-inscribed title on stretcher-bar verso “Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier in ‘The Sleeping Prince’” (the film’s early working title, hence evidence documenting this painting’s early status). Also shows artist’s London address notations on stretcher bar verso, with framing notes. In vintage very fine condition.
Estimate: $600 - $800
lot1186-H3257-L78859604 


(Day 2) Lot 1199: Marilyn Monroe in The Misfits approx. 48 minutes of unseen 8mm footage sold with copyright. (UA, 1961)
Original unpublished approx. 48 minutes of color 8mm documentary film footage captured throughout the entire location shoot for Marilyn Monroe’s final [completed] film, The Misfits. Shot by uncredited extra Stanley Killar (with help from an assistant, as Killar appears occasionally on camera interacting with the cast and crew). Killar and his camera were clearly accepted with full access, judging from the intimacy of the hand-held camera with Marilyn, Clark Gable, Montgomery Clift, John Huston, and others. Filming begins in Reno on the casino strip filled with flashing neon signs, and around the “Mapes Hotel and Casino” which was official headquarters for the production while on location. Includes Marilyn first in the legendary cherry dress, truly radiant, then throughout the footage in a few different outfits preparing for and rehearsing scenes like the courthouse (consulting with her coach Paula Strasberg), the rodeo and the tavern; Gable riding horses, practicing roping with a lasso, getting in and out of his beautiful personal Mercedes 300SL Gullwing, rehearsing the drunken tavern scene with Marilyn, and much more, and nearly always with cigarette in holder; real stunt cowboys rehearsing the bull-riding and bulldogging scenes (at obvious great peril) as doubles for Montgomery Clift, who we then see practicing falls as inserts into the filmed stunt action (his nose injury seen in the film was genuine from earlier rodeo rehearsing); and numerous shots of director John Huston and his camera crew at work, and near the end, at play in the Virginia City, Nevada camel races. Also includes occasional shots of Eli Wallach, Thelma Ritter, producer Frank Taylor, Arthur Miller, and other cast and crew. The Misfits is widely considered Marilyn’s finest dramatic acting role, as well as being one of the best for both Clark Gable and Montgomery Clift. Reasonably professional (at least to a certain degree) in nature and shot from start to finish as a sequential “film in production” documentation, with apparent working title On Sets: The Misfits. To the best of our knowledge, this footage has not been previously published or broadcast (apart from its acquisition at auction from Killar’s heirs in 2008), and is offered here with full rights and assignment of copyright to its entire content. The original 8mm film stock has been properly transferred to (2) 7 in. reels in the process of recording its entire contents onto (2) different types of DVDs, while the original metal reels and cardboard Bell & Howell boxes are retained for posterity. Film stock itself is not inspected off the reels for condition, but no problems are apparent from viewing the DVD transfer. An extraordinary and absolutely unique previously missing puzzle piece in the brief, convoluted history of Marilyn Monroe on and off screen. In vintage fine condition.
Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000
lot1199-H3257-L78855445  lot1199-H3257-L78855446 
lot1199-H3257-L78855451  lot1199-H3257-L78855454  lot1199-H3257-L78855457 
lot1199-H3257-L78855460  lot1199-H3257-L78855463  lot1199-H3257-L78855467 


(Day 2) Lot 1206: (2) books from the personal property of Marilyn Monroe. (1947, 1957)
Vintage (2) 8vo cloth-bound self-help/ psychology books from the personal library of Marilyn Monroe, with Christie’s “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe” auction special bookplates. Entitled Hypnotism Today by L. M. Le Cron and J. Bordeaux, and The Tower and the Abyss by Erich Kahler, both retain original dust-wrappers, and one of which exhibits a pencil notation presumed in Marilyn’s hand, “The conditioning has in some cases created a new, independent quantity—The person, who proceeds to condition himself.” Dust-wrappers chipped and stained, otherwise books themselves are in vintage fine condition.
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
lot1206-H3257-L78860112 


(Day 2) Lot 1207: (2) books from the personal property of Marilyn Monroe including Joseph Campbell’s The Masks of God: Primitive Mythology. (1948, 1959)
Vintage (2) 8vo cloth-bound self-help/ mythology books from the personal library of Marilyn Monroe, with Christie’s “The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe” auction special bookplates. Entitled The Open Self by Charles Morris and The Masks of God: Primitive Mythology by Joseph Campbell, the latter retaining original dust-wrapper and exhibiting a pencil notation presumed in Marilyn’s hand, “x: After all, what are you [I] here for but pleasure. But is it pleasure. When the actress is kissed and feels the warm breath of her lover on her neck—can you feel it? No. It is not pleasure you’ll find here but it’s as if it were. We are [pretending?] it is our pleasure. The real pleasure you can only take at home, when tonight [illegible] in your bed.” Dust-wrapper shows only a trace of marginal handling, otherwise books themselves are in vintage very good to fine condition.
Estimate: $800 - $1,200 
lot1207-H3257-L78860098 
lot1207-H3257-L78860102  lot1207-H3257-L78860106


(Day 2): Lot 1208: Marilyn Monroe extensive vintage original (40+) press file including obituaries. (1961-1965)
Vintage (40+) news clippings and full sections encompassing the last year of Marilyn Monroe’s troubled life, her obituaries, plus revelations and theories to follow. A treasure trove of information contemporaneous to the time of her questionable death, including a magazine article blaming (without naming) JFK. In vintage aged, archived condition.
Estimate: $200 - $300
lot1208-H3257-L78857822 lot1208-H3257-L78857825 lot1208-H3257-L78857827 
lot1208-H3257-L78857828 lot1208-H3257-L78857831 lot1208-H3257-L78857833 


(Day 2) Lot 1209: Marilyn Monroe (8) half-sheet posters including Dangerous Years, Bus Stop, River of No Return and others. (Various, 1948-1960)
Vintage (8) U.S. 22 x 28 in. half-sheet posters for films featuring Marilyn Monroe throughout the entire span of her career, including Dangerous Years, Home Town Story, Let’s Make it Legal, Monkey Business, Clash by Night, River of No Return, Bus Stop, and Let’s Make Love. Each is card-stock paper-backed to correct folds, marginal losses, or other wear, though none shows extensive repair much beyond marginal and fold retouching. Overall in vintage very good condition.
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
lot1209-H3257-L78857793 lot1209-H3257-L78857797 lot1209-H3257-L78857800 
lot1209-H3257-L78857804 lot1209-H3257-L78857807 
lot1209-H3257-L78857810 lot1209-H3257-L78857814 lot1209-H3257-L78857818  


(Day 2) Lot 1210: Marilyn Japanese “B2” poster. (TCF, 1963)
Japanese 20 x 28 in. “B2” poster for the post-mortem documentary by Fox to capitalize on the Marilyn cult sweeping the world after her untimely death. Highlighted by the climactic moment in the “Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend” number. Unfolded, in vintage very fine condition.
Estimate: $200 - $300
lot1210-H3257-L78856856 

 


(Day 2) Lot 1211: Andy Warhol signed “Marilyn” Castelli Gallery invitation. (1981)
Vintage original invitation to the Castelli Gallery’s Andy Warhol print retrospective (1963-1981). The 12 x 12 in. colorful invitation with Warhol’s iconic original “Marilyn” silkscreen print (1967). On the occasion of her death in 1962, Warhol chose the Gene Korman publicity photo of Monroe as “Rose Loomis” from the film Niagara as the basis for his instantly recognizable Pop Art treatment of the Hollywood sex symbol. Featuring printed red text on hot pink background in the lower left and right corner reading, “Andy Warhol” and “Castelli Graphics”. The legendary artist has signed boldly, in black pen, “Andy Warhol” vertically, to the left of the image. Show information, gallery address, November 21 through December 22, 1981 date and original print info: “Illustrated: Marilyn, 1967, silkscreen, 36 x 36 inches, edition of 250, published by Factory Additions” on the verso. With very minor signs of age. In vintage, very fine condition.
Estimate: $10,000 - $12,000
lot1211-H3257-L78860161


(Day 2) Lot 1212: 20th Century Fox “Marilyn Monroe” CineSimplex Model D Camera #6.
The CineSimplex Model D was truly built as a better choice than the heavily-blimped Mitchell cameras at other studios. It was extremely light. Indeed, the camera was so revolutionary that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences awarded it a Class One Technical Academy Award. The camera cost $140,000 to build in 1940, a time when a Mitchell could be purchased for $15,000! Of the 17 CineSimplex Model D cameras designed and built for 20th Century Fox, only six still exist today. This #6 camera is the only example with its complete set of Bausch & Lomb Baltar lenses (25, 30, 35, 40, 50, 75 and 100mm) built specifically for this camera, matched to be optically perfect. Of particular importance, this #6 camera photographed more Marilyn Monroe films than any other, including, How To Marry A Millionaire, Let’s Make Love, Bus Stop, River of No Return, Monkey Business, and her last film Something’s Got To Give. 20th Century Fox assigned cameras to specific Directors of Photography. This #6 camera was assigned to Charles G. Clarke, ASC by the studio. Mr. Clarke’s camera was the very first used to photograph in CinemaScope. All tests for the new process were done with #6 and it worked with Leon Shamroy’s camera on The Robe. Comes with Mitchell head and wooden tripod with spreader, 20th Century Fox wooden lens box, (1) Bausch & Lomb CinemaScope lens and wooden case full of camera accessories with “Hugh Crawford Camera” (Clarke’s assistant’s) name painted on the lid. Comes with a letter of provenance from Roy H. Wagner, ASC. From the collection of Debbie Reynolds.
Estimate: $30,000 - $50,000
lot1212-H3257-L78857951 lot1212-H3257-L78857953 lot1212-H3257-L78857956
lot1212-H3257-L78857960 lot1212-H3257-L78857964 lot1212-H3257-L78857967
lot1212-H3257-L78857973 lot1212-H3257-L78857977 lot1212-H3257-L78857981
lot1212-H3257-L78857985 lot1212-H3257-L78857986 
lot1212-H3257-L78857990 lot1212-H3257-L78857992 lot1212-H3257-L78857996


