23 février 2017

Saturday Evening Post, 1956/05/05

Saturday Evening Post
- The New Marilyn Monroe - Part 1

1956-05-05-saturday_evening_post-cover 

pays magazine: USA
paru le 5 mai 1956
article: 1ère partie "The New Marilyn Monroe"
en ligne sur saturdayeveningpost.com

1956-05-05-SEP 
1956-05-05-saturday_evening_post-p1 
1956-05-05-saturday_evening_post-p2-3 


The New Marilyn Monroe
This three-part series by Pete Martin was originally published in The Saturday Evening Post, May 5–19, 1956:
By Pete Martin
Originally published on May 5, 1956
A Post editor’s surprisingly candid report on the girl with the horizontal walk. He reveals things about the phenomenal blonde that even Marilyn herself doesn’t know.

1956-05-05-saturday_evening_post-pic1 
The new Marilyn Monroe in Hollywood after returning from
her self-imposed exile in New York. Not quite 30,
she possesses what is possibly the most
photographed face and figure in history. (Gene Lester, © SEPS)

I said to Marilyn Monroe, “Pictures of you usually show you with mouth open and your eyes half closed. Did some photographer sell you the idea that having your picture taken that way makes you look sexier?”

She replied in what I’d come to recognize as pure Monroese. “The formation of my lids must make them look heavy or else I’m thinking of something,” she told me. “Sometimes I’m thinking of men. Other times I’m thinking of some man in particular. It’s easier to look sexy when you’re thinking of some man in particular. As for my mouth being open all the time, I even sleep with it open. I know, because it’s open when I wake up. I never consciously think of my mouth, but I do consciously think about what I’m thinking about.”

Tucked away in that paragraph like blueberries in a hot muffin were several genuine Monroeisms. I had studied the subject long enough to be able to tell a genuine Monroeism from a spurious one.

When I asked her, “Has anyone ever accused you of wearing falsies?” she came through with a genuine Monroeism.

“Yes,” she told me, her eyes flashing indignantly. “Naturally,” she went on, “it was another actress who accused me. My answer to that is, quote: Those who know me better know better. That’s all. Unquote.”

Another Monroeism followed hard on the heels of that. I said, “I’ve heard that you wowed the marines in Korea when you climbed up onto a platform to say a few words to them, and they whistled at you and made wolf calls.”

“I know the time you’re talking about,” she said. “It wasn’t in Korea at all; it was at Camp Pendleton, California. They wanted me to say a few words, so I said, ‘You fellows down there are always whistling at sweater girls. Well, take away their sweaters and what have you got?’ For some reason they screamed and yelled.”

Another example came forth when Marilyn was asked if she and the playwright, Arthur Miller, were having an affair. “How can they say we’re having a romance?” she replied. “He’s married.”

Still another Monroeism had emerged from a press conference in the Plaza Hotel, in New York City. It was held to announce her teaming with Sir Laurence Olivier in an acting- directing-producing venture — a get-together described by one of those present as “one of the least likely duos in cinematic history.” The big Monroeism of that occasion was Marilyn’s answer to the query, “Miss Monroe, do you still want to do The Brothers Karamazov on Broadway?”

“I don’t want to play The Brothers,” she said. “I want to play Grushenka from that book. She’s a girl.”

Listening to her as she talked to me now, I thought, Nobody can write dialogue for her which could possibly sound half as much like her as the dialogue she thinks up for herself.

Nunnally Johnson, who produced the film, How to Marry a Millionaire, costarring Marilyn, told me, “When I talked to her when she first came on the lot, I felt as if I were talking to a girl under water. I couldn’t tell whether I was getting through to her or not. She lived behind a fuzz curtain.”

Johnson also directed How to be Very, Very Popular, and when Sheree North took Marilyn’s place in that film, he announced: “Sheree will not use the Monroe technique in How to be Very, Very Popular. She will play the entire role with her mouth closed.”

Marilyn’s last sentence to me: “I never consciously think of my mouth, but I do consciously think about what I’m thinking about” seemed a trifle murky, but I had no time to work on it, for, without pausing, she said, “Another writer asked me, ‘What do you think of sex?’ and I told him, ‘It’s a part of nature. I go along with nature.’ Zsa Zsa Gabor was supposed to write an article for a magazine on the subject: ‘What’s Wrong With American Men,’ and I did marginal notes for it. The editor cut out my best lines. I wrote, ‘If there’s anything wrong with the way American men look at sex, it’s not their fault. After all, they’re descended from the Puritans, who got off the boat on the wrong foot — or was it the Pilgrims? — and there’s still a lot of that puritanical stuff around.’ The editor didn’t use that one.”

I carefully wrote down every word she said to me. She told me that she’d rather I wouldn’t use a tape-recording machine while interviewing her. “It would make me nervous to see that thing going round and round,” she insisted. So I used pencils and a notebook instead. But I didn’t use them right away.

I had to wait for her to walk from her bedroom into the living room of her apartment, where I sat ready to talk to her. It took her an hour and a half to make that journey. At 3:45, Lois Weber, the pleasant young woman who handled the Monroe New York publicity, admitted me to the apartment Marilyn was occupying. She pushed the buzzer outside of a door on the eighth floor of an apartment building on Sutton Place South, and a voice asked, “Who is it?”

“It’s me,” said my chaperone.

The lock clickety-clicked open, but when we went in, Marilyn was nowhere in sight. She had retreated into a bedroom. Her voice said to us through the door, “I’ll be out in just seven minutes.”

A publicity man to whom I’d talked at Marilyn’s studio in Hollywood had warned me, “She’ll stand you up a couple of times before you meet her. Then she’ll be late, and when I say late, I mean real late. You’ll be so burned at her before she walks in that you’ll wrap up your little voice-recording machine and get ready to leave at least three times — maybe four times — before she shows. But somebody will persuade you to wait, and finally Marilyn will come in, and before you know it, she’ll have you wrapped up too. For she’s warmhearted, amusing and likable, even if her lateness is a pain in the neck. And after that, if somebody says, ‘That was mighty thoughtless of old Marilyn, keeping you waiting like that,’ you’ll want to slug him for being mean.

“What you won’t know,” that studio publicity man went on, “is that while you’re having hell’s own headache waiting for her, whatever publicity worker is trying to get her to see you is having an even bigger headache. Marilyn will be telling that publicity worker that her stomach is so upset that she’s been throwing up for hours; she hasn’t been able to get her make-up on right; or that she’s got a bum deal in the wardrobe department and hasn’t anything to wear.”

So, in an effort to be witty, when Marilyn said, through the closed door, “I’ll be out in just seven minutes,” I said, “I’ll settle for eight.” Time was to prove it the unfunniest remark I’ve ever made. One hour later I asked Lois Weber, “What do you suppose she’s doing in there?”

“You know how it is,” my publicity-girl chaperone said soothingly, “a girl has to put on her face.”

“What has she got, two heads?” I asked politely. A half hour later I suggested that Lois Weber go into the next room and see what was causing the delay.

Waiting for Lois Weber, I roamed the apartment. On a table lay a play manuscript. Typed on its cover was: Fallen Angels, by Noel Coward. Among the books which seemed in current use were Bernard Shaw’s Letters to Ellen Terry, Shaw’s Letters to Mrs. Patrick Campbell, Gertrude Lawrence as Mrs. A., by Richard Aldrich.

Mute evidence of Marilyn’s widely publicized drama studies at the Actors’ Studio, where she was said to be seeking out the secrets of artistic acting, was a copy of James Joyce’s Ulysses. Several lines of dialogue from that volume had been penciled on a piece of paper, obviously to be recited by or to a group of drama students; then the piece of paper had been thrust part way into the book. Lying on the floor was a large recording of John Barrymore as Hamlet.

That dialogue from Ulysses and the Barrymore recording represented one of the reasons why I was there. I’d read that Marilyn had gone “long hair” and “art theaterish,” and I wanted to see for myself. Just seeing it in print didn’t make it true.

Millions of words had been written about the alluring blonde in whose living room I sat, but most of those words had been of the “authorized” or “with-Marilyn’s-blessing” variety. Several millions of them had appeared in fan magazines — after having first been O.K.’d by the 20th Century-Fox publicity department.

I’d read a lot of those words, but I still felt that I didn’t understand this dame and I was sure that a lot of other people felt the same way about her and that, like myself, they’d been asking themselves for years, “What’s she really like?”

On top of that, they were probably asking themselves other questions — as I was doing. “Why did she blow her marriage with Joe DiMaggio? Why did she walk out on a movie career which was paying her heavy money? Why did she duck California in favor of New York? Why, after she holed up there, did she attend the art-for-art’s-sake Actors’ Studio — surely an unlikely place for a girl who, up to that time, had done most of her acting with her hips?”

I hoped that when I talked to her she would tell me the answers to some of these things. Maybe I’d even see the “new Marilyn Monroe” I’d heard existed.

Lois Weber came back to report: “She thinks the maid must have gone off with the top of her tapered slacks. She’s running around without a top on.”

In an effort to keep me from brooding, Lois Weber said, “The azalea people down in Wilmington, North Carolina, want her for a personal appearance in April, but I told them they’d have to call me in April. Who knows where she’ll be then?”

The minutes crawled by and I thought of various things that people had told me about Marilyn before I’d begun my marathon wait in her Sutton Place apartment. Every male friend I had told I was doing a story about Marilyn had asked me, “Can I go along to hold your notebook?” or “You call that work?” or “You get paid for that?” or “Can’t I go along and hold the flash bulbs?” Apparently they felt that if they failed to go into a blood-bubbling, heman routine at the drop of her name, their maleness was suspect. When Marilyn appeared breathless and friendly as a puppy, I told her of this phenomenon. “How do you explain it?” I asked. “Have you become a symbol of sex?”

She gave my query thought before answering. “There are people to whom other people react, and other people who do nothing for people,” she said. “I react to men, too, but I don’t do it because I’m trying to prove I’m a woman. Personally I react to Marlon Brando. He’s a favorite of mine. There are two kinds of reactions. When you see some people you say, ‘Gee!’ When you see other people you say, ‘Ugh!’ If that part about my being a symbol of sex is true, it ought to help at the box office, but I don’t want to be too commercial about it.” Quite seriously she said, “After all, it’s a responsibility, too — being a symbol, I mean.”

I told her I’d heard that among the titles bestowed upon her were Woo-Woo Girl, Miss Cheesecake, The Girl With the Horizontal Walk. “I don’t get what they mean by ‘horizontal walk,’” she said. “Naturally I know what walking means — anybody knows that — and horizontal means not vertical. So what?” I thought of trying to blueprint it for her; then decided not to.

The Hollywood publicity worker who had warned me that she would be “real late” had talked to me quite frankly about Marilyn; he had pulled no punches; but since it is unfair to quote a publicity worker by name, I’ll call him Jones. And since “flack” is Hollywood slang for publicity man, I’ll call him Flack Jones.

Jones worked for 20th Century-Fox during the years before Marilyn staged her walkout. Since then he has moved on to bigger — if not better — things. He has opened his own public-relations office, with branches in Paris and Rome. He is bald as a peeled egg. He is as broad as a small barn door; a junior-executive-size Mister Five-by-Five. He wears black-rimmed glasses instead of the clear tortoise-shell plastic variety.

“A thing that fascinates me is this,” I told Flack Jones: “the first time I ever saw her I was sitting with a friend in the Fox commissary and this girl came in without any make-up on. She was wearing a blouse and skirt, and she sat against the wall. She bore no resemblance to anybody I’d ever seen before, but, to my amazement, my friend said, ‘That’s Marilyn Monroe.’ What I want to know is: Does she have to get into her Marilyn Monroe suit or put on her Marilyn Monroe face before she looks like Marilyn Monroe?”

“This is true of all platinum blondes or whatever you call the highly dyed jobs we have out here,” Flack Jones said. “If their hair isn’t touched up and coiffured exactly right; if they’re not gowned perfectly and their make-up is not one hundred per cent, they look gruesome. This is not peculiar to Monroe; it’s peculiar to every other synthetic blonde I’ve ever known in picture business. There are very few natural blondes in Hollywood and, so far as I know, there have been no natural platinum blondes in mankind’s history, except albinos. They are strictly a product of the twentieth century. They’re created blondes, and when you create a blonde you have to complete your creation with make-up and dramatic clothes, otherwise you’ve got only part of an assembly job.”

I also talked to a member of the Fox Studio legal staff, who told me a Monroe story I found provocative. “One day,” he said, “she was in this office, and I said to her, ‘It would be better for you to sign this contract this year instead of next. It will save you money.’ She looked at me and said, ‘I’m not interested in money. I just want to be wonderful.’ Then she walked out.” The legal light looked at me helplessly and shrugged. “What do you suppose she meant by that?” he asked. I said I had no idea, but that I’d try to find out.

And I asked a friend high enough up in the Fox hierarchy to know the answer, “Why do you think your studio let her come back to work for it after she walked out and stayed in New York for fifteen months?”

“Our attitude was that she’d never work on our lot again,” he announced firmly; then he grinned, “unless we needed her.”

One of my longer talks was with Billy Wilder, who directed her in the film The Seven Year Itch.

“What do you want to know?” he asked when I went to see him in his Beverly Hills home.

“One of the interesting things about this Monroe girl, to me,” I said, “is she seemed in danger of spoiling what had begun as a successful career by running away from it. I began to ask myself: How long can a movie actress afford to stay away from moviemaking and still remain a star? The mere strangeness of her staying away gets her a terrific press for a while and makes everyone in the country conscious of her, but is it possible to stay away so long that you’re forgotten? Was that about to happen to Marilyn?”

“I don’t think there was any danger of Marilyn sinking into oblivion,” Wilder said. “A thing like her doesn’t come along every minute.”

I asked, “What do you mean ‘a thing like her’?”

“She has what I call flesh impact,” he told me. “It’s very rare. Three I remember are Clara Bow, Jean Harlow and Rita Hayworth. Such girls have flesh which photographs like flesh. You feel you can reach out and touch it.”

“I’ve heard that it’s a moot question as to whether Marilyn’s an actress or not,” I said.

“I’ve heard that, too,” he replied. “Before we go further I must tell you that I like the girl, but it’s also moot whether you have to be an actor or an actress to be a success in pictures. I’m sure you’ve heard the theory that there are two kinds of stars — those who can act and those who are personalities. I’ll take a personality any time. Something comes down from the screen to you when you see them, in a way that it doesn’t always come from the indifferently paid actors, although they may be perfect at their jobs.”

“It’s nothing against them or for them,” Flack Jones said, when I repeated Wilder’s idea to him. “It’s the way this business is put together. If the public likes a personality, he or she goes over. You take Tab Rock,” he said (only Tab Rock is not the name he used). “Old Tab’s a terrific personality. I doubt if he’s ever made a flop picture, but he’s never made a really good picture. This fellow can’t pick up his hat without instruction, yet he’s always picking up villains and throwing them across a bar singlehanded. He can clean up any barroom on the frontier, but he can’t clean up a kitchen. He’s a nice guy, but no one has ever called him an actor. You take Lloyd Nolan now, or Van Heflin. That’s acting for you. You believe them. There are lights and shades and meaning to what they do. But when old Tab Rock comes on the screen, he’s got to throw somebody around to prove his art. He can do this quicker than anybody in Hollywood, and this is his great value.”

“He sounds brave,” I said.

“No one is braver or more scornful about it,” Flack Jones said. “His bravery is without parallel in the industry. He’s the only man I ever saw who could take a forty-five and go to the Near East and clean the whole mess up in a day or two. He never fails. That’s the difference between a personality and an actor.”

When I talked to Wilder I said that I’d read that when Marilyn had announced that she wanted to appear in a movie version of The Brothers Karamazov, some people hooted.

“The hooters were wrong,” Wilder told me. “She meant that she wanted to play the part of Grushenka in that book, and people who haven’t read the book don’t know that Grushenka is a sex pot. People think this is a long-hair, very thick, very literary book, but Dostoevsky knew what he was doing and there is nothing long-hair about Grushenka. Marilyn knows what she’s doing too. She would be a good Grushenka.

“It was after she said that she wanted to be in The Brothers Karamazov,” Wilder went on, “that she started going to the Actors’ Studio School of Dramatic Arts in New York. She didn’t do it for publicity. She’s sincerely trying to improve herself, and I think she should be admired for that. She could have sat here in Hollywood on her pretty little fanny and collected all of the money any ordinary actress would ever want, but she keeps trying.

“Right now, as of today, no matter what she thinks, Marilyn’s great value is as a personality, not as an actress. [Wilder told me these things while Marilyn was still in New York being groomed by the Actors’ Studio. It may be that what happened to her during her Eastern schooling in new dramatic ways may change his opinion, but 1 haven’t talked to him since her return to Hollywood.] If she sets out to be artistic and dedicated, and she carries it so far that she’s willing to wear Sloppy-Joe sweaters and go without make-up and let her hair hang straight as a string, this is not what has made her great to date. I don’t say that it’s beyond the realm of possibility that she can establish herself as a straight dramatic actress — it is possible — but it will be another career for her, a starting all over.”

Back in New York, when Marilyn made that long, long journey from her bedroom to her living room in her apartment, I said to her, “I’ve heard your childhood referred to as ‘the perfect Cinderella story.’”

“I don’t know where they got that,” she told me. “I haven’t ended up with a prince, and I’ve never had even one fairy godmother. My birth certificate reads Norma Jean Mortenson. I was told that my father was killed in an automobile accident before I was born, so that is what I’ve always told people. There was no way I could check on that because my mother was put into a mental institution when I was little, and I was brought up as an orphan.”

I had read that she spent her childhood being farmed out to foster parents and to orphanages, but, talking to her, I discovered that there’d been only one orphanage, although it was true about the foster parents. “I have had eleven or twelve sets of them,” she told me, “but I don’t want to count them all again, to see whether there were eleven or twelve. I hope you won’t ask me to. It depresses me. Some families would keep me longer; others would get tired of me in a short time. I must have made them nervous or something.”

She thought of something else. “I had one pair of foster parents who, when I was about ten, made me promise never to drink when I grew up, and I signed a pledge never to smoke or swear. My next foster family gave me empty whisky bottles for playthings. With them I played store. I guess I must have had the finest collection of empty whisky bottles any girl ever had. I’d line them up on a plank beside the road, and when people drove along I’d say, ‘Wouldn’t you like some whisky?’ I remember some of the people in the cars driving past my ‘whisky’ store saying, ‘Imagine! Why, it’s terrible!’ Looking back, I guess I used to play-act all the time. For one thing, it meant I could live in a more interesting world than the one around me.

“The first family I lived with told me I couldn’t go to the movies because it was sinful,” Marilyn said. “I listened to them say the world was coming to an end, and if I was doing something sinful when it happened, I’d go down below, below, below. So the few times I was able to sneak into a movie, I spent most of the time that I was there praying that the world wouldn’t end.”

1956-05-05-saturday_evening_post-pic2 
The famous British photographer, Cecil Beaton, shoots Marilyn.
Says the lady: “It’s a responsibility — being a symbol of sex, I mean.”
(Hans Knopf, © SEPS)

Apparently I had been misinformed about her first marriage, to a young man named Jim Dougherty. I’d got the idea that she’d married him while they were both in Van Nuys High School; that she’d got a “crush” on him because he was president of the student body there, and a big wheel around school.

“That’s not true,” she told me. “In the first place, he was twenty-one or twenty-two — well, at least he was twenty-one and already out of high school. So all I can say is that he must have been pretty dumb if he were still in high school when I married him. And I didn’t have a crush on him, although he claimed I did in a story he wrote about us. The truth is the people I was staying with moved East. They couldn’t afford to take me because when they left California they’d stop getting the twenty dollars a month the county or the state was paying them to help them clothe and feed me. So instead of going back into a boarding home or with still another set of foster parents, I got married.

“That marriage ended in a divorce, but not until World War Two was over. Jim is now a policeman. He lives in Reseda, in the San Fernando Valley, and he is happily married and has three daughters. But while he was away in the merchant marines I worked in the dope room of a plane factory. That company not only made planes, it made parachutes.

“For a while I’d been inspecting parachutes. Then they quit letting us girls do that and they had the parachutes inspected on the outside, but I don’t think it was because of my inspecting. Then I was in the dope room spraying dope on fuselages. Dope is liquid stuff, like banana oil and glue mixed.

“I was out on sick leave for a few days, and when I came back the Army photographers from the Hal Roach Studios, where they had the Army photographic headquarters, were around taking photographs and snapping and shooting while I was doping those ships. The Army guys saw me and asked, ‘Where have you been?’

“’I’ve been on sick leave,’ I said. “Come outside.’ they told me. ‘We’re going to take your picture.’

“‘Can’t,’ I said. ‘The other ladies here in the dope room will give me trouble if I stop doing what I’m doing and go out with you.’ That didn’t discourage those Army photographers. They got special permission for me to go outside from Mr. Whosis, the president of the plant. For a while they posed me rolling ships; then they asked me. ‘Don’t you have a sweater?’

“‘Yes,’ I told them, ‘it so happens I brought one with me. It’s in my locker.’ After that I rolled ships around in a sweater. The name of one of those Army photographers was David Conover. He lives up near the Canadian border. He kept telling me, ‘You should be a model,’ but I thought he was flirting. Several weeks later, he brought the color shots he’d taken of me, and he said the Eastman Kodak Company had asked him, ‘Who’s your model, for goodness’ sake?’

“So I began to think that maybe he wasn’t kidding about how I ought to be a model. Then I found that a girl could make five dollars an hour modeling, which was different from working ten hours a day for the kind of money I’d been making at the plane plant. And it was a long way from the orphanage, where I’d been paid five cents a week for working in the dining room or ten cents a month for working in the pantry. And out of those big sums a penny every Sunday had to go into the church collection. I never could figure why they took a penny from an orphan for that.”

“How did you happen to sign your first movie contract?” I asked.

She tossed a cascade of white-blond tresses from her right eye and said, “I had appeared on five magazine covers. Mostly men’s magazines.”

What, I asked, did she mean by men’s magazines? “Magazines,” she said, “with cover girls who are not flat-chested. I was on See four or five months in a row. Each time they changed my name. One month I was Norma Jean Dougherty — that was my first husband’s name. The second month I was Jean Norman. I don’t know what all names they used, but I must have looked different each time. There were different poses— outdoors, indoors, but mostly just sitting looking over the Pacific. You looked at those pictures and you didn’t see much ocean, but you saw a lot of me.

“One of the magazines I was on wasn’t a man’s magazine at all. It was called Family Circle. You buy it in supermarkets. I was holding a lamb with a pinafore. I was the one with the pinafore. But on most covers I had on things like a striped towel. The towel was striped because the cover was to be in color and the stripes were the color, and there was a big fan blowing on the towel and on my hair. That was right after my first divorce, and I needed to earn a living bad. I couldn’t type. I didn’t know how to do anything. So Howard Hughes had an accident.”

I wondered if I’d missed something, but apparently I hadn’t. “He was in the hospital,” she went on, “and Hedda Hopper wrote in her column: ‘Howard Hughes must be recuperating because he sent out for photographs of a new girl he’s seen on five different magazines.’ Right after that Howard Hughes’ casting director got my telephone number somehow, and he got in touch with me and he said Howard Hughes wanted to see me.

“But he must have forgotten or changed his mind or something,” she said, “because instead of going to see him, I went over to the Fox Studio with a fellow named Harry Lipton, who handled my photography modeling. Expensive cars used to drive up beside me when I was on a street corner or walking on a sidewalk, and the driver would say, ‘I could do something for you in pictures. How would you like to be a Goldwyn girl?’ I figured those guys in those cars were trying for a pick-up, and I got an agent so I could say to those fellows, ‘See my agent.’ That’s how I happened to be handled by Harry Lipton.”

Harry took her to see Ivan Kahn, then head of Fox’s talent department, and also to see Ben Lyon, who was doing a talent-scouting job for Fox.

asked her how it happened that she changed her name from Norma Jean Dougherty to Marilyn Monroe.

“It was Ben Lyon who renamed me,” she said. “Ben said that I reminded him of two people, Jean Harlow and somebody else he remembered very well, a girl named Marilyn Miller. When all the talk began about renaming me, I asked them please could I keep my mother’s maiden name, which was Monroe; so the choice was whether to call me Jean Monroe or Marilyn Monroe, and Marilyn won.”

I asked Flack Jones, “What happened when she came to your studio?”

“She came twice,” he said. “The first time was in 1946. We did our best with her, but she just hadn’t grown up enough. She was great as far as looks went, but she didn’t know how to make the most of her looks — or what to do with them. That came with practice. Not that you have to mature mentally to be a star. In fact, it can be a holdback. It might even defeat you. Stars who are mature mentally are in the minority. But actually we had no stories lying around at that time in which she would appear to advantage. So we tried her out in a picture or two in which she played bit parts — secretaries, the pretty girl in the background. Then we let her go, and she went over to RKO and did a picture with Groucho.”

“I didn’t see the film,” I said, “but you’d think with the Marx Brothers chasing her, like a bosomy mechanical bunny romping about the sound stage a couple of jumps ahead of the greyhounds, the fun would have been fast and furious.”

“The trouble was that while the Marx Brothers always chased a dame in their pictures,” Flack Jones told me, “they never caught the dame. And usually the dame never became a star, so the whole thing was a waste of time. It was amusing while you were watching it, but the girls usually outran the Marx boys and a career.”

1956-05-05-saturday_evening_post-pic3 
The author interviewing Marilyn. Says Pete Martin:
“Every male friend I told
I was doing a story about
her asked me, ‘Can I go along to hold your notebook?'”
(Hans Knopf, © SEPS)

Marilyn gave me her own version of Flack Jones’ story:

“Most of what I did while I was at Fox that first time was pose for stills. Publicity made up a story about how I was a baby sitter who’d been baby-sitting for the casting director and that’s how I was discovered. They told me to say that, although it strictly wasn’t true. You’d think that they would have used a little more imagination and have had me at least a daddy sitter.”

Flack Jones had filled me in on some more Monroe chronology: “After she left us she went to Metro and appeared in The Asphalt Jungle, directed by John Huston,” he said. “Marilyn’s role was small. She was only a walk-on, but she must have looked good to Darryl Zanuck, for when he saw it, he re-signed her. Asphalt Jungle was one of those gangster things. There was a crooked legal mouthpiece in it, a suave fellow, played by Louis Calhern. Marilyn was his ‘niece’; which was a nice word for ‘keptie.’ She’d say a few lines of dialogue; then she’d look up at him with those big eyes and call him ‘Uncle.’”

“When did you first notice her impact on the public?” I asked.

“Once we got her rolling, it was like a tidal wave,” he said. “We began to release some photographs of her, and as soon as they appeared in print, we had requests for more from all over the world. We had the newspapers begging for art; then the photo syndicates wanted her; then the magazines began to drool. For a while we were servicing three or four photos to key newspapers all over the world once a week — and that was before she had appeared in a picture.

“Once this building-up process started,” Flack Jones explained, “other people got interested in her. We called up the top cameramen around town who had their own outlets, and we told them what we had, and we asked them if they’d like to photograph her. They said, ‘Ho, boy, yes.’

