Warren Beatty took a 'soulful' walk with Marilyn Monroe the night before she died
October, 7, 2016
en ligne sur nydailynews.com

 It could have been Warren Beatty's affair to remember.
The Hollywood legend was one of the last people to see Marilyn Monroe alive, he recalled in a new interview with Vanity Fair.
Beatty and Monroe met Aug. 4, 1962, at Peter Lawford's house in Santa Monica, California.
Lawford, also an actor, invited Beatty over for a night of tacos and poker, and Monroe, a longtime friend of Lawford, was there.

 “I hadn’t seen anything that beautiful,” he said in the interview.
The blonde buxom asked a then 25-year-old Beatty if he wanted to walk along the beach.
It was more soulful than romantic," the 79-year-old recounted of their telling stroll.

nydaily01  
 (L. J. Willinger/Getty Images)

Later, he played the piano for her and Marilyn was "wearing something so clingy that he could tell she wasn't wearing underwear."
Beatty also noticed that she was "already tipsy from the champagne" even "before the sun had set."
The next day, Beatty got a phone call from Harold Mirisch, brother of Hollywood producer Walter Marisch, who told him Marilyn had died from an overdose at age 36.


Six Decades In, Warren Beatty Is Still Seducing Hollywood
October, 6, 2016
en ligne sur vanityfair.com

warren-1962 
Warren & Natalie Wood, 1962, Academy Awards

[...]
He also briefly encountered Marilyn Monroe. Peter Lawford had invited him out to his house in Malibu for a night of tacos and poker, and Monroe was there. “I hadn’t seen anything that beautiful,” Beatty recalls. She invited him to take a walk along the beach, which he did. “It was more soulful than romantic.” Back in the house, he played the piano. (He’s a good pianist, by the way, enamored of jazz greats such as Erroll Garner.) Marilyn sat on the edge of the piano in something so clingy that Beatty could tell she wasn’t wearing underwear.

How old are you ?” she asked.
Twenty-five,” he answered. “And how old are you ?” he asked cheekily.
Three. Six,” she said, as if not wanting to bring the two numbers together. By then, the tacos had arrived, and no one really played poker that night. Warren noticed that Marilyn was already a bit tipsy from champagne, even before the sun had set.

The next day, the producer Walter Mirisch’s brother Harold called. “Did you hear ?” he asked. “Marilyn Monroe is dead.” Warren was one of the last people to see Marilyn alive—a story that Beatty tells only reluctantly. He really is one of Hollywood’s most discreet people, in a town and an industry marinated in its own gossip.