(Day 2) Lot 1220All About Eve screen-used prop “Sarah Siddons” award.
 (TCF, 1950) Vintage original gold-lacquered cast acrylic 5.5 x 5.5 in. sculpture of 18th Century actress Sarah Siddons (based upon Sir Joshua Reynolds 1784 portrait of her as “The Tragic Muse”) which is a key integral plot element in the Bette Davis, Anne Baxter and Marilyn Monroe classic film of backstage imbroglios. On 3.5 x 5.75 in. black-painted wooden base. Bette Davis as “Margo Channing” portrays the consummate stage actress and object of idolatry and envy in newcomer Anne Baxter as “Eve Harrington”, who manipulates Channing in order to usurp her crown as queen of the theatre, with the “Sarah Siddons” award being the badge of that distinction. This is one of the most recognized and revered “award” props ever featured in any film, not only from its importance in the story, but even more so from the continually growing fame and respect this extraordinary film garners. One of only three Sarah Siddons Award props visible during the ceremony, the statues are not only the object of specific attention through the opening sequence but one is then visible prominently throughout the film displayed on Margo Channing’s mantle. Years of storage have left the figure bereft only of its hands, with just a few tiny paint chips and bumps to figure and base, which is also missing the name placard. A truly fantastic, indelible icon from the golden-age of Hollywood. In vintage very good condition.
Estimate price: $4,000 - $6,000
lot1220-H3257-L78855863 lot1220-H3257-L78855865 lot1220-H3257-L78855867 
lot1220-H3257-L78855870 lot1220-H3257-L78855872 lot1220-H3257-L78855874

30 juillet 2015

Marilyn: bien avant Photoshop, cette célèbre photo a aussi été retouchée

Marilyn Monroe nue: bien avant Photoshop, cette célèbre photo a aussi été retouchée
Publié le 30/07/2015
en ligne sur 
huffingtonpost.fr

PHOTOS - Marilyn Monroe est l'icône glamour par excellence. Son nom est toujours associé à ses courbes généreuses et ses poses sexy.

Mais l'actrice a travaillé dur pour en arriver là. Lorsqu'elle est arrivée à Hollywood en 1949, elle n'était rien d'autre qu'une jeune fille qui essayait de se faire une place dans le monde du cinéma.

A la même époque, la légende voudrait qu'elle ait accepté de poser nue pour 50 $ afin de pouvoir payer son loyer. Cette histoire s'avère vraie, les photos de cette séance jamais sorties auparavant viennent d'être présentées au public.

Elles ont été prises par Tom Kelley, photographe connu pour avoir fait des clichés de nombreuses célébrités entre 1940 et 1950. On y voit la star sur un fond rouge en velours.

PHOTOS-MARILYN-MONROE-570 
PHOTO ORIGINALE

La photo originale est apparue en 1952 dans le célèbre calendrier Golden Dreams. Elle a aussi fait la couverture d'un numéro de Playboy en 1953. Ces événements ont contribué à faire de Marilyn Monroe, la star que l'on connaît.

Mais fait plus étonnant, ce sont les photos utilisées pour créer l'originale qui ont été révélées au public par Limited Runs, un site qui commercialise des photos vintages. Ces clichés font partie de l'exposition consacrée à la star "Marilyn Monroe: Red Velvet Collection" à Los Angeles qui prendra fin le 1er août.

Ces photos font découvrir au public comment étaient retouchées les images à l'époque. Exit Photoshop, chaque élément était modifié à la main, de la taille, à la couleur de cheveux en passant par les lèvres.

PHOTOS-MARILYN-MONROE-570b  PHOTOS-MARILYN-MONROE-570c  PHOTOS-MARILYN-MONROE-570d 
PHOTOS-MARILYN-MONROE-570e   PHOTOS-MARILYN-MONROE-570f 

Posté par ginieland à 21:50 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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10 octobre 2013

'Icons and Idols Hollywood' 11/2013 Photographies

lot 1237: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPHS
A group of three vintage black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe as a child. An image of Monroe and another child on the beach is inscribed on the back "The Blonde is Norma Jeane [crossed out and rewritten in pencil 'Marilyn Monroe'] and the other is Dona, my Chum's little girl. P.S. Just two little (illegible)." An image of Monroe on the beach alone is marked on verso "Marilyn Monroe age 3 1/2 yrs." The final image is of Monroe and another child sitting on a bench. Marked on verso "Marilyn Monroe age 2 1/2 yrs." The photographs were taken when Monroe was living with her foster parents, Albert and Ida Bolender.
Each, 3 3/4 by 4 3/4 inches
Estimate: $600 - 800
lot148380 lot148382


lot 1238: MARILYN MONROE DAVID CONOVER PHOTOGRAPH
A contemporary photographic print of Marilyn Monroe taken by David Conover circa 1945. The black and white photograph shows a smiling curly haired Monroe. The photographs were made from the digitally restored original negatives.
30 by 24 inches
Estimate: $150 - 300
lot148384  


lot 1239: MARILYN MONROE "A NEW WRINKLE" TOM KELLEY PRINT
A limited edition print of Tom Kelley's 1949 photograph of Marilyn Monroe titled "A New Wrinkle." Signed in the lower right by Tom Kelley and numbered 1270/2000.
Framed, 20 1/4 by 16 1/4 inches; Image, 16 by 12 inches
Estimate: $600 - 800
lot148386 
lot148388 lot148390 


lot 1240: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
A group of 11 black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe in a plaid shirt, taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 in a photoshoot for Blue Book Modeling Agency. Gelatin silver prints. Some mounted, some with photographer's stamp on verso.
Most, 8 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
Estimate: $600 - 800
lot148393 


lot 1241: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
A group of 13 black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 in a photoshoot for Blue Book Modeling Agency. Gelatin silver prints. Some mounted, some with photographer's stamp on verso, one signed in ink on recto.
8 by 10 inches, each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
Estimate: $600 - 800 
lot148395 


lot 1242: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
A group of five black and white photographs and three color photographs of Marilyn Monroe on the beach, taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 in a photoshoot for Blue Book Modeling Agency. Gelatin silver prints and chromogenic prints. Some mounted, some with photographer's stamp on verso.
8 by 10 inches, each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
Estimate: $600 - 800
lot148398  


lot 1243: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
A group of 11 black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and a group of local actors, taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 at Zuma Beach in Malibu, California. Gelatin silver prints. Some mounted, some with photographer's stamp on verso, one signed in ink on recto.
8 by 10 inches, each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
Estimate: $600 - 800
lot148400  


lot 1244: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
A group of five black and white photographs and one color photograph of Marilyn Monroe, taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 for Blue Book Modeling Agency. Gelatin silver prints. Some mounted, some with photographer's stamp on verso, one signed in ink on recto.
8 by 10 inches, each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
Estimate: $600 - 800
lot148402 lot148408 lot148405
lot148411 lot148413 lot148406 


lot 1245: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PORTFOLIO 
A portfolio containing 39 photographs of Marilyn Monroe, taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 for Blue Book Modeling Agency. The album contains 20 signed black and white prints, 13 unsigned black and white prints, and 6 unsigned color prints. Prints are high-quality laser prints, printed later. Accompanied by a typed document written and signed by Jasgur, detailing his work photographing a young Norma Jeane Dougherty/Marilyn Monroe.
Prints, 14 by 11 inches, each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
Estimate: $4 000 - 6 000
lot148414  


lot 1247: MARILYN MONROE IN KOREA PHOTOGRAPHS AND COPYRIGHTS
An album of photographs taken by Daryl Mitchell, who served in the Korean War from August 1952 to August 1954 as "Senior Still Photographer" of the 101st Signal Battalion. Mitchell photographed visiting dignitaries, government visitors including Senator Richard Nixon, generals, and entertainers, namely Marilyn Monroe. Included in the album are approximately 93 vintage black and white photographs Mitchell took in Korea, including approximately nine of Nixon and eight of Monroe during her visit to Korea. The images of Monroe show her entertaining, signing autographs, getting out of a Jeep, getting food in line, and two of Monroe with the troops, wearing a flight jacket. Also accompanied by 10 color transparency slides of Monroe on stage entertaining the troops. Seven photographs of Monroe are 14 by 11 inches; one is 10 by 8 inches. Copyrights to these images will be transferred to the winning bidder. NOTE: While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s cannot accept liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Overall, 16 by 12 inches
PROVENANCE From the photographer's estate
Estimate: $2 000 - 4 000
lot148418 lot148421 lot148423
lot148425 lot148427 lot148429
lot148431 lot148433 lot148435  


lot 1248: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL SLIDES
A group of three slides showing Marilyn Monroe on the roof of a building holding a white fan. Taken by an unknown photographer and believed to be previously unpublished. Accompanied by negatives of the slide images.
Estimate: $1 000 - 2 000
lot148436  
lot148438 lot148439 lot148441 lot148443 


lot 1249: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS PHOTOGRAPHS
 A suite of five George Barris photographs of Marilyn Monroe. Accompanied by a limited edition card stating that the images were published by Marilyn Monroe Weston Editions LTD. and numbered 833/2500. Contained in a white folder that reads "Marilyn Monroe/ 25/ 'The Last Photos.' "
Photographs, 14 by 11 inches
Estimate: $600 - 800
lot148445 lot148447 
lot148449 lot148451 lot148458
lot148454  lot148456 