“We told them what the deal was,” Flack Jones went on. “We said, ‘We think this girl has a great future; she’s beautiful, her chassis is great, and are you interested?’ Each guy had his own idea of what he wanted, and he let his imagination play upon her. This is the way such things get done. They’re not created by one person. They’re the creation of all of the press representatives who cover Hollywood for all the publications in the world, which means about three hundred and fifty people.

“Everybody in the studio publicity department worked on her.” Jones ticked them off on his fingertips, “The picture division, the magazine division, the fan-magazine division, the planters who plant the columnists, the radio planters, and so forth. Then, when you make a motion picture, a ‘unit man’ or ‘unit woman’ is assigned to cover its shooting, and he or she handles publicity for that film alone. In addition, the whole department works on the same picture. Our department is highly specialized, but each specialist makes his contribution to the personality we’re erecting in the public’s mind.”

“I’ve met a couple of press agents who’ve been unit men on Marilyn’s films,” I said.

“But the unit man is not always the same for a certain star’s pictures,” Jones said. “Sonia Wilson’s been unit woman on Monroe pictures, and Frankie Neal’s been a unit man on her pictures, but Roy Craft has been her unit man more than anyone else. Roy likes her. He gets along with her fine.”

There was something else I wanted to know. “In addition to distributing her photographs,” I asked, “did you have her show up at different places where you thought her appearance would do her good?”

“We took her to all of the cocktail parties we thought were important,” Flack Jones said. “For instance, one picture magazine had its annual cocktail party, and we told Marilyn she ought to show so we could introduce her to various editors, columnists and radio and TV people. She waited until everybody had arrived; then she came in in this red gown. That gown became famous. She’d had sense enough to buy it a size or two too small, and it had what Joe Hyams calls ‘break-away straps.’

“When she came in, everybody stopped doing what they were doing and their eyes went, ‘Boing, boing,’” Flack Jones went on. “The publisher of the magazine who was picking up the tab for the party shook hands with her a long, long time. After a while he turned to one of his associate editors and said, ‘We ought to have a picture of this little girl in our book.’ Then he looked at her again and said, ‘Possibly we should have her on the cover.’”

Flack Jones grinned. “So that’s the way things went,” he said. “Some months there were as many as fifteen or sixteen covers of her on the newsstands at once. She came back to the Fox lot in 1950 to appear in All About Eve, but she was not anyone’s great, big, brilliant discovery until we got our still cameras focused on her and started spreading those Marilyn Monroe shots all over the universe.”

“What did she do in All About Eve?” I asked. “I don’t remember.”

“She’s the dumb broad who walks into a party at Bette Davis’ place leaning on George Sanders’ arm,” he said. “There’s dialogue which shows you that Sanders is a critic, like George Jean Nathan; and he brings this beautiful dish Marilyn in, and he sights a producer played by Gregory Ratoff. Sanders points at Ratoff and says to Marilyn, ‘There’s a real live producer, honey. Go do yourself some good.’ So Marilyn goes off to do herself some good while Sanders stays in his own price class with Bette.”

“Do you remember the first day she came to work?” I asked.

“Do I remember?” he said. “She was in an Angora sweater out to there. While we were shooting her in photography, the word got around and the boys rushed across the hall to get an eyeful. Next we did some layouts with her for picture magazines. We put her in a negligee, and she liked it so much that she wouldn’t take it off. She walked all over the lot in it, yelling, ‘Yoo hoo’ at strangers as far away as the third floor of the administration building. Pretty soon the whole third floor was looking down at her. The first and second floors looked too.”

Flack Jones did an abrupt shift into the present tense, “It’s a bright, sunny day; the wind is blowing and she has Nature working with her. It has taken Nature quite a while to bring her to the ripe-peach perfection she reaches on that day, but it finally makes it. The wind does the rest. She walks all over the lot, has a ball for herself, and so does everybody else.”

Then he shifted back again, “After that we took her to the beach with a lot of wardrobe changes. But the basic idea was that this is a beautiful girl with a great body, and that idea was always the same, although we had different approaches to it. We had color shots, we had black-and-white shots, we had mountain shots, we had field shots, faked water-skiing shots — every type of approach we could think of. Picnicking, walking — anything a person does, we let her do it. When we began to see what she did best, we concentrated on it.

“Women always hate the obvious in sex,” Flack Jones said, “and men love it.” Apparently he had given this matter a lot of thought. He had even worked out a philosophy about it. “Guys are instinctively awkward and blundering and naïve — even worldly-wise ones — and subtlety in sex baffles them. Not only that, but they don’t have the time. Women who are not supporting a husband have all the time in the world for it. But men have other things to do, like making a dollar; and they like their love-making without preliminaries which last four or five hours. Instinctively Marilyn knows this. She is very down-to-earth, very straightforward.”

I asked Marilyn when I talked to her back on Sutton Place, “Do you think men like their sex subtle or fairly obvious?” This was a double check. I already had the male answer.

It seemed to me that she hedged. “Some men prefer subtleties and other men don’t want things so subtle,” she said. “I don’t believe in false modesty. A woman only hurts herself that way. If she’s coy she’s denying herself an important part of life. Men sometimes believe that you’re frigid and cold in the development of a relationship, but if they do, it’s not always your fault. Religion has to do with it and how you’re brought up. You’re stuck with all that.”

I remembered something else Wilder had told me before Marilyn’s recent return to Hollywood to make the film version of the New York stage hit Bus Stop. “You take Monroe, now,” he remarked. “Aside from whether she’s an actress or not, she’s got this lovely little shape, it twitches excitingly, and the public likes to watch it, either coming toward them or going away. There are two schools of thought about her — those who like her and those who attack her — but they both are willing to pay to watch her. Their curiosity is good for eighty cents or a dollar and a quarter or whatever the price of the ticket.”

He shook his head thoughtfully. “And she went back East to study at a slow-take arty place, where they feature understatement. Here’s a girl who’s built herself a career on overstating something, and she’s made up her mind to understate. It won’t be long before we’ll know whether she’s right and whether she needs the wardrobe department and the hairdressing department as much as she needs artistic lines to say. It’ll be interesting to watch and I hope it works out the way she wants it to, but the lines that the public really wants from her so far are not written in English. They are her curves.”

The voice of Flack Jones echoed in the back of my head. “I forgot to tell you. When she finished that Marx Brothers picture, she went over to Columbia for a couple of shows, but she didn’t click, and they released her too. After that she was around town for a while going broke. It was then that she posed for that famous nude calendar — the composition of glowing flesh against a red velvet background which threw the public into a tizzy when they learned about it.”

I asked Marilyn to tell me the story of that nude calendar herself, and she said, “When the studio first heard about it, everybody there was in a frenzy. They telephoned me on the set where I was working in a quickie called Don’t Bother to Knock. The person who called asked me, ‘What’s all this about a calendar of you in the nude? Did you do it?’

“‘Yes,’ I said. ‘Is there anything wrong with it? So they’ve found out it’s me on that calendar. Well, what do you know!’

“‘Found out!’ he almost screamed. ‘There you are, all of you, in full color!’ Then he must have gotten mixed up, for first he said, ‘Just deny everything’; then he said, ‘Don’t say anything. I’ll be right down.’”


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by Saturday Evening Post.

Enregistrer


09 novembre 2016

Marilyn Monroe Auction - 11/2016 - photos 2 -photographies


Photographies - Famille, Enfance & Adolescence
Photographs - Family, Childhood & Teens


Lot 18: MARILYN MONROE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH
 An original snapshot of Gladys Baker and Marion Otis Monroe, Marilyn Monroe's mother and uncle, with a handwritten note on the photo indicating they were aged 8 and 10 at the time the photo was taken.
3 3/4 by 2 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 81, “Fine Manuscripts,” Christie's Los Angeles, Sale 9814, September 20, 2001
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245039_0  


Lot 19: MARILYN MONROE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH
 An original snapshot of Gladys Baker, Marilyn Monroe's mother, with a handwritten note on the photo indicating Baker was 13 at the time the photo was taken.
3 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE: Partial Lot 81, “Fine Manuscripts,” Christie's Los Angeles, Sale 9814, September 20, 2001
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245040_0  


Lot 85: MARILYN MONROE BABY PICTURE
 A vintage black and white photograph of Monroe as an infant printed on heavy photo paper stock. Verso of image has note in the hand of Grace Goddard reading "Marilyn Monroe age 6 ms."
5 7/8 by 3 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245241_0 245242_0  


Lot 86: MARILYN MONROE BABY PICTURE
 A vintage black and white photograph printed as a postcard. The image features Monroe as a toddler posing with floral dress and matching bonnet. Verso has note in the hand of Grace Goddard reading "Marilyn Monroe age 2 yrs." Coffee mug ring stain to image.
5 3/8 by 3 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245243_0  245244_0  


Lot 87: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A hand tinted vintage photograph of Monroe at the age of five. The vintage photograph has writing on the back in the hand of Grace Goddard, her legal guardian, reading "Marilyn Monroe age 5yrs." Additional writing on verso in another hand has instructions for the tinting of the photograph listing that her dress should be pink with light hair and blue eyes.
5 3/4 by 3 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $1,200 - $1,800
245245_0  245246_0  


Lot 88: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Monroe at the age of five with Lester Bolender. A note on verso in the hand of Grace Goddard reads "Marilyn Monroe age 5 yo." An earlier notation has been erased beneath that read "Norma Jeane and Lester."
4 1/2 by 2 7/8 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245247_0 
245248_0 


Lot 89: MARILYN MONROE CHILDHOOD PHOTOGRAPHS
 Two vintage black and white photographs featuring a young Monroe, one showing Monroe with Lester Bolender. Monroe's first foster home placement was with the Bolenders, and she and Lester became known as the twins. Each photograph has notes on verso in the hand of Grace Goddard reading "Marilyn Monroe age 4yrs." One of the images had previous writing reading "Lester Bolender and Norma Jeane Baker" that has been erased and written over.
4 1/2 by 2 7/8 inches 
245249_0 
245250_0  245251_0  


Lot 92: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A small frame with Art Deco style matte containing a vintage oval portrait of a woman circa 1900 based upon hairstyle. This image could possibly be of a young Ana Lower, whom Marilyn Monroe referred to as Aunt Ana, an important mother figure in her life. Lower was born Edith Ana Atchinson in Los Angeles in 1880. Behind this image in the same frame were found two small black and white portraits of Monroe's first husband, Jim Dougherty, in his Merchant Marine uniform.
Frame, 6 1/8 by 4 1/8 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245257_0 245258_0  


Lot 790: MARILYN MONROE HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOK
 A 1942 Chieftain yearbook that includes Marilyn Monroe. Monroe's picture is on page 48 under the name Norma Baker. Monroe attended University High School in Los Angeles as a tenth grader until February, when she dropped out to marry Jim Dougherty. This yearbook belonged to Barbara Abston, also a tenth grade student. The book has numerous inscriptions to Abston.
9 by 12 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246332_0  246333_0  


Lot 791: MARILYN MONROE 1941 SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPH
 A 1941 Ralph Waldo Emerson Junior High School class photograph. The original vintage panoramic photograph is inscribed by a number of students on verso. Some inscriptions read "To Norma." The front of the photograph is marked "Belongs to Norma Jeane Baker." Monroe can be seen in the photograph in the seventh row from the bottom, and the 15th person from the right. Housed in a frame with a reproduction of the photograph at top and the reverse of the photograph at bottom. The frame is double-sided with a glazed window in the back to show the front of the photograph.
24 3/4 by 32 3/4 inches, framed
 Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000
246334_0 246335_0 246336_0 
246337_0  


Lot 792: MARILYN MONROE HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOK
 A Chieftain 1942 yearbook from University High School in Los Angeles. Norma Jeane Baker, soon to become Marilyn Monroe, attended University High School in Los Angeles for half of the year as a 10th grade student. Her picture appears on page 48. In February 1942, at age 16, Monroe dropped out of University High School to marry Jim Dougherty.
12 by 9 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246338_0  246339_0 


Photographies & Snapshots - en public
Photographs & Snapshots - Public Appearances


Lot 77: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS SOLD WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of five color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 19, 1962, at the birthday gala for President John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Three of these images show Monroe singing "Happy Birthday" on stage and are likely the only known color photos taken of Monreo during this performance. From the collection of Frieda Hull.
This item sold with copyright but not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $5,000 - $6,000
245222_0  245223_0  245224_0 
245225_0 245226_0 245227_0 


Lot 299: MARILYN MONROE SNAPSHOT
 A single color photograph on glossy Kodak Pavelle paper of Monroe as she appeared to kick the first ball at Ebbets Field in New York, May 12, 1957, for a match between the American Soccer League and a team from Israel.
3 1/4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245614_0  


Lot 420: MARILYN MONROE FILM PREMIERE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four vintage black and white glossy photographs of Monroe and Arthur Miller at the New York City premiere of her film Some Like It Hot on March 28, 1959.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245778_0  245781_0 
245779_0  245780_0  


Lot 531: MARILYN MONROE SNAPSHOTS
 Three black and white photographs of Monroe likely taken by a fan on the streets of New York City in the late 1950s.
4 3/4 by 3 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245966_0  


Lot 607: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on October 25, 1951, when she attended the Hollywood Foreign Correspondents Association dinner at the Mocambo club in Los Angeles.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246088_0  


Lot 614: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED SNAPSHOT
 A black and white snapshot of Marilyn Monroe in front of the Sherry Netherland Hotel in New York City, 1952. The image is signed in blue ballpoint pen "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246097_0   


Lot 615: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on April 4, 1952, as she attended a publicity event held at the Owl Drug Store in Los Angeles. The event was sponsored by Life magazine, and Monroe was there to sign copies of the magazines with her on the cover. Four of the photographs have writing on the back referencing the event, likely in Frieda Hull's own hand. Some of the photographs are never before seen.
Largest, 4 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246098_0  247261_0 


Lot 616: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original photo of Monroe taken on January 26, 1952, at the Henrietta Awards ceremony held at Club Del Mar in Santa Monica, CA.  Marilyn won the "Henrietta Award for Best Young box Office Personality," given by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246099_0 


Lot 617: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on June 3, 1952, at a Look magazine awards party held at the Beverly Hills Hotel. One image from this lot is likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400 
246100_0 


Lot 618: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on August 3, 1952, at a party thrown in her honor at the home of big band leader Ray Anthony in Sherman Oaks, California. This lot contains eight black and white and two color images, some likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246101_0  247262_0  


Lot 619: MARILYN MONROE REPRODUCTION PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of two reproduction black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on June 26, 1952, as she appeared in court to testify as part of a lawsuit against an entity using her name and likeness to sell pornographic photographs.
Largest, 3 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246102_0  


Lot 620: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on October 3, 1952, at a party sponsored by Photoplay magazine.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246103_0 


Lot 629: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe original black and white photographs, circa 1953, at an unknown event. Both are likely never before seen images.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246115_0  


Lot 630: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 9, 1953, at the Photoplay magazine awards ceremony where she received the award for Fastest Rising Star of 1953. Two of the photos have "Beverly Hills Hotel" written on verso. Some images in this lot are possibly never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246116_0 247263_0 247264_0  


Lot 631: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 13, 1953, when she was at a birthday party for Walter Winchell at Ciro’s restaurant in Los Angeles. Two photographs show Monroe with Jane Russell, and two show her with Betty Grable. Reverse of one black and white image is stamped "Photo by Darlene Hammond/ 1416 Belfast Drive/ Hollywood 46, Calif./ CR. 10747." This lot contains two color and two black and white images.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246117_0 


Lot 632: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 18 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on July 10, 1953, at a gala arranged by Danny Thomas to benefit St. Jude Hospital. The fundraiser, which was held at the Hollywood Bowl, also included appearances by Jane Russell, Robert Mitchum, and Danny Kaye. Thomas, Mitchum, and Kaye are photographed with Monroe in this set of photographs. This lot includes 17 black and white images and one color image. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246118_0  246119_0 
246120_0  247265_0 


Lot 634: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe original color and black and white photographs, circa 1953, taken at an unknown event. Both are likely never before seen.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246122_0 


Lot 636: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 13 color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe, some reproductions, taken on December 19, 1953, when she appeared at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles to receive the Miss Press Club Award. This lot contains five color and eight black and white photographs. Some photographs from this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246124_0  247266_0 


Lot 638: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe from March 9, 1954, when she appeared at the Beverly Hills Hotel to receive the Photoplay magazine award for The Most Popular Actress of 1953 due to her roles in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953) and How To Marry A Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). This lot contains two color photographs and one black and white photograph.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $500
246126_0  


Lot 639: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe with Jane Russell taken on June 26, 1953, at Grauman's Chinese Theatre as Monroe and Russell memorialized their autographs, shoe prints, and handprints in wet cement. Nine photographs are stamped on verso "Photo by Darlene Hammond/ 1416 Belfast Drive/ Hollywood 46, Calif./ CR. 10747."
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246127_0  246128_0   


Lot 640: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, one together with Jane Russell, taken on June 26, 1953, in conjunction with a Grauman's Chinese Theatre event where Monroe and Russell memorialized their autographs, shoe prints, and handprints in wet cement.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246129_0  246130_0 


Lot 647: MARILYN MONROE THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS SCREENING PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe, Gracie Allen, Jack Benny, Joan Collins, and Bing Crosby, among many other stars, attending a special screening of There’s No Business Like Show Business at 20th Century Fox studios in 1954.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246137_0  246138_0  


Lot 657: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original black and white photographs taken on June 1, 1955, at the premiere of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955). Seven of the photographs show Marilyn Monroe with her date for the evening, husband Joe DiMaggio. Two photographs show the theater marquee with large cutout images of Monroe in the now famous skirt- blowing scene from the film. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 7 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246150_0 
246151_0  246152_0 


Lot 667: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe alone and with guests, taken on January 7, 1955, at an event announcing the launch of Marilyn Monroe Productions, a joint venture with friend and photographer Milton Greene. This lot contains three color and seven black and white photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246162_0 247271_0 247272_0 


Lot 669: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A pair of color slides of Marilyn Monroe from March 11, 1955, at the Friars Club Testimonial Dinner.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246164_0


Lot 670: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 24 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 11, 1955, at the Friars Club Testimonial Dinner. Monroe is pictured surrounded by fans signing autographs and talking to James Haspiel. Several photographs show her with friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene. This lot contains 22 black and white photographs and two color photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246165_0  246167_0  246168_0 
246166_0  247273_0 


Lot 676: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 24, 1955, when she attended the play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof with Milton and Amy Greene. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246174_0 


Lot 686: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 19 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken at the East of Eden premiere on March 9, 1955, at the Astor Theatre in New York City. Monroe was an official usherette at the event. Some images show friend, photographer, and business partner Milton Greene and his wife, Amy Greene. Some images are never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246185_0 247276_0  


Lot 687: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe wearing a white brocade gown with matching jacket and white evening gloves as she attended the New York City premiere of East of Eden starring James Dean on March 9, 1955. The photograph is signed in blue ballpoint pen "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246186_0 


Lot 691: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe in costume taken on March 30, 1955, for her appearance on opening night at the Ringling Bros. Circus at Madison Square Garden, which was a benefit produced by Mike Todd for the Arthritis and Rheumatism Foundation.
Largest, 7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246191_0 246192_0 


Lot 692: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PRESS AND PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPHS
 An archive of nine vintage press and publicity photographs featuring Marilyn Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246193_0  


Lot 693: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large, glossy black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe during her famous appearance on March 31, 1955, when she rode a Barnum & Bailey elephant painted pink as part of the Mike Todd memorial event to benefit victims of arthritis.
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246194_0   


Lot 703: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 20 slides of Marilyn Monroe, from the collection of Frieda Hull. Some are never before seen images, from August 6, 1955, as she was at the airport in New York City preparing to fly to Bement, Illinois. Together with an original "Automatic Slide Changer" storage box, owned by Hull.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246207_0   


Lot 704: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 11 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on August 6, 1955, when she was at the airport in New York City preparing to fly to Bement, Illinois. One of the photographs is an original press photograph from the United Press Association. This lot contains six black and white and five color photographs. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 9 by 6 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200
246208_0 246209_0 247279_0 
247278_0 


Lot 706: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe wearing a white brocade gown with matching jacket and white evening gloves as she attended the New York City premiere of East of Eden starring James Dean on March 9, 1955. The photograph is signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246211_0 


Lot 711: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED SNAPSHOT
 A color snapshot of Marilyn Monroe posing in the backseat of a car circa early 1950s. The image is signed in blue ink “Marilyn Monroe.” The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the “Monroe Six, a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
3 by 2 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246218_0 


Lot 712: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken the evening of December 12, 1955, when she attended the premiere of The Rose Tattoo. This lot contains two color and three black and white photographs.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246219_0  


Lot 713: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of three slides of Marilyn Monroe from evening of December 12, 1955, when she attended the premiere of The Rose Tattoo.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246220_0 


Lot 714: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on December 18, 1955, at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel following her attendance at the premiere of Baby Doll. Two of the images show Monroe with husband Arthur Miller. Research indicates that this may be the only documented occasion where Monroe parted her hair on the right. Her regular part was always on the left.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246221_0 


Lot 718: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe in New York City circa 1955 wearing a white gown and white fur, signed in blue ink "Marilyn Monroe." The autograph was obtained by Frieda Hull, one of the "Monroe Six," a group of legendary fans with whom Monroe became friendly.
7 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000
246225_0 


Lot 719: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 8, 1956, when she attended the premiere of Middle of the Night in New York City. This lot contains seven black and white photographs and one color photograph. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $900 - $1,100
246226_0 246227_0 247282_0 


Lot 720: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
A pair of original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, taken on June 11, 1956. Monroe and Miller were outside her Sutton Place apartment. Miller's divorce from Mary Slattery had just been granted.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246228_0 


Lot 721: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, taken at a press conference in front of Monroe's Sutton Place apartment on June 22, 1956. Miller was in the throes of defending himself against accusations of communist activities. Monroe transitioned the focus of the press conference away from Miller toward their impending marriage, their plans to travel to England for their honeymoon, and the filming of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246229_0 


Lot 722: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 14 original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and soon-to-be husband Arthur Miller, taken on June 29, 1956. Monroe and Miller were married in a civil ceremony later that day. The photographs also show Milton Greene and Miller's parents, Isidore and Augusta. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 4 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246230_0 246231_0 247283_0 


Lot 724: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original candid color photograph of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, taken on January 7, 1957, following their return from their honeymoon in Jamaica.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246233_0 


Lot 726: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe as she boarded a plane for Hollywood at Idlewild Airport in New York on February 25, 1956. The image is signed in blue ballpoint pen over a photographer's arm, "To Frieda Love & Kisses," and below along the line of the white railing, "Marilyn Monroe." In the photograph Frieda Hull is pictured with her camera, which is lot 697 in this auction.
8 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246235_0 


Lot 728: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 20 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe that document her 1956 travels to and from Los Angeles to film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Several of the photographs show Monroe walking across the tarmac to a plane among a sea of fans and photographers, then posing for photographs at the top of the stairs leading to the plane. One photograph shows the crowd on hand at the airport to see Monroe. This lot includes eight color and 11 black and white photographs, many that have never been seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246242_0 247284_0 


Lot 729: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 18 slides of Marilyn Monroe from the collection of Frieda Hull, documenting Monroe’s travels to and from Los Angeles to film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956) in 1956. Several slides show Monroe posing for photographs at the top of the stairs leading to the plane. Together with an original "Automatic Slide Changer" storage box, owned by Frieda Hull. Many of the slides have never been seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246243_0 


Lot 730: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 19 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 25, 1956, when she held a press conference at Los Angeles Airport. Monroe had flown to Los Angeles to work on Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956). Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246244_0 247285_0


Lot 737: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large matte black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the Plaza Hotel in New York City during a 1956 press conference for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246255_0 


Lot 738: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe signing autographs for fans on February 8, 1956, when she attended the premiere of Middle of the Night in New York City.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246256_0   


Lot 739: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from July 13, 1956, as she and husband Arthur Miller departed New York City for England to film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246257_0   


Lot 740: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original candid black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken on July 13, 1956, as she and husband Arthur Miller departed New York City for England to film The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
3 1/2 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246258_0 


Lot 742: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 11 slides of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, from May 13, 1959, at the Italian Consulate on Park Avenue in New York City, where she attended a ceremony to receive the David di Donatello Award, the equivalent of the Academy Award, for her work in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200
246263_0  


Lot 743: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY IMAGE ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 30 vintage black and white publicity images related to Marilyn Monroe and The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). The photographs show Monroe at various press conferences, publicity events, and the premiere of the film.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $300
246264_0  


Lot 746: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller taken on May 13, 1959, as she arrived at the Italian Consulate on Park Avenue in New York City to receive the David di Donatello Award, the equivalent of the Academy Award, for her work in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246267_0  


Lot 747: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A pair of color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from February 26, 1959, as Monroe was on her way to the French Film Institute to receive the Crystal Star Award, the French equivalent of the Academy Award, for her performance in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300

246268_0  


Lot 748: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on February 26, 1959, when she was on her way to the French Film Institute to receive the Crystal Star Award, the French equivalent of the Academy Award, for her performance in The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Monroe is seen in the photographs with members of the "Monroe Six," including Frieda Hull, Eileen Collins, Gloria Milone, and Edith Pitts. Three photographs show Monroe with James Haspiel. Some images in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246269_0 


Lot 749: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS SOLD WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of 15 photographs of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1957, likely taken at a New York City showing of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). These photographs show Monroe with husband Arthur Miller at what appears to be a movie theater as a poster for the film can be seen on the theater lobby wall. Monroe is shown in the back of a cab signing autographs for fans, walking to the theater, and inside the lobby of the theater. This lot contains 12 color and three black and white photographs that are believed to be never before seen images.
This item sold with copyright but is not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $8,000 - $9,000
246270_0 246271_0 247287_0 


Lot 750: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, from January 7, 1957, following their return from their honeymoon in Jamaica.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246272_0 


Lot 751: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from November 18, 1957, when she and husband Arthur Miller attended Conversation Piece, a play in which Miller's sister Joan Copeland appeared.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246273_0   


Lot 752: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on November 18, 1957, when she and husband Arthur Miller attended Conversation Piece, a play in which Miller's sister Joan Copeland appeared. James Haspiel appears in two images, "Monroe Six" member Gloria Malone in another. Some images in this lot are never before seen. This lot contains four black and white and three color photographs.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246274_0  247288_0 


Lot 755: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original never before seen original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 30, 1958, as she exited her apartment at 444 East 57th Street in New York City. Just three days prior, Monroe was photographed by Richard Avedon for Life magazine.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246277_0 


Lot 756: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four never before seen original color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from May 30, 1958, as she exited her apartment at 444 East 57th Street in New York City. Just three days prior, Monroe was photographed by Richard Avedon for Life magazine.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246278_0   


Lot 753: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original candid color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on May 12, 1957, at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. Monroe was on hand to make the ceremonial first kick at a soccer match between the USA and Israel. It's reported that she sprained two of her toes while kicking the ball, yet she stayed until the end of the match to award the trophy to Israel, the winning team by a score of 6-4.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246275_0 