Lot 1250: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH
  An original photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Ron Stein of Hollywood Fancy Feather Co. Stein provided feathers for studio props and costumes. This image hung in his North Hollywood shop. Accompanied by two black and white images of Monroe and Jane Russell in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953), three publicity stills from other Monroe films, and four other images of Monroe.
Most, 8 by 10 inches
Estimate: $400 - 600
lot148460  


Lot 1251: MARILYN MONROE SCREENPRINT
  A screenprint of Marilyn Monroe. Signed and numbered "3 of 40" in pencil on verso and stamped "Fugsreen Studios," "Printed by Zissou Tasseff-Elenkoff" and "Galerie F" on verso.
24 by 20 inches
Estimate: $300 - 500
lot148462 lot148464  


Lot 1256: MARILYN MONROE SOMETHING'S GOT TO GIVE CONTACT SHEET
 A contact sheet of 29 images of Marilyn Monroe on the set of the unfinished film Something's Got To Give (20th Century) believed to be from the negatives of photographer Lawrence Schiller. The images are primarily of Monroe in and around the pool on set. Some markings and notes on sheet.
14 1/4 by 11 1/4 inches
Estimate: $1 500 - 2 500
lot148481  


Lot 1264: EARL MORAN (AMERICAN, 1893-1984) MARILYN MONROE NUDE
 An oil on canvas painting of Marilyn Monroe reclining nude in bed. Signed middle right “Earl Moran.”
Earl Moran was a prominent pin-up artist during the 1930s and 40s with a stylish flair that helped sell millions of calendars for publishers Brown & Bigelow. In 1946 Moran had the good fortune of meeting an aspiring model named Norma Jean Dougherty, soon to become famous as Marilyn Monroe. Dozens of photographs were taken of Monroe in various poses which Moran then used to paint seductive nudes in oil and pastel, portraying Marilyn as a blonde, redhead and even as a brunette. The painting shown here was purchased by the consignor's wife directly from Moran after they met him at the Laguna Art Festival. The consignor fondly recalls how Moran explained to them that the model for the painting was a young woman named Norma Jean Dougherty.
56 by 32 inches, Framed
Estimate: $20 000 - 30 000
lot148811 lot148812 


Lot 1265: MARILYN MONROE PHILIPPE HALSMAN IMAGES
 A group of three original black and white photographs and proof images of Marilyn Monroe taken by Philippe Halsman. The photographs were purchased from Philippe Halsman’s daughter by the current owner and include images believed to have never been released previously. The two multiple proof images are mounted to board.
Largest, 21 by 15 1/4 inches, framed
Estimate: $10 000 - 20 000
lot148527 lot148530 lot148532

25 avril 2013

1960 Interview de Georges Belmont

C'est par l'intermédiaire de Ruppert Allan, chargé de la promotion de Marilyn, qu'eut lieu en 1960 la grande interview entre Marilyn Monroe et Georges Belmont. Ce dernier était alors rédacteur en chef de la revue Marie-Claire, qui publiera l'interview dans le numéro 72 d'octobre 1960. L'interview se déroula pendant le tournage du film Let's Make Love (Le milliardaire) qui connut un succès particulier en France en raison de l'interprétation d'Yves Montand.
Georges Belmont réussit bientôt à gagner la confiance de Marilyn. Il faut dire qu'il lui avait promis de mettre à sa disposition une transcription de l'interview et en outre de s'en tenir rigoureusement dans le texte écrit à la formulation orale de ses propos. La base était donc bonne. Tous ceux qui, par la suite, prirent connaissance de cet entretien, durent reconnaître avec étonnement qu'ils n'avaient jamais entendu Marilyn parler d'elle-même avec tant de naturel.
Voilà comment Georges Belmont dépeint l'ambiance : "Je la laissais parler. La seule pression dont j'usais était le silence. Quand elle s'arrêtait de parler, je ne disais rien et, au bout du silence, quand elle n'en pouvait plus, ce qui venait alors était souvent capital et terriblement émouvant presque toujours."

Marilyn Monroe: J'aimerais mieux répondre à des questions. Je ne sais pas raconter, c'est terrible... par ou commencer? Comment? Il y a tant de ramifications...

Georges Belmont: Tout de même, il y a eu un commencement : votre enfance.

Marilyn Monroe: Même cela, personne n'en saurait rien, sans un pur hasard.
Longtemps, mon passé, ma vie sont restés totalement inconnus. Jamais je n'en parlais. Sans raison particulière. Simplement, je trouvais que c'etait mon affaire et pas celle des autres. Puis un jour, un M. Lester Cowan a voulu me mettre dans un film avec Groucho Marx, 'Love Happy'. J'avais déjà été sous contrat avec la Fox et la Columbia, à l'époque, mais saquée... C'était un petit rôle qu'il m'offrait, ce M. Cowan, mais il tenait à m'avoir sous contrat. Donc, il téléphone. J'etais encore très jeune et il me dit qu'il voulait parler à mon père et à ma mère. Je lui dis : "Impossible." - "Pourquoi?" insiste-t-il. Je lui ai expliqué alors brièvement la chose : "Je n'ai jamais vécu avec eux." C'était la vérité et je ne vois toujours pas ce que cela avait de sensationnel. Mais il téléphona à la chroniqueuse Louella Parsons et lui raconta toute l'histoire. Cela parut dans la "colonne" de Louella. C'est comme ça que tout a commencé. Depuis, on a débité tant de choses fausses que, mon Dieu, oui, pourquoi ne pas dire la vérité maintenant?

Georges Belmont: Quelles sont les premières images de vous, enfant, que vous gardiez?

Marilyn Monroe (long silence) : Mon premier souvenir?... C'est un souvenir de lutte pour la vie. J'etais toute petite... un bébé dans un petit lit, oui, et je luttais pour ma vie. Mais j'aimerais mieux ne pas en parler, si cela vous est égal : c'est une chose cruelle qui ne regarde que moi et personne d'autre, comme je disais. Ensuite, aussi loin que je remonte, je me revois dans une poussette, en longue robe blanche, sur le trottoir de la maison ou je vivais dans une famille qui n'était pas la mienne. C'est un fait que je suis une enfant naturelle. Mais tout ce que l'on a dit de mon père, ou de mes pères, est faux. Le premier mari de ma mère s'appellait Baker. Le second, Mortenson. Mais elle avait depuis longtemps divorcé d'avec les deux quand je suis née. On a raconté que mon père était norvégien, sans doute à cause du nom Mortenson, et qu'il était mort dans un accident de moto, peu après ma naissance. J'ignore si c'est vrai de Mortenson, n'ayant jamais eu de lien de parenté avec lui. Quant à l'indentité de mon vrai père, là encore, si vous le voulez bien, je vous prierai de ne pas m'interroger ; cela n'intéresse que moi. Cependant, il y a deux faits qui peuvent expliquer certaines... confusions. D'abord, on m'a toujours dit dans ma petite enfance que mon père s'était tué dans un accident d'automobile à New York, avant ma naissance. Ensuite, curieusement, mon bulletin de naissance porte, en réponse à une mention "Profession", le mot Baker, qui était le nom du premier mari de ma mère, mais qui veut dire aussi "boulanger". Quand je suis née, enfant naturelle ainsi que je l'ai dit, ma mère devait me donner un nom. Mon sentiment est que, forcée de penser vite, elle donna : "Baker". Pure coincidence, puis confusion de la part de l'officier d'état civil... C'est du moins ce que je pense.

Georges Belmont: Votre mère... J'ai lu quelque part que, pour vous, elle n'était que "la femme aux cheveux roux"?