Lot 754: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of eight color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from May 12, 1957, at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. Monroe was on hand to make the ceremonial first kick at a soccer match between the USA and Israel. It's reported that she sprained two of her toes while kicking the ball, yet she stayed until the end of the match to award the trophy to Israel, the winning team by a score of 6-4.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900

246276_0 


Lot 757: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four slides of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller, from their departure from New York for Los Angeles for her to film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959).
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246279_0   


Lot 758: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of eight original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller as they departed New York for Los Angeles for her to film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). This lot contains five color and three black and white photographs, some never before seen.
Largest, 5 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246280_0  


Lot 759: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 15 original color and black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 29, 1959. These images are believed to have been taken following the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) as Monroe and husband Arthur Miller traveled from the theater to the home of Lee and Paula Strasberg for a party they were throwing for Monroe. Many images are never before seen. This lot contains eight black & white and seven color photographs.
Largest, 6 3/4 by 5 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246281_0  246282_0 
246283_0  247289_0  


Lot 760: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of 11 slides of Marilyn Monroe, from March 29, 1959. These images are believed to have been taken following the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) as Monroe and husband Arthur Miller traveled from the theater to the home of Lee and Paula Strasberg for a party they were throwing for Monroe. Many images are never before seen.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200
246284_0   


Lot 761: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe, from September 18, 1959, as she left her apartment at 444 East 57th Street. She was leaving to fly to Los Angeles to attend a gala in honor of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev held by Twentieth Century Fox Studios.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246285_0   


Lot 762: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe and husband Arthur Miller taken on September 18, 1959, when the couple left their apartment at 444 East 57th Street. Miller was escorting his wife to the airport, where she would fly to Los Angeles to attend a gala in honor of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev held by Twentieth Century Fox Studios. Because this was an event in honor of a Communist leader, Miller didn't attend the gala as it wouldn't have been appropriate considering his appearance before the House Committee on Un-American Activities about his political leanings in June 1956.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246286_0 


Lot 763: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on September 27, 1959, at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel, where Monroe and husband Arthur Miller were attending the American Friends of The Hebrew University Awards Banquet, where Miller was honored for Distinguished Achievement in the Dramatic Arts. All the photographs in this lot are likely never before seen.
Largest, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400 
246287_0 


Lot 764: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, likely reproductions, taken on September 21, 1959, at Henry Miller's Theatre on Broadway in New York City, where Monroe was attending An Evening with Yves Montand, accompanied by friend and co-star Montgomery Clift. All four photographs reference Terri Arden on the reverse.
Largest, 6 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246288_0 


Lot 765: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of three color slides of Marilyn Monroe, from November 2, 1959, when she and husband Arthur Miller departed New York City for Los Angeles to film Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960). Of note, one slide in particular shows Monroe sitting in the back of a car holding a bird in a birdcage, likely Butch, the Millers' pet parakeet.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246289_0   


Lot 766: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original candid color photograph of Marilyn Monroe, likely taken on April 16, 1960, as she attended Josephine Baker's show at the Hollywood Hartford Theatre, accompanied by Yves Montand.
3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246290_0


Lot 767: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original candid color photographs of Marilyn Monroe, likely taken on June 1, 1960, her 34th birthday. The cast and crew of Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960) celebrated her birthday earlier that day. That evening, Monroe attended a party in her honor held by press agent Rupert Allan at his Beverly Hills home. In these photographs, Monroe wears the same clothing worn on the set earlier in the day.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246291_0 


Lot 773: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original Marilyn Monroe black and white photographs, one of her with Clark Gable, believed to have been taken on July 24, 1960, at an event held for the cast and crew of The Misfits (United Artists, 1961) at the Mapes Hotel in Reno, Nevada. This was Monroe's final completed film.
Larger, 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246308_0 


Lot 779: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDE
 A color slide of Marilyn Monroe surrounded by fans and security, from March 14, 1961. Monroe was attending a benefit for the Lee Strasberg Actors Studio held at the Roseland Dance Hall in New York City.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246321_0  


Lot 780: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of original color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken on March 14, 1961. Monroe was attending a benefit for the Lee Strasberg Actors Studio held at the Roseland Dance Hall in New York City.
Larger, 5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $300
246322_0 


Lot 835: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL CANDID PHOTOGRAPH
 An original photograph of Marilyn Monroe, circa 1950, with the words "Bel Air Hotel for Red Book Awards Party" written on verso. Likely never before seen.
3 3/4 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246404_0 


Lot 838: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE TRANSPARENCY
 A vintage color transparency of Marilyn Monroe with Herman Hover, owner of Ciro’s nightclub, circa 1953.
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246410_0 


Lot 846: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL SLIDES AND PHOTOGRAPHS WITH COPYRIGHT
 A group of four color transparency slides and two color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Sgt. Marvin Stamness in Korea when Monroe entertained troops there in 1954. Copyright of the images has been applied for. Once copyright is granted, it will be transferred to the winning bidder. Stamness was with the 189th Field Artillery 45th Division of the United States Army and served in the Korean War. At that time, he was from Barrett, Minnesota.
While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Photographs, 2 1/8 by 3 1/8 inches; Slides, 2 by 2 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246426_0  246427_0  


Lot 861: MARILYN MONROE SEVEN YEAR ITCH PREMIERE TRANSPARENCY
 A vintage color transparency of Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio at the premiere of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955).
2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246455_0  


Lot 894: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage partial contact sheet of images of Marilyn Monroe and others. The black and white contact sheet includes nine images, six of which show Monroe taken by Milton Greene at the 1955 announcement of the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc.
5 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $400 
246512_0 


Lot 895: MARILYN MONROE MMP ANNOUNCEMENT CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white partial contact sheet of images of Marilyn Monroe taken by Milton Greene at the 1955 announcement of the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. The sheet contains 10 frames, with numbering below each image.
3 1/2 by 10 inches
 Estimate:  $200 - $400
246513_0  


Lot 896: MARILYN MONROE MMP ANNOUNCEMENT CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white contact sheet of images taken at the 1955 announcement of the formation of Marilyn Monroe Productions Inc. Marlene Dietrich appears in many of the photographs along with Monroe and Milton Greene, among others. The sheet has 27 frames with grease pencil markings in red.
7 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800

246514_0 


Lot 901: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage Milton Greene contact sheet of 34 black and white images taken at the Sheraton Astor Hotel in December 1955. Two of the images are of Marilyn Monroe.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246523_0 
246702_0 


Lot 903: MARILYN MONROE MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three vintage Marilyn Monroe media photographs. Each is stamped by a media outlet or includes a snipe. Two images are of Monroe with husband Arthur Miller. One image is of Monroe with Jack Warner and Milton Greene from a press conference announcing the production of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Accompanied by one contemporary print of Monroe at a party for the film Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960).
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $600
246525_0 


Lot 917: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 12 black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe with husband Arthur Miller. Each photograph is dated in the margin "Jul 56" and marked "Pitts" on verso in an unknown hand.
5 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,200 - $1,400
246546_0  


Lot 934: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of seven vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe.
Largest, 5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246567_0  


Lot 935: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 11 vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe attending various events.
Largest, 5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246568_0 


Lot 936: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of 10 vintage black and white candid photographs of Marilyn Monroe attending various events.
5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
246569_0 


Lot 937: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five candid vintage black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe at an event.
4 3/4 by 3 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246570_0 


Lot 938: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Lois Weber on the street in New York City taken by photographer Hans Knopf. PIX Incorporated stamp on verso. A New York Post snipe is attached with a paperclip dating the photograph to February 22, 1956, and stating the pair were leaving Monroe’s apartment for lunch with Elsa Maxwell.
9 1/2 by 13 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246571_0  246572_0 


Lot 939: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Lois Weber on the street in New York City taken by photographer Hans Knopf. PIX Incorporated stamp on verso. A New York Post snipe is attached with a paperclip, dating the photograph to February 22, 1956, and stating the pair were leaving the Ambassador Hotel for a cocktail party.
10 3/4 by 11 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246573_0 246574_0 


Lot 940: MARILYN MONROE NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe with Lois Weber on the street in New York City taken by photographer Hans Knopf. PIX Incorporated stamp on verso. A New York Post snipe is attached with a paperclip dating the photograph to February 22, 1956, and stating the pair were walking to the studio of Cecil Beaton.
14 by 10 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246575_0 246703_0 


Lot 944: MARILYN MONROE CONTACT SHEET
 A contact sheet containing 10 vintage black and white candid images of Marilyn Monroe and one additional photograph from the set of an unknown production. The photographs were taken by Lois Weber.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246587_0  


Lot 945: MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of vintage candid black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe beside a plane.
5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246588_0 


Lot 946: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED KREINER PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner in 1959. The photograph shows Monroe during an interview in her hotel living room at the Ambassador East Hotel in Chicago, Illinois. Monroe was in Chicago to promote the film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer's and other stamps on verso.
9 1/2 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246589_0  


Lot 947: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED KREINER PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner in 1959 while Monroe was in Chicago to promote the film Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer’s stamp on verso with additional stamp that reads “Kindler Und Schiermeyer Verlag AG Archiv.”
13 1/2 by 10 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246590_0 


Lot 948: MARILYN MONROE MANFRED KREINER PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Manfred Kreiner circa 1959. Photographer's stamp and other notations on verso.
14 by 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246591_0  


Lot 949: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER PHOTOGRAPH BY MANFRED KREINER
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller at the New York City premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959) taken by Manfred Kreiner. Photographer's stamp on verso along with information about the photograph in an unknown hand, written with pencil in German.
10 1/2 by 13 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246592_0 


Lot 950: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller black and white vintage original photograph. Taken by Paul Schumach at the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer's stamp on verso.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246593_0 
246594_0 


Lot 971: MARILYN MONROE MONROE, MONTAND AND CUKOR SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe, Yves Montand, and George Cukor signed black and white photograph. The image was taken at a party for the film Let’s Make Love (20th Century ,1960) in which Monroe and Montand starred and Cukor directed. The photograph is inscribed “To Herbert Stern from his first director with every good wish George Cukor,” “For Herbert Love & Kisses Marilyn Monroe,” and “Pour Herbert Stern amical souvenir Y Montand 60.”
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $8,000 - $10,000
246621_0  


Lot 976: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN GLOBE CEREMONY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the 1962 Golden Globes award ceremony taken by Gene Daniels. Monroe won the award for Female World Film Favorite. Photographer's stamp on verso with additional “Revue” stamp and notation.
9 by 13 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246628_0  


Lot 977: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN GLOBE CEREMONY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the 1962 Golden Globes award ceremony taken by Gene Daniels. Monroe won the award for Female World Film Favorite. Photographer's stamp on verso with additional “Revue” stamp and notation.
13 1/2 by 9 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246629_0 


Photographies - Joseph Jasgur
Photograph
s


 Lot 796: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 with infrared film. Gelatin silver print. Printed by the artist. Artist’s copyright sticker on mount verso.
13 1/4 by 10 inches, mounted
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246343_0  


Lot 797: MARILYN MONROE COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of six color photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by photographer Joseph Jasgur. The images are of Monroe alone, and one image shows her with other models at Zuma Beach in 1946.
Each, 11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246344_0 246345_0 246346_0 
246347_0 246348_0 246349_0  


Lot 798: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 Two black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 at Zuma Beach, California. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Each with photographer’s stamp on verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246350_0 


Lot 799: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVE
 A Joseph Jasgur black and white negative of Marilyn Monroe produced in 1946. Accompanied by a photograph of the image, printed 2000–2001. Signed in ink lower right.
Negative, 2 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches; Photograph, 14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246351_0  246352_0 


Lot 800: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 Six Joseph Jasgur black and white negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced in 1946. Accompanied by a photograph of a cropping of the image, printed 2000–2001. Library of Congress number VA 308-684. The winning bidder is responsible for transfer of copyright.
One Negative, 2 1/4 by 2 1/4 inches; Five Negatives, 5 by 4 inches; Photograph, 14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246353_0  246354_0   


Lot 801: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 A sepia toned photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Toned gelatin silver print. Printed by the artist.
20 by 16 inches, mounted
 Estimate: $400 - $600 
246355_0 


Lot 802: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 Two black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. One is a cropped portrait from the full image. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the artist. Each with the artist’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246356_0  246357_0 


Lot 803: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVE AND COPYRIGHT
 A Marilyn Monroe negative of an image taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946, accompanied by copyright. The black and white negative shows Monroe on the beach with Tom Burton.
The seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright. Application for copyright has not been completed. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to obtain proper copyright. Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arriving as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
5 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 986, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Beverly Hills, April 11, 2014
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000
246358_0 


Lot 804: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Each with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246359_0 


Lot 805: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Each with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246360_0  


Lot 806: MARILYN MONROE BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by photographer Joseph Jasgur. Jasgur photographed Monroe in 1946 when she was still known as Norma Jeane Dougherty and was a model with the Blue Book Model Agency.
Largest, 11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246361_0 246363_0 246364_0 
246362_0 
246365_0 246366_0 246367_0 
246368_0 246369_0 


Lot 807: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Two with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246370_0  


Lot 808: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 Three black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946 using infrared film. Gelatin silver prints. Printed by the photographer. Two with photographer’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches each, mounted
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246371_0 246372_0 246373_0  


Lot 809: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. Gelatin silver print. Printed by the artist. Artist’s stamp on mount verso.
10 by 8 inches, mounted
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246374_0  


Lot 810: MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 A group of three Joseph Jasgur black and white negatives of Marilyn Monroe produced in 1946. Copyright to this image will be transferred to the winning bidder.
While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
5 by 4 inches, each
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246375_0 
247292_0 247293_0 


Photographies - André De Dienes
Photograph
s


Lot 795: MARILYN MONROE LIMITED EDITION ANDRE DE DIENES PRINT
A Marilyn Monroe black and white photograph taken by Andre De Dienes in 1945, printed in a limited edition, gelatin print made from the original transparency, numbered 29/50. This print is stamped, signed, and hand numbered by the estate of Andre De Dienes and stamped and hand numbered by OneWest Publishing.
19 1/2 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246342_0  


Lot 813: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white gelatin silver print montage photograph of Marilyn Monroe. Taken in 1949 by Andre de Dienes, printed circa 1960. Hand stamped on verso.
16 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Andre de Dienes
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246700_0 


Lot 814: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white gelatin silver print montage photograph of Marilyn Monroe by Andre de Dienes. Notations on the front of the photograph read "7/7 1949 A.D." in black ink.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Andre de Dienes
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246701_0  


Lot 850: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin vintage print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. The photograph is hand printed circa 1958 on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer on verso.
19 1/2 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246434_0  


Lot 851: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin vintage print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. The photograph is hand printed circa 1958 on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer on verso.
20 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246435_0  


Lot 852: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ANDRE de DIENES PHOTOGRAPH
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Silver gelatin print, printed circa 1955. Signed at lower right, photographer's stamp on verso.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 420, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Beverly Hills, March 31, 2012
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246436_0 246437_0   


Lot 853: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ANDRE de DIENES PHOTOGRAPH
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Silver gelatin print, printed circa 1955. Signed at lower right, photographer's stamp on verso.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 421, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's, Beverly Hills, March 31, 2012
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246438_0  246439_0   


Lot 865: MARILYN MONROE INSCRIBED MAGAZINE PAGE
 A black and white page of an unknown magazine inscribed to child star Linda Bennett. Inscription reads "To Linda, I saw you in the Seven Little Foys - Great Marilyn Monroe."
17 1/2 by 14 inches, framed; 7 1/4 by 6 3/4 inches, sight
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246461_0  


Photos Tom Kelley & Calendriers 'Golden Dreams'
Tom Kelley's Photos & Calendars 'Golden Dreams'


Lot 35: MARILYN MONROE UNCUT TIN TRAY
 A circa 1950s uncut tin tray, illustrated with two nude photographs of Marilyn Monroe, "Golden Dreams" and "A New Wrinkle" both taken during a photo session with Tom Kelley in 1949.
Framed, 26 1/2 by 36 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 110, “Film & Entertainment,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale number 9771, December 16, 2003
 Estimate: $200 - $400

245078_0  


Lot 817: MARILYN MONROE RED VELVET SESSION PHOTOGRAPHS
A group of four color Marilyn Monroe photographs from the Red Velvet session with Tom Kelley in 1949. The group of contemporary prints includes an interesting composite image of Monroe and other less often seen images from the session. Mackie was given the photographs by a fan who knew that he had worked on Monroe’s costumes and that he was a fan of Monroe's. Printed circa 2004.
15 by 10 inches
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Bob Mackie
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000

246384_0 


Lot 818: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH FROM THE REMASTERED RED VELVET COLLECTION
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe from the 1949 Red Velvet session with Tom Kelley. The limited edition print is part of the “Remastered Red Velvet Collection” issued by the estate of Tom Kelley in 2004. The image is numbered 2/500 and is signed by Tom Kelley Jr. in the lower right corner. The image is referred to as pose number 7.
27 3/4 by 23 1/2, framed
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246385_0  247296_0  


Lot 819: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NUDE PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe “New Wrinkle” photograph from her 1949 photo session with Tom Kelley. The black and white print is affixed to foam core board. The absence of optical brighteners in the print indicates that this print was made prior to 1953.
Photograph, 10 by 8 1/4 inches; 15 1/4 by 13 1/2 inches, overall
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246386_0 

 


Lot 36: MARILYN MONROE CALENDAR
 A U.S. calendar from 1952, featuring a color print of nude Marilyn Monroe photographed by Tom Kelley.
Matted, 30 by 21 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 64, “Film & Entertainment Memorabilia,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale number 5238, December 19, 2007
 Estimate: $200 - $400
245079_0  


Lot 310: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN DREAMS CALENDAR
 A calendar from Connors Bar & Grill New York City, 1958, all months intact. Paper loss to lower edge, tape residue along top edge.
15 1/2 by 9 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
245625_0  


Lot 626: 1955 MARILYN MONROE CALENDAR
 A four-page calendar with spiral-bound top edge featuring images of Marilyn Monroe taken by Tom Kelley in the late 1940s. The calendar features a modesty cover with added lace overprint to cover Monroe and three pin-up images of Monroe in cowboy boots, all over triple month pages. Together with original envelope advertising the calendar as "The Most Talked of Calendar in the World" for 50 cents.
12 1/4 by 8 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246112_0 


Lot 833: MARILYN MONROE GOLDEN DREAMS 1952 CALENDAR
 A 1952 Marilyn Monroe “Golden Dreams” calendar. This is an early version of Monroe’s famously posed calendar and does not have her name printed on the calendar itself. A note attached to the lower portion of the calendar does identify the model as Monroe, reading in part, “This Champion Calendar was posed by Marilyn Monroe. ...Since that time she has received much publicity in the daily newspapers and national magazines and has been [sic] starred in two movies.” The calendar advertises San Fernando Valley Motor. Housed in a frame.
37 by 19 inches, framed
 Estimate: $700 - $900
246402_0 


Photographies - Bert Stern
Photographs


Lot 984: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERT STERN
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe lying in bed, signed by Bert Stern. The photograph is contained in an orange portfolio.
23 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

246640_0  


Lot 985: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERT STERN
 A color photograph of a nude Marilyn Monroe holding a striped scarf, signed by Bert Stern.
23 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000

246641_0   


Lot 986: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERT STERN
 A Marilyn Monroe color photograph taken by Bert Stern in 1962 during "The Last Sitting." Numbered 188/250 and signed by Stern in the lower right. A Martin Lawrence Galleries label attached to backing of the framed photograph is typed with the title "Last Sitting: Not Bad For 36."
27 1/2 by 26 1/4 inches, framed
 Estimate: $2,000 - $3,000

246642_0 


Lot 1006: MARILYN MONROE BERT STERN SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white digital print photograph of Marilyn Monroe resting her chin on her hand, inscribed and dated in black marker to the upper left "For Bill/ 3-3-08" and signed and dated in red grease pen to the lower right "Bert Stern/ 2008" with Stern's copyright stamp on the verso.
8 1/2 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246671_0 


Photographies - George Barris
Photographs


Lot 996: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe talking on the telephone signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso.
7 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $200 - $400

246654_0 246655_0 


Lot 997: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe talking on the telephone signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246656_0 246657_0 247317_0  


Lot 998: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe dressed in orange signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246658_0 246659_0 247318_0   


Lot 999: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe leaning against a cinder block wall signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
11 by 14 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246660_0 246661_0 247319_0   


Lot 1000: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe standing in the surf signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
10 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246662_0 246663_0 247320_0 


Lot 1001: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe in a bikini signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200

246664_0 246665_0  247321_0 


Lot 1002: MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe standing in the surf signed in black marker to the lower right by George Barris with Weston Editions copyright stamp on the verso. Includes a certificate of authenticity from OneWest Publishing signed by Chuck Murphy.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600

246666_0  246667_0 


Lot 1003: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY GEORGE BARRIS
 A photographic print of Marilyn Monroe, limited edition numbered 21/50, taken in 1962 by George Barris. Silver gelatin print, printed on double-weight fiber paper under the guidance and approval of George Barris by OneWest Publishing. Signed by the photographer and stamped by OneWest Publishing.
20 by 16 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

246668_0 


Photographies - Milton H Greene
Photographs


Lot 257: MARILYN MONROE OUTTAKE PHOTOGRAPH
A black and white test print on archival paper of Monroe during the Mandolin Sitting with photographer Milton Greene. The image is stamped on verso "Reproduction Forbidden" with additional pencil notations documenting the exposure settings for the print.
7 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
245520_0 


Lot 890: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white partial contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe and Milton Greene. The sheet, which consists of two partial contact sheets stapled together, contains 17 images of Monroe.
4 1/2 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246508_0  


Lot 891: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage partial black and white contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe. The Milton Greene contact sheet includes 12 images of Monroe in a black cocktail dress.
3 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246509_0 


Lot 892: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE CONTACT SHEET
A  vintage partial black and white contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe. The Milton Greene contact sheet includes 10 frames with images of Monroe and others. The images were taken by Milton Greene at the 21 Club in New York in 1954. Monroe can be seen talking to the restaurant owner, Robert Kriendler.
4 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246510_0 


Lot 893: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE CONTACT SHEET
 A vintage black and white partial contact sheet of Marilyn Monroe and Milton Greene. The sheet includes 10 images of Monroe. Most of the images were likely taken by Greene circa 1955.
3 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246511_0  


Lot 909: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE PRINTS
 A group of four vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe, Laurence Olivier, Arthur Miller and others taken by Milton Greene circa 1956 during the preparation for and filming of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246535_0  


Lot 910: MARILYN MONROE MONROE, OLIVIER AND RATTIGAN CONTACT SHEET IMAGES
 A group of four vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe with Laurence Olivier and Terence Rattigan taken by Milton Greene. The photographs were taken during a 1956 publicity photo session for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Two of the images show Monroe with Olivier, who co-starred with Monroe and directed the film. One image is of Monroe and Olivier with Rattigan, author of the play on which the film was based and of the screenplay for the film, and one image is of Olivier and Rattigan. Notations on verso.
Each, 2 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246536_0  


Lot 911: MARILYN MONROE MONROE, OLIVIER AND RATTIGAN CONTACT SHEET IMAGES
 A group of four vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe with Laurence Olivier and Terence Rattigan taken by Milton Greene. The photographs were taken during a 1956 publicity photo session for The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957). Three of the images show Monroe with Olivier, who co-starred with Monroe and directed the film. One image is of Monroe and Olivier with Rattigan, author of the play on which the film was based and of the screenplay for the film. Notations on verso.
Each, 2 1/2 by 3 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246537_0 


Lot 913: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE MILTON GREENE PRINTS
 A group of six vintage black and white contact sheet prints of Marilyn Monroe, Laurence Olivier, Arthur Miller, Vivien Leigh and others taken by Milton Greene circa 1956 during the preparation for and filming of The Prince and the Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957).
Largest, 4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246539_0  246540_0   


Lot 921: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY MILTON GREENE
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier taken by Milton Greene in 1956. Photographer's stamp on verso.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246553_0  


Lot 922: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY MILTON GREENE
 A vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe, Terence Rattigan and Laurence Olivier taken by Milton Greene in 1956. Photographer's stamp on verso.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246554_0 


Lot 1010: MARILYN MONROE PRINT BY MILTON GREENE
 A large-scale silkscreen print of Marilyn Monroe removing her stockings. Marked "A/P" [Artist's Proof] to the lower left and signed to the lower right by photographer Milton H. Greene.
46 by 35 1/2 inches, framed
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Allan Rich
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246684_0 
246685_0  246686_0  


Lot 1011: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE SILKSCREEN PRINT
 A limited edition silkscreen print of a Milton Greene photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken during the "Black Sitting" photo session in New York in 1956. Numbered 218/300 and signed by Greene at lower right.
35 by 46 inches
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246687_0 
246688_0  246689_0  


Lot 1012: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE SILKSCREEN PRINT
 A silkscreen print of a Milton Greene photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken during the "Black Sitting" photo session in New York in 1956. Numbered 44/300 and signed by Greene in pencil at lower right.
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246690_0 
246691_0 246692_0 


Photographies - Divers photographes
Photographs - Various photographers


Lot 37: MARILYN MONROE AND JOHNNY HYDE PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white gelatin silver photograph featuring Marilyn Monroe dancing with talent agent Johnny Hyde, to whom she owed much of her success, presumably taken by Bruno Bernard. Numbered 9/350 in ink to the lower left.
16 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 332, “Film and Entertainment,” Christie's, South Kensington, Sale Number 6343, December 17, 1993
 Estimate: $400 - $600
245080_0 


Lot 94: MARILYN MONROE EARLY SNAPSHOT
 A circa late 1940s black and white glossy photograph of Monroe with her Chihuahua. The photograph was taken by Richard C. Miller.
4 by 5 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245260_0 


Lot 100: MARILYN MONROE MODELING PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white glossy photograph of photographer Richard C. Miller posing as he takes a photo of Monroe in hunting clothing holding a rifle during a 1946 photo session. The back of the photograph has pencil notation dating the photograph, "4/5/46."
3 3/4 by 4 3/4 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
245270_0  


Lot 434: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY CECIL BEATON
 A vintage copy of Monroe's favorite image of herself by Cecil Beaton. As evidenced by receipts among Monroe's documents, she ordered reprints of this photograph to sign for people. This is one of her vintage copies of the image, ordered during her lifetime.
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
245806_0 


Lot 663: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE
 An archive of approximately 20 photographs featuring or related to Marilyn Monroe, some vintage and some reproductions, collected by Frieda Hull.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $100 - $200
246158_0  


Lot 664: MARILYN MONROE COLOR SLIDES
 A group of four slides of Marilyn Monroe from various points in her career: a costume test shot from Something's Got To Give ; on the set of Something’s Got To Give ; a double exposure from the Red Velvet session by Tom Kelley; and an early photo of Monroe by Richard C. Miller.
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246159_0   


Lot 665: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A large, glossy black and white publicity photograph of Marilyn Monroe in white dress, heels and gloves.
14 by 11 1/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Frieda Hull
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246160_0  