Marilyn Monroe: Je n'ai jamais vécu avec ma mère. On a dit le contraire, mais cela seul est vrai. Aussi loin que je remonte dans mes souvenirs, j'ai toujours vécu en pension chez des gens. Ma mère avait des... troubles mentaux. Elle est morte maintenant. Mes grands-parents maternels sont morts tous les deux fous, enfermés. Ma mère, aussi, il fallut l'interner. Elle sortait parfois, et puis elle... rechutait. Alors, vous savez comme c'est... toute petite, je disais en montrant la première femme venue : "Oh! une maman!", et le premier homme : "Oh! un papa!". Mais un matin, je devais avoir trois ans, pas plus, on me baignait et je dis "maman" à la femme qui s'occupait de moi à l'époque. Elle me répondit : "Je ne suis pas ta maman. Appelle-moi 'tante'." - "Mais lui est mon papa?" dis-je ne montrant son mari. - "Non", me dit-elle. "Nous ne sommes pas tes parents. Celle qui vient te voir de temps en temps, la femme aux cheveux roux, celle-là est ta maman." Ce fut un choc d'apprendre cela, mais comme elle venait très rarement, c'est vrai que, pour moi, elle resta surtout "la femme aux cheveux roux". Tout de même, j'essayais qu'elle existait. Seulement, plus tard, quand on me mit dans un orphelinat, j'ai eu un autre choc. Je savais lire, alors. Quand j'ai lu "orphelinat" en lettres d'or sur fond noir, il a fallu me traîner, je hurlais : "Je ne suis pas une orpheline! J'ai une maman!" Mais par la suite, j'ai fini par penser : "Il faut croire qu'elle est morte..." Et, plus tard encore, des gens me disaient : "Ta mère, mieux vaut que tu l'oublies." - "Mais ou est-elle?" demandais-je. - "N'y pense plus, elle est morte." Après quoi, tout à coup, j'avais de ses nouvelles... Et il en fut ainsi pendant des annèes. Je la croyais morte et je le disais. Et elle vivait. Ce qui fait qu'on a prétendu que j'avais inventé qu'elle était morte, parce que je ne voulais pas avouer où elle était. Idiot!
En tout cas, j'ai eu... attendez que je compte... dix, non onze "familles". La première vivait dans une petite ville du comté de Los Angeles ; je suis née à Los Angeles. Il y avait avec moi un petit garçon que ces gens adoptèrent ensuite. Je suis restée avec eux jusqu'à l'âge de sept ans environ. Ils étaient affreusement sévères. Sans méchanceté. C'était leur religion. Ils m'élevèrent à leur manière, durement, en me corrigeant souvent comme on ne devrait jamais le faire, à mon avis: à coup de ceinturon de cuir. Finalement, cela se sut ; on me retira pour me confier à un couple anglais, à Hollywood. Ceux-là étaient des acteurs, des figurants plutôt, avec une fille de vingt et un ans qui était la doublure de Madeleine Carroll. Chez eux, c'était la vie sans souci, et assez tumultueuse. Cela me changeait de la première famille ou on ne pouvait même pas parler de cinéma ou d'acteurs, ni de danser ou de chanter, sauf des psaumes. Mes "nouveaux parents" travaillaient dur, quand ils travaillaient et jouissaient de la vie le reste du temps. Ils aimaient danser, chanter, boire, jouer aux cartes et avoir beaucoup d'amis. Avec l'éducation religieuse que j'avais reçue, j'étais terrifiée : je les voyais tous en enfer! Je passais des heures à prier pour eux. Je me rappelle une chose... au bout de quelques mois, je crois, ma mère acheta une petite maison où tout le monde alla vivre. Pas pour longtemps ; trois mois au plus. Cette fois encore, ma mère dut être... emmenée. Et même pendant ces trois mois, je la vis à peine. Bref, ce fut un grand changement. Après son départ, nous regagnâmes Hollywood. Ces anglais me gardèrent tant qu'il y eut de l'argent... l'argent de ma mère, de ses biens et d'une assurance qu'elle avait souscrite. C'est avec eux que j'ai fait la connaissance du cinéma. Je n'avais pas huit ans. Ils me déposaient devant une des grandes salles d'Hollywood, L'Egyptien ou le Grauman's Chinese tôt le matin. Toute seule, je regardais les singes en cage devant l'Egyptien, ou j'essayais de placer mes pieds dans les moulages de ceux des stars, à l'entrèe du Grauman's: mais je n'y arrivais jamais, j'avais de trop grands souliers... C'est drôle de penser que mes empreintes y sont, et que maintenant, d'autres petites filles font peut-être comme moi autrefois.
Ils me conduisaient donc là chaque samedi et dimanche. C'était repos pour eux et j'imagine qu'ils ne voulaient pas s'encombrer d'un enfant à la maison. D'ailleurs, cela valait probablement mieux pour moi.
J'attendais l'ouverture, je donnais mes dix cents et m'installais au premier rang. J'ai vu toutes sortes de films comme cela. Je me souviens de 'Cléôpatre', avec Claudette Colbert.
Je restais là, tard, séance après séance. J'étais censée rentrer avant la nuit. Mais comment pouvais-je savoir quand c'était la nuit?! Et puis, on était bien; et même si je ne pouvais rien acheter quand j'avais faim, je savais qu'on me garderait de quoi manger. Alors, je restais. J'avais mes stars préférées. Jean Harlow!... Mes cheveux étaient platines ;on m'appelait "Tête d'étoupe". Je détestais ça, je rêvais de cheveux blond doré... jusqu'à ce que je l'ai vue : si belle, et platine, comme moi!... Et Clark Gable! J'éspère qu'il ne m'en voudra pas si je dis que je voyais en lui mon père, je n'étais qu'une gamine, et, d'après Freud, il n'y a pas mal à cela, au contraire! Je rêvais que mon père lui ressemblait, ou même qu'il était mon père... ce qui me rappelle que c'est curieux, mais je n'ai jamais rêvé que personne fût ma mère... Ou en étais-je?!

Georges Belmont: Le couple anglais. Quand il n'y a plus eu d'argent...