Lot 793: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY LASZLO WILLINGER
 A large-scale Cibachrome color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Laszlo Willinger. Stamp-signed on verso.
34 1/2 by 30 1/2 inches, framed
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246340_0 


Lot 794: MARILYN MONROE HURRELL STAMPED PHOTOGRAPH
 A photograph of Marilyn Monroe with a George Hurrell attribution statement on verso signed by Hurrell-endorsed authenticator Allan Rich.
14 by 12 1/2 inches, framed
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Allan Rich
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246341_0  


Lot 811: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD
 An original vintage photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1946. The photograph is titled “Mistletoe” and is part of the Discovery Series. Signed on verso “Bernard of Hollywood.” The photograph is accompanied by a copy of Monroe’s model release signed “Norma Jeane Dougherty” on July 24, 1946. This image was among the photographs that Bernard gave to Twentieth Century Fox.
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246376_0 


Lot 812: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE NEGATIVE
 A vintage black and white negative of Marilyn Monroe. The image was taken by Ed Cronenweth while Monroe did her hair and makeup during the time of production for Ladies of the Chorus (Columbia, 1948). Accompanied by a contemporary print of the negative.
5 by 4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Ted Stampfer
 Estimate: $200 - $400
246377_0  246378_0   


Lot 821: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE TRANSPARENCY
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage color transparency of an image taken in 1951. The image shows Monroe in the gown she wore to the 23rd Academy Awards ceremony, where she presented the award for Best Sound Recording. The award went to All About Eve (20th Century, 1950).
5 by 4 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246388_0  


Lot 822: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE ED CLARK TRANSPARENCY
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage color transparency of an image taken in 1950 by Ed Clark, a LIFE photographer.
5 by 4 inches
Estimate: $400 - $600
246389_0  


Lot 825: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY BRUNO BERNARD
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard in 1952. In the photograph, Monroe is wearing the hot pink dress she wore in her role as Rose Loomis in Niagara (20th Century, 1953). The photograph is numbered 15/90 and signed “From the estate of Bernard of Hollywood."
16 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 Estimate: $1,500 - $2,500
246393_0  


Lot 826: MARILYN MONROE PHILLIPPE HALSMAN PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white image of Marilyn Monroe taken by Phillippe Halsman during a 1952 photo session for LIFE magazine. Numbered 81/250.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246394_0 


Lot 827: MARILYN MONROE HAROLD LLOYD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition poster photograph print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Harold Lloyd in 1952. The color print is numbered 25/250 at lower right. The photograph was taken by silent screen star turned photographer Harold Lloyd during a photoshoot at Monroe’s Los Angeles apartment with Philippe Halsman. Later in 1952, a photograph from Halsman’s session appeared on the cover of LIFE magazine. Printed on crystal archive paper from the original 35mm Kodachrome negative in 2005. Blind stamped in the lower right corner by the Harold Lloyd Trust.
20 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 204, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246395_0 


Lot 828: MARILYN MONROE HAROLD LLOYD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition poster photograph print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Harold Lloyd in 1952. The color print is numbered 25/250 at lower right. The full-length photograph of Monroe speaking to photographer Philippe Halsman was taken by silent screen star turned photographer, Harold Lloyd, during a photo shoot at Monroe’s Los Angeles apartment with Halsman. Later in 1952, a photograph from Halsman’s session appeared on the cover of LIFE Magazine. Printed on crystal archive paper from the original 35mm Kodachrome negative in 2005. Blind stamped in the lower right corner by the Harold Lloyd Trust.
20 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 206, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's, Los Angeles, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
246396_0  


Lot 831: MARILYN MONROE AND JOHN FLOREA PHOTOGRAPH NEGATIVES
 A pair of vintage original negatives showing Marilyn Monroe with photographer John Florea. The first image was taken during a publicity photograph session for the film Monkey Business (20th Century, 1952). The second was taken while shooting publicity images for How To Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). The negatives were originally from the collection of John Florea.
6 by 2 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $400 - $600
246399_0   


Lot 839: MARILYN MONROE JOHN FLOREA SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe stacking thousand-dollar bills next to photographer John Florea, likely from a series of promotional photos for the Monroe film How To Marry A Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). Signed on the verso by Florea with a copyright stamp.
14 by 11 inches
 Estimate: $300 - $500
246411_0 246412_0   


Lot 840: MARILYN MONROE AND OTHERS FRANK WORTH PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of five black and white Frank Worth images, including two of Marilyn Monroe. All are blind stamped “Frank Worth Estate Limited Edition.” The first is an image of Monroe wearing a dress she made famous in the film How To Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). In the second image, Monroe is wearing the same dress and leaning against a car in the background, and Sammy Davis Jr. is in mid-leap, dancing in the foreground. The remaining photographs are portraits of Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor and James Dean.
Each, 12 by 17 1/2 inches
 Estimate: $500 - $700
246416_0  246417_0 246415_0 

246413_0 246414_0 


Lot 857: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED AND INSCRIBED PORTRAIT
 A vintage print full-length black and white studio portrait shot by Bernard of Hollywood, signed and inscribed by Marilyn Monroe as she appeared in a floral corset with lace trim, fishnet stockings and high-heel shoes in a provocative pose. Inscription reads in full, “To Carole, It’s a pleasure to work with you/ Marilyn Monroe.
18 1/2 by 17 inches, overall; 9 1/2 by 7 1/2 inches, sight
PROVENANCE Lot 173, "Property from the Estate of Marilyn Monroe," Julien's Auctions, Los Angeles, California, June 4, 2005
 Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
246446_0   


Lot 866: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white matte photograph signed in green ink "Dear Inez, My love and deepest thanks, Marilyn."
8 by 10 inches
 Estimate: $15,000 - $20,000
246462_0  


Lot 867: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY CECIL BEATON
 A vintage black and white image of Marilyn Monroe taken by Cecil Beaton in 1956 at the Ambassador Hotel. Camera Press stamp on verso with additional typed label that reads in part, "Monroe by Beaton:/ THE ETERNAL MARILYN/ Sophisticated innocence.../ Please acknowledge: photograph by Cecil Beaton/ Camera Press London."
9 1/4 by 8 inches
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246463_0  246464_0  


Lot 872: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe photograph and contact sheet prints circa 1956. The black and white image, which shows Monroe having her photograph taken, is stamped with Hans Knopf photographer's stamp on verso. With nine additional vintage contact sheet photographs assumed to have been taken at the same time. The contact sheet prints were all affixed to black paper at one time.
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
Estimate: $600 - $800
246472_0 246476_0 246477_0 
246475_0  246481_0 
246473_0 246478_0 246474_0 
246479_0 246480_0 


Lot 873: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage portrait publicity photograph from her personal collection.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246482_0  


Lot 874: MARILYN MONROE CECIL BEATON PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Cecil Beaton in 1956. The photograph, from Monroe's personal archive, is mounted to board and contained in a brown folder.
Photograph, 9 by 9 1/4 inches; 16 by 14 1/2 inches, overall
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
 Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
246483_0  


Lot 878: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED AND INSCRIBED PHOTOGRAPH
 A framed photograph of Marilyn Monroe signed "To David, so you're still counting my money - what money? Marilyn Monroe."
20 1/2 by 17 1/2 inches, overall; 13 by 10 1/4 inches, sight
 Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
246493_0  246494_0 


Lot 919: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage Marilyn Monroe black and white publicity photograph with a notation in pencil on verso in an unknown hand "500 8x10's ordered 6/16/58 deliver and bill MM."
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Lois Weber
 Estimate: $600 - $800
246548_0 


Lot 972: MARILYN MONROE PORTRAIT IMAGES
A group of nine Marilyn Monroe portrait images from film studios for reference or publicity and from photoshoots, with photographers Eric Skipsey and Richard Avedon. Eight of the images are in black and white with one color image from the film Let's Make Love (20th Century, 1960).
Most, 8 by 10 inches
Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246622_0  


Lot 1009: MARILYN MONROE DOUGLAS KIRKLAND PORTFOLIO
 A limited edition portfolio of Marilyn Monroe photographs taken by Douglas Kirkland and published by the Govinda Gallery in Washington, D.C. Each of the six photographs is numbered 16/30 to the lower left and signed by Kirkland to the lower right. Housed in a blue cloth clamshell case with gilt-stamped morocco label.
19 3/4 by 16 1/2 inches, overall
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Allan Rich
 Estimate: $800 - $1,200
246677_0 246678_0 246679_0 
246680_0 246681_0 246682_0 
246683_0 

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

29 décembre 2015

Icons & Idols Feat Joan Collins 12/2015 - Photos


 Andre De Dienes


Lot 478  MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1945. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$512 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot478-220406_0 


Lot 479 MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1946. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer on verso.
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$896 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot479-220407_0 


Lot 480  MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1949. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
17 by 16 inches
 Winning bid:$750 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot480-220408_0  


Lot 481  MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1949. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
20 by 16 inches
 Winning bid:$384 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot481-220409_0 


Lot 482  MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1949. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer on verso. Additionally handwritten on verso is "17/67 given to [illegible] Shirley de Dienes 11-18-86."
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$384 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot482-220410_0  


Lot 483  MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1949. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso. Additionally inscribed on verso "25/67 given to Chad Lewis Shirley de Dienes 11-18-86."
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$384 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot483-220411_0 


Lot 484 MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1949. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
20 by 16 inches
 Winning bid:$576 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot484-220412_0  


Lot 485 MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$1,024 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot485-220413_0 


Lot 486 MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$1,024 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot486-220414_0 


Lot 487 MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDRE de DIENES
 A black and white silver gelatin print of Marilyn Monroe taken by Andre de Dienes in 1953. Hand printed by de Dienes on double-weight paper and stamped by the photographer twice on verso.
20 by 16 inches
 Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot487-220415_0 


 Bruno Bernard


Lot 502  MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition color photograph of Marilyn Monroe titled “Valentine Heart” taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1946. Numbered 16/90 and signed by The Estate of Bruno Bernard in the lower margin.
20 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
unsold - Estimate: $3,000 - $4,000
lot502-220447_0 


Lot 503  MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition color photograph of Marilyn Monroe titled “Sailor Girl” taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1946. Numbered 16/90 and signed by The Estate of Bruno Bernard in the lower margin.
20 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
unsold - Estimate: $3,000 - $4,000
lot503-220448_0 


Lot 504  MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition color photograph of Marilyn Monroe titled “My Girl Friday” taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1946. Numbered 16/90 and signed by The Estate of Bruno Bernard in the lower margin.
20 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 unsold - Estimate: $3,000 - $4,000
lot504-220449_0 


Lot 505  MARILYN MONROE BRUNO BERNARD SIGNED ORIGINAL VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 An original vintage black and white pin-up photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1946. Signed on verso “Bernard of Hollywood.”
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 unsold - Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000
lot505-220450_0 


Lot 510  MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe titled “Poolside” taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1949. Numbered 16/90 and signed by The Estate of Bruno Bernard in the lower margin.
20 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Winning bid:$4,062.50 - Estimate: $3,000 - $4,000
lot510-220455_0 


Lot 511  MARILYN MONROE BRUNO BERNARD SIGNED ORIGINAL VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
  An original vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe signing autographs taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1954. Signed on verso “Bernard of Hollywood.”
11 by 14 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
unsold - Estimate: $6,000 - $8,000
lot511-220456_0 


Lot 512  MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe wearing a costume dress from her film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953) taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1953. Numbered 16/90 and signed by The Estate of Bruno Bernard in the lower margin.
20 by 16 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 unsold - Estimate: $3,000 - $4,000
lot512-220457_0 


Lot 513  MARILYN MONROE BRUNO BERNARD SIGNED ORIGINAL VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 An original vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe on the set of The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1954. Signed on verso "Bernard of Hollywood" and contained in a brown Bernard of Hollywood folder.
14 by 11 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
Winning bid:$12,500 - Estimate: $10,000 - $20,000
lot513-220458_0 


Lot 514  MARILYN MONROE BERNARD OF HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A limited edition color photograph of Marilyn Monroe wearing the famous white dress from her film The Seven Year Itch (20th Century, 1955) taken by Bruno Bernard circa 1954. Numbered 16/50 and signed by The Estate of Bruno Bernard in the lower margin.
24 by 20 inches
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Bruno Bernard
 unsold - Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000
lot514-220459_0 


 George Barris


Lot 537 MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS PHOTOGRAPHS
A pair of black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by George Barris. Each photograph is signed by Barris. One of the photographs is stamped “© 1987 George Barris/ Marilyn Monroe/ Weston Editions LTD./ All Rights Reserved,” and both photographs are stamped “The Private Collection of Kim Goodwin.”
Winning bid:$448 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot537-220508_0  lot537-220509_0 


Lot 538  MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS PHOTOGRAPH
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by George Barris in the summer of 1962. Signed by the photographer at lower right and stamped “The Kim Goodwin Collection” on verso.
Winning bid:$250 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
lot538-220510_0 


Lot 539  MARILYN MONROE GEORGE BARRIS LAST PHOTOGRAPHS PORTFOLIO
 A folder containing eight color prints of George Barris’ photographs of Marilyn Monroe. White folder reads on the cover “Marilyn Monroe/ 25th/ The Last Photos.” Interior left of folder reads “Limited Edition/ Original Photographs by/ George Barris.” Interior right of folder reads “As seen in/ ‘Marilyn’ Norma Jeane/ text by Gloria Steinem.” Accompanied by a card that gives the edition number as 74/99. Each photograph is signed by Barris and stamped on verso “Copyright 1987/ Marilyn Monroe/ Weston Editions LTD.” The photographs are additionally stamped “The Private Collection of Kim Goodwin.”
Photographs, 10 by 8 inches; Folder, 10 1/2 by 9 inches
 Winning bid:$2,240 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot539-220511_0 
lot539-220512_0 lot539-220513_0 
lot539-220514_0 lot539-220515_0 lot539-220516_0 
lot539-220517_0 lot539-220518_0 lot539-220519_0 


Photos Diverses


Lot 19  JOAN COLLINS TWO FRAMED POSTERS
 The first, titled "Marilyn Monroe as Jean Harlow," is from a series of photographs photographer Richard Avedon produced with Marilyn Monroe, signed by Avedon. Other photographs from the series show Monroe dressed as actresses Lillian Russell, Marlene Dietrich, Theda Bara, and Clara Bow. The second, an Erte exhibition poster from 1972.
Larger, 32 by 24 1/4 inches
Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $200 - $300
lot19-219124_0  lot19-219125_0 


Lot 488 MARILYN MONROE ARCHIVE OF PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSEPH JASGUR
 An archive of photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Joseph Jasgur in 1946. The photographs were taken of a 19-year-old Norma Jeane Dougherty, before she was Marilyn Monroe. Taken in Los Angeles for Blue Book Modeling Agency, these photographs comprise one of Monroe’s first modeling portfolios. It was this portfolio she presented to Ben Lyon, the casting director at 20th Century Fox who signed her to the studio and shortly after changed her name. Jasgur’s images of Norma Jeane Dougherty mark the beginning of her career and offer us a unique glimpse of Marilyn Monroe, before she was Marilyn.
All prints in this lot are from these early photoshoots and are directly from the estate of Joseph Jasgur. Included in the archive are approximately 400 color and black and white later prints, size 11 by 14 inches; approximately 120 black and white gelatin silver prints, size 8 by 10 inches; approximately 10 black and white gelatin silver prints, size 11 by 14 inches; some oversize prints, contact prints, and a wooden camera tripod used by Jasgur. Some prints are signed or stamped by the photographer, others are not. Print dates vary. Condition varies.
Sizes vary
PROVENANCE From the Estate of Joseph Jasgur
Winning bid:$8,320 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot488-220416_0 


Lot 489  MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVE AND COPYRIGHT
 One Joseph Jasgur black and white negative of Marilyn Monroe taken in 1946. Copyrights to this image will be transferred to the winning bidder.
5 by 4 inches
Winning bid:$1,280 - Estimate: $1,000 - $1,500
lot489-220417_0  lot489-220418_0  


Lot 490  MARILYN MONROE JOSEPH JASGUR NEGATIVES AND COPYRIGHT
 Two Joseph Jasgur black and white negatives of Marilyn Monroe taken in 1946. Copyrights to this image will be transferred to the winning bidder. Accompanied by a photograph of the image, printed 2000-2001.
Negatives, 5 by 4 inches; Photograph, 14 by 11 inches
 Winning bid:$384 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot490-220420_0  lot490-220421_0 


Lot 491  MARILYN MONROE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH
 An original vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe circa 1946, with her half sister Berniece Baker Miracle, her mother Gladys, and her niece Mona Rae. Originally from the collection of Eleanor Goddard.
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 84, "Julien's Autumn Sale," Julien's, Las Vegas, October 29, 2005
Winning bid:$875 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot491-220422_0  lot491-220423_0 


Lot 492  MARILYN MONROE INSCRIBED JIM DOUGHERTY PHOTOGRAPH
 A pair of original vintage photographs of Marilyn Monroe's first husband, Jim Dougherty. The first is a passport style portrait, and the second shows Dougherty sleeping on the beach and is inscribed on the back in Monroe's hand "(zzz.....zzz) Jimmie sound asleep." Originally from the collection of Eleanor Goddard.
Larger, 3 3/4 by 4 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE Lot 80, "Julien's Autumn Sale," Julien's, Las Vegas, October 29, 2005
Winning bid:$750 - Estimate: $400 - $600
lot492-220424_0  lot492-220425_0 


Lot 496  MARILYN MONROE TOM KELLEY SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A large-format nude photograph of Marilyn Monroe printed from an image taken by Tom Kelley in 1949 during his famous photoshoot with Monroe. Numbered 146 of 300 to the lower left and signed by Tom Kelley to the lower right. Includes certificate of authenticity from Mirage Editions.
44 by 36 inches, framed
PROVENANCE From the Collection of James Heeren
 Winning bid:$1,562.50 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot496a lot496-220431_0 lot496-220432_0 


Lot 497 MARILYN MONROE HUGH HEFNER SIGNED EARL MORAN PHOTOGRAPH
A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe posing topless, originally taken by pin-up artist Earl Moran. Numbered 1 of 75 and signed by Playboy founder Hugh Hefner to the lower left. Embossed with the Playboy Legacy Collection logo to the lower right.
 Winning bid:$6,400 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot497-220433_0  
lot497-224723_0  


Lot 498  MARILYN MONROE EARL MORAN PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe posing topless, originally taken by pin-up artist Earl Moran. Numbered 5 of 75 to the lower left and embossed with the Playboy Legacy Collection logo to the lower right. Housed in a cloth-bound clamshell box with gilt titling and includes a Playboy certificate of authenticity.
24 by 20 inches
Winning bid:$2,187.50 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot498-220434_0 lot498-220435_0 lot498-220436_0  


Lot 499  MARILYN MONROE HUGH HEFNER SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A large-format nude photograph of Marilyn Monroe printed from an image taken by Tom Kelley in 1949. This is the iconic Marilyn pose used in the first issue of Playboy magazine. Numbered 171 of 300 to the lower left and signed by Playboy founder Hugh Hefner to the lower right. Includes certificate of authenticity from Light Signatures.
42 by 34 inches, framed
 Winning bid:$2,187.50 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot499-220437_0 lot499-220438_0 


Lot 500  MARILYN MONROE FRANK WORTH PHOTOGRAPH
 A large-format gelatin silver photograph of Marilyn Monroe posing in her dress from the film How to Marry a Millionaire (20th Century Fox, 1953) printed from a negative created by Frank Worth. Numbered 9 of 95 to the lower left and embossed by the Frank Worth Estate. Includes cloth-bound clamshell box with gilt-stamped titling and a certificate of authenticity from the Frank Worth Estate.
25 3/4 by 21 3/4 by 1 3/4 inches
PROVENANCE From the Collection of James Heeren
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
lot500-220439_0  lot500-220440_0  
lot500-220441_0  lot500-220442_0 


Lot 517  MARILYN MONROE EARL LEAF CONTACT SHEET
 A contact sheet containing eight vintage black and white images of Marilyn Monroe taken by Earl Leaf. They were taken at the home of talent agent Johnny Hyde, where Monroe occasionally lived, on May 17, 1950. The images are attached to a sheet of cardstock with numerous notations, including the date the photographs were taken and Monroe’s name; stamped at the bottom left with the photographer's stamp.
EXHIBITED Etherton Gallery, Tucson, Arizona, "Marilyn Monroe Collection," Number 46
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$2,187.50 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
lot517-220464_0 


Lot 519  MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL 1954 SLIDES
 A group of 12 original vintage color slides showing Marilyn Monroe entertaining members of the United States military in Korea in 1954. Accompanied by a printed mage of each slide and two additional slides showing other performers that do not include Monroe.
This item sold with copyright but is not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given .
2 by 2 inches, each
PROVENANCE Lot 135, "Entertainment Memorabilia," Christie's, New York, Sale number 8525, July 19, 2001
Winning bid:$2,240 - Estimate: $4,000 - $6,000
lot519-220466_0  lot519-220467_0 


Lot 520 MARILYN MONROE 1954 NEGATIVES
 A pair of black and white negatives of Marilyn Monroe taken in 1954 while the actress was entertaining troops in Korea on a break from her honeymoon with Joe DiMaggio.
This item is sold with copyright but is not sold with copyright documentation. It is the responsibility of the winning bidder to apply for copyright. While the seller confirms that this property is sold with copyright, Julien’s can accept no liability in relation to any matters arising as a result of any imperfection in copyright given.
Strip of negatives, 4 1/2 by 1 3/8 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000 
lot520-220469_0  lot520-220470_0  lot520-220471_0 
lot520-220472_0 


Lot 523  MARILYN MONROE EVE ARNOLD PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Eve Arnold. The image shows Monroe in a one-piece leopard print swimsuit lying in a marsh, taken circa 1955. The photograph is affixed to a board. Some handwritten markings on verso and stamped “The Kim Goodwin Collection.”
15 1/2 by 19 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot523-220477_0 


Lot 524  MARILYN MONROE AND MARLON BRANDO DIGITAL PRINTS
 A group of eight digital prints of Marilyn Monroe and Marlon Brando taken by Milton Greene in November 1955. The photographs were used to publicize a performance of The Rose Tattoo to benefit The Actors Studio. A paper label is affixed to the back of each image from the Milton H. Greene Collection.
Each, 19 by 13 inches
Winning bid:$1,920 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot524-220478_0 lot524-220479_0 lot524-220480_0 
lot524-220481_0 lot524-220482_0 
lot524-220483_0 lot524-220484_0 lot524-220485_0 


Lot 526  MARILYN MONROE CECIL BEATON PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Cecil Beaton in 1956. The photograph, from Monroe's personal archive, is mounted to board and contained in a brown folder.
Photograph, 9 by 9 1/4 inches; 16 by 14 1/2 inches, overall
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$2,187.50 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot526-220488_0 


Lot 527  MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage portrait publicity photograph from her personal collection.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$576 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot527-220489_0 


Lot 528  MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller black and white vintage original photograph. Taken by Paul Schumach at the premiere of Some Like It Hot (USA, 1959). Photographer stamp on verso.
10 by 8 inches
PROVENANCE From the Lost Archive of Marilyn Monroe
Winning bid:$896 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot528-220490_0 


Lot 530 MARILYN MONROE CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of nine vintage candid snapshots of Marilyn Monroe. Eight images are in color and one is black and white. Three of the images show Monroe and husband Arthur Miller at the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Eight of the nine images were sold together as a lot in a previous Christie's auction.
Largest, 5 1/4 by 3 1/2 inches
PROVENANCE Partial Lot 15, "Entertainment Memorabilia," Christie's, New York, Sale number 8609, November 19, 2001
 Winning bid:$1,250 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot530-220493_0 


Lot 540 MARILYN MONROE DOUGLAS KIRKLAND PHOTOGRAPH
 A color photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Douglas Kirkland on November 17, 1961, on assignment for Look magazine. Signed by Kirkland and numbered 17/49 at lower right.
20 by 16 inches
Winning bid:$1,920 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot540-220520_0 
lot540-220521_0 


Lot 541  MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE SILKSCREEN PRINT
A limited edition silkscreen print of a Milton Greene photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken during the "Black Sitting" photo session in New York in 1956. Numbered 85/300 and signed by Greene at lower right.
 Winning bid:$750 - Estimate: $600 - $800
lot541-220522_0  
lot541-220523_0  lot541-220524_0  


Lot 542  MARILYN MONROE BILL RAY PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the May 19, 1962, birthday celebration of President John F. Kennedy, taken by Bill Ray. The photograph is inscribed at the lower margin “To Kim, With Best Wishes, Bill Ray 1982.” Stamped “Kim Goodwin” on verso.
 Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
lot542-220525_0 

31 août 2015

Le tableau de chasse de Marilyn Monroe

puretrend-logo

 Le tableau de chasse de Marilyn Monroe
Publié le 05/04/2012,
en ligne
sur puretrend.com

pt-699640-g-637x0-2 

Profession : Actrice et chanteuse.

Pourquoi elle plaît ? Marilyn c'est Marilyn. Un mythe, une icône, l'idole des hommes, qui n'arrivaient jamais à lui résister. Sa bouche charnue et ses yeux bleu azur en ont séduit plus d'un. Ses formes généreuses et sa poitrine pulpeuse sont aujourd'hui encore objet de fantasme. Mais ce qui plaisait aussi chez Marilyn c'était son image de jeune femme avec une âme en perdition. Fragile, bouleversée, rongée par la détresse, Monroe aurait pu être sauvée par bon nombre d'hommes... Tous devenus fous face au caractère presque bipolaire de l'actrice.

Son style de proie ? Les hommes de pouvoir, les acteurs célèbres comme Paul Newman ou Marlon Brando. Mais aussi les écrivains, comme son troisième époux Arthur Miller ou les sportifs version italien : Joe Dimaggio. Marilyn Monroe aimait plaire aux hommes et voulait toujours être sensuelle, sexy et désirable à leurs yeux. Née sans connaitre son père, elle a longtemps chercher a retrouver celui-ci au travers des hommes qu'elle séduisait.

Ses conquêtes ? Beaucoup. Trop nombreuses, avec également bon nombres de rumeurs, on en a ici sélectionné 29. Et c'est déjà pas mal ! Des hommes comme Yves Montand ou Eddie Fisher en passant par des femmes, des belles. On pense surtout à Brigitte Bardot ou Joan Crawford.

Avec qui elle aurait pu roucouler ? Si le mythe Marilyn Monroe ne s'était pas terminé trop tôt, on aurait bien imaginé celle-ci flirter avec des hommes plus jeunes. Une sorte de cougar version icône glamour. L'actrice aurait dû avoir 86 ans cette année, elle aurait donc pu flirter avec un beau gosse d'une cinquantaine d'années, connu pour son image de Don Juan. George Clooney m'entends-tu ?