Marilyn Monroe: Oui. On m'a mise à l'orphelinat. Oh! mais, attendez! Oh!... non! Quand ces anglais n'ont plus pu me garder, je suis allée vivre chez des gens à Hollywood. Des gens de la Nouvelle-Orléans. Je m'en souviens parce qu'ils prononçaient "New Orlinns".
Mais je n'y suis pas restée longtemps. Trois, quatre mois. Je me rappelle seulement que le mari était opérateur de cinéma et que, tout à coup, on m'a conduite à l'orphelinat. Je sais, certains prétendent que ce n'était pas un endroit si affreux. Mais je sais aussi que la maison a beaucoup changé ; peut-être est-ce moins sinistre à présent... bien que l'orphelinat le plus moderne du monde demeure un orphelinat, si l'on voit ce que je veux dire.
La nuit, quand les autres dormaient, je restais à la fenêtre du dortoir et je pleurais parce que, loin et haut par-dessus les toits, je voyais briller les lettres des studios R.K.O. et que ma mère y avait travaillé come monteuse. Des annèes après, en 1951, quand je tournais 'Clash by night' pour R.K.O., je suis montée là-haut pour essayer de voir l'orphelinat; mais il y avait de trop grands buildings. J'ai lu, je ne sais où, que nous n'étions pas plus que trois ou quatre par chambre dans cet orphelinat. C'est faux. J'étais dans un dortoir de vingt-cinq lits, dont on pouvait faire le tour si on le méritait, en remontant du lit n°1 au lit n°27, qu'on appelait le "lit d'honneur". Et du 27, si l'on était très sage, on pouvait espérer passer dans un autre dortoir avec moins de lits. J'y ai réussi une fois. Mais un matin, où j'étais en retard, je pense, et où je laçais mes chaussures, la surveillante me dit : "Descendez!" Je tentai de lui expliquer: "Mais il faut que j'attache mes souliers!" Elle me foudroya : "retour au lit n°27!".
Le lever était à 6 heures et nous devions faire certaines corvées avant d'aller à l'école. Nous avions chacune un lit, une chaise et une armoire. Tout cela devait être très propre, astiqué, à cause des inspections à l'improviste. J'ai nettoyé le dortoir pendant un temps. Tous les jours, bouger les lits, balayer, épousseter. Les salles de bain, c'était plus facile: moins de poussière, à cause du sol en ciment. J'ai travaillé également aux cuisines. Je lavais la vaisselle. Nous étions cent: je lavais donc cent assiettes et autant de cuillères et de fourchettes... pas de couteaux ni de verres; nous buvions dans les quarts. Seulement, à la cuisine, on gagnait des sous: cinq cents par mois et à cela, après qu'on vous retenait un cent pour l'école du dimanche. Bref, on se retrouvait avec un cent au bout du mois, s'il n'y avait que quatre dimanches; de quoi acheter peut-être un petit cadeau pour sa meilleure amie, à Noël, en économisant. Je ne peux pas dire que j'étais très heureuse. Je n'étais pas bien avec les surveillantes. Mais la directrice était très gentille. Je me souviens, qu'un jour, elle me fait appeller dans son bureau et me dit: "Vous avez une très jolie peau, mais un peu luisante. Nous allons y mettre un soupçon de poudre, pour voir." Je me sentais honorée d'être là. Elle avait un petit pékinois qu'on empêchait d'aller avec les enfants parce qu'il les mordrait, mais qui me fit des tas d'amitiés. Comme j'adorais déjà les chiens, imaginez!... J'étais si honorée, vraiment, que je marchais dans les airs.
Un peu plus tard, j'ai voulu m'évader avec d'autres camarades. Pour aller où ? Nous n'en avions pas la moindre idée. Le temps de traverser une grande pelouse, nous étions déjà rattrapées. Quand on me ramena, je suppliais: "Ne le dites pas à la directrice!" - parce que je la voyais encore me sourire en me tapotant le nez avec sa houpette, et parce qu'elle m'avait laissé caresser son petit chien.
Même maintenant, cela revient parfois, quand je suis trop nerveuse ou surexcitée. Une fois, j'avais un petit rôle, avec une scène où je devais gravir un escalier; j'ai oublié ce qui arriva, mais le metteur en scéne assistant se précipita vers moi en me criant des mots et j'en fus si bouleversée que, au moment de la reprise, impossible de dire la réplique! Rien qu'un affreux bafouillis. Sur quoi, le metteur en scène, furieux, se précipite à son tour et crie : "Tout de même, vous ne bégayez pas?" - "V-v-vous croyez ça?" lui ai-je dit. C'était horrible! Et ça l'est encore, quand je parle trop vite ou quand je dois faire un discours. Pénible!...
(Silence) Je voudrais qu'on en ait fini avec cette partie de ma vie...
(Silence)
Je suis restée environ un an et demi dans cet orphelinat. Nous allions à l'école. C'est très mauvais pour les enfants d'une institution comme celle là, d'aller à l'école publique. Les autres nous montraient du doigt et serinaient : "Oh, v'là les orphelins!" Nous avions honte.
A l'école, j'aimais bien le chant et l'anglais. Je détestais le calcul ; je n'avais pas l'esprit à ça ; pendant les leçons, mes rêves s'envolaient par la fenêtre. Mais j'étais bonne en gymnastique et en sport. J'étais très grande. A l'orphelinat, le premier jour, on n'a pas voulu me croire quand j'ai dit mon âge: neuf ans. On m'en donnait quatorze. Je mesurais presque ma taille actuelle: 1m63. Mais j'étais très maigre jusqu'à onze ans, où les choses ont changé. Je n'étais plus à l'orphelinat, à cet âge. Je m'étais tellement plainte à ma tutrice qu'elle me sortit de là. C'était une vieille amie de ma mère. Grace McKee. Elle est morte il y a onze ans. A l'époque où elle était devenue ma tutrice, elle était chef monteuse chez Columbia. Puis on la renvoya et elle a épousé alors un homme de dix ans plus jeune qu'elle et père de trois enfants. Ils étaient très pauvres et, pour cela, ne pouvaient s'occuper de moi. En outre, je pense qu'elle estimait que son premier devoir allait à son mari et aux enfants de celui-ci, ce qui est normal. Néanmoins, elle était merveilleuse pour moi, à bien des égards. Sans elle, j'aurais pu me retrouver Dieu sait où, à l'Assistance Publique jusqu'à 18 ans.
A mon orphelinat, qui était privé, elle venait me voir et me sortait. Pas souvent, mais tout de même... cela me donnait du courage. Je n'avais que neuf ou dix ans, et elle me laissait jouer avec son rouge à lèvres ou me menait chez le coiffeur pour une ondulation... chose inouïe, d'abord parce que c'était interdit, et puis parce que j'avais les cheveux raides: alors vous imaginez ce que cela représentait! De plus, c'est elle qui me retira de l'orphelinat, après mes plaintes, ainsi que je l'ai dit. Naturellement, cela signifia d'autres "familles". Je me souviens d'une où je restais trois ou quatre semaines. Je m'en souviens à cause de la femme qui allait livrer des choses que son mari fabriquait. Elle m'emmenait avec elle, et oh! la voiture me rendait si malade!...
J'ignore si on les payait pour me garder. Je sais seulement que, après eux, j'ai tout le temps changé de maison. Certaines familles me prenaient à la fin d'un trimestre scolaire et en avaient assez, après les vacances; ou peut-être étais-ce l'arrangement. Par la suite, le comté de Los Angeles m'a prise en charge. C'était pire: je détestais ça. Même à l'orphelinat, quand j'allais à l'école, j'essayais toujours de ne pas avoir l'air d'une orpheline. Mais maintenant, une femme arrivait et disait: "Voyons, voyons... lève les pieds" et elle marquait: "Paire de chaussures". Puis: "A-t-elle un chandail ?" Ou encore: "Je crois que la pauvre fille aurait bien besoin de deux robes, une pour l'école, une pour le dimanche." Et les chandails étaient en coton et laids, les robes semblaient taillées dans de la toile de sac... Terrible! Et les chaussures! Je disais: "Je n'en veux pas!" Je m'arrangeais toujours pour me faire donner des robes, des robes de grandes personnes, qu'on recoupait à ma taille. Et la plupart du temps, j'avais des souliers de tennis: on en trouvait pour moins d'un dollar. Je devais être une drôle de fille, à cette époque. Très grande, comme je l'ai dit. Pas grimacière pour la nourriture. Mangeant de tout. Je le sais parce que, dans presque toute les familles, on disait que jamais on avait vu une enfant aussi peu difficile. Je sais aussi que j'étais très tranquille, avec les grandes personnes en tout cas. On m'appelait "la souris". Je parlais peu, sauf quand j'étais avec d'autres gosses. Alors je n'étais plus la même. Ils aimaient jouer avec moi. J'avais de l'invention; je disais: "On joue au divorce, au crime!" et eux me regardaient: "Mais où vas-tu prendre ça?".
J'étais probablement très différente des autres. Alors que les enfants refusent en général d'aller se coucher, jamais je ne rechignais. Au contraire, de moi-même je disais: "Je crois que je vais aller me coucher." J'aimais la solitude de ma chambre, et mon lit. J'aimais surtout me jouer le dernier film que j'avais vu. Debout sur mon lit, plus grande que jamais, je jouais tous les rôles, y compris ceux des hommes, et j'ajoutais des inventions de mon cru. J'adorais cela, tout comme jouer la comédie dans les fêtes scolaires.
Là, toujours à cause de ma taille, j'ai joué le roi une fois, et une autre fois le prince. J'ai eu une période heureuse, dans cette partie de ma jeunesse: celle où j'ai vécu chez "tante" Anna. C'était une vielle femme de soixante ou soixante-cinq ans, parente de Grace McKee. Elle m'aimait beaucoup et j'y étais très sensible. Elle me comprenait. Elle n'oubliait jamais qu'elle avait été jeune et ses merveilleuses histoires, tristes ou gaies, de ce temps passé, me fascinaient. Le soir, quand je faisais la vaisselle, j'étais si heureuse que je chantais ou sifflais par la fenêtre de la cuisine, et qu'elle disait: "Quel pinson! Je n'ai jamais rien entendu de pareil!". C'est vers la fin de cette période qu'on m'a mariée. Il y a peu de choses à dire de ce mariage. Grace McKee et son mari devaient partir pour la Virginie. A Los Angeles, ils touchaient vingt dollars du comté pour moi; si je partais avec eux, nous perdions cet argent. Comme ils n'étaient pas assez riches pour me faire vivre mais qu'ils m'aimaient bien, il fallait trouver un moyen de me "caser". En Californie, une jeune fille peut se marier à seize ans. On m'a donc donné le choix: ou entrer dans un Orphelinat d'Etat jusqu'à dix-huit ans ou me marier. J'avais presque seize ans; j'ai choisi le mariage.
Il s'appelait Dougherty, il avait vingt et un ans et travaillait dans une usine. Peu de temps après, ce fut la guerre. D'abord mobilisé comme moniteur d'éducation physique, il fut versé ensuite dans l'armée active, mais échoua finalement dans la marine marchande. Peu avant la fin de la guerre, j'allais à Las Vegas et obtins le divorce. J'avais vingt ans. Aujourd'hui, il est agent de police. J'ai travaillé en usine pendant la guerre. J'ai commencé par vérifier des parachutes, pour avions-cibles, pas pour hommes. Puis, je suis passée au "collage", comme on appelait ça... un enduit qu'on étalait sur ce qui servait à fabriquer les avions-cibles. C'était fastidieux et il y avait une mauvaise ambiance humaine. Les femmes parlaient surtout de l'emploi de leurs soirées et du prochain week-end. Je travaillais tout près de l'atelier de peinture au pistolet... rien que des hommes. Ils m'écrivaient des mots et s'arrêtaient de peindre, etc.
C'était si monotone que je travaillais vite, pour me débarrasser. Le résultat fut inattendu. On a dû trouver que j'abattais un travail formidable. Il y a eu une assemblée générale du personnel et le directeur m'a citée pour "bonne volonté exemplaire" et m'a remis une insigne en or et un bon du Trésor de vingt-cinq dollars. Les autres filles ont été folles de jalousie et m'ont mené la vie dure, après cela. Elles ricanaient et faisaient exprès de me bousculer quand j'allais remplir mon pot d'enduit; pour le renverser sur moi. Oh, j'ai souffert! Et puis, un jour, l'Armée de l'Air a voulu des photos de notre usine. Je revenais d'un congé, on m'appelle au bureau: "Où vous cachiez-vous?" Morte de peur, je réponds: "J'étais en permission régulière!"- ce qui était vrai. On me dit: "Là n'est pas la question. Voulez-vous poser pour des photos?" Bref, les photographes arrivèrent et prirent des photos. Ils en réclamèrent d'autres, hors de l'atelier. Moi, j'avais peur de m'attirer des ennuis si je quittais mon travail. J'ai refusé, j'ai dit: "Demandez la permission." Ils l'ont obtenue et j'ai passée plusieurs journées à poser ici, là, et à tenir des trucs, pousser des trucs, tirer des trucs...