Le tableau de chasse de Marilyn Monroe :

pt-01_paul-699636-g-637x0-2  pt-02_robert-699643-g-637x0-2  pt-03_peter-699641-g-637x0-2 
Paul Newman / Robert Wagner / Peter Lawford

pt-04-porfirio-699621-h-637x0-2  pt-05_dean-699637-g-637x0-2  pt-06_mickey-699647-g-637x0-2 
Porfirio Rubirosa /  Dean Martin / Mickey Rooney

pt-07_jeanne-699650-g-637x0-2  pt-08_eddie-699633-g-637x0-2  pt-09_jim-699625-h-637x0-2 
Jeanne Carmen / Eddie Fisher / Jim Dougherty

De 1941 à 1946, Marilyn Monroe est mariée à James Dougherty, surnommé "James le veinard" suite à son mariage avec cette dernière. Mais Marilyn ayant beaucoup souffert de l'abandon plus jeune ne supporta pas quand son époux parti s'engager dans la Marine. Elle expliqua plus tard que "son mariage n'était ni heureux ni malheureux" et cette première séparation officielle ne fut qu'une simple formalité.

pt-10_darryl-699627-h-637x0-2  pt-11_george-699628-h-637x0-2  pt-12_joseph-699623-h-637x0-2 
Darryl F Zanuck (1946) / George Jessel (1948) / Joseph Schenck (1948) 

pt-13_milton-699645-g-637x0-2  pt-14_natasha-699624-h-637x0-2  pt-15_tony-699631-g-637x0-2 
Milton Berle (1948) / Natasha Lytess (1949) / Tony Curtis (1949-1950)

pt-16_milton-699622-h-637x0-2  pt-17_paul-699630-g-637x0-2  pt-18_elia-699626-h-637x0-2 
Milton Greene (1949) / Paul Sanders (1950) / Elia Kazan (1951)

pt-19_joe-699629-g-637x0-2  pt-20_robert-699642-g-637x0-2  pt-21_joan-699936--637x0-1 
Joe DiMaggio (1952-1954) / Robert Mitchum (1954) / Joan Crawford (1954)

Joe DiMaggio est le deuxième mari de Marilyn Monroe. Le couple se rencontre en 1953 et ils se marièrent en janvier 1954. Ce joueur de baseball professionnel a divorcer pour se mettre avec Marilyn... Un mariage qui finalement ne durera que 9 mois. Malgré un divorce à l'amiable, le tribunal accuse officiellement Monroe de "cruauté mentale".

pt-22_arthur-699635-g-637x0-2  pt-23_marlon-699639-g-637x0-2  pt-24_yul-699646-g-637x0-1 
Arthur Miller / Marlon Brando (1955-1962) / Yul Brynner (1957)

De 1955 à 1961 Marilyn Monroe est avec son troisième et dernier mari: Arthur Miller. Une relation tumultueuse née alors, entre amour et infidélités. Finalement, l'écrivain dit les pires horreurs au sujet de sa femme: "C'est un monstre narcissique et méchant qui a pris mon énergie et m'a vidé de mon talent".

pt-25-franck-699634-g-637x0-2  pt-26_yves-699638-g-637x0-2 
Franck Sinatra (1959-1961) / Yves Montand (1960)

En 1960 Marilyn Monroe flirte avec Yves Montand, pendant le tournage du film "Le Milliardaire". Simone Signoret la compagne de celui-ci déclara "Si Marilyn est amoureuse de mon mari, c'est la preuve qu'elle a bon goût.". Montand se lassa finalement des sentiments de Monroe à son égard et retourna avec Signoret. 

pt-27_jfk-699632-g-637x0-2  pt-28_rfk-699648-g-637x0-2 
John F Kennedy (1961-1962) / Robert F Kennedy (1962)

De 1961 à 1962, Marilyn Monroe créa le scandale en sortant avec le Président des USA : John F. Kennedy. Une relation très complexe qui selon certaines personnes est même à l'origine de la mort de l'actrice.

14 novembre 2014

Property from the life and career of MM - 12/2014 - Photos


Photographies


Lot 692: MARILYN MONROE SIGNED 1941 SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe signed vintage original 1941 panoramic photograph from Ralph Waldo Emerson Jr. High School. Monroe can be seen in the seventh row from the bottom and the 15th person from the right. Inscribed by the future Marilyn Monroe, among other classmates, on verso, “To a swell, nice & perfect girl Norma Jeane Baker” with “41” possibly written below her name. The image was originally owned by Norma Jeane’s classmate, Joan Boggs, to whom the inscriptions are written.
8 by 24 3/4 inches
Winning bid:$2,560 - Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot692a 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot692b  juliens-mmauction2014-lot692c


Lot 693: GINGER ROGERS INSCRIBED PHOTOGRAPH TO NORMA JEANE BAKER
 A vintage black and white RKO studio publicity photograph of Ginger Rogers inscribed, "To Norma Jean Baker Sincerely Ginger Rogers 1937." In 1937 the eleven-year old Norma Jean was living with Grace McGee, a friend of Monroe's mother and a film cutter at RKO. It is possible that McGee arranged for the signing of this photograph for the young Marilyn Monroe. Monroe went on to co-star with Rogers in Monkey Business (20th Century Fox, 1952) fifteen years after this photograph was signed.
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$1,920 - Estimate: $800 - $1,200
juliens-mmauction2014-lot693a juliens-mmauction2014-lot693b 


Lot 694: MARILYN MONROE WEDDING IMAGE SIGNED BY JAMES DOUGHERTY
 An image of Marilyn Monroe on her wedding day with first husband James Dougherty taken from a book. Inscribed and signed by Dougherty in blue ink. Attached to three other book pages of letters written by Monroe to Grace Goodard. This image can be found in the biography Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox by Lois Banner (New York: Bloomsbury, 2012).
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
11 1/4 by 8 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$448 - Estimate: $200 - $300
juliens-mmauction2014-lot694a juliens-mmauction2014-lot694b 


 Lot 710: MARILYN MONROE AND JOE KIRKWOOD PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white original vintage photograph of Marilyn Monroe with actor and golfer Joe Kirkwood Jr. marked on verso in pencil with the actress and actors' names. This image can be found in the biography Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox by Lois Banner (New York: Bloomsbury, 2012).
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
4 by 5 inches
Winning bid:$375 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot710 


Lot 711: MARILYN MONROE ORIGINAL 1948 FOX STUDIOS PERFORMANCE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A collection of five black and white original vintage photographs showing Marilyn Monroe in the Fox Studios employee stage show "Strictly for Kicks" in 1948. Accompanied by two copies of the April 1948 "Action" newsletter featuring an article on the production that includes photographs and mentions of Monroe. One of the photographs can be seen in the biography Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox by Lois Banner (New York: Bloomsbury, 2012).
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
5 by 4 inches
Winning bid:$1,024 - Estimate: $500 - $700
juliens-mmauction2014-lot711a juliens-mmauction2014-lot711b juliens-mmauction2014-lot711c


Lot 713: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage original photograph taken by Frank Powolny circa 1950.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot713 


Lot 714: MARILYN MONROE LASZLO WILLINGER VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage original black and white publicity photograph taken by Laszlo Willinger for the film All About Eve (20th Century, 1950).
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
 Winning bid:$4,062.50 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot714 


 Lot 716: MARILYN MONROE 1951 PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage original photograph taken by Phil Burchman circa 1951. Believed to be taken for 20th Century Fox publicity photographs. Marked at lower right "F999-S-259."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
5 by 4 inches
 Winning bid:$768 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot716 


 Lot 717: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage original black and white photograph circa 1950.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot717


 Lot 719: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PUBLICITY IMAGE
 A black and white publicity image of Marilyn Monroe taken by Frank Powolny and used to publicize the film How to Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953). The image is spuriously stamped on the back as being copyrighted by Robert F. Slatzer.
9 1/2 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$1,562.50 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot719a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot719b


Lot 721: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage black and white photograph.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$2,812.50 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot721 


 Lot 724: MARILYN MONROE CAMEL COAT SITTING PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of vintage photographs of Marilyn Monroe taken by Milton Greene in 1953. Each stamped on verso "Reproduction Forbidden."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
7 by 5 inches
 Winning bid:$1,875 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot724a juliens-mmauction2014-lot724b 


 Lot 726: MARILYN MONROE PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage studio publicity photograph for the film How To Marry a Millionaire (20th Century, 1953).
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
 Winning bid:$1,600 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot726 


 Lot 729: MARILYN MONROE GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES PUBLICITY IMAGE
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage black and white studio publicity photograph for the film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953).
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid: $576 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot729 


Lot 730: MARILYN MONROE GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES PUBLICITY IMAGE
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage black and white studio publicity photograph for the film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (20th Century, 1953).
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid: $448 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot730 


 Lot 740: JOE DiMAGGIO PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage black and white image of Joe DiMaggio signing a baseball.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
 Winning bid: $448 - Estimate: $150 - $300
juliens-mmauction2014-lot740 


Lot 741: MARILYN MONROE 1954 HONEYMOON PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of vintage original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe in Japan while on her honeymoon with Joe DiMaggio in 1954. DiMaggio can be seen in partial profile in the lower left of one image.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
4 1/4 by 6 inches
 Winning bid: $384 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot741 


Lot 742: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of three vintage original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe at the Honolulu International airport in Hawaii during her honeymoon with Joe DiMaggio in 1954. The photographs were taken by a photographer who was tipped off that Monroe and DiMaggio were waiting in a secluded area of the airport. He and a friend, who was stationed in Hawaii with the Navy, went to photograph the newlyweds. The photographer gave the photographs he could not use to the friend, who kept them in his photo book of his time during the war and later sold the photographs at auction. Presumably, these photographs were never released for print. Monroe's thumb is bandaged, and some have accused DiMaggio of inflicting the injury. One of the images can be found in the biography Marilyn: The Passion and the Paradox by Lois Banner (New York: Bloomsbury, 2012).
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
and Lot 766, "Hollywood Legends," Julien's Auctions, Las Vegas, June 26, 2010
Largest, 9 1/2 by 7 1/2 inches
Winning bid: $1,875 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot742a 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot742b juliens-mmauction2014-lot742c 


Lot 744: MARILYN MONROE KOREA CONTACT SHEETS
 A group of seven contact sheets and one half sheet from Marilyn Monroe’s 1954 visit to Korea to entertain American troops. The black and white sheets show Monroe on stage, signing autographs, posing with servicemen, and behind a changing curtain in addition to images of the servicemen in the audience. Photographer unknown. Sheets marked on verso with numeric notations.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
8 by 10 inches
Winning bid: $1,562.50 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot744 


Lot 745: MARILYN MONROE KOREA VISIT PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four vintage original black and white photographs of Marilyn Monroe dining with troops in Korea in 1954. Also present is an image of a band performing on stage.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
5 by 7 inches
Winning bid: $500 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot745 


Lot 746: MARILYN MONROE 1954 KOREA VISIT PHOTOGRAPHS
 A group of four original vintage photographs of Marilyn Monroe visiting troops in Korea. Three show Monroe at servicemen’s bedside. Each has carbon copied information snipes and credits on verso from the United States Signal Corps.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
5 by 7 inches
Winning bid: $625 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot746


 Lot 751: MARILYN MONROE AND JOE DiMAGGIO PHOTOGRAPH CUT IN HALF
 An original vintage photograph of Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio taken while on their honeymoon in Japan. The photograph has been cut in half directly between the couple.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Each half, 4 1/4 by 3 1/8 inches
 Winning bid:$1,280 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot751 


Lot 756: MARILYN MONROE RIVER OF NO RETURN PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of vintage candid images of Marilyn Monroe on the set of River of No Return (20th Century, 1954). Both images are believed to have been taken by Milton Greene; only one of the images bear his stamp on verso. Both photographs are stamped "Reproduction Forbidden."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
7 by 5 inches
Winning bid:$576 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot756a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot756b 


Lot 762: MARILYN MONROE BEMENT CENTENNIAL RIBBON
 A Marilyn Monroe beard contest judge ribbon and photograph from the 1955 Bement Centennial. The white ribbon with gold tone print reads "Bement/ Centennial/ Official/ 1855-1955." Cardstock affixed to the top of the ribbon reads "Marilyn Monroe." Accompanied by a vintage black and white photograph of Monroe at the event. Stamped on verso "News Gazette/ Photograph," with photocopies of articles about the event. Monroe attended the Centennial celebration and served as a judge in the beard contest, among other activities, after a resident assisted her in paying a hotel bill in exchange for her appearance. Originally from the estate of Peter Leonardi. The image can be found in the biography Marilyn : The Passion and the Paradox by Lois Banner (New York: Bloomsbury, 2012).
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
and Lot 718, "Julien's Summer Sale," Julien's Auctions, Las Vegas, June 26, 2009
Winning bid: $640 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot762a juliens-mmauction2014-lot762b
juliens-mmauction2014-lot762c


Lot 765: MARILYN MONROE CECIL BEATON PHOTOGRAPH
 A black and white vintage photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Cecil Beaton in 1956. The photograph is mounted to board.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
9 by 9 inches
Winning bid: $3,840 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot765


Lot 766: MARILYN MONROE SECRETARIALLY SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe secretarially signed photograph accompanied by transmittal envelope. It appears the photograph was mailed out from Marilyn Monroe Productions to Bogota, Columbia, and returned.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid: $11,250 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot766a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot766b


 Lot 772: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE CONTACT SHEET
 A contact sheet of 24 images of Marilyn Monroe taken by Milton Greene during a 1953 photoshoot on the Twentieth Century-Fox backlot. Monroe was shot by Greene preparing for the shoot (some images include Greene) and in a peasant costume worn by Jennifer Jones in Song of Bernadette (20th Century, 1943). Photographer's stamp and numeric note on verso.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
8 by 10 inches
Winning bid: $896 - Estimate: $400 - $600 
juliens-mmauction2014-lot772  


Lot 780: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 An original vintage photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Milton Greene. Monroe is dressed as her character Chérie from the film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956).
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
 Winning bid: $1,125 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot780 


Lot 781: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 An original vintage photograph of Marilyn Monroe taken by Milton Greene. Monroe is dressed as her character Chérie from the film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956).
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid: $1,600 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot781


Lot 782: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE BUS STOP PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe vintage black and white photograph taken on the set of the film Bus Stop (20th Century, 1956).
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid: $1,024 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot782 


Lots 787/788: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage photograph of Marilyn Monroe printed with two images of Monroe. Believed to have been taken by Sam Shaw circa 1958. The image shows Monroe in her New York apartment in front of her piano.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
8 by 10 inches
Lot 787: Winning bid:$640 - Estimate: $200 - $400
Lot 788: Winning bid:$896 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot788 


Lot 789: MARILYN MONROE VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of Marilyn Monroe vintage black and white photographs. One shows Monroe at a party. The other was taken on set and has a Milton Greene photography stamp on verso.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 8 by 10 inches
 Winning bid:$896 - Estimate: $600 - $800
juliens-mmauction2014-lot789 


Lot 797: ARTHUR MILLER PHOTOGRAPH BY DAN WEINER
 An original vintage black and white photograph of Arthur Miller taken by Dan Weiner circa 1952. Stamped by the photographer on verso with handwritten notions that have been crossed out.
9 1/2 by 13 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$128 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot797a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot797b 


Lot 805: ARTHUR MILLER VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A pair of vintage original black and white photographs of Arthur Miller. In one, Miller stands smiling next to a bicycle. Image marked on verso “Apr. 1955.” The second is a professional photograph of Miller. Stamped with photographer Daniel Bernstein’s stamp on verso.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
7 by 5 inches
Winning bid:$128 - Estimate: $200 - $400
 juliens-mmauction2014-lot805 


Lot 812: MARILYN MONROE AND ARTHUR MILLER VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller black and white vintage original photograph. Taken by Paul Schumach at the premiere of Some Like It Hot (UA, 1959). Photographer stamp on verso.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
10 by 8 inches
 Winning bid:$3,125 - Estimate: $400 - $600
juliens-mmauction2014-lot812 


Lot 814: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE CONTACT SHEETS
 A collection of approximately five vintage contact prints of photographs taken by Milton Greene featuring Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier at a press conference for the film The Prince and The Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) and Monroe with Marlon Brando at the premiere of the film The Rose Tattoo (Paramount, 1955). Also includes a contact sheet with images of an event where Sammy Davis Jr. was performing live.
Largest, 10 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$1,125 - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot814  


Lot 815: MARILYN MONROE MILTON GREENE PHOTOGRAPHS
 A vintage 8-by-10-inch gelatin silver photograph taken by Milton Greene, depicting Marilyn Monroe with Laurence Olivier at a press conference for the film The Prince and The Showgirl (Warner Bros., 1957) in which they played the starring roles. The photograph has been encapsulated and includes a letter of authenticity from PSA grading it a "Type I" original photograph. The verso of the photograph is marked with Greene's identification stamp. Accompanied by a vintage medium-format print of the same image as well as an additional vintage print of Monroe laughing.
10 by 8 inches
Winning bid:$ 5,760 - Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot815a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot815b juliens-mmauction2014-lot815c


Lot 816 C: MARILYN MONROE PERSONAL PHOTOGRAPHS
 A collection of Marilyn Monroe's personal photographs, including a photograph of Isador Miller (Monroe's father-in-law); two photographs of a television screen showing images of Monroe on The Jack Benny Program in 1953; a black and white image of an unknown woman, stamped by Milton Greene on verso; a color photograph of a manenquin holding up a champagne glass behind a sign that reads "Marilyn Monroe" dated "Mar 58"; a pair of images of two men in Scottish kilts; two photographs of children, one with an inscription on the back from "Ilah" (one of the children may be Joshua Greene); and a photograph taken behind the scenes of a film. Accompanied by a newspaper clipping of an image of Monroe.
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
Largest, 7 by 5 inches
Winning bid: $896 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot816C 


Lot 821: MARILYN MONROE CECIL BEATON TRIPTYCH
A three-panel sterling silver custom-made Cartier frame, gifted to Marilyn Monroe by Nedda and Joshua Logan. The center frame houses a black and white silver gelatin print of the portrait Cecil Beaton took of Monroe in 1956. This image is purported to be Monroe’s favorite image of herself. The portrait is mounted to board and signed on matte by Beaton. The center frame is engraved at the top “For Marilyn Monroe Miller” and at the bottom “Love Nedda and Joshua Logan.” Joshua Logan directed Monroe in her 1956 film Bus Stop . The left and right frames house a handwritten letter from Beaton describing Monroe. It reads in part, “But the real marvel is the paradox – somehow we know that this extraordinary performance is pure charade, a little girl’s caricature of Mae West. The puzzling truth is that Miss Monroe is a make-believe siren, unsophisticated as a Rhine maiden, innocent as a sleepwalker. She is an urchin pretending to be grown-up, having the time of her life in mother’s moth-eaten finery, tottering about in high-heeled shoes and sipping gingerale as though it were a champagne cocktail. There is an otherworldly, a winsome naiveté about the child’s eyes… .” The portrait can be seen in images of Monroe’s living room, where it was housed from 1956 until the actress’ death in 1962.
Please note: This item will not be available for shipment or pick-up until January 1, 2015.
PROVENANCE Lot 22 "The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe," Christie's, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
16 by 46 1/2 inches, framed
Winning bid: $38,400 - Estimate: $30,000 - $40,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot821a  juliens-mmauction2014-lot821b
juliens-mmauction2014-lot821c juliens-mmauction2014-lot821d juliens-mmauction2014-lot821e
juliens-mmauction2014-lot821f  juliens-mmauction2014-lot821g


Lot 822: MARILYN MONROE AFHU DINNER VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage candid photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the September 27, 1959, American Friends of the Hebrew University (AFHU) awards ceremony in Philadelphia. Monroe's then husband, Arthur Miller, was honored at the event. Label affixed to the bottom center of the photograph reads "Hebrew University Dinner/ Sheraton Hotel Sunday Sept. 27."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
8 by 10 inches
 Winning bid:$448 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot822 


Lot 823: MARILYN MONROE AFHU DINNER VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH
 A vintage candid photograph of Marilyn Monroe at the September 27, 1959, American Friends of the Hebrew University (AFHU) awards ceremony in Philadelphia. Monroe's then husband, Arthur Miller, was honored at the event. Label affixed to the bottom center of the photograph reads "Hebrew University Dinner/ Sheraton Hotel Sunday Sept. 27."
PROVENANCE From the lost archive of Marilyn Monroe
8 by 10 inches
 Winning bid:$576 - Estimate: $300 - $500
juliens-mmauction2014-lot823  


Lot 824: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY JOHN BRYSON
 An original vintage black and white photograph of Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller taken by photojournalist John Bryson in Los Angeles in 1960. Matted and framed. Christie's lot sticker affixed to frame back.
PROVENANCE Lot 340, "The Personal Property of Marilyn Monroe," Christie's, New York, Sale number 9216, October 27 & 28, 1999
Sight, 13 by 9 1/2 inches
Winning bid:$1,920 - Estimate: $2,000 - $4,000
juliens-mmauction2014-lot824 


Lot 943: MARILYN MONROE CANDID COLOR PHOTOGRAPH
 A single Kodachrome wallet-sized candid photo print of Marilyn Monroe in her often seen disguise. The photo was taken in New York by a young fan who became acquainted with the star.
PROVENANCE From the Collection of Lois Banner
and Lot 788, "Julien's Summer Sale," Julien's Auctions, Las Vegas, June 26, 2009
3 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
 Winning bid: $640 - Estimate: $200 - $400
juliens-mmauction2014-lot943 


Lot 985 : MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH BY GEORGE BARRIS
 A photographic print of Marilyn Monroe, limited edition numbered 21/50, taken in 1962 by George Barris. Silver gelatin print, printed on double-weight fiber paper under the guidance and approval of George Barris by OneWest Publishing. Signed by the photographer and stamped by OneWest Publishing.
20 by 16 inches 
unsold - Estimate: $1,000 - $2,000

juliens-mmauction2014-lot985 


Lot 994: MARILYN MONROE PHOTOGRAPH SIGNED BY ALLAN GRANT
An original vintage photograph signed by Allan Grant. This photograph was taken on July 7, 1962, in Marilyn Monroe’s Brentwood home for an article in LIFE magazine that went to newsstands on August 3, 1962. Monroe died two days later, on August 5.
29 by 26 inches, framed
Winning bid:$3,750  - Estimate: $3,000 - $5,000

juliens-mmauction2014-lot991  juliens-mmauction2014-lot991b


21 février 2014

5/08/1962 de Brentwood à la Morgue et Autopsie

Journée du dimanche 5 août 1962, au lendemain du décès de Marilyn Monroe.
Day of Sunday, August, 5, 1962, the day after the death of Marilyn Monroe.


 > à 4h25: Le Dr Hyman Engelberg (docteur généraliste de Marilyn) téléphone à la police (the West Los Angeles Police Station) pour dire que "Marilyn Monroe est morte. Elle s'est suicidée. Je suis chez elle."
at 4.25 am: Dr. Hyman Engelberg (Marilyn's doctor) calls the police (the West Los Angeles Police Station) to say "Marilyn Monroe died. She committed suicide. I'm at her home."


> à 4h30: les employés de l'agence de publicité d'Arthur Jacobs sont prévenus de la mort de Marilyn et décident de se retrouver à sa maison au Fifth Helena Drive. Michael Selsman se souvient: "C'était la panique, bien sûr. Les événements étaient déjà hors de contrôle, et là, elle était morte, la presse n'était pas contrainte de cacher ce qu'ils savaient, sauf, bien sûr, pour les choses sur Kennedy, qui sont apparues plus tard. Je repoussais les médias en disant que nous ne savions pas quelle était la cause de la mort, parce que nous ne le savions pas."
at 4.30 am: the employees of the advertising agency of Arthur Jacobs are notified of the death of Marilyn and decided to go to her home at Fifith Helena Drive. Michael Selsman remembers: "It was panic of course. Events were already out of control, and now she was dead the press didn't fell constrained to hide what they knew -except, of course, for the Kennedy stuff, which came later. I fended off the media by saying we didn't know what the cause of death was, because we didn't."


> à 4h40: Le sergent Jack Clemmons est le premier policier à arriver au domicile de Marilyn; il découvre Eunice Murray (la gouvernante) en train de faire le ménage, nettoyant la maison et mettant une lessive dans la machine à laver, avec d'autres linges propres pliés à côté, et les Dr Greenson et Engelberg dans la chambre avec le corps de Marilyn gisant dans son lit à plat ventre sous les draps: "Son corps avait été bougé. Marilyn était allongée sur le ventre dans ce que j'appelle la 'position du soldat'. Son visage était appuyé contre un oreiller, ses bras étaient sur les côtés, le bras droit légèrement plié, et ses jambes étaient parfaitement alignées, comme si elle prenait la pose pour des photos. J'avais l'impression d'arriver sur une scène de crime. J'étais déjà intervenu sur des scènes de suicides par barbituriques, et avant de mourir, les victimes font des convulsions, vomissent et leurs corps sont en distorsions. (...) Les boîtes de pillules posés sur la tablette avaient été clairement disposées en bon ordre et le corps délibérément repositionné. Tout semblait trop rangé."
at 4.40 am: Sergeant Jack Clemmons was the first police officer to arrive at the Marilyn' home, he discovers Eunice Murray (the housekeeper) doing housework, cleaning the house and putting a laundry in the washing machine, with other clean cloths folded side, and Dr. Greenson and Engelberg in the bedroom with Marilyn's body lying in bed face down under the sheets, "Her body seemed to have been moved. Marilyn was lying face down in what I call the soldier's position. Her face was in a pillow, her arms were by her side, her right arm was slightly bent, and her legs were stretched out perfectly straight, as if she were posing for pictures. It was the most obviously staged death scene I have ever seen. I had already seen scenes of suicides by barbiturates, and before dying, victims suffer convulsions and vomiting in a somewhat contorted position.. (...) The pill bottles on her bedside table had been arranged in neat order and the body deliberately positioned. It all looked too tidy".

> Chambre de Marilyn
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-dead-1  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-death_mm  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-dead-2 
photographies de Dan Tompkins >>
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-1-1  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-1-2  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-1-4 
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-1-1a  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-1-4a 
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-1-5 
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-2  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-2a 

> Les boîtes de pillules sur la table de nuit
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-bottles-1a  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-bottles-1b 
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-bottles-2a  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-bottles-2c 
- photographies de Barry Feinstein >>
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-bottles-3  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-bottles-by_barry_feinstein-1 
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-bottles-by_barry_feinstein-1a 
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-bottles-by_barry_feinstein-2  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom-bottles-by_barry_feinstein-3 

> Le fil du téléphone passant sour la porte de la chambre
1962-08-05-brentwood-phone 


Arrivée de l'inspecteur Robert E. Byron, qui recueille les déclarations du Dr Greenson, du Dr Engelberg et de Eunice Murray. Il consigne dans son rapport officiel: "L'opinion de l'officier de police est que Mrs Murray était aussi vague et évasive que possible dans ses réponses aux questions concernant les activités de Miss Monroe avant sa mort."
Arrival of Inspector Robert E. Byron, whoh collects reports of Dr. Greenson, Dr. Engelberg and Eunice Murray. He writes in his official report: "The opinion of the police officer is that Mrs. Murray was vague and evasive as possible in her answers to questions about the activities of Miss Monroe before her death."