Les photos étaient développées dans les laboratoires Eastman-Kodak. Et là, les gens ont demandé qui était le modèle et en ont parlé aux photographes; si bien que l'un d'eux - David Conover - est revenu me dire: "Vous devriez faire le modèle. Vous gagneriez facilement cinq dollars de l'heure." Cinq dollars de l'heure, alors que j'en gagnais vingt par semaine, pour dix heures de travail par jour, les pieds sur le ciment! Il y avait de quoi tenter la moins folle des filles.
Je m'y suis mise peu à peu. C'était la fin de la guerre. J'ai quitté l'usine. Je me suis présentée à une agence. J'ai eu du travail. Photos publicitaires. Calendriers... Pas celui qui a fait tant de bruit; nous y viendrons. D'autres, où j'étais brune, rousse, blonde. Et je gagnais vraiment cinq dollars de l'heure! De temps à autres, je pouvais réaliser un de mes rêves: me payer des leçons d'art dramatique... quand j'avais assez d'argent, car ça coûtait cher, dix dollars de l'heure! Je faisais la connaissance de gens très différents de ce que j'avais connus jusqu'alors. Des bons et des mauvais. Souvent, quand j'attendais un bus à un coin de rue, une voiture s'arrêtait et l'homme au volant me débitait une histoire: "Qu'est-ce que vous fabriquez là? Vous devriez être dans les films." Ensuite, il proposait de me ramener. Moi, je répondais toujours: "Non merci. J'aime mieux le bus." Mais tout de même, l'idée du cinéma cheminait dans ma tête. Une fois, je me souviens, j'ai accepté un rendez-vous dans un studio avec un homme rencontré de cette façon. Il devait être très persuasif. J'y suis allée. C'était un samedi et il n'y avait pas un chat dans ces studios. J'aurais dû me méfier, mais j'étais naïve à bien des points de vue. Bref, je trouve mon homme qui me conduit dans un bureau. Nous étions seuls. Il me tend un scénario en disant que je devrais faire l'affaire pour un rôle, mais qu'il faut voir. Sur quoi, il me demande de lire le rôle, tout en insistant pour que je relève ma robe et que je la garde comme ça. C'était en été et j'avais un maillot de bain sous ma robe. Mais comme il répétait: "Plus haut!" j'ai pris peur et, toute rouge, je me suis entêtée de mon côté: "Seulement si je garde mon chapeau!" C'était idiot, mais j'avais vraiment peur et j'étais déséspérée. Je devais être ridicule, assise là et cramponnée à mon chapeau. A la fin, il s'est mis en fureur, ce qui a achevé de me terrifier, je me suis sauvée et j'ai signalé l'affaire à l'agence. On a téléphoné aux studios, et ailleurs, pour essayer de le retrouver. Impossible. Il devait avoir un ami dans la place qui lui avait permis d'utiliser son bureau. L'incident me bouleversa à tel point que, pendant assez longtemps, je résolus de ne jamais être actrice. C'est une dure époque de ma vie. Je déménageais tout le temps, d'un meublé à l'autre. L'hôtel était trop cher.
Et puis le hasard a fait qu'on m'a vue sur la couverture de cinq magasines différents le même mois et la Fox a téléphoné. Je me suis retrouvée sur un banc de bois avec des gens de tout âge et de toutes dimensions qui attendaient comme moi. On a attendu lontemps avant que Ben Lyon, qui dirigeait le recrutement, sorte de son bureau. A peine sorti, il a dit en me montrant du doigt : "Qui est-ce?" Je portais une petite robe blanche en piqué que "Tante" Anna - j'étais revenue vivre chez elle quelque temps - avait lavée et repassée à toute vitesse; tout cela était arrivé si rapidement que je n'aurais jamais pu préparer la robe et me préparer en même temps; "Tante" Anna m'avait dit: "Je m'occupe de la robe. Occupe-toi de tes cheveux et de ton maquillage."
Je me sentais plutôt défaite aprés cette longue attente. Mais Lyon fut très gentil. Il me dit qu'il me trouvait si fraîche, si jeune, etc... Il dit même : "vous êtes la première que je découvre depuis Jean Harlow." Jean Harlow, entre nous, est ma préférée d'autrefois!
Le lendemain, bien qu'il eût fallu normalement le consentement du Président directeur général ou de je ne sais qui, Lyon me glissa dans une série de bouts d'essais en technicolor et, presque aussitôt, la Fox me signa un contrat. Un contrat de star, pour un an!
En pure perte d'ailleurs. Je n'ai jamais su pourquoi, jamais compris. Ils engageaient des tas de filles et de garçons et les laissaient tomber sans leur accorder une seule chance. Ce fut mon cas. Mise à la porte, j'essayai de voir M. Zanuck. Impossible. Chaque fois, on me répondait qu'il était à Sun Valley. Semaine après semaine je revins à l'assaut : "Navré", me disait-on. "Il est occupé, il est à Sun Valley." J'imagine, il y est encore... bien que je l'ai revu, quand la Fox me reprit sous contrat, après 'Asphalt Jungle'. Il me dit: "Vous avez déjà été ici apparemment ?" - "C'est vrai." - "Que voulez vous, la roue tourne!" et il enchaîna en déclarant que j'avais "quelque-chose", une qualité à trois dimensions qui lui rappelait Jean Harlow; ce qui fut très intéressant puisque ça avait été l'avis de Ben Lyon. Je dois beaucoup à Ben Lyon, il fut le premier à me donner confiance. Je lui doit aussi mon nom actuel. Un jour où nous cherchions pour moi un nom de cinéma, car je ne voulais pas garder celui d'un homme qui n'était pas mon père, j'insistai pour prendre celui du nom de jeune fille de ma mère: Monroe. Je tenais à conserver du moins une forme de lien avec mes parents. Il accepta Monroe, mais ce fut lui qui trouva Marilyn, parce que, dit-il, après Jean Harlow, l'actrice à laquelle je ressemblais le plus était Marilyn Miller, la fameuse vedette des comédies musicales de Broadway. Etrange, quand on y pense que me voilà devenue Marilyn Miller pour l'état civil!
Mais enfin, pour en revenir à notre histoire, j'étais donc sans rien. Saquée par la Fox, saquée par la Columbia un peu plus tard, quoique différemment. La Columbia m'avait du moins donné un rôle dans 'Ladies of the Chorus'. Un film affreux! Je jouais une danseuse de burlesque dont un type de Boston tombe amoureux. Horrible! Mais ce n'était pas la raison de mon départ. Le vrai motif tient à des circonstances plutôt étranges et, mettons, déplaisantes. Je n'en dirai pas plus, si ce n'est que... la vie est pleine de leçons. Je ne voyais pas d'issue. J'étais revenue aux jours les plus durs. J'habitais au Hollywood Studio Club. J'y étais très malheureuse: cela me rappelait l'orphelinat. J'avais des dettes et j'étais très en retard pour mon loyer. Au Club, on vous accorde une semaine de retard et, après, vous recevez un petit mot: "Vous êtes la seule à ne pas apporter votre soutien à notre merveilleuse institution.", etc. Et vous comprenez! Tant que vous vivez là, vous mangez deux fois par jour, petit déjeuner et dîner. Ce n'est pas toujours très bon, mais cela nourrit. Et vous avez un toit et un lit. Sans cela, où aller? Pas de famille. Rien. Personne. Et j'avais faim. Je sais, des gens me disaient: "Pourquoi ne pas chercher un job de vendeuse, quelque part ?" Oui, pourquoi pas ? Une fois j'ai essayé, dans un drugstore: on n'a pas voulu de moi parce que je n'avais pas terminé mes etudes de lycée. Et puis, comment dire ?... ce n'était pas la même chose. J'avais été modèle et surtout je voulais devenir une actrice et il me semblait que, si je retombais, ce serait sans retour. On a raconté beaucoup de fables à propos du fameux calendrier. A l'époque où l'on a découvert la chose, j'avais déjà fait 'Asphalt Jungle' et j'étais de nouveau sous contrat avec la Fox, pour sept ans cette fois. J'entends encore la voix de celui qui m'appela au téléphone, des bureaux de la Publicité: "C'est vrai que vous avez posé pour un calendrier?" - "Bien sûr", dis-je. "Cela vous ennuie?" puis j'ai compris à quel point ils étaient bouleversés, car la voix reprit : "Eh bien, même si c'est vrai, dites que non." - "Mais j'ai signé l'autorisation de vente! Comment voulez-vous que je mente?" Et, si contrariés qu'ils fussent, je dis la vérité. Mais quand les journalistes me demandèrent pourquoi et que je repondi: "J'avais faim", on crut à un bon mot.
Ceux qui me connaissent bien savent que j'ai beaucoup de mal à mentir. Cela m'a coûté assez cher dans la vie. Il m'arrive de passer délibérement des choses sous silence, pour me protéger ou protéger les autres - qui n'a pas envie ou besoin de se protéger? - mais je ne mens jamais. J'avais faim et j'avais quatre semaines de loyer en retard; je cherchais déséspérémment de l'argent. Telle est la vérité. Je me suis rappelée que j'avais posé pour les publicités de bière avec le photographe Tom Kelley, et que sa femme, Nathalie, avait suggéré que je devrais poser sans vêtements, en ajoutant qu'il n'y avait rien de mal à cela et que c'était bien payé: cinquante dollars, la somme dont j'avais besoin. Alors, comme ils avaient toujours été très gentils pour moi, j'ai téléphoné. J'ai commencé par dire à Tom: "Etes-vous sûr qu'on ne me reconnaîtra pas ?" Il l'a promis. Puis j'ai demandé si Nathalie serait là. "Oui." - Mais ça devra être de nuit", ai-je insisté. "Après que vos assistants seront partis. Vous devrez vous debrouillez tout seul avec Nathalie pour les éclairages." Il a dit oui. Je suis venue. Ils se montrèrent d'une compréhension extrêmes; ils me sentaient suffisamment bouleversée. Ils ont étalé un velour rouge. Ce fut vite fait, très simple, et plein de courants d'air. Mais je pus payer le loyer et manger.
Les gens sont drôles. Ils vous posent de ces questions ! Et si vous êtes franches, ils sont choqués ! On me demande: "Qu'est-ce que vous mettez pour vous coucher ? Un haut de pijama ? Le bas ? Une chemise de nuit ?" Je reponds: "Une goutte de Chanel n°5", et l'on croit que c'est encore un bon mot, alors que j'essaie de répondre avec tact à une question grossière et indiscrète. Et puis, c'est vrai ! Mais on ne le croit pas !
Il fut un moment où je commençais à être... reconnue, disons, et où les gens n'arrivaient pas à imaginer ce que je faisais quand je n'étais pas sur le plateau, parce qu'on ne me voyait à aucune première, aucune représentation de presse, aucune réception. C'est simple: j'allais à l'école ! Je n'avais jamais pu finir mes études, alors j'allais à l'Université de Los Angeles. Le soir. Dans la journée, je gagnais ma vie avec des petits rôles dans les films. Je suivais des cours d'histoire de littérature et d'histoire de ce pays; je lisais beaucoup, de grands écrivains. C'était dur d'être à l'heure pour les cours. Je devais me dépêcher. Je quittais le studio à 6h30 et j'avais dû me lever très tôt pour être sur le plateau, prête, à 9 heures du matin. Souvent j'étais morte de fatigue; il m'arrivait même de m'endormir en classe. Mais je me forçais à rester droite et à écouter. J'avais pour voisin un jeune noir, studieux et brillant: il me donnait l'exemple et cela m'aidait à rester éveillée. Entre parenthéses, c'était un humble postier à l'époque; il est aujourd'hui directeur des postes à Los Angeles. Le professeur, Mme Seay, ne savait pas qui j'étais, bien qu'elle trouvât bizzare que des garçons des autres classes passaient parfois la tête à la porte, pendant les cours, pour me regarder en chuchotant. Un jour, elle se décida à interroger mes camarades, qui dirent: "Elle joue dans les films". Surprise, elle déclara: "Et moi qui la prenais pour une jeune fille fraîche émoulue du couvent!" C'est l'un des plus grands compliments qu'on m'ait jamais faits.
Mais les gens dont je parlais tout à l'heure, eux, préféraient voir en moi une starlette frivole, "sexy" et stupide. C'est comme ma réputation d'être toujours en retard. D'abord, tout le temps, non ! On se rappele seulement quand je le suis. Cela dit, je crois en effet que je ne peux pas aller aussi vite que les autres. Ils sautent en voiture, se rentrent dedans, sans répit... Je ne crois pas que nous soyons faits pour vivre comme des machines. D'ailleurs, c'est tellement inutile ! On travaille tellement mieux avec un peu plus de bon sens et de loisirs ! Au studio, si je dois me presser pour répéter ou pour me faire coiffer, maquiller, habiller, j'arrive épuisée sur le plateau. Pendant que nous tournions 'Let's make love', George Cukor, le metteur en scéne, a trouvé plus intelligent de me laisser un peu en retard mais plus fraîche. En tout ce que je fais, j'aime prendre mon temps. On se bouscule trop, de nos jours. C'est pourquoi les gens sont si nerveux et si malheureux en face de la vie et d'eux-mêmes. Comment peut-on faire parfaitement quoi que ce soit, dans ces conditions ? La perfection demande du temps.
J'aimerais devenir une grande actrice, une vraie, et être heureuse aussi parfaitement que possible. Mais qui est heureux ? Le bonheur ! Vouloir devenir une vraie actrice, tout cela demande beaucoup d'effort et de temps.