> Vers 5 h, le journaliste Joe Ramirez (qui travaillait pour la petite agence "City News") reçoit un appel lui annoncant le décès de Marilyn; mais l'information arrive trop tard pour paraître dans les journaux du jour.
> William "Bill" Woodfield (photographe) et Joe Hyams (correspondant au "New York Herald Tribune") se rendent ensemble chez Marilyn sitôt qu'ils apprennent la nouvelle.
Tout comme James Bacon (chroniqueur d'"Associated Press") qui racontera: "Je recourus à une vieille ruse; je me suis présenté devant un flic en prétendant que le bureau du coroner m'avait dépêché sur place. Je suis entré dans la maison mais ne suis pas resté longtemps, juste le temps pour la voir gisant sur son lit. Je remarquai que ses ongles étaient négligés."
Around 5 am, the journalist Joe Ramirez (who worked for the small agency "City News") receives a call announcing the death of Marilyn, but the information comes too late to appear in daily newspapers.
> William "Bill" Woodfield (photographer) and Joe Hyams (corresponding to the "New York Herald Tribune") go together at Marilyns soon as they hear the news.
Just as James Bacon (columnist of "Associated Press") that will tells: "I resorted to an old trick, I introduced myself to a cop claiming that the coroner's office had sent me there. I went into the home but did not stay long, just long enough to see lying her on bed. I noticed that his nails were overlooked."

Au Fifth Helena Drive, chez Marilyn, une foule de personnes se constitue peu à peu, s'agglutinant aux abords de la maison: des journalistes reporters de la télévision, de la radio, de la presse, des paparazzis, des camions et voitures obstruent la rue.
De nombreuses photographies sont prises autour de la maison: devant le patio, la chambre à travers la fenêtre, mais aussi le jardin, où l'on y voit deux animaux en peluche dans l'herbe devant la piscine; Marilyn avait reçu la veille (le 4 août), par colis, un tigre en peluche, dont on ne connait pas le destinataire.
At Fifth Helena Drive, at Marilyn's home, a crowd of people is gradually agglutinating near the house: journalists, reporters from television, radio, press, paparazzi, trucks and cars clog the street.
Many photographs are taken around the house: front patio, the bedroom through the window, but also the garden, where we see two stuffed animals in the grass in front of the pool; Marilyn had received the day before (August 4) per package, a stuffed tiger, which we don't know the recipient.

> Devant le portail de la maison de Marilyn
1962-08-05-brentwood-out-police-1  1962-08-05-brentwood-out-police_officers_newsmen-1  1962-08-05-brentwood-out-over_gate-1 

> Devant la maison
 1962-08-05-brentwood-out-newsmen-1 
- photographies de Lawrence Schiller >>
1962-08-05-brentwood-out-newsmen-2

> Dans le jardin, la piscine
1962-08-05-brentwood-outside-garden-1  1962-08-05-brentwood-outside-garden-2 
1962-08-05-brentwood-outside-garden-5  1962-08-05-brentwood-outside-garden-4  1962-08-05-brentwood-outside-garden-7 
- photographie de Dan Tompkins >>
1962-08-05-brentwood-outside-garden-6 1962-08-05-brentwood-outside-garden-3 1962-by_dan_tompkins-7baacecefce7fd6  
- photographie de Barry Feinstein >>
1962-08-05-brentwood-outside-garden-by_barry_feinstein 

 > La fenêtre de la chambre de Marilyn
dont le carreau a été cassé par le Dr. Engelberg
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom_window-1-1  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom_window-2-1  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom_window-2-1a 
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom_window-2-2  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom_window-3 
- photographies de Gene Anthony >>
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom_window-by_gene_anthony-1 
1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom_window-by_gene_anthony-2  1962-08-05-brentwood-bedroom_window-by_gene_anthony-3 

> captures 
1962-08-05_cap-14  1962-08-05_cap-15  1962-08-05_cap-01 
1962-08-05_cap-02  1962-08-05_cap-03  1962-08-05_cap-17 


> Vers 5h10: Jack Clemmons est remplacé par un officier de police d'un grade supérieur (le chef de la police William Parker) pour mener l'enquête et ainsi, soumettre au silence Clemmons qui avait relevé plusieurs faits incohérents (Murray lui avait informé qu'elle avait découvert le corps à minuit, alors qu'elle affirmera par la suite avoir découvert le corps à 3h; d'après Clemmons, le décès devait remontait à environ 8 heures). Clemmons va ensuite appeler son collègue Jim Dougherty, le premier mari de Marilyn, pour l'informer du décès de celle-ci. 
Around 5.10 am: Jack Clemmons is replaced by a police officer of higher rank (the Chief policer William Parker) to investigate and thus submit to silence Clemmons who had identified several inconsistent facts (Murray had informed him she had discovered the body at midnight, while she will affirm after to have discovered the body at 3 am; for Clemmons, the death had occurred some 8 hours before). Clemmons will then call his colleague Jim Dougherty, the first husband of Marilyn, informing him of the Marilyn's death.

Arrivée de l'officier Don Marshall qui fouille la maison à la recherche d'un message attestant le suicide. Il interroge les plus proches voisins de Marilyn, Mr et Mrs Abe Landeau, qui déclarèrent n'avoir rien entendu de suspect pendant la nuit.
Arrival of the officer Don Marshall who search in the house a message stating suicide. He asks the nearest neighbors of Marilyn, Mr. and Mrs. Abe Landeau, who declared to have heard nothing suspicious during the night.


> L'envoyé du coroner, Guy Hockett constate que le décès "remonte à plusieurs heures. Elle était raide et il fallut près de 5 minutes pour la redresser. (...) Elle gisait, assez droite, dans une position semi-foetale. Ses cheveux, desséchés, étaient en très mauvais état à cause de tous ces traitements. Elle n'était pas très belle à voir, au point qu'on avait du mal à croire que c'était bien elle. On aurait dit une pauvre femme ordinaire qui venait de mourir. Pas de maquillage, les cheveux négligés sans mise en plis, un corps fatigué. Nous eûmes tous la même impression, à des degrés divers."
The representative of the coroner Guy Hocknett notes that the death "goes back several hours. She was stiff and it tooks about 5 minutes to recover her. (...) She lays quite right in a semi-fetal position. Her hair, dried, were in very poor condition because of all these treatments. She was not very nice to see, to the point that it was hard to believe it was really her. She seemed as a poor ordinary woman who had just died. No makeup, hair styling neglected, a tired body. We had all the same impression, to varying degrees."


> Vers 5h30: Patricia Newcomb arrive à la maison de Marilyn (elle racontera avoir été prévenue par téléphone à 4 h par Milton Rudin, l'avocat de Marilyn), provoquant une scène, en hurlant aux photographes: "Allez-y, mitraillez, vautours ! ... Espèces de buveurs de sang ! Vampires ! Ne pouvez-vous même pas la laisser mourir en paix ?"; Eunice Murray raconte que lorsque Pat Newcomb est arrivée, "il y avait tant de gens que personne ne l'a remarquée." Pat Newcomb se souvient que "il y avait plus de cinq personnes dans la maison" quand elle y est entrée; elle dit aussi ne pas avoir vu le corps de Marilyn. Elle restera quasiment tout le temps au téléphone, traitant des appels téléphoniques des médias du monde entier; elle racontera: "J'ai parlé à plus de 600 journalistes ce dimanche là. C'était mon travail de faire ce que je pouvais pour Marilyn."
Pat Newcomb était "hystérique" comme le dira Eunice Murray: "Même après que la police décida de fermer la maison, elle refusait toujours de partir. Il a fallu qu'on la fasse sortir."
Around 5.30 am: Patricia Newcomb arrives at Marilyn's home (she will tell to have been prevented by phone at 4 am by Milton Rudin, the Marilyn's lawyer), screaming to photographers: "Go ahead, shoot pictures, vultures ! ... Bloodthirsty Vampires ! Can't you even let her die in peace ?" Eunice Murray says that when Pat Newcomb arrived, "there were so many people that nobody noticed her." Pat Newcomb remembers that "there was more than five people in the house" when she comes in, she also says to don't have seen the Marilyn's body. She will stays almost the time on the phone, dealing with telephone calls from media around the world; she will tell later: "I spoke to over 600 journalists that Sunday. It was my job to do what I could for Marilyn."
Pat Newcomb was "hysterical" as Eunice Murray will tell: "Even after the police decided to close the house, she still refused to go. We had to make exit her. "


> Quand Allan Whitey Snyder, le maquilleur de Marilyn qui, dès qu'il apprend la triste nouvelle, se précipite chez Marilyn, il se fait renvoyer par un policier qui lui refuse l'accès à la maison. Il racontera "qu'il fallait que je voie de mes yeux ce qui était vraiment arrivé." Quand il remonte dans sa voiture et entend à la radio que "Marilyn est morte d'une overdose de barbituriques qu'elle s'est administrée", Snyder ne parvient pas à croire au suicide.
When Allan Whitey Snyder, Marilyn's makeup artist, who, when he learns the sad news, rushed to Marilyn's home, he gets fired by a policeman who refuses him the access to the house. He will tell "that I had set my eyes what really happened." When he goes back to his car and heard on the radio that "Marilyn died of an overdose of barbiturates that she administered herself" Snyder can not believe in suicide.

> Joe DiMaggio, qui est à San Francisco, apprend la nouvelle très tôt le matin. Il se rend immédiatement à Los Angeles, contacte son fils Joe Jr. qui se trouve au camp Pendleton, et se réfugie avec deux de ses amis dans la suite 1035 du Miramar Hotel. Il refuse de faire la moindre déclaration à la presse et reste enfermé dans sa chambre d'hôtel. Son ami Harry Hall racontera que Joe pleurait sans consulter les nombreux télégrammes reçus: "Il considérait Bobby Kennedy comme responsable de sa mort."
Personne ne réclame le corps de Marilyn et le coroner ne peut délivrer le corps qu'avec l'autorisation d'un membre de la famille: sa mère en est incapable, et sa demie-soeur Berniece, contactée par télégramme, donne sa permission à Joe DiMaggio de s'occuper des funérailles.
Joe DiMaggio, who is in San Francisco, heards the news early in the morning. He immediately goes to Los Angeles, contacts his son Joe Jr. who is at Camp Pendleton, and stays with two of his friends in the suite 1035 of the Miramar Hotel. He refuses to make any statement to the press and remains locked in his hotel room. His friend Harry Hall tells that Joe was crying without consulting the many telegrams he received: "He considered Bobby Kennedy as responsible for her death."
Nobody claims the body of Marilyn and the coroner may not issue a body with the authority of a member of the family: her mother is unable to act, and her half-sister Berniece, contacted by telegram, gives permission to Joe DiMaggio to arrange the funeral.

> Peter Lawford est chez lui à L.A. Il est en état de choc, hagard, en larmes, terrassé, répétant sans cesse qu'il était la dernière personne à avoir parlé à Marilyn (au téléphone). Sa mère, Lady May, surnommée "Lady L." le contacte par téléphone quand elle apprend la nouvelle, et elle reproche à son fils de ne pas être allé chez Marilyn, quand cette dernière appela Peter. Puis quand Rupert Allan téléphone à Lawford, il a au bout du fil un homme hors de lui, furieux, aux propos incompréhensibles, entrecoupés de sanglots.
Peter Lawford is at his home L.A. He is in shock, distraught, in tears, overwhelmed, constantly repeating that he was the last person to have spoken to Marilyn (on the phone). His mother, Lady May, named "Lady L." calls him when she heards the news, and she blames her son to don't have gone to Marilyn's home, when she called Peter. Then, when Rupert Allan phone Lawford, he has on the phone a man out of him, furious, with incomprehensible words, interspersed with sobs.

> Dans la propriété des Kennedy sur la côte Est où la famille est réunie autour de la piscine, la nouvelle de la mort de Marilyn passe à la radio: ce fut le silence total. Pat Kennedy Lawford s'effondre en larmes.
In the property of the Kennedys on the East Coast where the family gathered around the pool, the news of the death of Marilyn is broadcoast on the radio: it was a full silence. Pat Kennedy Lawford collapses in tears.

> A peine à 6 km de chez Marilyn, Jayne Mansfield apprend la nouvelle chez elle dans sa maison du Pink Palace; elle devient hystérique et pleure beaucoup, serrant son assistant Ray Strait: "Je suis peut être la prochaine sur la liste." (Jayne était aussi la maîtresse des frères Kennedy).
At Just 6 km from Marilyn's home, Jayne Mansfield heards the news at her Pink Palace home; she becomes hysterical and crying a lot, shaking his assistant Ray Strait: "I may be next on the list." (Jayne was also the mistress of the Kennedy brothers).


> à 7h30: Les hommes du coroner, accompagnés de Guy Hockett (propriétaire du Westwood Memorial Park Cemetery), emportent le corps de Marilyn, dissimulé sous une couverture bleue ordinaire, sur un chariot, et le chargent à bord d'un vieux break, qu'ils conduisent au dépôt mortuaire de Westwood Village, où sa dépouille reste quelques heures dans un réduit encombré de brosses et de bocaux où le photographe Bud Gray du "Herald Examiner" fait un cliché de sa dépouille enveloppée. 
At 7.30 am: Coroner's men, accompanied by Guy Hockett (owner of Westwood Memorial Park Cemetery) outweigh Marilyn's body, hidden under an ordinary blue blanket on a cart, and charge her on an old break that they drive to the mortuary Westwood Village, where she remains few hours in a small room crowded by brushes and jars.

> Départ du corps de Marilyn de sa maison 
1962-08-05-brentwood-out-mm_body-1

> Arrivée du corps de Marilyn à Westwood Village 
1962-08-05-westwood-body_arrival-1  1962-08-05-westwood-body_arrival-2  1962-08-05-westwood-body_arrival-3 

- photographies de Lawrence Schiller >>
1962-08-05-westwood-body_arrival-4 
1962-08-05-westwood-body_arrival-by_schiller-1 

 - photographie de Bud Gray >>
1962-08-05-mortuary-by_bud_gray 

> Au cimetière de Westwood, tombe de Grace Goddard
1962-08-05-westwood-journalists-2  1962-08-05-westwood-journalists-1  1962-08-05-westwood-journalists-3 

> captures
1962-08-05_cap-09  1962-08-05_cap-10  1962-08-05_cap-13 


 > Marilyn est ensuite transportée dans la case 33 de la County Morgue, au palais de justice de Los Angeles. Son numéro de dossier du coroner est le 81128.
Un photographe parvient à s'introduire dans la morgue: Leigh Wiener, qui enverra ses photographies au magazine Life, parvient à prendre de nombreux clichés en échange de bouteilles de whisky offertes aux employés: un employé ouvre la porte en acier inoxydable et tire l'étagère coulissante où repose la dépouille de Marilyn. Wiener la mitraille, couverte et découverte (il aurait pris 6 clichés de Marilyn morte).
Marilyn is then transported in box 33 of the County Morgue of Los Angeles. Her coroner file number is 81128.
Two photographers manage to get into the mortuary: Bud Gray of "Herald Examiner" takes a snapshot of his body wrapped; and Leigh Wiener, who will send his photographs to "Life" magazine, manages to take many pictures in exchange for whiskey bottles offered to employees: an employee opens the stainless steel door and pulls the sliding shelf where the body of Marilyn remains. Wiener shoots pictures of Marilyn with covered and uncovered (he would take 6 shots of Marilyn dead).

> Départ du corps de Marilyn de Westwood Village
1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-1-1  1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-4 
1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-1-2  1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-3  1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-2 
1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-2a  1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-2-press1  1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-2-press2 
1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-4-2  1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-5a  1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-5
1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-6-1  1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-6-2  1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-7 
1962-08-05-westwood-body_removed_to_mortuary-8

> County Morgue de L.A., le casier 33
1962-08-05-mortuary-01-1 
1962-08-05-mortuary-01-2 
1962-08-05-mortuary-01-3  1962-08-05-mortuary-01-4 
1962-08-05-mortuary-01-5   1962-08-05-mortuary-02-2   1962-08-05-mortuary-02-1  
1962-08-05-mortuary-LA_county_morgue-1 

- photographies de Leigh Wiener >>
1962-08-05-mortuary-by_leigh_weiner-2-1  1962-08-05-mortuary-by_leigh_weiner-2-2  1962-08-05-mortuary-by_leigh_weiner-2-3 
1962-08-05-mortuary-by_leigh_weiner-1   

> captures
1962-08-05_cap-11  1962-08-05_cap-12


> à 10h30: Début de l'autopsie, dans une salle sans fenêtres des sous-sols du palais de justice de L.A., sur la table 1, équipée d'un système d'arrivée d'eau et d'évacuation, et d'une balance. Le médecin légiste est Thomas Noguchi, assisté de Eddy Day, en présence de John Miner, observateur du District Attorney.
At 10.30 am: Beginning of the autopsy, in a windowless room of the County Morgue of L.A., on the table 1, equipped with a water inlet and exhausted system, and a balance. The medical examiner is Thomas Noguchi, assisted by Eddy Day, in the presence of John Miner, observer of District Attorney.
(> Lire le rapport d'autopsie < read the autopsy report)

> Avant l'autopsie: Photo post-mortem 1 
(Avertissement: image choquante de Marilyn morte)

La photographie post-mortem du dossier de police montre Marilyn avec un visage flasque, enflé, les cheveux plats et raides mais précisons que les muscles de son visage ont été sectionnés pendant l'ablation du cerveau et qu'après l'autopsie, sa dépouille a été lavée à grandes eaux. 
The post-mortem photograph of the police report shows Marilyn with a flange face, swollen, flat and straight hair but let's specify that the muscles of her face were severed during removal of the brain and after the autopsy, her body was washed with plenty of water.

> Après l'autopsie: Photo post-mortem 2
(Avertissement: image choquante de Marilyn morte)

> Retour du corps à Westwood Village après l'autopsie
1962-08-05-westwood-body_back_after_autopsy-7-1

- photographies de Bud Gray >>
1962-08-05-westwood-body_back_after_autopsy-1-1  1962-08-05-westwood-body_back_after_autopsy-2-1  1962-08-05-westwood-body_back_after_autopsy-3-1 
1962-08-05-westwood-body_back_after_autopsy-4-1  1962-08-05-westwood-body_back_after_autopsy-4-2  1962-08-05-westwood-body_back_after_autopsy-5-1 

- Guy Hockett conduit la voiture >>
1962-08-05-westwood-body_back_after_autopsy-guy_hockett 

> captures
1962-08-05_cap-04  1962-08-05_cap-05 


> Vers 11h: premier rapport de police établi (complété ensuite le lendemain).
Around 11 am: the first police report is established (then completed the next day).
(> Lire le rapport de police < read the police report)


> à 11h, Ralph Greenson et Milton Rudin font monter Pat Newcomb dans la voiture d'Eunice Murray; les reporters se précipitent devant la voiture dans la petite impasse et un journaliste de NBC News demande à Pat comment elle se sent, ce à quoi, elle lui répond, en larmes: "Si votre meilleur ami venait de se tuer, qu'éprouveriez-vous ? que feriez-vous ?".
A ce moment là, la maison était remplie de monde: les policiers, Arthur Jacobs, trois gardes du service de sécurité de la Fox envoyés par Peter Levathes, le technicien du General Telephone (qui coupera les lignes le jour même), les journalistes James Bacon et James A. Hudson de United Press International, mais aussi quatre hommes en noir (dont certains pensent qu'il pourrait s'agir d'agents du FBI ou de la CIA). 
At 11 am, Ralph Greenson and Milton Rudin drive up Pat Newcomb in Eunice Murray's car; reporters rushed to the car and an NBC News reporter asks to Pat how she feels, and she replied in tears: "If your best friend just came to kill, how would you feel ? What would you do ?".
At that time, the house was full of people: policemen, Arthur Jacobs, three guards of the security service of the Fox sent by Peter Levathes, the General Telephone technician (who cut the lines the same day), journalists as James Bacon and James A. Hudson of United Press International, but also four men in black (some people think it might be men from FBI or CIA).

> On emmène Maf, le chien de Marilyn
1962-08-05-brentwood-maf-1-2  1962-08-05-brentwood-maf-1-1 
1962-08-05-brentwood-maf-2  1962-08-05-brentwood-maf-3  
- photographie de Dan Tompkins >>
1962-by_dan_tompkins-bcb3a205997e61d 

- Milton Rudin (à gauche) >>
1962-08-05-brentwood-maf_milton_rudin 

> Eunice Murray et son gendre Norman Jefferies
- photographies de Dan Tompkins
1962-08-05-brentwood-eunice_murray-1  1962-08-05-brentwood-eunice_murray_norma_jeffries-3-2  1962-08-05-brentwood-eunice_murray_norma_jeffries-2 
1962-08-05-brentwood-eunice_murray_norma_jeffries-1  1962-08-05-brentwood-eunice_murray_norma_jeffries-3-1  1962-08-05-brentwood-eunice_murray_norma_jeffries-3-1a 

> Départ de Patricia Newcomb
- photographies de Dan Tompkins
1962-08-05-brentwood-pat_newcomb-1  1962-08-05-brentwood-pat_newcomb-2  1962-08-05-brentwood-pat_newcomb-4 
1962-08-05-brentwood-pat_newcomb-3 
- Pat avec Norman Jefferies
1962-08-05-brentwood-pat_newcomb-5 
- Un journaliste interpelle Pat
1962-08-05-brentwood-pat_newcomb-6 

> captures
1962-08-05_cap-18  1962-08-05_cap-19  1962-08-05_cap-20 
1962-08-05_cap-21  1962-08-05_cap-22  1962-08-05_cap-23


> peu avant 12h00: Hazel Washington (femme de chambre de Marilyn) et son mari Rocky (policier de Los Angeles) arrivent à la maison pour récupérer des tables et chaises prêtées à Marilyn en février, car la maison serait ensuite fermée. Mrs Washington va remarquer un des hommes en noir brûler des documents dans la cheminée: des blocs-notes de Marilyn, des papiers de la Fox, des pages d'agenda, des bandes de magnétophones. Les serrures de classeur avait été forcées et les tiroirs vidés.
Avant de partir, Mrs Washington remarque que les gardes du studio de la Fox avaient investi toute la maison et de voir Frank Neill et trois autres attachés à la publicité de s'emparer de tous les documents relatifs à la Fox (notamment le nouveau contrat de négociation et de réintégration de Marilyn à la Fox avec la reprise du tournage de Something's got to give ont disparu).
Les hommes en noir ont même vérifié le contenu de la voiture de Hazel et Rocky avant leur départ.
Cependant, ces allégations affirmant que des papiers ont été détruits ont été formellement démenties par les officiers de police présents sur les lieux toute la journée. Néanmoins, il est indiscutable que des personnes sont parvenues à emporter des documents, tel que le confirme l'auteur Donald Spoto qui consultera des papiers acquis lors de la succession d'Inez Melson.
shortly before 12.00 am: Hazel Washington (Marilyn's maid) and husband Rocky (Los Angeles' policeman) arrive at Marilyn's home to retrieve tables and chairs lent to Marilyn in February, as the house would then be closed. Mrs. Washington notices one of the men in black burn papers in the fireplace: Marilyn's notebooks, Twentieth Century Fox 'papers, calendar pages, strips of tapes. The locks of workbooks had been forced and the drawers were emptied.
Before leaving, Mrs. Washington notes that guards from Fox Studios had invested the house and she sees Frank Neill and three others guy from publicity department to take all documents relating to the Fox (including the new contract with negotiation and reintegration of Marilyn to the Fox Studios with the resumption of filming 'Something's got to Give' which have disappeared ) .
Men in black have even checked the content of the car of Hazel and Rocky before they leave.
However, these allegations stating that the papers were destroyed, have been formally denied by the police officers who were present all the day. Nevertheless, it is indisputable that some people were able to take documents, as confirmed by the author Donald Spoto who will consult papers acquired in succession of Inez Melson.


> La police met la maison de Fifth Helena Drive sous scellés.
Police put the house of Fifth Helena Drive sealed.

> La police pose les scellés sur la porte
1962-08-05-brentwood-out-police_seal_after_body_removed-1  1962-08-05-brentwood-out-police_seal_after_body_removed-1d 
1962-08-05-brentwood-out-police_seal_after_body_removed-1b  1962-08-05-brentwood-out-police_seal_after_body_removed-1c 
1962-08-05-brentwood-out-police_seal_after_body_removed-2  1962-08-05-brentwood-out-police_seal_after_body_removed-3  1962-08-05-brentwood-out-police_seal_after_body_removed-4
- photographie de Dan Tompkins >>
1962-by_dan_tompkins-b417e84956d8a27  1962-08-05-brentwood-out-police_seal_after_body_removed-1d 

> captures
1962-08-05_cap-06  1962-08-05_cap-07  1962-08-05_cap-08 


Des gens se réunissent devant le Grauman's Chinese Theatre de Los Angeles et déposent des fleurs devant la plaque où Marilyn Monroe avait laissé ses empreintes (le 26 juin 1953).
People meet in front of the Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles and lay flowers in front of the foot and hans prints left by Marilyn Monroe (in June, 26, 1953).

1962-08-05-graumans_chinese_theatre-crowd 

- photographie de Gene Anthony >>
1962-08-05-graumans_chinese_theatre-by_gene_anthony


L'information de la mort de Marilyn Monroe défile sur les panneaux lumineux du New York Times sur Times Square à Manhattan, New York.
The news of the Marilyn Monroe's death scrolls on the light panels on the New York Times building in Times Square in Manhattan, New York City.

1962-08-05-ny-times_square-ny_times_building-1  1962-08-05-ny-times_square-ny_times_building-2 


VIDEOS

> News USA

> Divers extraits

> Eunice Murray, Norman Jefferies, Pat Newcomb et Maf


> Original du certificat de décès
1962-08-05-certificate_of_death-1  1962-08-05-certificate_of_death-1a 


Les réactions des proches de Marilyn recueillies par les journalistes:

  • James Dougherty: "Je suis atterré". Quand son collègue Jack Clemmons lui apprend la nouvelle, Dougherty se tourne vers sa femme et lui dit: "Fais une prière pour Norma Jeane. Elle est morte."
  • Arthur Miller, à Paris avec sa nouvelle femme Inge Morath, refuse de s'exprimer publiquement, sans doute étant trop bouleversé. A l'un de ses proches, il aurait dit: "Il fallait bien que ça arrive. Je ne savais ni quand, ni comment, mais c'était inévitable."
  • Isadore Miller (père d'Arthur): "Elle était comme ma propre fille. Elle était une fille gentille et bonne. Je suis tellement désolé, je n'étais pas là pour être avec elle. Elle a du se sentir vraiment seule et effrayée."
  • Billy Wilder, interviewé à sa descente d'avion par des journalistes qui ne le tiennent pas au courant, ne dit que des banalités sur Marilyn. Il apprendra la nouvelle dans le taxi qui l'amenait à l'hôtel.
  • Joshua Logan: "Marilyn était l'une des personnes les plus sous-estimées de la terre !"
  • Paula Strasberg: "Marilyn était une actrice comme il n'en existe aucune autre."
  • Milton et Amy Greene sont à Paris et apprennent la nouvelle par téléphone à leur hôtel. Ils sont bouleversés (avant leur départ, après un mauvais pressentiment, Amy avait incité Milton à contacter Marilyn, qui semblait heureuse et leur avait assurer que tout allait bien).
  • Frank Sinatra se dit "profondément affligé (...) Elle va beaucoup me manquer." George Jacobs, son domestique, racontera que "Il demeura dans une sorte d'état de choc pendant des semaines après la mort de Marilyn, profondément angoissé."
  • Kay Gable (veuve de Clark Gable) apprend la nouvelle au flash d'information à 7 heures: "Je suis allée à la messe, j'ai prié pour elle."
  • La famille Greenson se dit "accablée de chagrin". Le Dr. Greenson rencontre DiMaggio et les deux hommes se serrent dans les bras, se consolant l'un et l'autre.
  • Peter Lawford: "Pat et moi l'aimions profondément. C'est probablement l'un des êtres humains les plus merveilleux et les plus chaleureux que j'ai connus. Tout ce que je pourrais dire d'autre serait superflu."
  • L'Osservatore Romano du Vatican: "Elle a été la victime d'une mentalité et d'un mode de vie dont on l'a forcée à être le symbole. Sa mort transcende les limites d'une tragédie personnelle pour atteindre un retentissement universel." 

sources:
Marilyn Monroe, encyclopédie d'Adam Victor
Les vies secrètes de Marilyn Monroe
, d'Anthony Summers

Marilyn Monroe, biographie de Barbara Leaming
Marilyn Monroe, Private and Undisclosed, de Michelle Morgan
Marilyn, Histoire d'un assassinat, de Brown et Barham


© All images are copyright and protected by their respective owners, assignees or others.
copyright text by GinieLand. 