Georges Belmont: J'imagine que ce portrait de la Duse, au mur, n'est pas ici pour rien ?

Marilyn Monroe: Non. J'ai une grande tendresse pour elle. A cause de sa vie, comme femme et comme actrice. Comment dire ?... Elle n'a jamais fait de concession, dans un cas comme dans l'autre.
Personnellement, quand il m'arrive de réussir quelque chose dans mon métier, j'ai le sentiment de toucher à ce qu'on appelle le sommet du bonheur. Mais ce ne sont que des moments ! Je ne suis pas heureuse, comme ça, en général. Si je suis quelque chose, en général, ce serait plutôt misérable comme un chien ! Mes deux vies, professionelle et privée, me sont si personnelles, sont si étroitement liées, que je ne peux les séparer: l'une réagit constamment sur l'autre.
L'ennui dans mon cas, je pense, c'est que je voudrais tant être merveilleuse ! Je sais que cela fera rire certains, mais c'est vrai. Une fois, à New York, mon avocat me parlait d'histoires d'argent, en déployant une patience d'ange pour m'expliquer ça. A la fin je lui ai dit: "Je n'y comprend rien et je m'en moque. Je sais seulement que je voudrais être merveilleuse!". Dites cela à un homme de loi, il vous croira folle.
Il y a un livre du poète Rainer Maria Rilke qui m'a beaucoup aidée: 'Lettres à un jeune poète'. Sans lui, peut-être croirais-je par moments que je suis folle. Quand un artiste... je m'excuse, mais je considère que je suis presque une artiste, et là encore, on rira sans doute; c'est pourquoi je m'excuse... quand un artiste recherche à tout prix la vérité, il a parfois la sensation de frôler la folie. Mais ce n'est pas vraiment la folie. C'est seulement qu'on s'efforce de faire sortir ce qu'on a de plus vrai en soi-même; et croyez-moi, c'est dur. Il y a des jours où l'on se dit: "Sois vraie, c'est tout !", et ça ne sort pas. Et d'autres jours, c'est si simple !
J'ai toujours eu le sentiment secret de ne pas être absolument sincère. Tout le monde sent cela, de temps à autre, je suppose. Mais dans mon cas, cela va loin parfois... jusqu'à penser que, foncièrement, je ne suis qu'un monstre de fabrication. Lee Strasberg, le directeur de l'Actors Studio me répète souvent: "...Pourquoi es-tu si mécontente de toi-même ?" Et il ajoute: "Après tout, tu es un être humain !" Et moi je lui réponds: "Oui, mais j'ai l'impression que je dois être plus que cela." - "Non!" me dit-il alors. "C'est cela que tu essaies de faire en ce moment ?" - "Il faut bien que j'entre dans la peau du personnage, non ?!" Et il répète encore : "Non ! Tu es un être humain. Pars de toi-même !" La première fois qu'il m'a sorti cela, j'ai crié : "De MOI?" Et il a répondu : "Oui! De TOI !!".
Après Arthur, Lee est probablement celui qui a le plus changé ma vie. C'est pourquoi j'aime tant aller à l'Actors Studio. A New York, j'y vais régulièrement. Je n'ai qu'une envie: faire de mon mieux, toujours, à tout instant. Sur le plateau, dès que la caméra se déclenche, je veux être parfaite, aussi parfaite que possible, jusqu'au bout. Quand j'étais à l'usine, le samedi soir, j'allais au cinéma. C'était le seul moment où je pouvais me distraire, rire, être moi-même. Alors, si le film était mauvais, quelle déception ! Toute la semaine, j'avais attendu et travaillé dur pour me payer cela. Si les acteurs me paraissaient jouer par-dessous la jambe, je sortais déçue comme si l'on m'avait trahie. Que me resterait-il pendant toute une semaine ? C'est pourquoi, aujourd'hui, quand je travaille, je songe toujours à ceux qui travaillent aussi pour pouvoir aligner leur argent au guichet dans l'espoir de s'amuser. Ce que pensent les producteurs et le metteur en scéne, cela m'est assez égal: mais pas ce que penseront les gens en voyant le film. Un jour, j'ai essayé d'expliquer ça à M. Zanuck...
L'amour et le travail sont les seules choses vraies qui nous arrivent dans la vie. Ils font la paire; sinon, c'est boiteux. D'ailleurs, le travail même est une forme d'amour. A l'usine j'ai dit que je me dépêchais d'expédier mon travail parce que c'était fastidieux; mais je me rappelle que, malgré tout, je mettais un point d'honneur à le faire exactement, aussi parfaitement que possible. Et si je rêvais de l'amour, c'était aussi comme d'une chose qui doit être la plus parfaite possible. Quand j'ai épousé Joe DiMaggio, en 1954, il ne jouait déjà plus au base-ball, mais c'était un merveilleux athlète et un être d'une grande sensiblité. Fils d'immigrants italiens, il avait eu une jeunesse difficile. Nous nous comprenions donc assez bien. Ce fut la base de notre mariage. Mais je dis assez bien. Et pour cela ce fut un échec. C'était fini au bout de neuf mois, malheureusement. Je mets le même point d'honneur à mes sentiments qu'à mon travail. Peut-être est-ce pourquoi je suis impétueuse et exclusive. J'aime bien les gens. Et quand j'aime, je pousse l'exclusivité jusqu'à ne plus avoir qu'une seule idée en tête ! Surtout, j'ai envi d'être traitée humainement.
La première fois que j'ai vu Arthur Miller, c'était sur un plateau et je pleurais. Je jouais dans un film 'As young as you feel', et il passait dans les studios avec Elia Kazan. Je pleurais à cause d'une amie dont je venais d'apprendre la mort. On nous présenta. Je voyais tout dans un brouillard. C'était en 1951. Je restai quatre ans sans le revoir, après cela. Nous nous écrivions et il m'envoya une liste de livres à lire. Mais je me rappelle que, constamment, je songeais qu'il me verrait peut-être dans un film... on passerait deux films, ce soir là, et peut-être serais-je dans un et me verrait-il. Alors, quand je travaillais, je faisais encore plus de mon mieux... Je ne sais comment décrire cela. Je l'aimais, depuis le premier jour. Voilà, c'est tout. Jamais je n'oublierai qu'il dit, ce jour là, qu'à son avis, je devrais faire du théâtre et que les gens autour de nous, sur le plateau, rirent en l'entendant. Mais il répéta: "Non, non, c'est très sérieux." Et le ton, son attitude, les circonstances, firent que je sentis en lui un être profondément humain et sensible, et qui m'avait traitée comme une personne humaine et sensible, moi aussi. C'est le mieux que je puisse dire. Mais c'est le plus important. Depuis notre mariage, quand je ne tourne pas, nous menons une vie tranquille et heureuse à New York, et plus encore dans notre maison du Connecticut pendant les week-ends. Mon mari aime travailler tôt le matin. Il se lève en général à 6 heures. Il se repose ensuite dans la journée en faisant la sieste. Comme l'appartement n'est pas grand, j'ai fait insonoriser son bureau. Il a besoin de solitude totale quand il travaille. Moi, je me lève à 8h30 et quelques. Nous avons une excellente cuisinière. Parfois, en attendant mon petit-déjeuner, je vais promener mon chien Hugo. mais quand la cuisinière est de sortie, je me lève plus tôt et je prépare le petit déjeuner pour mon mari; car je trouve qu'un homme ne doit pas s'occuper de ses repas. Je suis très vieux jeu à bien des égards. Je trouve aussi qu'un homme ne doit jamais porter à la main ce qui appartient en propre à la femme, souliers à hauts talons, sac, etc. Il m'arrive de cacher un peigne dans la poche de mon mari, mais c'est tout.
Après le petit déjeuner, je prends un bain, pour changer des jours de travail où je me lève si tôt, parfois à 6h ou 5h du matin, que je dois prendre deux douches, une chaude et une froide pour me secouer. A New York, j'aime à me tremper dans mon bain en lisant les journaux et écoutant des disques. Après, j'enfile une jupe, une blouse, des souliers plats et une veste de polo et, le mardi et le vendredi, je vais à l'Actors Studios, à 11h, ou les autres jours aux cours privés de Lee Strasberg. Je rentre pour le déjeuner, que nous prenons d'habitude ensemble, comme le dîner. Nous écoutons des disques en mangeant. Mon mari aime comme moi la musique classique. Ou le jazz s'il est excellent, bien que nous réservions plutôt cela aux soirées où nous avons des amis qui aiment danser. Souvent, Arthur se remet au travail après sa sieste. Je trouve toujours à m'occuper pendant ce temps. Il a deux enfants de son premier mariage et je m'efforce d'être une bonne belle-mère. Et il y a à faire dans l'appartement. J'aime faire la cuisine, pas tellement à la ville où l'on est trop bousculé, mais à la campagne pour le week-end. Je fais du très bon pain, et les nouilles aussi très bien. Rouler, sécher, la cuisson et la sauce. Ce sont mes deux spécialités. Mais j'aime également inventer... J'adore les assaisonnements ! L'ail ! Souvent, j'en mets de trop pour le goût des autres.
Il arrive que les acteurs avec qui j'étudie une scène pour les cours de Strasberg viennent à la maison, le matin ou l'après-midi et je leur prépare un petit-déjeuner ou le thé... Bref, les journées sont assez remplies. Mais toujours, j'ai soin d'être libre avant le dîner, pour mon mari. Aprés le dîner, parfois nous allons au théâtre ou au cinéma, ou des amis viennent, ou nous allons chez des amis. Mais très souvent, nous restons tout simplement à la maison, tous les deux, à écouter de la musique, parler ou lire. Ou encore, nous marchons dans les rues ou dans Central Park. Nous adorons marcher. Il n'y a pas de routine fixe dans notre vie. Il y a bien des moments où j'aimerai être plus organisée, faire certaines choses à certaines heures etc. Mais mon mari dit que comme ça, au moins, on ne s'ennuie pas ! Alors, tout va bien. Et puis, personellement, les choses ne m'ennuient jamais. Ce qui m'ennuient, ce sont les gens qui s'ennuient. J'aime beaucoup les gens; pourtant, parfois, je me demande si je suis vraiment sociable. La solitude ne me pèse pas. Cela m'est égal d'être seule. Même, j'aime cela. C'est un repos. Cela permet de prendre plus possession de soi-même, de se rafraîchir. Je crois qu'il y a deux aspects dans tout être humain; du moins, c'est ce que je sens dans mon cas. On a envie d'être seul, et en même temps, envie d'être ensemble. C'est un vrai conflit. J'y suis sensible à un point suraigu. C'est pourquoi, j'aime tant mon travail. Quand j'en suis contente, naturellement je me sens plus gaie, plus sociable. Quand ça ne va pas, j'ai envie d'être seule. Et c'est la même chose dans ma vie...

Georges Belmont: En sorte que, pour résumer, si je vous demande quelle impression cela fait d'être Marilyn Monroe, à ce stade de votre vie, que direz-vous?

Marilyn Monroe: Quelle impression cela vous fait-il d'être vous?

Georges Belmont: Parfois je suis content du monde et de moi-même. Parfois, non.

Marilyn Monroe: Et vous êtes heureux comme ça?

Georges Belmont: Ma foi, oui.

Marilyn Monroe: Eh bien, moi aussi. Et comme j'ai trente quatre ans et encore quelques années devant moi, j'éspère, cela me laisse le temps de travailler à devenir meilleure et plus heureuse dans mon métier comme dans ma vie privée. C'est ma seule ambition. Peut-être y mettrais-je le temps, car je suis lente; et je ne veux pas dire par là que ce soit le plus sûr moyen. Mais c'est le seul que je connaisse et qui me donne le sentiment que la vie, après tout, n'est pas sans espoir. 

14 décembre 2011

Lindsay Lohan pose en Marilyn pour Playboy

lindsay_playboy_coverDans le dernier numéro de Playboy américain de janvier 2012 (sorti en kiosque en décembre 2011), Lindsay Lohan pose entièrement nue, copiant l'une des séances des plus célèbres de Marilyn Monroe: celle de Tom Kelley où la jeune Marilyn prenait la pose nue en 1949, sur des draps de satin rouge.
Il y a eu une fuite où les photos circulent sur le web, bien avant la sortie du magazine, faisant ainsi un buzz sur la toile. Lindsay a ainsi déclaré: “Sex and sexuality are a part of nature, and I go along with nature. I think Marilyn Monroe once said that. I certainly agree with her… Knowing yourself and your body is so important because it gives you confidence, and in life, women need confidence. It’s a very male-dominated world to begin with, so knowing yourself and being comfortable with your body is an important thing for me as a woman. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but that’s mine."
La starlette aurait été payée près d'un million de Dollars pour faire cette séance photos.

lindsay_playboy_page1 lindsay_playboy_page2 lindsay_playboy_pic8
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 lindsay_playboy_pic4 lindsay_playboy_pic2 lindsay_playboy_pic5
lindsay_playboy_pic3 lindsay_playboy_pic6 lindsay_playboy_pic7
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> Lindsay en backstage
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>> Source article & photos:
article sur lci.tf1.fr
article sur actustar
photos sur tetu.com 

Posté par ginieland à 13:44 - - Commentaires [9] - Permalien [#]
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