Enregistrer

25 avril 2013

1960 Interview de Georges Belmont

C'est par l'intermédiaire de Ruppert Allan, chargé de la promotion de Marilyn, qu'eut lieu en 1960 la grande interview entre Marilyn Monroe et Georges Belmont. Ce dernier était alors rédacteur en chef de la revue Marie-Claire, qui publiera l'interview dans le numéro 72 d'octobre 1960. L'interview se déroula pendant le tournage du film Let's Make Love (Le milliardaire) qui connut un succès particulier en France en raison de l'interprétation d'Yves Montand.
Georges Belmont réussit bientôt à gagner la confiance de Marilyn. Il faut dire qu'il lui avait promis de mettre à sa disposition une transcription de l'interview et en outre de s'en tenir rigoureusement dans le texte écrit à la formulation orale de ses propos. La base était donc bonne. Tous ceux qui, par la suite, prirent connaissance de cet entretien, durent reconnaître avec étonnement qu'ils n'avaient jamais entendu Marilyn parler d'elle-même avec tant de naturel.
Voilà comment Georges Belmont dépeint l'ambiance : "Je la laissais parler. La seule pression dont j'usais était le silence. Quand elle s'arrêtait de parler, je ne disais rien et, au bout du silence, quand elle n'en pouvait plus, ce qui venait alors était souvent capital et terriblement émouvant presque toujours."

Marilyn Monroe: J'aimerais mieux répondre à des questions. Je ne sais pas raconter, c'est terrible... par ou commencer? Comment? Il y a tant de ramifications...

Georges Belmont: Tout de même, il y a eu un commencement : votre enfance.

Marilyn Monroe: Même cela, personne n'en saurait rien, sans un pur hasard.
Longtemps, mon passé, ma vie sont restés totalement inconnus. Jamais je n'en parlais. Sans raison particulière. Simplement, je trouvais que c'etait mon affaire et pas celle des autres. Puis un jour, un M. Lester Cowan a voulu me mettre dans un film avec Groucho Marx, 'Love Happy'. J'avais déjà été sous contrat avec la Fox et la Columbia, à l'époque, mais saquée... C'était un petit rôle qu'il m'offrait, ce M. Cowan, mais il tenait à m'avoir sous contrat. Donc, il téléphone. J'etais encore très jeune et il me dit qu'il voulait parler à mon père et à ma mère. Je lui dis : "Impossible." - "Pourquoi?" insiste-t-il. Je lui ai expliqué alors brièvement la chose : "Je n'ai jamais vécu avec eux." C'était la vérité et je ne vois toujours pas ce que cela avait de sensationnel. Mais il téléphona à la chroniqueuse Louella Parsons et lui raconta toute l'histoire. Cela parut dans la "colonne" de Louella. C'est comme ça que tout a commencé. Depuis, on a débité tant de choses fausses que, mon Dieu, oui, pourquoi ne pas dire la vérité maintenant?

Georges Belmont: Quelles sont les premières images de vous, enfant, que vous gardiez?

Marilyn Monroe (long silence) : Mon premier souvenir?... C'est un souvenir de lutte pour la vie. J'etais toute petite... un bébé dans un petit lit, oui, et je luttais pour ma vie. Mais j'aimerais mieux ne pas en parler, si cela vous est égal : c'est une chose cruelle qui ne regarde que moi et personne d'autre, comme je disais. Ensuite, aussi loin que je remonte, je me revois dans une poussette, en longue robe blanche, sur le trottoir de la maison ou je vivais dans une famille qui n'était pas la mienne. C'est un fait que je suis une enfant naturelle. Mais tout ce que l'on a dit de mon père, ou de mes pères, est faux. Le premier mari de ma mère s'appellait Baker. Le second, Mortenson. Mais elle avait depuis longtemps divorcé d'avec les deux quand je suis née. On a raconté que mon père était norvégien, sans doute à cause du nom Mortenson, et qu'il était mort dans un accident de moto, peu après ma naissance. J'ignore si c'est vrai de Mortenson, n'ayant jamais eu de lien de parenté avec lui. Quant à l'indentité de mon vrai père, là encore, si vous le voulez bien, je vous prierai de ne pas m'interroger ; cela n'intéresse que moi. Cependant, il y a deux faits qui peuvent expliquer certaines... confusions. D'abord, on m'a toujours dit dans ma petite enfance que mon père s'était tué dans un accident d'automobile à New York, avant ma naissance. Ensuite, curieusement, mon bulletin de naissance porte, en réponse à une mention "Profession", le mot Baker, qui était le nom du premier mari de ma mère, mais qui veut dire aussi "boulanger". Quand je suis née, enfant naturelle ainsi que je l'ai dit, ma mère devait me donner un nom. Mon sentiment est que, forcée de penser vite, elle donna : "Baker". Pure coincidence, puis confusion de la part de l'officier d'état civil... C'est du moins ce que je pense.

Georges Belmont: Votre mère... J'ai lu quelque part que, pour vous, elle n'était que "la femme aux cheveux roux"?

Marilyn Monroe: Je n'ai jamais vécu avec ma mère. On a dit le contraire, mais cela seul est vrai. Aussi loin que je remonte dans mes souvenirs, j'ai toujours vécu en pension chez des gens. Ma mère avait des... troubles mentaux. Elle est morte maintenant. Mes grands-parents maternels sont morts tous les deux fous, enfermés. Ma mère, aussi, il fallut l'interner. Elle sortait parfois, et puis elle... rechutait. Alors, vous savez comme c'est... toute petite, je disais en montrant la première femme venue : "Oh! une maman!", et le premier homme : "Oh! un papa!". Mais un matin, je devais avoir trois ans, pas plus, on me baignait et je dis "maman" à la femme qui s'occupait de moi à l'époque. Elle me répondit : "Je ne suis pas ta maman. Appelle-moi 'tante'." - "Mais lui est mon papa?" dis-je ne montrant son mari. - "Non", me dit-elle. "Nous ne sommes pas tes parents. Celle qui vient te voir de temps en temps, la femme aux cheveux roux, celle-là est ta maman." Ce fut un choc d'apprendre cela, mais comme elle venait très rarement, c'est vrai que, pour moi, elle resta surtout "la femme aux cheveux roux". Tout de même, j'essayais qu'elle existait. Seulement, plus tard, quand on me mit dans un orphelinat, j'ai eu un autre choc. Je savais lire, alors. Quand j'ai lu "orphelinat" en lettres d'or sur fond noir, il a fallu me traîner, je hurlais : "Je ne suis pas une orpheline! J'ai une maman!" Mais par la suite, j'ai fini par penser : "Il faut croire qu'elle est morte..." Et, plus tard encore, des gens me disaient : "Ta mère, mieux vaut que tu l'oublies." - "Mais ou est-elle?" demandais-je. - "N'y pense plus, elle est morte." Après quoi, tout à coup, j'avais de ses nouvelles... Et il en fut ainsi pendant des annèes. Je la croyais morte et je le disais. Et elle vivait. Ce qui fait qu'on a prétendu que j'avais inventé qu'elle était morte, parce que je ne voulais pas avouer où elle était. Idiot!
En tout cas, j'ai eu... attendez que je compte... dix, non onze "familles". La première vivait dans une petite ville du comté de Los Angeles ; je suis née à Los Angeles. Il y avait avec moi un petit garçon que ces gens adoptèrent ensuite. Je suis restée avec eux jusqu'à l'âge de sept ans environ. Ils étaient affreusement sévères. Sans méchanceté. C'était leur religion. Ils m'élevèrent à leur manière, durement, en me corrigeant souvent comme on ne devrait jamais le faire, à mon avis: à coup de ceinturon de cuir. Finalement, cela se sut ; on me retira pour me confier à un couple anglais, à Hollywood. Ceux-là étaient des acteurs, des figurants plutôt, avec une fille de vingt et un ans qui était la doublure de Madeleine Carroll. Chez eux, c'était la vie sans souci, et assez tumultueuse. Cela me changeait de la première famille ou on ne pouvait même pas parler de cinéma ou d'acteurs, ni de danser ou de chanter, sauf des psaumes. Mes "nouveaux parents" travaillaient dur, quand ils travaillaient et jouissaient de la vie le reste du temps. Ils aimaient danser, chanter, boire, jouer aux cartes et avoir beaucoup d'amis. Avec l'éducation religieuse que j'avais reçue, j'étais terrifiée : je les voyais tous en enfer! Je passais des heures à prier pour eux. Je me rappelle une chose... au bout de quelques mois, je crois, ma mère acheta une petite maison où tout le monde alla vivre. Pas pour longtemps ; trois mois au plus. Cette fois encore, ma mère dut être... emmenée. Et même pendant ces trois mois, je la vis à peine. Bref, ce fut un grand changement. Après son départ, nous regagnâmes Hollywood. Ces anglais me gardèrent tant qu'il y eut de l'argent... l'argent de ma mère, de ses biens et d'une assurance qu'elle avait souscrite. C'est avec eux que j'ai fait la connaissance du cinéma. Je n'avais pas huit ans. Ils me déposaient devant une des grandes salles d'Hollywood, L'Egyptien ou le Grauman's Chinese tôt le matin. Toute seule, je regardais les singes en cage devant l'Egyptien, ou j'essayais de placer mes pieds dans les moulages de ceux des stars, à l'entrèe du Grauman's: mais je n'y arrivais jamais, j'avais de trop grands souliers... C'est drôle de penser que mes empreintes y sont, et que maintenant, d'autres petites filles font peut-être comme moi autrefois.
Ils me conduisaient donc là chaque samedi et dimanche. C'était repos pour eux et j'imagine qu'ils ne voulaient pas s'encombrer d'un enfant à la maison. D'ailleurs, cela valait probablement mieux pour moi.
J'attendais l'ouverture, je donnais mes dix cents et m'installais au premier rang. J'ai vu toutes sortes de films comme cela. Je me souviens de 'Cléôpatre', avec Claudette Colbert.
Je restais là, tard, séance après séance. J'étais censée rentrer avant la nuit. Mais comment pouvais-je savoir quand c'était la nuit?! Et puis, on était bien; et même si je ne pouvais rien acheter quand j'avais faim, je savais qu'on me garderait de quoi manger. Alors, je restais. J'avais mes stars préférées. Jean Harlow!... Mes cheveux étaient platines ;on m'appelait "Tête d'étoupe". Je détestais ça, je rêvais de cheveux blond doré... jusqu'à ce que je l'ai vue : si belle, et platine, comme moi!... Et Clark Gable! J'éspère qu'il ne m'en voudra pas si je dis que je voyais en lui mon père, je n'étais qu'une gamine, et, d'après Freud, il n'y a pas mal à cela, au contraire! Je rêvais que mon père lui ressemblait, ou même qu'il était mon père... ce qui me rappelle que c'est curieux, mais je n'ai jamais rêvé que personne fût ma mère... Ou en étais-je?!

Georges Belmont: Le couple anglais. Quand il n'y a plus eu d'argent...

Marilyn Monroe: Oui. On m'a mise à l'orphelinat. Oh! mais, attendez! Oh!... non! Quand ces anglais n'ont plus pu me garder, je suis allée vivre chez des gens à Hollywood. Des gens de la Nouvelle-Orléans. Je m'en souviens parce qu'ils prononçaient "New Orlinns".
Mais je n'y suis pas restée longtemps. Trois, quatre mois. Je me rappelle seulement que le mari était opérateur de cinéma et que, tout à coup, on m'a conduite à l'orphelinat. Je sais, certains prétendent que ce n'était pas un endroit si affreux. Mais je sais aussi que la maison a beaucoup changé ; peut-être est-ce moins sinistre à présent... bien que l'orphelinat le plus moderne du monde demeure un orphelinat, si l'on voit ce que je veux dire.
La nuit, quand les autres dormaient, je restais à la fenêtre du dortoir et je pleurais parce que, loin et haut par-dessus les toits, je voyais briller les lettres des studios R.K.O. et que ma mère y avait travaillé come monteuse. Des annèes après, en 1951, quand je tournais 'Clash by night' pour R.K.O., je suis montée là-haut pour essayer de voir l'orphelinat; mais il y avait de trop grands buildings. J'ai lu, je ne sais où, que nous n'étions pas plus que trois ou quatre par chambre dans cet orphelinat. C'est faux. J'étais dans un dortoir de vingt-cinq lits, dont on pouvait faire le tour si on le méritait, en remontant du lit n°1 au lit n°27, qu'on appelait le "lit d'honneur". Et du 27, si l'on était très sage, on pouvait espérer passer dans un autre dortoir avec moins de lits. J'y ai réussi une fois. Mais un matin, où j'étais en retard, je pense, et où je laçais mes chaussures, la surveillante me dit : "Descendez!" Je tentai de lui expliquer: "Mais il faut que j'attache mes souliers!" Elle me foudroya : "retour au lit n°27!".
Le lever était à 6 heures et nous devions faire certaines corvées avant d'aller à l'école. Nous avions chacune un lit, une chaise et une armoire. Tout cela devait être très propre, astiqué, à cause des inspections à l'improviste. J'ai nettoyé le dortoir pendant un temps. Tous les jours, bouger les lits, balayer, épousseter. Les salles de bain, c'était plus facile: moins de poussière, à cause du sol en ciment. J'ai travaillé également aux cuisines. Je lavais la vaisselle. Nous étions cent: je lavais donc cent assiettes et autant de cuillères et de fourchettes... pas de couteaux ni de verres; nous buvions dans les quarts. Seulement, à la cuisine, on gagnait des sous: cinq cents par mois et à cela, après qu'on vous retenait un cent pour l'école du dimanche. Bref, on se retrouvait avec un cent au bout du mois, s'il n'y avait que quatre dimanches; de quoi acheter peut-être un petit cadeau pour sa meilleure amie, à Noël, en économisant. Je ne peux pas dire que j'étais très heureuse. Je n'étais pas bien avec les surveillantes. Mais la directrice était très gentille. Je me souviens, qu'un jour, elle me fait appeller dans son bureau et me dit: "Vous avez une très jolie peau, mais un peu luisante. Nous allons y mettre un soupçon de poudre, pour voir." Je me sentais honorée d'être là. Elle avait un petit pékinois qu'on empêchait d'aller avec les enfants parce qu'il les mordrait, mais qui me fit des tas d'amitiés. Comme j'adorais déjà les chiens, imaginez!... J'étais si honorée, vraiment, que je marchais dans les airs.
Un peu plus tard, j'ai voulu m'évader avec d'autres camarades. Pour aller où ? Nous n'en avions pas la moindre idée. Le temps de traverser une grande pelouse, nous étions déjà rattrapées. Quand on me ramena, je suppliais: "Ne le dites pas à la directrice!" - parce que je la voyais encore me sourire en me tapotant le nez avec sa houpette, et parce qu'elle m'avait laissé caresser son petit chien.
Même maintenant, cela revient parfois, quand je suis trop nerveuse ou surexcitée. Une fois, j'avais un petit rôle, avec une scène où je devais gravir un escalier; j'ai oublié ce qui arriva, mais le metteur en scéne assistant se précipita vers moi en me criant des mots et j'en fus si bouleversée que, au moment de la reprise, impossible de dire la réplique! Rien qu'un affreux bafouillis. Sur quoi, le metteur en scène, furieux, se précipite à son tour et crie : "Tout de même, vous ne bégayez pas?" - "V-v-vous croyez ça?" lui ai-je dit. C'était horrible! Et ça l'est encore, quand je parle trop vite ou quand je dois faire un discours. Pénible!...
(Silence) Je voudrais qu'on en ait fini avec cette partie de ma vie...
(Silence)
Je suis restée environ un an et demi dans cet orphelinat. Nous allions à l'école. C'est très mauvais pour les enfants d'une institution comme celle là, d'aller à l'école publique. Les autres nous montraient du doigt et serinaient : "Oh, v'là les orphelins!" Nous avions honte.
A l'école, j'aimais bien le chant et l'anglais. Je détestais le calcul ; je n'avais pas l'esprit à ça ; pendant les leçons, mes rêves s'envolaient par la fenêtre. Mais j'étais bonne en gymnastique et en sport. J'étais très grande. A l'orphelinat, le premier jour, on n'a pas voulu me croire quand j'ai dit mon âge: neuf ans. On m'en donnait quatorze. Je mesurais presque ma taille actuelle: 1m63. Mais j'étais très maigre jusqu'à onze ans, où les choses ont changé. Je n'étais plus à l'orphelinat, à cet âge. Je m'étais tellement plainte à ma tutrice qu'elle me sortit de là. C'était une vieille amie de ma mère. Grace McKee. Elle est morte il y a onze ans. A l'époque où elle était devenue ma tutrice, elle était chef monteuse chez Columbia. Puis on la renvoya et elle a épousé alors un homme de dix ans plus jeune qu'elle et père de trois enfants. Ils étaient très pauvres et, pour cela, ne pouvaient s'occuper de moi. En outre, je pense qu'elle estimait que son premier devoir allait à son mari et aux enfants de celui-ci, ce qui est normal. Néanmoins, elle était merveilleuse pour moi, à bien des égards. Sans elle, j'aurais pu me retrouver Dieu sait où, à l'Assistance Publique jusqu'à 18 ans.
A mon orphelinat, qui était privé, elle venait me voir et me sortait. Pas souvent, mais tout de même... cela me donnait du courage. Je n'avais que neuf ou dix ans, et elle me laissait jouer avec son rouge à lèvres ou me menait chez le coiffeur pour une ondulation... chose inouïe, d'abord parce que c'était interdit, et puis parce que j'avais les cheveux raides: alors vous imaginez ce que cela représentait! De plus, c'est elle qui me retira de l'orphelinat, après mes plaintes, ainsi que je l'ai dit. Naturellement, cela signifia d'autres "familles". Je me souviens d'une où je restais trois ou quatre semaines. Je m'en souviens à cause de la femme qui allait livrer des choses que son mari fabriquait. Elle m'emmenait avec elle, et oh! la voiture me rendait si malade!...
J'ignore si on les payait pour me garder. Je sais seulement que, après eux, j'ai tout le temps changé de maison. Certaines familles me prenaient à la fin d'un trimestre scolaire et en avaient assez, après les vacances; ou peut-être étais-ce l'arrangement. Par la suite, le comté de Los Angeles m'a prise en charge. C'était pire: je détestais ça. Même à l'orphelinat, quand j'allais à l'école, j'essayais toujours de ne pas avoir l'air d'une orpheline. Mais maintenant, une femme arrivait et disait: "Voyons, voyons... lève les pieds" et elle marquait: "Paire de chaussures". Puis: "A-t-elle un chandail ?" Ou encore: "Je crois que la pauvre fille aurait bien besoin de deux robes, une pour l'école, une pour le dimanche." Et les chandails étaient en coton et laids, les robes semblaient taillées dans de la toile de sac... Terrible! Et les chaussures! Je disais: "Je n'en veux pas!" Je m'arrangeais toujours pour me faire donner des robes, des robes de grandes personnes, qu'on recoupait à ma taille. Et la plupart du temps, j'avais des souliers de tennis: on en trouvait pour moins d'un dollar. Je devais être une drôle de fille, à cette époque. Très grande, comme je l'ai dit. Pas grimacière pour la nourriture. Mangeant de tout. Je le sais parce que, dans presque toute les familles, on disait que jamais on avait vu une enfant aussi peu difficile. Je sais aussi que j'étais très tranquille, avec les grandes personnes en tout cas. On m'appelait "la souris". Je parlais peu, sauf quand j'étais avec d'autres gosses. Alors je n'étais plus la même. Ils aimaient jouer avec moi. J'avais de l'invention; je disais: "On joue au divorce, au crime!" et eux me regardaient: "Mais où vas-tu prendre ça?".
J'étais probablement très différente des autres. Alors que les enfants refusent en général d'aller se coucher, jamais je ne rechignais. Au contraire, de moi-même je disais: "Je crois que je vais aller me coucher." J'aimais la solitude de ma chambre, et mon lit. J'aimais surtout me jouer le dernier film que j'avais vu. Debout sur mon lit, plus grande que jamais, je jouais tous les rôles, y compris ceux des hommes, et j'ajoutais des inventions de mon cru. J'adorais cela, tout comme jouer la comédie dans les fêtes scolaires.
Là, toujours à cause de ma taille, j'ai joué le roi une fois, et une autre fois le prince. J'ai eu une période heureuse, dans cette partie de ma jeunesse: celle où j'ai vécu chez "tante" Anna. C'était une vielle femme de soixante ou soixante-cinq ans, parente de Grace McKee. Elle m'aimait beaucoup et j'y étais très sensible. Elle me comprenait. Elle n'oubliait jamais qu'elle avait été jeune et ses merveilleuses histoires, tristes ou gaies, de ce temps passé, me fascinaient. Le soir, quand je faisais la vaisselle, j'étais si heureuse que je chantais ou sifflais par la fenêtre de la cuisine, et qu'elle disait: "Quel pinson! Je n'ai jamais rien entendu de pareil!". C'est vers la fin de cette période qu'on m'a mariée. Il y a peu de choses à dire de ce mariage. Grace McKee et son mari devaient partir pour la Virginie. A Los Angeles, ils touchaient vingt dollars du comté pour moi; si je partais avec eux, nous perdions cet argent. Comme ils n'étaient pas assez riches pour me faire vivre mais qu'ils m'aimaient bien, il fallait trouver un moyen de me "caser". En Californie, une jeune fille peut se marier à seize ans. On m'a donc donné le choix: ou entrer dans un Orphelinat d'Etat jusqu'à dix-huit ans ou me marier. J'avais presque seize ans; j'ai choisi le mariage.
Il s'appelait Dougherty, il avait vingt et un ans et travaillait dans une usine. Peu de temps après, ce fut la guerre. D'abord mobilisé comme moniteur d'éducation physique, il fut versé ensuite dans l'armée active, mais échoua finalement dans la marine marchande. Peu avant la fin de la guerre, j'allais à Las Vegas et obtins le divorce. J'avais vingt ans. Aujourd'hui, il est agent de police. J'ai travaillé en usine pendant la guerre. J'ai commencé par vérifier des parachutes, pour avions-cibles, pas pour hommes. Puis, je suis passée au "collage", comme on appelait ça... un enduit qu'on étalait sur ce qui servait à fabriquer les avions-cibles. C'était fastidieux et il y avait une mauvaise ambiance humaine. Les femmes parlaient surtout de l'emploi de leurs soirées et du prochain week-end. Je travaillais tout près de l'atelier de peinture au pistolet... rien que des hommes. Ils m'écrivaient des mots et s'arrêtaient de peindre, etc.
C'était si monotone que je travaillais vite, pour me débarrasser. Le résultat fut inattendu. On a dû trouver que j'abattais un travail formidable. Il y a eu une assemblée générale du personnel et le directeur m'a citée pour "bonne volonté exemplaire" et m'a remis une insigne en or et un bon du Trésor de vingt-cinq dollars. Les autres filles ont été folles de jalousie et m'ont mené la vie dure, après cela. Elles ricanaient et faisaient exprès de me bousculer quand j'allais remplir mon pot d'enduit; pour le renverser sur moi. Oh, j'ai souffert! Et puis, un jour, l'Armée de l'Air a voulu des photos de notre usine. Je revenais d'un congé, on m'appelle au bureau: "Où vous cachiez-vous?" Morte de peur, je réponds: "J'étais en permission régulière!"- ce qui était vrai. On me dit: "Là n'est pas la question. Voulez-vous poser pour des photos?" Bref, les photographes arrivèrent et prirent des photos. Ils en réclamèrent d'autres, hors de l'atelier. Moi, j'avais peur de m'attirer des ennuis si je quittais mon travail. J'ai refusé, j'ai dit: "Demandez la permission." Ils l'ont obtenue et j'ai passée plusieurs journées à poser ici, là, et à tenir des trucs, pousser des trucs, tirer des trucs...
Les photos étaient développées dans les laboratoires Eastman-Kodak. Et là, les gens ont demandé qui était le modèle et en ont parlé aux photographes; si bien que l'un d'eux - David Conover - est revenu me dire: "Vous devriez faire le modèle. Vous gagneriez facilement cinq dollars de l'heure." Cinq dollars de l'heure, alors que j'en gagnais vingt par semaine, pour dix heures de travail par jour, les pieds sur le ciment! Il y avait de quoi tenter la moins folle des filles.
Je m'y suis mise peu à peu. C'était la fin de la guerre. J'ai quitté l'usine. Je me suis présentée à une agence. J'ai eu du travail. Photos publicitaires. Calendriers... Pas celui qui a fait tant de bruit; nous y viendrons. D'autres, où j'étais brune, rousse, blonde. Et je gagnais vraiment cinq dollars de l'heure! De temps à autres, je pouvais réaliser un de mes rêves: me payer des leçons d'art dramatique... quand j'avais assez d'argent, car ça coûtait cher, dix dollars de l'heure! Je faisais la connaissance de gens très différents de ce que j'avais connus jusqu'alors. Des bons et des mauvais. Souvent, quand j'attendais un bus à un coin de rue, une voiture s'arrêtait et l'homme au volant me débitait une histoire: "Qu'est-ce que vous fabriquez là? Vous devriez être dans les films." Ensuite, il proposait de me ramener. Moi, je répondais toujours: "Non merci. J'aime mieux le bus." Mais tout de même, l'idée du cinéma cheminait dans ma tête. Une fois, je me souviens, j'ai accepté un rendez-vous dans un studio avec un homme rencontré de cette façon. Il devait être très persuasif. J'y suis allée. C'était un samedi et il n'y avait pas un chat dans ces studios. J'aurais dû me méfier, mais j'étais naïve à bien des points de vue. Bref, je trouve mon homme qui me conduit dans un bureau. Nous étions seuls. Il me tend un scénario en disant que je devrais faire l'affaire pour un rôle, mais qu'il faut voir. Sur quoi, il me demande de lire le rôle, tout en insistant pour que je relève ma robe et que je la garde comme ça. C'était en été et j'avais un maillot de bain sous ma robe. Mais comme il répétait: "Plus haut!" j'ai pris peur et, toute rouge, je me suis entêtée de mon côté: "Seulement si je garde mon chapeau!" C'était idiot, mais j'avais vraiment peur et j'étais déséspérée. Je devais être ridicule, assise là et cramponnée à mon chapeau. A la fin, il s'est mis en fureur, ce qui a achevé de me terrifier, je me suis sauvée et j'ai signalé l'affaire à l'agence. On a téléphoné aux studios, et ailleurs, pour essayer de le retrouver. Impossible. Il devait avoir un ami dans la place qui lui avait permis d'utiliser son bureau. L'incident me bouleversa à tel point que, pendant assez longtemps, je résolus de ne jamais être actrice. C'est une dure époque de ma vie. Je déménageais tout le temps, d'un meublé à l'autre. L'hôtel était trop cher.
Et puis le hasard a fait qu'on m'a vue sur la couverture de cinq magasines différents le même mois et la Fox a téléphoné. Je me suis retrouvée sur un banc de bois avec des gens de tout âge et de toutes dimensions qui attendaient comme moi. On a attendu lontemps avant que Ben Lyon, qui dirigeait le recrutement, sorte de son bureau. A peine sorti, il a dit en me montrant du doigt : "Qui est-ce?" Je portais une petite robe blanche en piqué que "Tante" Anna - j'étais revenue vivre chez elle quelque temps - avait lavée et repassée à toute vitesse; tout cela était arrivé si rapidement que je n'aurais jamais pu préparer la robe et me préparer en même temps; "Tante" Anna m'avait dit: "Je m'occupe de la robe. Occupe-toi de tes cheveux et de ton maquillage."
Je me sentais plutôt défaite aprés cette longue attente. Mais Lyon fut très gentil. Il me dit qu'il me trouvait si fraîche, si jeune, etc... Il dit même : "vous êtes la première que je découvre depuis Jean Harlow." Jean Harlow, entre nous, est ma préférée d'autrefois!
Le lendemain, bien qu'il eût fallu normalement le consentement du Président directeur général ou de je ne sais qui, Lyon me glissa dans une série de bouts d'essais en technicolor et, presque aussitôt, la Fox me signa un contrat. Un contrat de star, pour un an!
En pure perte d'ailleurs. Je n'ai jamais su pourquoi, jamais compris. Ils engageaient des tas de filles et de garçons et les laissaient tomber sans leur accorder une seule chance. Ce fut mon cas. Mise à la porte, j'essayai de voir M. Zanuck. Impossible. Chaque fois, on me répondait qu'il était à Sun Valley. Semaine après semaine je revins à l'assaut : "Navré", me disait-on. "Il est occupé, il est à Sun Valley." J'imagine, il y est encore... bien que je l'ai revu, quand la Fox me reprit sous contrat, après 'Asphalt Jungle'. Il me dit: "Vous avez déjà été ici apparemment ?" - "C'est vrai." - "Que voulez vous, la roue tourne!" et il enchaîna en déclarant que j'avais "quelque-chose", une qualité à trois dimensions qui lui rappelait Jean Harlow; ce qui fut très intéressant puisque ça avait été l'avis de Ben Lyon. Je dois beaucoup à Ben Lyon, il fut le premier à me donner confiance. Je lui doit aussi mon nom actuel. Un jour où nous cherchions pour moi un nom de cinéma, car je ne voulais pas garder celui d'un homme qui n'était pas mon père, j'insistai pour prendre celui du nom de jeune fille de ma mère: Monroe. Je tenais à conserver du moins une forme de lien avec mes parents. Il accepta Monroe, mais ce fut lui qui trouva Marilyn, parce que, dit-il, après Jean Harlow, l'actrice à laquelle je ressemblais le plus était Marilyn Miller, la fameuse vedette des comédies musicales de Broadway. Etrange, quand on y pense que me voilà devenue Marilyn Miller pour l'état civil!
Mais enfin, pour en revenir à notre histoire, j'étais donc sans rien. Saquée par la Fox, saquée par la Columbia un peu plus tard, quoique différemment. La Columbia m'avait du moins donné un rôle dans 'Ladies of the Chorus'. Un film affreux! Je jouais une danseuse de burlesque dont un type de Boston tombe amoureux. Horrible! Mais ce n'était pas la raison de mon départ. Le vrai motif tient à des circonstances plutôt étranges et, mettons, déplaisantes. Je n'en dirai pas plus, si ce n'est que... la vie est pleine de leçons. Je ne voyais pas d'issue. J'étais revenue aux jours les plus durs. J'habitais au Hollywood Studio Club. J'y étais très malheureuse: cela me rappelait l'orphelinat. J'avais des dettes et j'étais très en retard pour mon loyer. Au Club, on vous accorde une semaine de retard et, après, vous recevez un petit mot: "Vous êtes la seule à ne pas apporter votre soutien à notre merveilleuse institution.", etc. Et vous comprenez! Tant que vous vivez là, vous mangez deux fois par jour, petit déjeuner et dîner. Ce n'est pas toujours très bon, mais cela nourrit. Et vous avez un toit et un lit. Sans cela, où aller? Pas de famille. Rien. Personne. Et j'avais faim. Je sais, des gens me disaient: "Pourquoi ne pas chercher un job de vendeuse, quelque part ?" Oui, pourquoi pas ? Une fois j'ai essayé, dans un drugstore: on n'a pas voulu de moi parce que je n'avais pas terminé mes etudes de lycée. Et puis, comment dire ?... ce n'était pas la même chose. J'avais été modèle et surtout je voulais devenir une actrice et il me semblait que, si je retombais, ce serait sans retour. On a raconté beaucoup de fables à propos du fameux calendrier. A l'époque où l'on a découvert la chose, j'avais déjà fait 'Asphalt Jungle' et j'étais de nouveau sous contrat avec la Fox, pour sept ans cette fois. J'entends encore la voix de celui qui m'appela au téléphone, des bureaux de la Publicité: "C'est vrai que vous avez posé pour un calendrier?" - "Bien sûr", dis-je. "Cela vous ennuie?" puis j'ai compris à quel point ils étaient bouleversés, car la voix reprit : "Eh bien, même si c'est vrai, dites que non." - "Mais j'ai signé l'autorisation de vente! Comment voulez-vous que je mente?" Et, si contrariés qu'ils fussent, je dis la vérité. Mais quand les journalistes me demandèrent pourquoi et que je repondi: "J'avais faim", on crut à un bon mot.
Ceux qui me connaissent bien savent que j'ai beaucoup de mal à mentir. Cela m'a coûté assez cher dans la vie. Il m'arrive de passer délibérement des choses sous silence, pour me protéger ou protéger les autres - qui n'a pas envie ou besoin de se protéger? - mais je ne mens jamais. J'avais faim et j'avais quatre semaines de loyer en retard; je cherchais déséspérémment de l'argent. Telle est la vérité. Je me suis rappelée que j'avais posé pour les publicités de bière avec le photographe Tom Kelley, et que sa femme, Nathalie, avait suggéré que je devrais poser sans vêtements, en ajoutant qu'il n'y avait rien de mal à cela et que c'était bien payé: cinquante dollars, la somme dont j'avais besoin. Alors, comme ils avaient toujours été très gentils pour moi, j'ai téléphoné. J'ai commencé par dire à Tom: "Etes-vous sûr qu'on ne me reconnaîtra pas ?" Il l'a promis. Puis j'ai demandé si Nathalie serait là. "Oui." - Mais ça devra être de nuit", ai-je insisté. "Après que vos assistants seront partis. Vous devrez vous debrouillez tout seul avec Nathalie pour les éclairages." Il a dit oui. Je suis venue. Ils se montrèrent d'une compréhension extrêmes; ils me sentaient suffisamment bouleversée. Ils ont étalé un velour rouge. Ce fut vite fait, très simple, et plein de courants d'air. Mais je pus payer le loyer et manger.
Les gens sont drôles. Ils vous posent de ces questions ! Et si vous êtes franches, ils sont choqués ! On me demande: "Qu'est-ce que vous mettez pour vous coucher ? Un haut de pijama ? Le bas ? Une chemise de nuit ?" Je reponds: "Une goutte de Chanel n°5", et l'on croit que c'est encore un bon mot, alors que j'essaie de répondre avec tact à une question grossière et indiscrète. Et puis, c'est vrai ! Mais on ne le croit pas !
Il fut un moment où je commençais à être... reconnue, disons, et où les gens n'arrivaient pas à imaginer ce que je faisais quand je n'étais pas sur le plateau, parce qu'on ne me voyait à aucune première, aucune représentation de presse, aucune réception. C'est simple: j'allais à l'école ! Je n'avais jamais pu finir mes études, alors j'allais à l'Université de Los Angeles. Le soir. Dans la journée, je gagnais ma vie avec des petits rôles dans les films. Je suivais des cours d'histoire de littérature et d'histoire de ce pays; je lisais beaucoup, de grands écrivains. C'était dur d'être à l'heure pour les cours. Je devais me dépêcher. Je quittais le studio à 6h30 et j'avais dû me lever très tôt pour être sur le plateau, prête, à 9 heures du matin. Souvent j'étais morte de fatigue; il m'arrivait même de m'endormir en classe. Mais je me forçais à rester droite et à écouter. J'avais pour voisin un jeune noir, studieux et brillant: il me donnait l'exemple et cela m'aidait à rester éveillée. Entre parenthéses, c'était un humble postier à l'époque; il est aujourd'hui directeur des postes à Los Angeles. Le professeur, Mme Seay, ne savait pas qui j'étais, bien qu'elle trouvât bizzare que des garçons des autres classes passaient parfois la tête à la porte, pendant les cours, pour me regarder en chuchotant. Un jour, elle se décida à interroger mes camarades, qui dirent: "Elle joue dans les films". Surprise, elle déclara: "Et moi qui la prenais pour une jeune fille fraîche émoulue du couvent!" C'est l'un des plus grands compliments qu'on m'ait jamais faits.
Mais les gens dont je parlais tout à l'heure, eux, préféraient voir en moi une starlette frivole, "sexy" et stupide. C'est comme ma réputation d'être toujours en retard. D'abord, tout le temps, non ! On se rappele seulement quand je le suis. Cela dit, je crois en effet que je ne peux pas aller aussi vite que les autres. Ils sautent en voiture, se rentrent dedans, sans répit... Je ne crois pas que nous soyons faits pour vivre comme des machines. D'ailleurs, c'est tellement inutile ! On travaille tellement mieux avec un peu plus de bon sens et de loisirs ! Au studio, si je dois me presser pour répéter ou pour me faire coiffer, maquiller, habiller, j'arrive épuisée sur le plateau. Pendant que nous tournions 'Let's make love', George Cukor, le metteur en scéne, a trouvé plus intelligent de me laisser un peu en retard mais plus fraîche. En tout ce que je fais, j'aime prendre mon temps. On se bouscule trop, de nos jours. C'est pourquoi les gens sont si nerveux et si malheureux en face de la vie et d'eux-mêmes. Comment peut-on faire parfaitement quoi que ce soit, dans ces conditions ? La perfection demande du temps.
J'aimerais devenir une grande actrice, une vraie, et être heureuse aussi parfaitement que possible. Mais qui est heureux ? Le bonheur ! Vouloir devenir une vraie actrice, tout cela demande beaucoup d'effort et de temps.

Georges Belmont: J'imagine que ce portrait de la Duse, au mur, n'est pas ici pour rien ?

Marilyn Monroe: Non. J'ai une grande tendresse pour elle. A cause de sa vie, comme femme et comme actrice. Comment dire ?... Elle n'a jamais fait de concession, dans un cas comme dans l'autre.
Personnellement, quand il m'arrive de réussir quelque chose dans mon métier, j'ai le sentiment de toucher à ce qu'on appelle le sommet du bonheur. Mais ce ne sont que des moments ! Je ne suis pas heureuse, comme ça, en général. Si je suis quelque chose, en général, ce serait plutôt misérable comme un chien ! Mes deux vies, professionelle et privée, me sont si personnelles, sont si étroitement liées, que je ne peux les séparer: l'une réagit constamment sur l'autre.
L'ennui dans mon cas, je pense, c'est que je voudrais tant être merveilleuse ! Je sais que cela fera rire certains, mais c'est vrai. Une fois, à New York, mon avocat me parlait d'histoires d'argent, en déployant une patience d'ange pour m'expliquer ça. A la fin je lui ai dit: "Je n'y comprend rien et je m'en moque. Je sais seulement que je voudrais être merveilleuse!". Dites cela à un homme de loi, il vous croira folle.
Il y a un livre du poète Rainer Maria Rilke qui m'a beaucoup aidée: 'Lettres à un jeune poète'. Sans lui, peut-être croirais-je par moments que je suis folle. Quand un artiste... je m'excuse, mais je considère que je suis presque une artiste, et là encore, on rira sans doute; c'est pourquoi je m'excuse... quand un artiste recherche à tout prix la vérité, il a parfois la sensation de frôler la folie. Mais ce n'est pas vraiment la folie. C'est seulement qu'on s'efforce de faire sortir ce qu'on a de plus vrai en soi-même; et croyez-moi, c'est dur. Il y a des jours où l'on se dit: "Sois vraie, c'est tout !", et ça ne sort pas. Et d'autres jours, c'est si simple !
J'ai toujours eu le sentiment secret de ne pas être absolument sincère. Tout le monde sent cela, de temps à autre, je suppose. Mais dans mon cas, cela va loin parfois... jusqu'à penser que, foncièrement, je ne suis qu'un monstre de fabrication. Lee Strasberg, le directeur de l'Actors Studio me répète souvent: "...Pourquoi es-tu si mécontente de toi-même ?" Et il ajoute: "Après tout, tu es un être humain !" Et moi je lui réponds: "Oui, mais j'ai l'impression que je dois être plus que cela." - "Non!" me dit-il alors. "C'est cela que tu essaies de faire en ce moment ?" - "Il faut bien que j'entre dans la peau du personnage, non ?!" Et il répète encore : "Non ! Tu es un être humain. Pars de toi-même !" La première fois qu'il m'a sorti cela, j'ai crié : "De MOI?" Et il a répondu : "Oui! De TOI !!".
Après Arthur, Lee est probablement celui qui a le plus changé ma vie. C'est pourquoi j'aime tant aller à l'Actors Studio. A New York, j'y vais régulièrement. Je n'ai qu'une envie: faire de mon mieux, toujours, à tout instant. Sur le plateau, dès que la caméra se déclenche, je veux être parfaite, aussi parfaite que possible, jusqu'au bout. Quand j'étais à l'usine, le samedi soir, j'allais au cinéma. C'était le seul moment où je pouvais me distraire, rire, être moi-même. Alors, si le film était mauvais, quelle déception ! Toute la semaine, j'avais attendu et travaillé dur pour me payer cela. Si les acteurs me paraissaient jouer par-dessous la jambe, je sortais déçue comme si l'on m'avait trahie. Que me resterait-il pendant toute une semaine ? C'est pourquoi, aujourd'hui, quand je travaille, je songe toujours à ceux qui travaillent aussi pour pouvoir aligner leur argent au guichet dans l'espoir de s'amuser. Ce que pensent les producteurs et le metteur en scéne, cela m'est assez égal: mais pas ce que penseront les gens en voyant le film. Un jour, j'ai essayé d'expliquer ça à M. Zanuck...
L'amour et le travail sont les seules choses vraies qui nous arrivent dans la vie. Ils font la paire; sinon, c'est boiteux. D'ailleurs, le travail même est une forme d'amour. A l'usine j'ai dit que je me dépêchais d'expédier mon travail parce que c'était fastidieux; mais je me rappelle que, malgré tout, je mettais un point d'honneur à le faire exactement, aussi parfaitement que possible. Et si je rêvais de l'amour, c'était aussi comme d'une chose qui doit être la plus parfaite possible. Quand j'ai épousé Joe DiMaggio, en 1954, il ne jouait déjà plus au base-ball, mais c'était un merveilleux athlète et un être d'une grande sensiblité. Fils d'immigrants italiens, il avait eu une jeunesse difficile. Nous nous comprenions donc assez bien. Ce fut la base de notre mariage. Mais je dis assez bien. Et pour cela ce fut un échec. C'était fini au bout de neuf mois, malheureusement. Je mets le même point d'honneur à mes sentiments qu'à mon travail. Peut-être est-ce pourquoi je suis impétueuse et exclusive. J'aime bien les gens. Et quand j'aime, je pousse l'exclusivité jusqu'à ne plus avoir qu'une seule idée en tête ! Surtout, j'ai envi d'être traitée humainement.
La première fois que j'ai vu Arthur Miller, c'était sur un plateau et je pleurais. Je jouais dans un film 'As young as you feel', et il passait dans les studios avec Elia Kazan. Je pleurais à cause d'une amie dont je venais d'apprendre la mort. On nous présenta. Je voyais tout dans un brouillard. C'était en 1951. Je restai quatre ans sans le revoir, après cela. Nous nous écrivions et il m'envoya une liste de livres à lire. Mais je me rappelle que, constamment, je songeais qu'il me verrait peut-être dans un film... on passerait deux films, ce soir là, et peut-être serais-je dans un et me verrait-il. Alors, quand je travaillais, je faisais encore plus de mon mieux... Je ne sais comment décrire cela. Je l'aimais, depuis le premier jour. Voilà, c'est tout. Jamais je n'oublierai qu'il dit, ce jour là, qu'à son avis, je devrais faire du théâtre et que les gens autour de nous, sur le plateau, rirent en l'entendant. Mais il répéta: "Non, non, c'est très sérieux." Et le ton, son attitude, les circonstances, firent que je sentis en lui un être profondément humain et sensible, et qui m'avait traitée comme une personne humaine et sensible, moi aussi. C'est le mieux que je puisse dire. Mais c'est le plus important. Depuis notre mariage, quand je ne tourne pas, nous menons une vie tranquille et heureuse à New York, et plus encore dans notre maison du Connecticut pendant les week-ends. Mon mari aime travailler tôt le matin. Il se lève en général à 6 heures. Il se repose ensuite dans la journée en faisant la sieste. Comme l'appartement n'est pas grand, j'ai fait insonoriser son bureau. Il a besoin de solitude totale quand il travaille. Moi, je me lève à 8h30 et quelques. Nous avons une excellente cuisinière. Parfois, en attendant mon petit-déjeuner, je vais promener mon chien Hugo. mais quand la cuisinière est de sortie, je me lève plus tôt et je prépare le petit déjeuner pour mon mari; car je trouve qu'un homme ne doit pas s'occuper de ses repas. Je suis très vieux jeu à bien des égards. Je trouve aussi qu'un homme ne doit jamais porter à la main ce qui appartient en propre à la femme, souliers à hauts talons, sac, etc. Il m'arrive de cacher un peigne dans la poche de mon mari, mais c'est tout.
Après le petit déjeuner, je prends un bain, pour changer des jours de travail où je me lève si tôt, parfois à 6h ou 5h du matin, que je dois prendre deux douches, une chaude et une froide pour me secouer. A New York, j'aime à me tremper dans mon bain en lisant les journaux et écoutant des disques. Après, j'enfile une jupe, une blouse, des souliers plats et une veste de polo et, le mardi et le vendredi, je vais à l'Actors Studios, à 11h, ou les autres jours aux cours privés de Lee Strasberg. Je rentre pour le déjeuner, que nous prenons d'habitude ensemble, comme le dîner. Nous écoutons des disques en mangeant. Mon mari aime comme moi la musique classique. Ou le jazz s'il est excellent, bien que nous réservions plutôt cela aux soirées où nous avons des amis qui aiment danser. Souvent, Arthur se remet au travail après sa sieste. Je trouve toujours à m'occuper pendant ce temps. Il a deux enfants de son premier mariage et je m'efforce d'être une bonne belle-mère. Et il y a à faire dans l'appartement. J'aime faire la cuisine, pas tellement à la ville où l'on est trop bousculé, mais à la campagne pour le week-end. Je fais du très bon pain, et les nouilles aussi très bien. Rouler, sécher, la cuisson et la sauce. Ce sont mes deux spécialités. Mais j'aime également inventer... J'adore les assaisonnements ! L'ail ! Souvent, j'en mets de trop pour le goût des autres.
Il arrive que les acteurs avec qui j'étudie une scène pour les cours de Strasberg viennent à la maison, le matin ou l'après-midi et je leur prépare un petit-déjeuner ou le thé... Bref, les journées sont assez remplies. Mais toujours, j'ai soin d'être libre avant le dîner, pour mon mari. Aprés le dîner, parfois nous allons au théâtre ou au cinéma, ou des amis viennent, ou nous allons chez des amis. Mais très souvent, nous restons tout simplement à la maison, tous les deux, à écouter de la musique, parler ou lire. Ou encore, nous marchons dans les rues ou dans Central Park. Nous adorons marcher. Il n'y a pas de routine fixe dans notre vie. Il y a bien des moments où j'aimerai être plus organisée, faire certaines choses à certaines heures etc. Mais mon mari dit que comme ça, au moins, on ne s'ennuie pas ! Alors, tout va bien. Et puis, personellement, les choses ne m'ennuient jamais. Ce qui m'ennuient, ce sont les gens qui s'ennuient. J'aime beaucoup les gens; pourtant, parfois, je me demande si je suis vraiment sociable. La solitude ne me pèse pas. Cela m'est égal d'être seule. Même, j'aime cela. C'est un repos. Cela permet de prendre plus possession de soi-même, de se rafraîchir. Je crois qu'il y a deux aspects dans tout être humain; du moins, c'est ce que je sens dans mon cas. On a envie d'être seul, et en même temps, envie d'être ensemble. C'est un vrai conflit. J'y suis sensible à un point suraigu. C'est pourquoi, j'aime tant mon travail. Quand j'en suis contente, naturellement je me sens plus gaie, plus sociable. Quand ça ne va pas, j'ai envie d'être seule. Et c'est la même chose dans ma vie...

Georges Belmont: En sorte que, pour résumer, si je vous demande quelle impression cela fait d'être Marilyn Monroe, à ce stade de votre vie, que direz-vous?

Marilyn Monroe: Quelle impression cela vous fait-il d'être vous?

Georges Belmont: Parfois je suis content du monde et de moi-même. Parfois, non.

Marilyn Monroe: Et vous êtes heureux comme ça?

Georges Belmont: Ma foi, oui.

Marilyn Monroe: Eh bien, moi aussi. Et comme j'ai trente quatre ans et encore quelques années devant moi, j'éspère, cela me laisse le temps de travailler à devenir meilleure et plus heureuse dans mon métier comme dans ma vie privée. C'est ma seule ambition. Peut-être y mettrais-je le temps, car je suis lente; et je ne veux pas dire par là que ce soit le plus sûr moyen. Mais c'est le seul que je connaisse et qui me donne le sentiment que la vie, après tout, n'est pas sans espoir. 

08 octobre 2011

Sondage: Votre mariage préféré de Marilyn ?

Quel est votre époux préféré
de Marilyn Monroe ?

Marilyn Monroe s'est mariée trois fois;
et chacun de ses mariages s'est soldé par un divorce.

Posté par ginieland à 17:43 - - Commentaires [25] - Permalien [#]
Tags : , , ,

10 juillet 2011

Paris Match 31/12/1966

mag_paris_match_1966_12_31_cover_num925Le magazine Paris Match n°925, du 31 décembre 1966, consacrait un article de six pages sur des débuts de la vie de Marilyn Monroe: Quand Marilyn n'était que Norma Jeane

mag_paris_match_1966_12_31_p1 mag_paris_match_1966_12_31_p2
mag_paris_match_1966_12_31_p3 mag_paris_match_1966_12_31_p4
mag_paris_match_1966_12_31_p5 mag_paris_match_1966_12_31_p6

Posté par ginieland à 11:37 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
Tags : , , ,

04 juin 2010

19/06/1942 Mariage Norma Jeane et Jim

1942_06_19_JimDougherty_wedding020Le vendredi 19 juin 1942, Norma Jeane épouse Jim Dougherty. Le mariage a lieu dans la maison de la famille Howell, des amis de Grace Goddard, au 432 South Bentley Avenue, à Los Angeles. Norma Jeane vient de fêter ses 16 ans (le 1er juin) et James Dougherty est âgé de 21 ans. C'est Grace Goddard qui a "arrangé" ce mariage afin d'éviter à Norma Jeane le retour à l'orphelinat; et Ana Lower a organisé les préparatifs, notamment en envoyant les invitations et en confectionnant la robe de mariée.

>> Le carton d'invitation
1942_06_19_JimDougherty_wedding05_Invite_1 

>> La robe de mariée (photo de 1946 par Richard C Miller )
1942_06_19_wed_dress_1 1942_06_19_JimDougherty_wedding_byRichardCMiller_2 1942_06_19_wed_dress_2

La cérémonie débute à 20h30 et est orchestrée par le révérend Benjamin Lingenfelder, appartenant à l'Eglise de la science chrétienne (dont faisait parti Gladys -la mère de Norma Jeane- et Norma Jeane).
Peu d'invités représentaient la famille de Norma Jeane: en effet ni son ancienne tutrice Grace Goddard (partie vivre en Virginie), ni sa demie-soeur Berniece (qui vivait dans le Kentucky), ni sa mère Gladys (hospitalisée) n'étaient présentes. Seuls les Bolender (famille d'acceuil de Norma Jeane quand elle était enfant) et Ana Lower étaient là, Ana amenant Norma Jeane devant l'autel.
Les témoins des mariés sont: Marion Dougherty, le frère de Jim et Lorraine Allen, une camarade de classe de Norma Jeane. Et c'est le neveu de Jim, Wesley (fils de sa soeur Billie)  qui amena les alliances disposées sur un coussin.

>> Les photos
1942_06_19_JimDougherty_wedding010
1942_06_19_JimDougherty_wedding020a 1942_james32 1942_06_19_JimDougherty_wedding030 1942_06_19_JimDougherty_wedding040

D'après le certificat de mariage, Norma Jeane a remplit le formulaire sous le nom de jeune fille "Mortensen", à "nom du père", elle indique "E. Mortensen" et "inconnu" pour lieu de naissance du père; à "nom de la mère", elle inscrit d'abord un point d'interrogation puis l'inscription "unknown" ("inconnue") suivie de "Monroe" et "Oregon" pour le lieu de naissance. Quand à James Edward Dougherty, ses parents Edward et Ethel sont nés tous deux dans le Colorado.

>> Les certificats de mariage
1942_06_19_certificate_1 1942_06_19_certificate_2

>> Annonce dans le Westwood Hills Press
1942-06-19-annonce_mariage_westwood_hilss_press 

Posté par ginieland à 23:46 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
Tags : , , ,